Inquisitions
3 Elizabeth I (1560-1)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

212-228

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: 3 Elizabeth I (1560-1)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 212-228. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65880 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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John Sturman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 June, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Sturman, citizen and "poulter" of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Kele, Thomas Kendall, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Richard Hynman, Stephen Waldon, Robert Dunkyns and Anthony Garret, who say that

John Sturman was seised of the 3rd part and 8th part of all those messuages, tenements, stables, shops, cellars, orchards, gardens, houses, and buildings, in 8 parts to be divided, now or late in the tenure of William Hawkes, situate in the parish of St. Bartholomew next Bishopsgate, London; and in the 3rd and 8th part of those 2 tenements and 1 cellar built under the Brodegate there in the said parish, late in the tenure of the said William: which said premises are held of the Queen in chief, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, 53s. 4d.

John Sturman died 18 December, 1 Eliz. [1558]; Thomas Sturman is his son and next heir, and was aged 13 years on the 9 August last past.

Katherine Hethe, late the wife of the said John Sturman, mother of the said Thomas, and now the wife of Fulke (Fulconis) Hethe, took the profits of all the said premises from the death of the said John up to the taking of this inquisition.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 120.

Thomas Cromer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 5 May, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, to prove the age of Thomas Cromer, son and heir of Walter Cromer, esq., deceased, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Kele, Thomas Kendall, William Gibbons, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Michael Smythe, Stephen Waldon, Robert Dunkys, Anthony Garret, John Jackson, Laurence Jackson and William Swayneson, who say that

Thomas Cromer, son and next heir of the said Walter, was born in the parish of St. Albans in Little Woodstreet, in the ward of Crepulgate, London, on 9 January, 1539, and was baptized in the Church of the said parish on the same day, month and year.

The said Thomas was aged 21 years on 9 January last past, as was proved before the said jurors in the presence of Stephen Hadnall, gent., who in right of Margaret, his wife, late the wife and executrix of Thomas Hues, of the grant of Philip and Mary, late King and Queen of England, to the said Thomas Hues thereof made, had the wardship of the body and marriage of the said Thomas Cromer and of his inheritance until he (Thomas) attained his full age.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 121.

William Walker, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 6 March, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Walker, gent., by the oath of John Haddon, William Gybbyns, John Keale, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davis, Andrew Kempe, Richard Henman, Laurence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Garret and William Swanson, who say that

William Walker was seised of a messuage or house lying at the corner of Dowlane, in the parish of St. Michael Pater Noster at Dowgate, London.

So seised, the said William made his will, 22 February, 1557, and thereby bequeathed the house wherein John Vawdy dwelt in Dowyate, to Anne Porter, wife of William Porter, and to her heirs for ever.

The said messuage is held of the Queen in socage by fealty only, and is worth per ann., clear, £8.

William Walker died 23 February, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558], without heirs: after his death the said William Porter and Anne, his wife, entered into the said messuage and took the profits thereof up to the feast of the Apostles Peter and Paul, 2 Eliz. [1560], when Richard Roberts, gent., disseised the said William and Anne, and entered into the said premises.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 122.

Katherine Lune, widow.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 11 January, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, to inquire into the lunacy of Katherine Lune, widow, by the oath of William Gybbens, John Keyle, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Duexell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Henry Calyce, Richard Henman, Michael Smyth, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkyns and William Swainson, who say that

Katherine Lune on 7 December last past was of good and sound mind and memory, and was not a lunatic, neither did she enjoy lucid intervals. She is quite capable of governing both herself and her lands, goods and chattels.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 123.

Robert Trappes.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 19 March, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Trappes, late of London, goldsmith, by the oath of John Haddon, William Gybbyns, Thomas Kendall, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewall, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davis, Andrew Kempe, Henry Calles, Michael Smith, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Garrett and William Swanson, who say that

Robert Trappes was seised of 1 messuage in the parish of St. Botolph in Thames Street, London; 1 messuage in the parish of St. Helen near Bisshopsgate, London; and 45 messuages in the parish of St. Nicholas in the "fflesh shambles," London.

