Inquisitions
1587

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

E. A. Fry (editor)

Year published

1908

Pages

99-105

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'Inquisitions: 1587', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 3 (1908), pp. 99-105. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65895 Date accessed: 30 October 2014.


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William Lambe, Citizen and Clothworker.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 30 May, 29 Eliz. [1587], before George Barne, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Lambe, late citizen and clothworker of the said City, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Thomas Russell, John Harrison, William Lare, John Jackson, Roger Hole, John Thompson . . . (fn. 1) Bond, William Steeche, William Cooke, William Crowche, Edmond Owen, George Robertes, Thomas Wigges, James Dodson, Edward Swaine and John Irelande, who say that

William Lambe was seised in his demesne as of fee . . . called le St. Jaemes Chappell at London Wall within the said City; 3 several tenements lying there now or late in the several tenures of John Feilde, baker, . . . and — Spighte, gent., 5 several gardens, with 6 several tenements now therein built, lying in the parish of St. Stephen in Colmanstreet within the said City, now or late in the several tenures of . . . Bodeley, merchant, Fulk Oneslowe, gent., John Barnes, mercer, George Cullymore, merchant, and John Morgan, citizen and grocer of London; 2 tenements with 2 stalls (seldis) being in the parish of St. Olave in Silverstreet within . . . now or late in the several tenures of Guy Bartram, minstrell, and Richard Williams, merchant tailor of London.

So seised, the said William Lambe, by deed dated 12 July, 10 Eliz. [1568] made between the Master and Wardens of the Guild of the Assumption of the Blessed Mary the Virgin of the art of Clothwarkers in the City of London on the one part, and the Mayor and Commonalty of the said City of London of the other part, witnesses that he the said William Lamb of London, gent., by writing sufficient in the law intends to make his will concerning his messuages, lands, &c., within the City of London, and thereby to give the same to the said Master and Wardens, and it is then covenanted by the said Master and Wardens that they from the death of the said William Lamb for ever shall yearly on the 1st day of October and on the feast days of St. Stephen, the Anunciation of St. Mary the Virgin and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist cause some learned godly man to make a sermon within the chapel or church of St. James in the Wall, and that at each of the said sermons 4 of the livery of the said company of clothworkers shall be present, and the said Master shall pay to the preacher of each said sermon 6s. 8d., and to the said 4 clothworkers there present 13s. 4d.; and shall cause 12 gowns for 12 men to be new made of good new friese, every gown to contain 6½ yards of friese, "if so be" that 12 such gowns can be made for £6 9s.; also 12 gowns for 12 women of good new frise, every gown to contain 5½ yards, if they can be made for £5 11s.; also 12 "shertes" for 12 men to be made of canvas or lokeram, every shirt to contain 2½ ells, the price of every ell to be 12d.; also 12 smocks for 12 women to be made of the same, every smock to contain 2 ells of same price; and shall also buy yearly for ever 12 pairs of new strong winter shoes for 12 men and 12 pair for 12 women, and to give the said gowns, &c., away on the 1st day of October to poor aged men and women being impotent or lame. If the Chamberlain, the Town Clerk and the Under-Chamberlain of the City of London be present on the said 1st of October, then the said Master shall pay to each of them 6s. 8d.; and lastly shall for ever find an honest, virtuous and "sad" chaplain to say divine service in the said Chapel or Church every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday.

