Inquisitions
1579

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

E. A. Fry (editor)

Year published

1908

Pages

9-19

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'Inquisitions: 1579', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 3 (1908), pp. 9-19. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65887 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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William Peterson, Citizen and Haberdasher.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 26 March, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pype, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Peterson, citizen and haberdasher of London, by the oath of John Haddon, John Harrison, John Keblewhite, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povye, Anthony Barbor, Thomas Eliott, Griffin Jones, Henry Shawe, John Ireland, John Ricardes, Roger Hoell, William Curteis and Arthur Raynescrofte, who say that

William Peterson was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage called the Bell and the Cheker, formerly in the tenure of Thomas Norton, situate in the parish of St. Dionis Backchurch, London, and all the houses, shops, &c., thereto appertaining.

So seised, the said William made his will 15 July, 1578, as follows [here given in English]:

I give to Daniel my second son my house called the Bell and Cheker, in one part of which said house now dwell Gerson Hilles, and in the other my said son Daniel: to hold to him and his heirs for ever: which said house lies in the parish of St. Dionis Backechurch in Fanchurch Street in London.

The said messuage is held of the Queen by fealty only, in free burgage, and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear £10.

William Peterson died 3 October last past; Robert Peterson is his son and next heir and was then aged 27 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 22.

Richard Pelter, Citizen and Brewer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 29 July, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pype, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Pelter, citizen and brewer of London, by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dickenson, John Keblewhyte, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povye, William Layer, William Typper, John Jackson, William Curtys, John Stoddard, Thomas Ellyot, John Rickardes, Richard Smyth and John Ireland, who say that

Richard Pelter was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage and tenement called the Garland in the parish of St. Albans in Woodstrete, London, lately purchased to him and his heirs of Thomas Godwyn, gent., 2 messuages situate in the parish of St. John Zacharie, London, now or late in the several tenures of William Holmes and James Collyns, purchased to him and his heirs of Anthony Stringar and John Handbye, gent.; 1 other messuage formerly in the tenure of William Shelton, gent., and now in that of George Fynche, situate in Busshopsgate strete in the parish of the Blessed Mary Ax in the city of London, which he purchased to him and his heirs of Christopher Campion and John Rollesleye; 1 marsh and land called the Haremarshe lying in the parish of Stubbenheithe in co. Middlesex, viz., upon the land of the Bishop of London, on the north and west, and upon the land of Christopher Campyon, citizen and mercer of London on the south, and upon the land of the heirs of Cookes now or late in the tenure of Robert Nyscham on the east: which said marsh and land the said Richard Pelter purchased to him and his heirs of John Pope, late of London, gent.; 1 messuage or inn called the three Cupps, with 5 small tenements or cottages thereto adjoining, situate in the parish of St. Andrew in Holborn, in the suburbs of London; and 1 close of land or pasture called Drakefield, situate in the parish of St. Pancras in co. Middlesex, now or late in the tenure of John Cooke, citizen and pieman (pastelar) of London, which he purchased to him and his heirs of John Clerk.

The said messuage and tenement called the Garland in the parish of St. Alban in Woodstrete are held of the Queen, in free socage, and not in chief, by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £13. The said 2 messuages in the parish of St. John Zacharie, the said messuage in Busshopsgate strete in the parish of the Blessed Mary Axe and the said marsh in Stubbenheithe are held of the Queen in free socage, by fealty only, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £22. The messuage called the three Cuppes and the 5 small tenements adjoining, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, and the close of pasture called Drakefield in the parish of St. Pancras are held of the Queen in free burgage and common socage, by fealty only, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £22.

Richard Pelter died 23rd November last past; Blanch Richardes now the wife of Morgan Richardes of London, skinner, is his only daughter and next heir and is now aged 30 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 25.