So seised, Henry Saxye and Thomas Lewis in Hilary term, 4 Edward VI [1550], by writ of entry upon disseisin in the post (p' b're de ingres sup[er] disseinam in le post), recovered the said premises against the said Robert Trappes: which said recovery was had to the use of the said Robert and Joan, his wife, for their lives; after their decease, as to the messuage in the parish of St. Helen to the use of Francis Trappes and his heirs male; for default, to the use of Robert Trappes, junior, and his heirs male; for default, to the use of Joyce Saxsey, daughter of the said Robert Trappes, senior, and her heirs; and for default, to the use of the right heirs of the said Robert Trappes for ever. As to the residue of the said premises, after the death of the said Robert and Joan, to the use of the said Robert Trappes, junior, and his heirs male, with remainders as above.

The said messuages in the parishes of St. Botolph and St. Helen are held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and the yearly rent of 17s. 8d. The said messuages in the parish of St. Nicholas are held in chief, but by what service the jurors know not: all the said premises are worth per ann., clear, £40.

Robert Trappes died 19 December last past; Brian Trappes is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, son and heir of George Trappes, son and heir of the said Robert, and is aged 17 years and more.

The said Joan still survives in the parish of St. Leonard, and the said Robert Trappes, junior, and the said Francis Trappes in the parish of St. John Zachary.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 124.

John Wase.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 24 October, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Wase, brewer, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Haddon, John Keyle, Thomas Kendall, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callyce, Richard Henman, Michael Smythe, Stephen Waldon, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Barrett and William Swaynson, who say that

John Wase was seised of 1 messuage or burgage and 2 tenements situate in the parish of St. Andrew next Barnards Castle, sometime in the tenure of William Cutler, brewer, and now in the several tenures of William Watson, carpenter, Thomas Taylor, carpenter, and Philippa Warner, widow; also, conjointly with Winifred, his wife, for her life, of 1 messuage, burgage or mansion, together with the wharf thereto adjoining, lying in the parish of St. Andrew next the Wardrobe there, called the Great Wardrobe, late in the tenure of John Hamonde, sometime belonging to the lately dissolved house of the "Blacke ffreers" of London, and now parcel of the possessions thereof, 1 parcel of the said wharf now in the tenure of Richard Smythe altogether excepted; 1 garden lying next the Thames, within the precinct of the said Black Friars, sometime in the tenure of John Fowke, and now in the tenure of the said Richard Smythe; 1 other garden there sometime in the tenure of — Wigmore, and now in that of the said Richard Smythe; 1 messuage or burgage called the brewhowse, situate in the said parish of St. Andrew next Barnard's Castle, late of Robert Hamonde and now in the tenure of the said Winifred Wase, widow; certain lands there called Hoddells; certain tenements in the lane there called the Common lane, now in ruins, late in the tenure of the said Robert Hamonde; 4 messuages and 12 acres 3 roods of land in Bursted, co. Essex; 2 pieces of land and meadow there containing 6 acres; 1 parcel of land there called Hide containing 7 acres, now divided by hedges; 6 acres of pasture and wood and 1 piece of land containing 16 acres at the Teye Nere, sometime of John "Cockockes," with all the appurtenances in Bursted Magna and Parva.

So seised, the said John Wase by his will [date not given] bequeathed all the said premises to the said Winifred, his wife, and her heirs for ever.

All the said premises within the said City of London are held in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £30. The premises in Bursted Magna and Parva are held of others than the Queen [sic], and are worth per ann., clear, £8.

John Wase died 30 August last past, but who is his next heir the jurors know not.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 125.