Afterwards, the said William Lambe to perform his said intention made his will dated 11 October, 16 Eliz. [1574] as follows: whereas heretofore a conveyance was intended to have been made by me to William Tomlynson John Cawoode and Anthony Bond of the City of London, and their heirs of all my messuages, lands, tenements, &c., in the parishes of St. James in the Wall near Criplegate and St. Stephens in Colmanstreet, whereupon it was meant that the said William Tomlynsonn and others should have conveyed the use thereof to me and Joahne, then my wife, now deceased, for our heirs for the dower of the said Joan, and after our decease to such uses as I should limit, whereupon nothing was effectually done, so that I am still seised of the said premises in my demesne as of fee: yet to avoid all doubt, I by my deed dated 3 July, 9 Eliz. [1567], granted that I and the said William Tomlynson, John Cawood and Anthony Bond should be seised of the said premises to the only use of me and my heirs for ever, and the said William Tomlynson and others by deed dated 4 July in the said 9th year of Eliz. released to me all their right and interest in the said premises: and whereas also I and Joan my wife by indenture made between us of the one part and the Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the art of the Stationers of London of the other part, have granted to the said Master an annuity of £6 13s. 4d. issuing out of the premises in said parish of St. James, as by the said indenture dated 7 July in said 9th Eliz. more plainly appears: I now will that the said annuity shall be paid to the said Master of the Stationers and his successors for ever. I give all my messuages, lands, &c., in the said 3 parishes to the said Master and Wardens of the Clothworkers and their successors for ever, to the uses mentioned in the said indenture dated 12 July, 10 Eliz., but if at any time the said company be seised into the Prince's hands so that they cannot enjoy the said lands, I will that the profits thereof shall be paid by the tenants thereof to the President and fellows of the college lately founded by Sir Thomas Whight, knight and alderman of London to the use of the poor scholars of the same college, so long as the said corporation of the clothworkers shall remain in the Queen's hands, but after her Majesty has removed her hands therefrom the said corporation to enjoy the said lands for ever. If the said company of clothworkers be negligent in carrying out my bequests, I give the said lands to the President and fellows of St. John's College of Oxford to the use of the poor scholars there for ever.

By virtue of the said indenture and will the said company of clothworkers directly after the death of the said William Lamb entered into the said premises and took the profits thereof.

The said St. James's Chapel and all the premises in the said parishes of St. James on the Wall and St. Stephen in Colmanstreet are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, £7. The premises in the parish of St. Olave in Silverstreet are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 33s. 4d.

William Lambe died the last day of April, 1580; William Whitlocke is his kinsman and next heir, viz., son of — Whitlocke and Joan his wife, daughter of John Lambe father of the said William Lambe, and was then aged 50 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 212, No. 50.

Millicent Herenden, widow.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 28 June, 29 Eliz. [1587], before George Barne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Millicent Herenden, widow, by the oath of Robert Dyconson, Thomas Russell, John Harrison, John Jackson, Roger Hole, John Thompson, Robert Elder, John Bond, William Stytch, William Cooke, William Crowch, Edmund Owen, Nicholas Hauxford, Thomas Wigges, James Dodson and John Ireland, who say that

Millicent Herenden long before her death was seised in her demesne as of fee of 2 gardens called Grayfryars gardeynes lying in the parish of Christchurch within the said City, now or late in the tenure of Ralph Dowries.

So seised, the said Millicent made her will with a codicil as follows: whereas in my will I have appointed that the 2 gardens adjoining the gardens belonging to the Hospital of Christchurch westward should be sold by my executor: I now revoke that clause and will that the said gardens shall descend to Edmond Herenden my son and heir, on condition that he shall sell or let the same to whoever shall have my now dwelling house, as by the said will dated 21 October, 23 Eliz. [1581] more fully appears.

The said Millicent was likewise seised in her demesne as of fee of the manor of Tadworth, and of 10 messuages, 2 tofts, 600 a. of land, 10 a. of meadow, 400 a. of pasture, 400 a. of wood, 500 a. of furze and heath and 205. rent in Tadworth, Ewell and Bansted in co. Surrey; and so seised, by indenture made between herself of the one part and Henry Herenden her son of Gray's Inn in co. Middlesex, gent., of the other part, dated 10 Sept., 11 Eliz. [1569], in consideration of a marriage then to be solemnised between the said Henry Herenden and Mary Digby of North-Luffenham in co. Rutland, widow, the said Millicent agreed that she would be seised of the said premises to her own use for her life; the remainder thereof after her death being to the use of the said Henry and Mary and the heirs of the said Henry for ever.

The said 2 gardens are held of the Queen by knight's service by the 100th part of 1 knight's fee in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d. The said manor of Tadworth and other the premises in Tadworth, Ewell and Bansted are held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich in co. Kent by fealty only in free socage and not in chief, paying therefore yearly to the Queen £12 12s. at the Court of Augmentations and revenues of the Crown, and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Millicent Herenden died 5 November, 23 Eliz. [1581]; Edmund Herenden is her elder son and next heir, and was then aged 49 years.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 212, No. 53.