John Cheyne, Esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 4 July, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pipe, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Cheyne, esq., by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dicken son, John Harrison, John Keblewhite, Arthur Ravenscrofte, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povye, John Crowche, Anthony Barbor, Henry Shawe, William Typper, John Ireland, Edward Owen, Thomas Eliott, John Ricardes and Griffin Jones, who say that

Long before the death of the said John Cheyne one Francis Slade, esq., was seised in his demesne as of fee of 3 messuages and 2 shops or le "Sheddes" at Fletebridge in the parish of St. Bridgitte the Virgin, commonly called the George, the White Harte and the Roose Taverne; a yearly rent of 13s. 4d., called the Chief Rente of Powles issuing out of divers tenements lying in the street of Bucklersburie in the parish of St. Benedict Sherehogge: all which said premises descended to the said Francis Slade as son and heir of Thomas Slade, son and heir of Richard Slade of Maxstocke in co. Warwick, esq., and Margaret his wife, sister and heir of Thomas Luyte, gent., as by divers charters more fully appears. And so being thereof seised, the said Francis Slade died 11 March, 27 Hen. 8 [1536]; after whose death the said premises descended to Alice, Margaret, Elizabeth, Brigitte and Wiburga Slade his daughters and next heirs. Afterwards the said Margaret married the said John Cheyne of Shardlos in the parish of Agmondesham in co. Bucks, esq., the said Alice married John Pytcher, esq., the said Elizabeth married Humfrey Cholmeley, esq., and the said Brigitt married George Cockett, esq., and the said John Cheyne and Margaret, John Pytcher and Alice, Humfrey Cholmeley and Elizabeth and George Cockett and Brigitt and the said Wiburga Slade being so seised as well of the said premises as of divers other manors, lands, &c., in cos. Warwick, Suffolk, Cambridge, Middlesex and London, a division was made between them by mutual agreement and consent on the 11th day of February, 36 Hen. 8 [1545] of all the said premises, whereby a moiety of the said messuages called the Rose Tavern and the George and of the said rent of 13s. 4d. was assigned to the said John Cheyne and Margaret his wife, and to the heirs of the said Margaret for ever in severalty for her part of all the said premises, and the other moiety of the said Rose Tavern was assigned inter alia to the said Wiberga Slade and her heirs, to be held in severalty for her pourparty, and so being thereof seised the said Wiburga married Rowland Wymarke, gent.; and the said Rowland and Wiburga, so seised, by deed enrolled in the Court of Hustings, London, dated 15 June, 7 Eliz. [1565], assured to the said John Cheyne and his heirs for ever their moiety of the said Roose Tavern and all the shops, cellars, &c., thereto belonging now or late in the tenure of William Maynard, citizen and mercer of London, situate at Fletebridge in the said parish of St. Brigitte; also the moiety of the tenement situate on the west side of the said messuage called the Rose Tavern in the said parish, now or late in the tenure of the said William Maynard, which the said John Cheyne lately had to him and his heirs for ever of the gift of the said Rowland and Wiburga, as by indenture made between the said Rowland and Wiburga of the one part and the said John Cheyne of the other part more fully appears.

The said messuage called the White Harte and the 2 shops called the Shedd are parcel of the said messuage called the Rose Tavern.

The said Margaret Cheyne late the wife of the said John Cheyne died seised as abovesaid on the 1st day of November in the last year of Philip and Mary [1558]; the said John Cheyne survived her and took the profits of the said premises up to his death.

The said John and Margaret had issue William Cheyne who was aged 25 years and more at his father's death. The said John Cheyne made his will 11 October, 20 Eliz. [1578], whereby he bequeathed inter alia the said moiety purchased of the said Rowland Wimark and Wiburga to the said William Cheyne, gent., his son and the heirs of his body, with remainder thereof as by the said will more fully appears.

All the said premises are held in free burgage of the City of London, and are worth per ann., clear, £18.

John Cheyne died 23 October, 20 Eliz. [1578]; Henry Cheyne is his son and next heir, and was then aged 40 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 26.

Richard Reinoldes, Citizen and Clothier.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 29 May, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pipe, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Reinoldes, citizen and clothier, by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dickenson, Arthur Ravenscrofte, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povye, William Layer, Anthony Barbor, John Weilde, Richard Cox, John Ireland, Edward Owen, John Stodderd, Thomas Eliot and Griffin Jones, who say that

Richard Reinoldes was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage in the parish of St. Clement next Estcheape, London, now or late in the tenure of the said Richard Reinoldes and formerly in the farm of a certain William Hewett; 2 other messuages, now divided into 3 tenements, in the parish of St. Mary Magdalene in the Old Fishmarket (vetere Piscaria) London, now or late in the tenures of Thomas Hanley, John Roo and Michael Thombe.

The messuage in the parish of St. Clement next Estcheap is held of the Queen in free burgage and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £4. The said 2 messuages in the parish of St. Mary Magdalene are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d.