John Swingfeld.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 24 October, 1 Elizabeth [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of a writ de melius inquirend', after the death of John Swingfeld, citizen and "Stockefysshemonger" of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Haddon, William Gybbons, John Keyle, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Anthony Kempe, Henry Callyce, Richard Henman, Michael Smythe, Stephen Waldon, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Garret and William Swaynson, who say that

John Swingfeld was seised of 21 tenements called the Alley, in the tenure of William Danyell, situate in Southwark, co. Surrey; 1 tenement there in the tenure of John Millor; 1 tenement there in the tenure of William Daye; 2 gardens there in the tenure of William Emerson; 2 tenements there in the tenure of John Piggion; 1 garden there in the tenure of William Holden; 1 garden there in the tenure of Cuthbert Fox; 1 garden there in the tenure of James Drawfeld; 1 garden there in the tenure of Richard Diplidge; 1 garden there in the tenure of Christopher Hampton; 1 garden there in the tenure of Robert Woodwarde; 1 small "Colehowse" there in the tenure of—Holden, widow; 1 garden there lying on the west of the highway there called Kentyshestrete, in the tenure of Hugh Currante; all those messuages, lands and tenements in Southwark, late of Nicholas Tycheborne, now in the several tenures of Richard Thompson, Peter Moone and Nicholas Harrison; all the messuages, lands and tenements lying in the parish of St. Olave within the City of London, in the tenure of George Conyeres; 1 tenement and 1 shop with all the cellars, solars and rooms thereto belonging, in the several tenures of John Bromesgrave, fishmonger, and Alice Brokewell, widow, lying in the parish of St. Nicholas Cole Abbey in Old Fish Street, to wit, between the shop in the tenure of John Wright on the west, the shop now in the tenure of Culhbert Bradforde on the east, and the highway called Old Fish Street on the south and north.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £40.

John Swingfeld died 10 October, 1558; Stephen Swingfelde is his son and next heir, and is aged 30 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 126.

William Seintpier.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 22 April, 2 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Seintpeir, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Haddon, William Gybbyns, John Key, Thomas Kendall, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Lee, Robert Davys, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Michael Smith, Laurence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Anthony Garrett and William Swanson, who say that

William Seintpeir was seised of divers tenements in Nunne Alley, situate in the parish of St. Christopher next the Stockes, now demised to farm to Richard Bower, citizen and draper of London; 2 messuages in the said parish of St. Christopher in the tenure of Christopher Goodridge and William Yarrington; and 1 stable with a small yard and "fonte" situate in Nunne Alley, demised to William Garrett, knight.

So seised, the said William Seintpier made his will, 21 December, 25 Henry VIII [1533], whereby he bequeathed as follows:—

I give all my lands and tenements, as well freehold as customary, lying within the City of London and in the parish of Pontesbury, co. Shropshire, to Agnes, my wife, for her life; after her decease the same to remain to John, my eldest son, and his heirs for ever; for default, to William, my son, and his heirs for ever; for default, to Richard, my son, and his heirs for ever; for default, to Peter, my son, and his heirs for ever; and for default, to my right heirs for ever.

All the said premises are held of the Queen by the free service of 1 penny yearly, and are worth per ann., clear, £13 3s. 4d.

William Seintpier died 24 December, 25 Henry VIII [1533]; John Seintpier is his son and next heir, and is now aged 44 years and more.

The said Agnes died at London, 18 February, 1560.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 127.

Edward Vaughan, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 October, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Edward Vaughan, gentleman, by the oath of John Haddon, John Keyle, Thomas Kendall, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, . . . Dewxell, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davie, Andrew Kempe, Henry Calyce, Richard Henman, Michael Smyth, Stephen Waldon, Robert Dunkyns and William Swaynson, who say that

Before the death of the said Edward Vaughan one Laurence Gopferler, clerk, late Master of the House or Hospital of Acon, London, and the brethren of the said place, in right of the said House, were seised of the tenement called the "Sygne de le Whyte Harte," wherein John Lincolne lately dwelt, together with all the shops, warehouses, cellars, etc., thereto belonging, situate in Westchepe, in the parish of St. Mary Colchurch, London, to wit, between the tenement sometime of Peter Coventrie, and afterwards of Richard Gressham, knight, citizen and Alderman of London, on the west, the tenement sometime of Richard Charleton, and afterwards of William Cowyke, on the east, and the said street called Westchepe on the south, and the tenement belonging to the mystery of the Mercers, London, on the north.

