Inquisitions
1581

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

E. A. Fry (editor)

Year published

1908

Pages

32-43

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'Inquisitions: 1581', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 3 (1908), pp. 32-43. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65889 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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Julius Burgarncye, Esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 9 May, 23 Eliz. [1581], before (fn. 1) . . . after the death of Julius Burgarncy, esq., Doctor of Medicine, by the oath of Robert . . . Russell, John Irelond, John Jackson, John Keblewhite, William Styche, George Ginne, John Crowche, Edmund Owen, Griffin Jones, Peter Legate, John Rieardes and William Feeke, who say that

Long before the death of the said Julius King Henry 8 was seised of 2 houses and 1 parcel of waste ground . . . viz., next the site of the late Priory or New Hospital of the Blessed Mary without Bishopsgate, London, now dissolved; and so seised, afterwards, viz., the 28th day of June, in the 32nd year of his reign by Letters Patent for a certain sum of money granted the said messuage and other the premises to . . . and mercer of London: to hold to the said Christopher Campion and his heirs for ever, of the said late King . . . one knight's fee and paying to the King 2s. yearly.

So seised, the said Christopher Campion afterwards by indenture dated 10 . . . 3 and 4 Philip and Mary by indenture made . . . and Giles Allen, gent., of the other part demised the said premises by the name of the mansion houses with the garden and orchard adjoining, to the said Giles for 99 years, paying therefor yearly to the said Christopher 1 grain of pepper: the estate and term of years of which said Giles in the said premises . . . of Thurgarton in co. Nottingham, yeoman, now has by sufficient conveyances in the law, by virtue whereof the said John Grondey was and still is seised of the residue of the said term of years.

After the death of the said Christopher Campion the said premises descended to . . . gent., to Barbara wife of Thomas Ball, gent., and to Elizabeth wife of Lawrence Swynborne, gent., daughters and coheirs of the said Christopher, by virtue whereof the said Ellis, Thomas and Lawrence were thereof seised in right of their said wives, and so seised by indenture dated 4 February, 20 Eliz., for a certain sum of money, sold the said premises to the said Julius Burgarncye and Elianore his wife: to hold to them and the heirs of the said Julius for ever.

By deed dated 12 March, 20 Eliz., the said Ellis and Helen, Thomas and Barbara, Lawrence and Elizabeth acknowledged . . . and remised the said premises to the said Julius and Elianore and the heirs of the said Julius for ever.

The said John Grondey being so seised of the said premises demised the same to the said Julius, who by charter dated 26 December, 23 Eliz., enfeoffed thereof Roger Townesende, esq., and Nicholas Coote, gent., to hold to the use of the said Julius for life; after his decease, to the use of the said Elianore for life; after her decease, to the use of the heirs of the body of the said Julius; and for default, to the use of the said Julius and Elianore and the heirs of the said Julius for ever: which said charter is here given in full as follows: This indenture made 26 Dec, 23 Eliz., between Julius Burgarncye, esq., Doctor of "Phisick" of the one part and Roger Townessend of Estraineham in co. Norfolk, esq., and Nicholas Coote of . . . in the said county, esq., of the other part witnesses that the said Julius in consideration of a marriage had between himself and Eleanor his wife and for the affection he bore her and for the advancement of his heirs granted to the said Roger and Nicholas all that great messuage or tenement and all the buildings, lands, &c., lying near the Spittle without Bishopsgate: to hold to the use of the said Julius for life; after his decease, to the use of the said Eleanor for life; after her decease, to the use of the heirs of the body of the said Julius; and for default, to the use of the said Julius and Eleanor and their heirs for ever.

The said premises are held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 2s. The reversion of the premises during the residue of the said term is worth nothing except the said rent of 1 grain of pepper, but after the said term it will be worth £5.

Julius Burgarncye died at London 7 January last past without issue of his body: after his death the said John Grondey was possessed of the said premises for the residue of the said term. With the assent of the said John the said Eleanor took the profits of the said premises and dwelt therein.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 60.