Richard Reinoldes died 4 Feb., 21 Eliz. [1579]; Richard Reinoldes is his son and next heir and was then aged 30 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 28.

Richard Roper.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 22 May, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pipe, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Roper, by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dickenson, John Keblewhite, Arthur Ravenscroft, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, John Jackson, John Crowche, Thomas Elyott, Griffin Jones, John Ireland, William Typper, Richard Cox, Edward Owen, William Povye, John Stodderd and Henry Shawe, who say that

Long before the death of the said Richard Roper, a certain John Gresham, Knight, was seised in his demesne as of fee of all that messuage or bakehouse with cellars, sollars, &c., situate in Redcrosstreate in the parish of St. Giles without Crepulgate, London, then or late in the tenure of John Collyns, deceased; a parcel of a garden formerly in the tenure of Hamond Westbrook, sometime belonging to the said messuage; all that tenement with a garden adjoining on the north part of the said bakehouse, with a well (fonte) in the said garden, formerly in the tenure of Edward Orthopp; 2 other tenements formerly in the several tenures of John Rysley and John Vincent lying in Redcrosstreate aforesaid: all which said premises the said John Gresham, with others, purchased to him and his heirs of the gift and grant of King Edw. 6, as by Letters Patent dated at Leighes 12 April in the 4th year of his reign [1550] more fully appears.

So seised, the said John Gresham together with Katherine his wife by charter dated 7 July, 2 Mary [1554] granted to the said Richard Roper and Heline his wife and to the heirs of the said Richard for ever all the said premises.

Before the death of the said Richard Roper a certain Richard Wotton, citizen and Clothworker of London was seised in his demesne as of fee of divers messuages with 3 small gardens adjoining or belonging situate in Goldinglane on the east side of the street there in the said parish of St. Giles without Crepulgate, London, then or late in the tenure of the said Richard Roper; and so seised, the said Richard Wotton by deed dated 1 April, 3 Eliz. [1561], made between himself of the one part and the said Richard Roper and Heline his wife of the other part, sold all the said premises in Goldinglane and the reversion thereof to the said Richard Roper and Heline his wife and the heirs of the said Richard for ever.

So seised, the said Richard Roper made his will 8 September, 20 Eliz. [1578] as follows [here given in English]: I will that Hellen my wife shall have all my lands in Redcrosstreate and Goldinglane or elsewhere in England for her life; and after her decease my lands in Redcrosstreate to remain to Edward Thickens one of my journeymen and to the heirs of his body for ever; for default, the remainder thereof to Raphe Thickens brother of the said Edward and to the heirs of his body for ever; and for default to the right heirs of the said Raphe. I will that the remainder of 1 tenement and garden now in the tenure of — Tyndall in Goldinglane and 1 chamber over another tenement in the tenure of — Brockett after my wife's decease be to Elizabeth Androwes sister of my said wife for life; the remainder thereof after the deaths of the said Helen and Elizabeth together with all my lands, &c., in Goldinglane aforesaid in a certain alley there called George Alley on the north side thereof, with the moiety of my great garden ground there now in the occupation of the Frenchman and myself to be to Miles Forest son of the said Elizabeth and his heirs for ever.

I will that all the rest of my lands, &c., on the south side of the said Alley with the other moiety of the said great garden on the same side and 1 little garden thereto adjoining, after my wife's decease remain to Raphe Roper my eldest brother's son and his heirs for ever.

The premises in Redcross street are held of the Queen, by fealty only, in free burgage, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d. The premises in Goldinglane are held of the Prebendary of the manor or lordship of Fynnesburye in co. Middlesex, by fealty and the yearly rent of 2s. 2d. only, and suit at the court of the said manor, and are worth per ann., clear, 66s. 8d.

Richard Roper died 28 September, 20 Eliz. [1578]; Ralph Roper is his kinsman and next heir, viz., son and heir of John Roper elder brother of the said Richard Roper and was then aged 27 years and more.

The said Helen still survives.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 29.