So seised, they by indenture dated 1 October, 29 Henry VIII [1537], granted the said premises to John Lincoln, citizen and "Gyrdeler," of London, to hold from the feast of St. Michael the Archangel then last past for the term of 50 years, he paying therefore yearly £10 10s.

Afterwards the reversion of the said messuage came into the hands of the King by reason of the dissolution of the said House, whereupon his Majesty by Letters Patent, dated 11 March, in the 30th year of his reign, in consideration of the faithful service rendered to him by the said Edward Vaughan, gent., granted to him and his heirs male the said reversion, the said rent of £10 10s. and the said messuage called the White Hart.

The said messuage is held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and the yearly rent of 21s., and is worth per ann., clear, £9 9s.

Edward Vaughan died 8 May, 3 Eliz. [1561]; John Vaughan, gent., is his son and next heir, and was aged 19 years and more on 24 June in the said year [1561].

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 128.

Anthony Mynge.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 May, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Anthony Mynge, son and heir of Henry Mynge, deceased, late citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Haddon, John Keyle, John Jackson, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Lee, Robert Davy, Henry Calleys, Richard Hynman, Michael Smith, Laurence Jackson, Stephen Waldon, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Garrett and William Swanson, who say that

Before the death of the said Anthony Mynge one Thomas Franke, gent., and Mary, his wife, were seised of all that messuage or all those messuages, shops, cellars, warehouses, etc., situate in Bucklersbury, in the parish of St. Stephen in Walbroke, within the City of London, then in the tenure of the said Henry Mynge, lying between the messuages then in the several tenures of John Howe and John Bulle, citizen and grocer of London, on the south, and the messuage called the Catte and the fidle on the west: one head of the said messuage and premises abuts upon the high street there called Bucklersburye and upon part of the messuages of the said John Howe and John Bulle towards the north, and the other head abuts upon the messuage wherein Joan Warren, widow, then dwelt, and upon certain rooms and other waste lands and buildings in the tenure of John Hudeon, citizen and grocer of London, to the south.

So seised, the said Thomas and Mary Franke, by indenture dated 24 May, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1558], made between themselves of the one part and the said Henry Mynge and Elizabeth, his wife, of the other part, sold the said premises to the said Henry and Elizabeth, and their heirs for ever.

Afterwards Roger Warfelde and John Hudson, citizens and grocers of London, recovered the said premises against the said Henry and Elizabeth to the use of them, the said Henry and Elizabeth.

After the death of the said Henry, the said Roger and John, by indenture of release dated 17 September, 5 and 6 Philip and Mary [1558], remised to the said Elizabeth all their right and title in the premises: to hold for her life, with remainder to the use of the right heirs of the said Henry Mynge for ever.

The said premises are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and by the yearly rent of 10s. 8d., and are worth per ann., clear, £5 1s. 9d.

Anthony Mynge died 24 May, 2 Eliz. [1560]; Alexander Mynge, is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, eldest brother of the said Henry Mynge, deceased, father of the said Anthony, and was then aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 129.

Lawrence Jackson.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 18 October, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Lawrence Jackson, by the oath of John Haddon, John Keyle, Thomas Kendall, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Richard Henman, Michael Smyth, Stephen Walden, William Swaynson and Robert Dunkyns, who say that

Lawrence Jackson and Joan, his wife, were seised of all that wharf called Sondayes Wharff, lying in the west part of the common water called the common Watringplace, in the parish of St. Andrew at Baynards Castle, sometime belonging to the monastery of Busclesham, co. Berks, as by Letters Patent dated 2 December, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557], more fully appears.