Eleanor Burgarncy, Widow.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 November, 23 Eliz. [1581], before James Harvey, Mayor and Escheator, after the death of Eleanor Burgarnci, widow, late the wife of Julius Burgarncy, esq., Doctor of Medicine, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Roger Hole, William Povye, John Harryson, John Irelond, John Jackson, William Stiche, Arthur Raynscrofte, George Ginne, John Rickardes, Edmund Owen, Griffin Jones, Henry Shaw, William Curtes, George . . . and William Feake, who say that

Long before the death of the said Eleanor, King Henry 8 was seised in his demesne of 2 houses and 1 parcel of waste land adjoining the same, containing 1 acre and 1 rood, and of 2 walls of bricks near adjoining the said houses, lying in the suburbs of the City of London, viz., next the site of the late Priory or new Hospital of the Blessed Mary without Bisshopsgate, London, now dissolved, and late parcel thereof; and so being thereof seised, afterwards, viz., on the 28th day of June in the 32nd year of his reign, by Letters Patent, dated at Westminster the same day and year, for a certain sum of money, granted the said premises, inter alia, to Christopher Campion, citizen and mercer of London: to hold to him and his heirs for ever, of the said late King and his heirs by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and rendering yearly for the same 2s.

And the said Christopher Campion so being thereof seised by indenture dated 14 April, 3 and 4 Philip and Mary [1557], made between himself of the one part and a certain Giles Allen, gent., of the other part demised and to farm let the said premises by the name of a mansion house with a garden and orchard adjoining the same to the said Giles Allen for 99 years, he paying for the same yearly to the said Christopher 1 grain of pepper: the estate and term of years in the said premises of which said Giles, a certain John Grondeye of Thurgarton in co. Notts now has, as by divers lawful conveyances more fully appears.

And so seised of the reversion of the said premises the said Christopher died at London: after whose decease the said messuage and other the premises descended to Helen wife of Ellis (Elizens) Stempe, gent., to to Barbara wife of Thomas Ball, gent., and to Elizabeth wife of Lawrence Swynborne, gent., daughters and coheirs of the said Christopher, by virtue whereof the said Ellis, Thomas and Lawrence were thereof seised in right of the said Helen, Barbara and Elizabeth; and so being thereof seised, they afterwards, viz., on the 4th day of February, 20 Eliz. [1578], by indenture of the same day and year, by pardon from the Queen by her Letters Patent, for a certain sum of money, sold the said premises to the said Julius Burgarncy and Eleanor his wife: to hold to them and to the heirs of the said Julius to their sole use for ever; and by their deed dated 12 March, 20 Eliz. [1578], remised and altogether quitclaimed to the said Julius and Eleanor and the heirs of the said Julius for ever all their estate, title and interest in the said premises.

The said John Grondie being so seised of the said premises, long before the death of the said Julius Burgarncy demised to him the said premises at the will of the said John; and afterwards, the said Julius by charter dated 26 December, 23 Eliz. [1580], enfeoffed thereof a certain Roger Townesende, esq., and Nicholas Coote, gent., to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Julius for life; and after his decease to the use of the said Eleanor for life; after her decease to the use of the heirs of the body of the said Julius; and for default of such issue to the use of the said Julius and Eleanor and their heirs for ever. By virtue of which said enfeoffment and by force of the Statute of Uses the said Julius was seised of the said premises in his demesne as of freehold, with remainders as above.

The said Julius Burgarncy died so seised at London on the 7th day of January last past without issue lawfully begotten; after whose death the said John Grondeye was possessed of the said premises for the residue of the said term of years, with remainder thereof to the said Eleanor and her heirs.

The said premises are held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of one knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 2s., and during the residue of the said term are worth nothing except the said rent of 1 grain of pepper, and afterwards they will be worth per ann., clear, £5.

Eleanor Burgarncy died 10 August last past at London; Thomas Cooper of Thurgarton in co. Notts is her son and next heir and was then aged 23 years and more.

After the death of the said Ellen the said John Grondy was seised of the said premises for the residue of the said term, the remainder thereof being to the said Thomas and his heirs.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 62.