Roger Coys, Gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 October, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pype, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Roger Coys, gent., by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dickenson, John Keblewhite, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povye, John Harrison, Arthur Raynescrofte, Thomas Bromley, William Typper, John Jackson, John Crowche, William Curteis, Edward Owen, Thomas Elyot, Richard Smith, Griffin Jones and William Jones, who say that

Robert Coys was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 large capital messuage, 1 yard and 1 garden with 2 small tenements adjoining the said messuage, wherein he dwelt; 2 messuages, and 1 yard or waste ground adjoining the said capital messuage and garden, now or late in the tenure of Robert Shepperd, "playsterer"; all which said premises lie together in the parish of the Blessed Marie in Aldermanburye, in the City of London, and are the same which the said Roger Coys purchased to him and his heirs of Stephen Reames of Estfarleigh in co. Kent, gent., as by a deed enrolled in the Court of Hustings, London, and dated 24 January, 3 Eliz. [1561], more fully appears; 8 messuages with all the shops, cellars, &c., thereto belonging, lying near the Wall of the said City in the parish of the Blessed Mary in the street of Aldermanbury aforesaid and St. Michael Bassishaw within the said City, to wit, between the Queen's highway leading from Cripplegate towards Busshoppsgate on the north side, and the Queen's highway leading from the Church of Aldermanburye towards London Wall towards the west, and the lands and tenements of the said Roger Coys and now or late in the tenure of Richard Fallowes, "Curryor," on the south, and the lands and tenements of the Wardens and Commonalty of the Mystery of the Mercers of London on the east: all which said premises now are or late were in the several tenures of Thomas Smyth, clothworker, William Wytt, "curryor," Robert Harman, Henry Kedwey, hosier, John Dodson, John Moore and John Harrison, curryor, and William Brigges, carpenter, and are the same which the said Roger Coys purchased to him and his heirs of George Bowes, Knight, John Stilcragge, yeoman, brother of Francis Stilcragge, late citizen and carpenter of London, and Michael Stilcragge, yeoman, son and heir apparent of the said John Stilcragge, as by a deed, dated 24 June, 5 Eliz. [1563], more fully appears.

The premises in the said parish of Aldermanbury, purchased of Stephen Reames are held of the Queen in free burgage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £13 6s. 8d. The residue of the premises in the said parish, late purchased of George Bowes, Knight, and others are held of the Queen in free burgage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £16.

Roger Coys died 30 January last past; William Coys is his son and next heir and was then aged 18 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 31.

William Catchier, Citizen and Clothworker.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 29 May, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pipe, Knight, Mayor and Escheator, after the death of William Catchier, citizen and clothworker of London, by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dickenson, Arthur Ravenscrofte, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povye, William Layer, . . . Barbor, . . . elde, Richard Cox, John Ireland, Edward Owen, John Stodderd, Thomas Eliott and Griffin Jones, who say that

William Skipwith of Ornesbie in co. Lincoln, knight, and Richard Skipwith his son and heir by their deed dated 7 June, 15 Eliz. [1573], sold to William Holstocke and the said William Catchier and their heirs for ever, inter alia, 1 messuage or great place commonly called the Old Place situate at the east head of the parish Church of the Blessed Mary At Hill formerly in the tenure of Thomas Lucas, citizen and fishmonger of London, and then in that of the said William Catchier, except certain rooms (Romeis) parcel of the said Olde Place granted to the said William Holstocke by an Indenture of bargain and sale dated 17 Feb., 13 Eliz. [1571], made to him by the said William Skipwith, knight, Dame Elizabeth his wife and the said Richard Skipwith, of the yearly value of 50s., or otherwise.

The said William and Richard Skipwith by their said deed sold to the said William Holstocke and William Catchier and their heirs for ever 1 other messuage and 1 curtilage called a "Yerde" situate in the said parish of the Blessed Mary at Hill, then in the tenure of John Holstocke of London, woodmonger. And they being so thereof seised, the said William Holdstocke by his deed dated 16 January, 16 Eliz. [1574], released and quitclaimed for himself and his heirs for ever to the said William Catchier and his heirs for ever all his right and estate whatsoever of and in the said messuage called the Old Place except the said "Romeis," parcel thereof, granted to the said William Holstock, as above, and also all his right and estate of and in the said other messuage and curtilage, and all the buildings, &c., thereto belonging and the reversions and remainders of the said premises (except as above excepted) and 3 shops and 1 "yerde" parcel of the premises, lying together now or late in the several tenures of John Edwardes, William Hawse alias Pygeon and John Myller which the said William Holstock and William Catchier by their charter, dated 7 December, 17 Eliz. [1574], sold to a certain John Holstocke, citizen and woodmonger of London and his heirs for ever: all which said premises so released by the said William Holstock to the said William Catchier and his heirs were late in the tenure of the said William Catchier, Ralph Bell, cowper, Richard Stringar, draper, Mary Browne, widow, and John Edwardes, leatherseller.