The said Lawrence Jackson was likewise seised of the messuage called the Cristofer, and of the house or mansion called the Preestes House, situate in the said parish of St. Andrew.

So seised, the said Lawrence made his will 22 May, 1560, whereby he bequeathed as follows:—

I give to Joan, my wife, all my houses, lands, tenements, and hereditaments whatsoever, whether within the realm of England or elsewhere, for her natural life only; after her decease I give to Edmunde Jackeson, my eldest son, 6 tenements, situate within the parish of St. Andrew in the Great Wardrobe, wherein John Westley, Henry Heysie, Joan Jackson, widow, William Edwardes, John Tether, and Mistress Anthonye, widow, now dwell: to hold to him and his heirs for ever. To Edward Jackeson, my second son, I give (after the death of the said Joan) the house wherein I now dwell, situate in the said parish; also my "bruhouse" with the woodyeard and such other rooms as I now occupy, but without any of the implements belonging to the said "bruhouse": to hold to him and his heirs for ever. To George Jackeson, my third son (after the death of the said Joan), my tenement called "the Cristofer" in the said parish, with my 4 tenements and a stable thereto belonging, wherein William Wright, Thomas Swymorton, William Hounter, John Heyley and Harman Brocke now dwell: to hold to him and his heirs for ever. To Harman Jackeson, my fourth son (after the death of his mother), my tenement and the wharf thereto belonging called Powyls Wharffe alias Sondayes Wharffe, situate in the said parish of St. Andrew: to hold to him and his heirs for ever. If all my said four sons shall die without heirs ("which God defend") then all the said premises shall revert to Jane Jackson, my daughter, for her natural life; and after her death the same shall come to Thomas Jackson, my brother's son, and to his heirs for ever.

The said wharf called Sondays Wharf is held of the Queen in free burgage, and not in chief. The said messuage called the Cristofer and the said house called the Preestes house are held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich, co. Kent, by fealty only, in free socage and not in chief: all the said premises are worth per ann., clear, £31.

Lawrence Jackson died 29 May last past; Edmund Jackson is his son and next heir, and was then aged 20 years and 10 months.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 130.

John Patenson.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 22 April, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Patenson, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Haddon, William Gybbyns, John Keyle, Thomas Kendall, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callys, Michael Smith, Lawrence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Anthony Garret and William Swanson, who say that

John Patenson was seised of all that messuage called the White Hinde, in the parish of St. Stephen in Colmanstrete in the City of London; 2 messuages situate in the parish of St. Michael in Bassinghawe, late in the tenure of Thomas Clerke and Ralph Pygott, sometime belonging to the Monastery of Clerkenwell, co. Middlesex, now dissolved; all that inn or brewhouse (mesuagio pandoxatorio) called the Bell in the Hoop, with a room and a garden, late in the tenure of John Brewett, brewer, in the said parish of St. Michael; 1 room over the entry or lane of a certain bakehouse adjoining, late in the tenure of the said John Brewett; and 1 small cottage in Bell Alley in the said parish of St. Michael.

So seised, the said John Patenson made his will, 21 February, 1560, whereby he bequeathed as follows:—

To the said Joan, my wife, I give the messuage wherein I now dwell called the White Hinde, in the said parish of St. Stephen in Colmanstrete, 1 messuage called the Bell, 2 little cottages next adjoining the said messuage, purchased of one Smith, and 2 other tenements wherein John ap Hoell and one Toes, widow, dwell: which said messuage and other the premises last mentioned are situate in the parish of St. Michael in Basingehawe: to hold the same for her life, she keeping them all in good repair; after her decease all the said premises to remain wholly to my daughter Faith Patenson for her natural life; after her decease, the same to remain to the heirs of her body; and for default, to my right heirs for ever.