Christopher Draper, Knight.

Writ dated at Westminster 23 June, 23 Eliz. [1581].

Delivered into court the last day of October, 23 Eliz.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall [no date given], before John Braunche, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Christopher Draper, knight, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, William Povey, Thomas Russell, John Irelonde, John Jackson, Peter Legatt, William Stiche, John Keblewhite, George Gynne, Edmund Owyn, Griffin Jones, Henry Webbe, George Robertes, John Oldam, Roger Hole and John Stodderd, who say that

Christopher Draper was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage commonly called the Gallie in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East, in London, in the occupation of Clement Draper; and of a certain other large messuage called Asheling Wharfe and formerly called Puckman Wharfe and afterwards called Crechurche-wharfe and late called Gibson's Key, situate in the said parish.

And so seised, the said Christopher afterwards by feoffment dated 1 March, 13 Eliz. [1571], gave the said premises, with all the houses, buildings, &c., thereto belonging to William Webbe, citizen and salter of London, Stephen Woodroff, citizen and haberdasher of London, Wolstan Dixie, citizen and skinner of London, and Laurence Grene, citizen and cutler of London: to hold to them and their heirs for ever to the use of the said Christopher for life; and after his decease, then as to 2 parts of the said premises, in 3 equal parts to be divided, to the use of Margaret wife of the said Christopher for life; after her decease then as to the same to the use of Benedicta, Brigitt and Agnes, daughters of the said Christopher, and their heirs for ever.

Afterwards the said Margaret died in the said parish in the lifetime of the said Christopher.

The said messuage called Gibson's Key is held of the Queen by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and the yearly rent of 23s., and is worth per ann., clear, £8. The messuage called the Gallie is held of the Queen in free burgage of the City of London and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £5.

Christopher Draper died 8 May, 23 Eliz. [1581], in the said parish; the said Benedicta, now the wife of William Webbe, citizen and Alderman of London, the said Brigitt now the wife of Henry Billingsley, citizen and haberdasher of London, and the said Agnes the wife of Wolstan Dixe, citizen and Alderman of London, are his daughters and next heirs and are now aged respectively, the said Benedicta 39 years, the said Brigitt 30, and the said Agnes 26.

Chan. Inq. p.m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 64.

William Chapman, Citizen and Ironmonger.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 28 November, 23 Eliz. [1580], before William Tooke, esq., Auditor of the Court of Wards and Liveries, Richard Gadburye, gent., and William Necton, feodary of the City of London, after the death of William Chapman, citizen and ironmonger of the said city, by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dickenson, Thomas Russell, Arthur Raynscrofte, George Ginne, John Crowche, John Keblewhite, William Povie, John Harrison, John Jackson, John Irelonde, William Stiche, John Ricardes, Griffin Jones, Peter Leggat, William Curtis, Edmund Owen and Henry Shawe, who say that

Long before the death of the said William Chapman a certain Robert Chamberleyn, citizen and ironmonger of London, was seised of 1 messuage situate in Borthalane alias Bordehawelane within the parish of the Blessed Mary Colchurch in the Ward of Chepe, London; 1 yard or waste piece of land to the said messuage adjoining; 2 other messuages situate in the said parish late belonging to the House or College of Acon, London, lately dissolved; and 2 yards with 2 small houses thereupon built lying in the said lane called Borthalane in the said parish.

So seised, the said Robert Chamberlain in part fulfilment of certain bargains and agreements specified and declared in certain indentures of bargain, dated the last day of March, 18 Eliz. [1576], and made between himself of the one part and the said William Chapman, deceased, and Joan his wife of the other part, sold to the said William and Joan the said messuage in Borthalane, the said yard or waste land thereto adjoining, then or late in the several tenures of the said William Chapman and of Robert Herne, merchant tailor of London, and also the said 2 other messuages: to hold to them and to the heirs of the said William to their sole use for ever.

And so seised, the said William Chapman made his will dated 15 August, 1579, as follows [here given in English]:—

I give to William Chapman my son and heir apparent and to his heirs for ever my manor of Bright Walton alias Brickleton in co. Berks and all my lands in Bright Walton thereto appertaining.