The said William Catchier was also seised in his demesne as of fee of a house called a great warehouse and 1 shop with all the "Romeis" and buildings thereupon built, now or late in the occupation of Adrian Porter, foreigner, and John Basse, draper, and formerly in that of John Levisham, situate in the parish of the Blessed Mary at Hill adjoining the west side of the messuage in the said parish late in the occupation of the said Thomas Lucas, late of London, fishmonger, and later in that of the said William Catchier: which said premises the said William Catchier purchased to him and his heirs of the said William Holstock, as by deed of bargain and sale dated . . . Eliz. more fully appears: and which the said William Holstock purchased to him and his heirs, inter alia, of the said William Skipwith, Knight, Dame Elizabeth his wife and Richard Skipwith their son, as by the said deed dated 17 Feb., 13 Eliz. [1571], more fully appears.

So seised, the said William Catchier made his will dated the first day of A . . ., 1577, as follows [here given in English]: I give to Mary my wife for life the messuage in the parish of St. Mary at Hill, London, now in my occupation.

As to the residue of my lands, &c., in the said parish I give the same to William Catchier my son and his heirs for ever; the 2 tenements adjoining my said dwelling house, now or late in the occupation of Richard Stringar and Thomas Lothberye only excepted: which 2 tenements I give to my child unborn.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage and are worth per ann., clear, £20.

William Catchier died 4 August, 19 Eliz. [1577]; the said William is his son and next heir and is now aged 6 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 33.

Thomas Godfrey, Esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 October, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pipe, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Godfrey, esq., by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dickenson, John Keblewhite, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povye, John Harrison, Arthur Aynescroft, Thomas Bromley, William Typper, John Jackson, John Crowche, William Curtesse, Edward Owens, Thomas Eliott, Richard Smith, Griffin Jones and William Jones, who say that

Thomas Godfrey was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage and 4 tenements and 1 shop in the parish of the Blessed Mary Aldermanbury in the several tenures of the said Thomas, Cicely Swale, Robert Whippe, Annabell Herdman and John Henshaw; and 14 cottages in the several tenures of John Tylley, John Legatt, Thomas Medcafe, — Hopkyns, John Holdernes, Robert Erley, William Legatt, Jone Sallion, Robert Richardson, William Waley, — Holland, widow, Henry Morley, . . . and William Hodgkin.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage, viz., by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Thomas Godfrey died 27 February, 20 Eliz. [1578]; Oliver Godfrey is his son and next heir and was then aged 29 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 21 Eliz., part 2, No. 35.

Gerson Hilles, Lunatic.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 18 December, 22 Eliz. [1579], before Thomas Penny, Doctor of Medicine, Richard Taylor, Doctor of Medicine, Nicholas Wheler, gent., and William Necton, feodary, by virtue of a commission to enquire into the lunacy of Gerson Hilles, by the oath of John Haddon, Thomas Russell, Arthur Raynscrofte, John Jackson, Edward Owen, John Stodderde, Thomas Elyot, John Ricardes, Richard Smyth, Geoffrey Johnes, William Jones, John Ireland, John Keblewhite, William Povye, William Layer and William Curteis, who say that

Gerson Hilles is a lunatic and does not enjoy lucid intervals, so that he is incapable of governing either himself or his lands, and he became a lunatic on the 10th day of December, 20 Eliz. [1577], and has not since alienated any of his lands or goods, nor has he since been seised of any messuages, lands, &c., which he might alienate, but long before his lunacy he was and still is possessed of divers goods and chattels, viz., 1 piece of white woollen cloth, containing 27 yards, remaining in the City of Antwerp, in parts beyond the seas, in the custody of Reginald Capcote, citizen and ironmonger of London, of the price of £9, and of a certain lease of a tenement in the which he dwells, lying in the parish of St. Dionis Backchurche, London, for a term of years not yet expired, of the value of £20; also of divers goods, movables and utensils in his said house of the value of £163 1s. 3d.; and divers clothes and other things thereto appertaining of the value of £105 9s. 6d.

Barnabas Hilles is the brother and next heir of the said Gerson Hilles, and is now aged 30 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., p. 2, No. 19.



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