The messuage called the White Hynde, and the 2 messuages in the parish of St. Michael, are held of the Queen in free burgage and common socage, by fealty only and not in chief. The said messuage called the Bell on the Hoope, the said room over the entry, and the cottage in Bell Alley are held, and from time immemorial have been held, in free socage of the City of London: all the said premises are worth per ann., clear, £8 13s. 4d.

John Patenson died 5 March last past in the said parish of St. Stephen; Faith Patenson is his only daughter and next heir, and was then aged 15 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 131.

Edmund Browne.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 11 May, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Edmund Browne, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Haddon, John Keyle, John Jackson, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Henry Callys, Richard Hynman, Michael Smithe, Laurence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Garret and William Swaynson, who say that

Edmund Browne was seised of 1 messuage situate in Fletestrete in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West, in the suburbs of the City of London, between the lane called Chancery Lane on the east, the tenement late of William Chomley, gent., on the west, the highway on the south, and the tenement of the said William Chomley, late in the tenure of William Beton, on the north, sometime parcel of the possessions of the lately dissolved Priory of St. John of Jerusalem in England.

Before the death of the said Edmund, Richard Garrat, citizen and brewer of London, and Joan, his wife, were seised in right of the said Joan of 2 messuages and 1 garden situate in the said parish of St. Dunstan, to wit, between the tenement late in the tenure of John Brownyng on the east and the tenement now in the tenure of John Armyn on the west: the north head (caput) thereof lying upon the highway called Fletestrete, and the south head upon the said garden: which said premises are now in the tenures of William Salt, merchant-tailor, and Edmund Bradshawe, draper.

So seised, the said Richard and Joan, by indenture dated 20 December, 1 and 2 Philip and Mary [1554], made between themselves of the one part and the said Edmund Browne and Anne, his wife, of the other part, and acknowledged on the 16th February in the said year before Ralph Cholmley, esq., then Recorder of the City of London, and David Woodroffe, Alderman, sold the said premises to the said Edmund and Anne and to the heirs of the said Edmund for ever.

Afterwards, to wit, 12 October 1560, the said Edmund Browne made his will, whereby he bequeathed as follows:—

I give to Anne, my wife, all my lands and tenements for her life; after her decease I will that my house wherein I now dwell, lying in Fletestrete over against St. Dunstan's Church, shall remain to Abraham, my son, and his heirs for ever, they paying yearly to my daughter Millisent and her heirs for ever an annuity of £3, issuing out of the said house. I will that my houses lying near "Chancery Lane ende" shall, after the decease of my said wife, remain to William, my son, and his heirs for ever, they paying yearly to my daughter Frances and her heirs for ever an annuity of £3, issuing out of the said houses.

The said messuage in Chancery Lane is held of the Queen by knight's service, and is worth per ann., clear, 33s. 4d. The said 2 messuages and 1 garden lying next Fleetstreet are held of the Queen in free burgage and common socage, by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth, per ann., clear, 46s. 8d.

Edmund Browne died in the said parish of St. Dunstan, 15 October last past; Abraham Browne is his son and next heir, and is aged 14 years and 5 months.

The said Anne still survives in the said parish.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 132.

Robert Pery, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 6 March, 2 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Pery, gent., by the oath of John Haddon, William Gybbyns, John Keyle, Henry Sutton, William Mosyer, Thomas Dewxall, John Jackson, Robert Lee, Robert Davis, Andrew Kempe, Richard Henman, Michael Smith, Laurence Jackson, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Garrett and William Swanson, who say that

Robert Pery was seised of 1 messuage called the Beare situate in Westsmythfeld, in the parish of St. Sepulchre London, sometime belonging to the late Monastery of St. Bartholomew the Great in Westsmithfeld; 1 yearly rent of 6s. issuing out of a tenement called the Ferrours House, situate near the said messuage called the "Bere"; and 1 yearly rent of 13s. 4d. issuing out of 1 messuage called the Bell in Westsmithfeld.