I give to my son Robert Chapman all my lands, tenements, &c, in the City of London, and in the towns, parishes and hamlets of Cookeham and Bray in co. Berks.

The said messuage in Borthalane, the said yard or waste piece of land thereto adjoining, and the said 2 yards with the 2 small houses thereupon built in Borthalane aforesaid are held of the Queen by fealty only, in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 40s. The 2 messuages in the said parish of the Blessed Mary Colchurch to the said late House of Acon belonging are held of the Queen in chief by the 40th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £3.

William Chapman died 8 August last past; William Chapman is his son and next heir and was aged 7 years on the 20th day of December last past.

The said Joan still survives in the said parish of the Blessed Mary Colechurch, London.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 79.

William Heron, Gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 30 January, 23 Eliz. [1581], before John Harte, citizen and Alderman of London, William Tuck, esq., Auditor of the Court of Wards and Liveries, Richard Gadberye, gent., Nowell Sotherton, gent., and William Necton, gent., feodary within the City of London, by virtue of a commission to them and to Rowlande Haywarde directed after the death of William Heron, gent., by the oath of Robert Dyconson, George Gynne, William Povey, John Harryson, Richard Smythe, John Jackson, John Irelande, William Styche, John Rychardes, William Leyer, William Typper, John Stoddarde, Roger Hole, Thomas Bromley and William Feake, who say that

William Heron was a citizen and freeman of the said city and was seised in his demesne as of fee of 14 messuages and 1 stable situate in Westsmythfeild in the parish of St. Sepulchre, London; and so being thereof seised he made his will 12 July, 1580, at London, as follows: [here given in English]: I give to Elizabeth my wife a yearly rent of £20 issuing out of my house called the Maydenhed and other my lands thereto adjoining in the said parish of St. Sepulchre, on condition that she shall not claim any dower, "franke banke" (free beach) or wife's part of my lands or goods; if she does claim them then this my grant to cease.

I give to Thomas Heron of Newcastell and his heirs for ever the yearly rent of £5 issuing out of my said lands and tenements in the said parish.

I give to 2 poor colleges in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, viz., University College in Oxford and Peterhouse in Cambridge, to each of them the yearly rent of £5, issuing out of my said lands "towarde the educacion and bringinge upp of poore schollers within the said towe severall Colleges or howses".

I give to the parish of St. Sepulchre to the use of the poor for ever the yearly rent of £4, also issuing out of my said lands.

Towards the repair of the parish Church of Clerkenwell the yearly rent of £4 for 12 years, and after that period, a like sum yearly for ever to the poor of the said parish of Clerkenwell: all issuing out of my said lands.

I give to Katherine Bassett alias Poppleton my first wife's daughter for life the yearly rent of 40s.; to Joan Hall alias Poppleton my said first wife's daughter the yearly rent of 40s. for life; to Margaret Bell my servant the yearly rent of 40s. for life; to the said Katherine Bassett alias Poppleton the yearly rent of 20s. besides the said 40s., and to John Hall the yearly rent of 20s. for life: all issuing out of said lands.

I give to the use and repair of the parish Churches of St. Sepulchre and Clerkenwell for ever the yearly rent of £20 after the decease of my said wife; and after the decease of the said Katherine Basset, Joan Hall, Margaret Bell and John Hall I give the said yearly rent of £8 issuing out of my said lands for ever towards the repair of the highways from time to time in most needful places between the Spittlehowse at Highegate and the corner of St. John's Wall and the common highway leading from Highegate through Kentyshe towne to Battlebridge: the same to be yearly bestowed by the Constables and Churchwardens of the said places for the time being. I give to Thomas Charleton son of Roger Charleton the yearly rent of 26s. 8d., issuing out of my said lands.

And finally in order that the several demises of the said lands may be performed, I will that the said lands shall be conveyed to the corporations of the Woodmongers or Clothworkers to the above said uses if my executors shall be so advised by their counsel.

The said William Heron made Edward Buggins, gent., Robert Woode and Clement Rigges his ex[ecut]ors.

After the death of the said William the said executors by their deed dated 6 October, 22 Eliz. [1580], conveyed the said premises to the Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the Freemen of the Art or Mystery of the Clothworkers of London and their successors to their proper use for ever.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £40.

William Heron died 12 July last past; Thomas Heron is his kinsman and next heir, viz., son of William Heron, son of John Heron alias Bernard Heron, father of John Heron, father of the said William Heron named in the said commission, and is now aged 40 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 83.

William Clerk, Idiot.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 6 November, 23 Eliz. [1581], before John Allott, Alderman of the City of London, Gabriel Colston, citizen and grocer of London, and William Necton, feodary, commissioners appointed to enquire into the lunacy of William Clerke, son of Roger Clerke, citizen and salter of London, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, William Layer, William Povye, John Harryson, Thomas Russell, John Irelonde, John Jackson, William Stiche, John Keblewhite, George Ginne, John Crowche, John Richardes, Edmund Owen, Gri . . ., Henry Shawe, William Curtes, George Robartes, Peter Legate, Roger Hole and William Feake, who say that

William Clerke is an idiot so that he is incapable of governing either himself or his lands, tenements, goods and chattels, and has been and still is an idiot by the visitation of God, and does not enjoy lucid intervals, nor is he seised of any other messuages, lands, &c.

Roger Clerke, son of the said Roger Clerke the father is the elder brother and next heir of the said William, and was aged 19 years on the 25th day of August last past.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 88.

Lawrence Reynoldes.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 October, 23 Eliz. [1581], before John Braunche, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Lawrence Reynoldes, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, William Povye, John Irelande, John Jacson, William Stiche, John Keblewhyte, John Riccardes, Griffin Jones, George Robertes, John Oldham, Roger Hole, John Stodderd, Richard Smythe and Thos. Russell, who say that

One Edward Whitwell was seised in his demesne as of fee of all that messuage and the wharf, adjoining the same, situate in the parish of St. Andrew, at Castlebaynerd, in London; 3 small tenements in the said parish and 2 other messuages there near the gate of the lord of the Borroughe: which said premises the late King Henry 8 by his Letters Patent, dated 11 June in the 36th year of his reign gave to Robert Taverner, gent., to the sole use of himself and his heirs for ever, to be held of the said King in free and common socage, by fealty only and not in chief: the estate of which said Robert Taverner in the said premises the said Edward Whitwell had to him and his heirs at the time of his death; after whose death the said premises descended to Avice Reynolds, then wife of Thomas Reynolds, as daughter and heir of the said Edward Whitwell, and so thereof seised the said Avice died in the said parish, and afterwards the said Thomas died, by reason whereof the said premises descended to said Lawrence, named in the said writ, as son and heir of the said Avice and he was thereof seised in his demesne as of fee.

The said premises are held of the Queen in free and common socage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Laurence Reynoldes died 15 August, 23 Lliz. [1581], without heirs of his body; John Bryan is his next kinsman and heir, viz., son and heir of John Bryan and Isabel his wife, daughter of Edward Whitwell, father of the said Edward Whitwell, father of the said Avice, mother of the said Lawrence, and is now aged 45 years.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 89.

Alice Skebington, Widow, Lunatic.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 2 November, 23 Eliz. [1581], before William Necton, gent., William Dalbye, gent., and William Squier, gent., by virtue of a commission to enquire into the lunacy of Alice Skevington, widow, to them and to Humphrey Nicholls directed, by the oath of Robert Dickinson, Richard Smythe, Roger Hole, John Jackson, John Keblewhite, Walter Warde, John Twiste, Thomas Madocke, John Myles, Griffin Jones, William Typper, William Stiche, John Harryson, George Gynne, John Ireland and Edmund Owen, who say that

The said Alice Skevington is not a lunatic, nor does she enjoy lucid intervals, but is of sound mind and memory, and has the governing of her own lands, tenements, goods and chattells.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 91.