So seised, the said Robert Pery made his will 28 March, 2 Eliz. [1560], and thereby bequeathed as follows:—

I give to my brother Matthew Pery my messuages and tenements, with a watercourse and other appurtenances, situate in Charterhouselane in the said parish of St. Sepulchres; my lands and tenements in Heycrofte in the parish of Stonedone, co. Hertford; my messuage called the "Bere" in Westsmithfield; the messuage with a garden wherein I now dwell in Charterhouselane; a certain quit rent of 13s. 4d. issuing out of the Bell in Smithfield; and another quit rent of 6s. yearly due to me out of the Ferrours House there: to hold to the said Matthew Pery and his heirs male for ever.

The said messuage called the Beare is held of the Queen in chief by the 40th part of a knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, 46s. 8d.

Robert Pery died 5 October, 2 Eliz. [1560]; the said Matthew Pery is his brother and next heir, and was then aged 35 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 133.

William Locke.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 24 October, 3 Eliz. [1561], before William Chester, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Locke, son and heir of Thomas Locke, deceased, by the oath of Thomas Lytton, John Haddon, William Gybbyns . . . . Thomas Dewxall, John Jackeson, Robert Lee, Robert Davye, Andrew Kempe, Henry Callyce, Richard Henman, Michael Smythe, Stephen Walden, Robert Dunkyns, Anthony Garrett and William Swanson, who say that

Before the death of the said William Locke, one Thomas Locke, his father, deceased, was seised of 2 messuages in the parish of the Blessed Mary of the Arches (de Arcubz), in a certain lane there commonly called Bowe Lane, late in the tenure of Thomas Parise and now of Simon Croxton; 2 messuages in the said parish in the tenure of Agnes Blauncher, and late in the several tenures of Agnes Sawkyns and John Scotte, tailor; the third part of 2 messuages, 1 whereof is called the Locke and the other the Bell, lying in the said parish, in 3 parts to be divided, except 2 shops parcel of the said messuages, one whereof is called the Locke shop, and the other the Bell shop: which said 2 messuages are now in the several tenures of Ambrose Ferrour and Elienore Karket; 1 moiety of the said 2 shops; and divers messuages and shops in the parish of St. Peter, London, called "le Cocke" and "le Cocke Alie," "le Katte and ffydell" and "le Dogges Hede in the Pote," now in the tenure of Thomas Pikett and Anthony Nele. After the death of the said Thomas Locke the said premises descended to the said William Locke as his son and heir.

The said 2 messuages now in the tenure of Simon Croxton are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £4. The 2 messuages in the tenure of Agnes Blauncher are held of the Queen by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £4. The 3rd part of the 2 messuages called the Locke and the Bell are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £4. The moiety of the said 2 shops is held of the Queen in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, £4. The said messuages and shops in the said parish of St. Peter are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £14.

The said Thomas Locke was likewise seised of 1 messuage in the said parish of St. Mary of the Arches in the said lane called Bowe lane, now in the tenure of John Isham; 9 messuages in the parish of All Saints called Alhallowes de More, lying in 2 streets there called Dowgate and the Vintre, in the several tenures of John Mele, Henry Palmer, Roger Temmys, Richard Bartlet, Matthew Sentyse, William Windleghe, William Davise, Agnes Waterforde and John Fluyde; the 3rd part of the moiety of 5 tenements and shops in the said parish of St. Mary, called White legge Entre, now in the several tenures of George Dyamonde and William Chelsham; the 3rd part of 1 messuage in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less, in the farm of Thomas Goodman; 6 messuages and shops in the parish of St. Mary of Colchurche, lying in the Pultre and Bucklersbury; 6 other messuages and shops lying in the parish of St. Sepulchre, in the suburbs of the City, called the Dunghilles, in or next to a certain street called St. John's Street or Cowe Crosse Street; which said 12 messuages are in the tenure of Giles Hamonde.