Nicholas Backhouse, Alderman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 25 January, 23 Eliz. [1581], before John Braunche, Esq., Mayor and escheator, after the death of Nicholas Backhouse, citizen and Alderman of the City of London, by the oath of Robert Dykenson, Thomas Russell, Arthur . . ., George Gynne, John Keblewhite, William Povye, . . . John Jackson, John Irelonde, William Stitche, John Ricardes, William Layer, Griffin Jones, William Jones, John Stodderd, Edmund Owen, Roger Hoell, Henry Shawe, William Feake and . . . who say that,

Nicholas Backhouse was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 large messuage and tenement situate in the streets of Cornehill and Brodestreete in the parish of St. Christopher next "lez Stockes" within the said city, lately purchased of Anthony Gamage, citizen and Alderman of London, John Banaster and Philip Banaster, executors of the will of Thomas Banaster, late citizen and skinner of London, deceased; 1 messuage and tenement situate in the parish of All Saints in Hony Lane within the said City, late in the tenure of Thomas Thickens, and lately purchased by the said Nicholas to him and his heirs of William Boxe, of London, grocer; 1 capital messuage or mansion house situate in the street called Bassinges Hawe within the said City, late in the tenure of John Gresshame, knight, citizen and Alderman of London, deceased; 5 small tenements adjoining the said capital messuage, lying in Bassingshawe aforesaid: all which said premises last recited lying in Bassinghawe were lately purchased by the said Nicholas Backhouse, to him and his heirs of Thomas Gressham, knight, and John Gressham now deceased; 3 tenements with 1 small garden lying in or near an alley called Swan Alley in the street called Colman strete in the parish of St. Stephen of Colman strete in the said City, late in the several tenures of the said Nicholas Backhouse, Libius Foxe and Matthew Twyford and lately purchased by the said Nicholas to him and his heirs of John Drewrie, esq.; 1 messuage called the Boores Heade with all the shops, cellars, solars, lands, &c., and the warehouses thereupon built, late in the tenure of John Eccelston, lying in the street called Weastcheape and in the lane called Hony Lane in the said parish of All Saints of Honey Lane, lately purchased by the said Nicholas, to him and his heirs, of John Eccleston of London, goldsmith; 1 messuage called the Half Moone and 1 vault situate in the street called Westchepe in the parish of the Blessed Mary, Colechurch within the said City, late in the tenure of Mark Dingley, and lately purchased by the said Nicholas to him and his heirs of the said Mark Dingley and William Colles, citizens and grocers of the said City; 1 garden with a tenement thereupon newly built, late in the tenure of Richard Brooke, late citizen and goldsmith of London, deceased, lying in a certain alley called Swanne Alley in the street called Colman street in the said parish of St. Stephen and lately purchased by the said Nicholas, to him and his heirs of the said John Drewrie, esq.

The said messuage in the parish of St. Christopher next the Stockes is held of the Queen in free burgage of the said City and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £6. The said messuage in the said parish of All Saints in Hony Lane, lately purchased of William Boxe is held of the Queen in free burgage of the said City, and is worth per ann., clear, 5 marks. The said capital messuage and the 5 small tenements adjoining the same in Bassingshawe, lately purchased of the said Thomas and John Gressham, are held of the Queen in free burgage of the said City, and are worth per ann., clear, 20 marks. The said 3 tenements and garden and the said other garden and tenement in or near Swan Alley, lately purchased of the said John Drewrie, esq., are held of the Queen in free burgage of the said City, and are worth per ann., clear, £4. The said messuage called the Boores Heade, with 'all the houses, &c., &c., lying in West-Cheape and Honey Lane in the said parish of All Saints, purchased of John Eccelston of London, goldsmith, are held of the Queen in chief, by the 30th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d. The said messuage called the Half Moone in Weastcheape in the parish of the Blessed Mary Colechurch is held of the Queen in free burgage and common socage by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £4.

Nicholas Backhouse died 12 June last past; Samuel Backhouse is his son and next heir, and was then aged 24 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 23 Eliz., part 2, No. 92.

Footnotes

1 Part of the right hand side of this Inquisition is torn away.


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