So seised, the said Thomas Locke afterwards, to wit, 16 March, 1 Mary [1554], by charter dated 20 February in the said year, enfeoffed John Coswarthe, Thomas Stacye and Anthony Hickman, citizens and mercers of London, of the said premises: to hold to the use of the said Thomas Locke and Mary, his wife, for their lives; after their decease, then to the use of William Locke, son and heir apparent of the said Thomas, and his heirs; for default, to the use of Rowland, one of the sons of the said Thomas, and his heirs; for default, to the use of Thomas Locke, another of the sons of the said Thomas, and his heirs; for default, to the use of Matthew Locke, another of the sons of the said Thomas, and his heirs male; and lastly, for default, to the use of the right heirs of the said Thomas Locke, the father, for ever.

The said Mary survived the said Thomas, and is still seised of the said premises.

The messuage in the tenure of John Isham is worth, per ann., clear, £6: of whom it is held the jurors know not. The 9 messuages and shops in the said parish of All Saints are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d. The said 3rd part of the moiety of the said 5 tenements and shops called Whitelegge entre is held of the Queen in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d. The said 3rd part of the messuages in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less is held of the Queen in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 20s. The 12 messuages and shops in the Pultre and Bucklersbury and St. John's Street, are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Before the death of the said William Locke, one William Locke, knight, now deceased, his grandfather, was seised of 1 tenement in the said parish of St. Mary of the Arches, now in the tenure of John Walker, parcel of the capital messuage wherein the said William Locke dwelt; 1 tenement there in the occupation of Thomas Brene; 1 small tenement and shop there lying at the end of Bowe Lane, now in the tenure of William Pierson.

So seised, the said William Locke by his will dated 15 March, 1540, bequeathed the said premises to Michael Locke for his life, the reversion thereof being to the said Thomas Locke, the father.

The said William Locke, grandfather of the said William named in the writ, was likewise seised of 2 messuages in the said parish of the Blessed Mary of the Arches, one whereof was late in the occupation of John Edwardes and is now in that of John Bambridge, and the other was late in the occupation of John Kelk and is now in that of William Lovyse and Lewis Lovyse: which said messuages the said William by his will gave to Henry Locke for his life, the reversion thereof being to the said Thomas Locke; also of the said messuage called the Bell in Chepe in the said parish of St. Mary, 1 shop called the Bell Shop, 1 messuage called the Locke, 1 shop called the Locke shop, the moiety of the said 5 tenements and shops called Whittelegge entre in the said parish, and 1 messuage in the said parish of St. Bartholomew the Less in the tenure of Thomas Goodeman: 2 parts of which said premises the said William bequeathed to the said Henry and Michael Locke for their lives, with reversion to the said Thomas Locke.

The said Thomas Locke, by his will dated 21 March, 1553, bequeathed to the said Mary, his wife, 2 parts of the said reversions for her life: if she should die before his son and heir apparent came of age then his executors were to hold the said premises during the minority of the said heir, and divide all the profits thereof amongst all the children of the said Thomas.

The 3 messuages in the tenures of John Walker, Thomas Brene, and William Pierson are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £9. The 2 messuages in the tenures of John Bambridge and William and Lewis Lovyse are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £11. The said 2 parts of the said messuage called the Bell, the moiety of the said 2 shops called the Bell shop and the Locke shop, and the 2 parts of the messuage in the tenure of Thomas Godeman are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £14. The 2 parts of the said moiety called Whitelegge entre are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 8s. 4d.

William Locke died 28 October, 1558; the said Matthew Locke is his brother and next heir, and was aged 9 years 16 April last past.

The said Mary, late the wife of the said Thomas, and the said Henry Locke and Michael Locke still survive.

Inq. p.m., 3 Elizabeth, p. 1, No. 153.