John Gardener, Gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 28 July, 29 Eliz. [1587], before George Barne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Gardyner, gent., by the oath of Robert Dickinson, Thomas Russell, John Jackson, John Stodderd, William Povey, Roger Hole, John Ireland, William Feake, John Bounde, William Crowche, William Cooke, Edmund Owen, George Robartes, John Adlyn, Nicholas Hawkesford, Richard Trayfford and David Holyland, who say that

John Gardyner long before his death was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage, with shops, cellars, &c., lying in Budge Rowe in the parish of St. John upon Walbrooke, London, now or late in the tenure of Fulk Evance.

So seised, the said John Gardener made his will as follows: I give my house in Budge Rowe in the City of London to Elizabeth Duddeley my good sister for her life; after her decease, the same to remain to Anne Duddeley my said sister's daughter and the heirs of her body; for default the remainder thereof to my good brother-in-law John Duddeley and his right heirs for ever, as by the said will dated 30 Nov., 1590, more fully appears.

The said messuage is held in free burgage of the City of London, and is worth per ann., clear, £8.

John Gardyner died 11 November last past; John Gardyner is his kinsman and next heir, and was then aged 27 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 212, No. 56.

Thomas Jackson.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 October, 29 Eliz. [1587], before George Barne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Jackson, citizen and fishmonger of London, by the oath of Robert Dickinson, Thomas Russell, John Harrisson, William Povy, Roger Hole, Robert Elder, William Feake, John Bonde, William Cooke, William Crowche, Edmund Owen, George Robartes, William Harvy, Nicholas Hawkeford, Peter Noxton, Thomas Sewell, Thomas Wigges, John Tompson and John Stevens, who say that

Thomas Jackson long before his death was seised in his demesne as of fee of all that capital messuage called le Garland; and 2 other messuages adjoining the said capital messuage on the west, lying together in the parish of St. Brigide in Flytstreat in the suburbs of the City of London, now in the tenure of Nicholas Haukesford; also all that waste place of land and 1 "shede" situate on the wharfe in the said parish, late in the tenure of Alice Perce and now in that of Philip Smith, and sometime belonging to the Fraternity or Guild in the said Church of St. Brigide; and 11 small tenements and 1 "le storehouse," situate on the south part of the Common hall there called Our Ladys hall in the said parish of St. Brigide, late in the tenure of Christopher Dray, and now in the several tenures of Timothy Watson, Robert Hoyle, William Smith, — Browne, John Dixon, John Bradshawe, Maudlyne Juxson, John Goffe and Hugh Nash, and formerly belonging to the said Fraternity.

So seised, the said Thomas Jackson made his will as follows: I will that Fraunces my wife shall have all my messuages, houses, lands, &c., in the City of London and elsewhere, and take all the rents thereof for her life; after her decease, I give the same to Anne my daughter and the heirs of her body for ever; for default, to William Jackson son of my brother Robert Jackson and the heirs of his body for ever; and for default, the same to remain to my right heirs and blood for ever, as by the said will dated 1 August, 1563, and proved before Master John Orphinstrange official of the Archdeacon of London 26 June, 1564, more fully appears.

The capital messuage called le Garland and the 2 messuages thereto adjoining in the said parish of St. Brigede are held of the Queen in free burgage of the City of London, and are worth per ann., clear, £10. The waste places of land, and the shed and the 11 small tenements and the storehouse are held of the Queen in free burgage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £6.

Thomas Jackson died 19th June, 1564; Robert Jackson is his brother and next heir, and was then aged 60 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 213, No. 76.

Thomas Randall, Citizen and Brewer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 October, 29 Eliz. [1587], before George Barne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Randall, citizen and brewer, by the oath of Robert Dickinson, Thomas Russell, John Harrison, William Povy, Roger Hole, Robert Elder, William Feake, John Bonde, William Cooke, William Crowche, Edmund Owen, George Robartes, William Harvy, Nicholas Hawkesford, Peter Noxton, Thomas Sewell, Thomas Wigges, John Tompson and John Stevens, who say that

Thomas Randall was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage, with the shops, cellars, curtilages and easements thereto belonging, late in the tenure of Honor Shinyshall and now in that of John Phillippes, lying in the parish of St. Andrew near the Queen's Wardrope in the said City: of which said messuage a certain William Butler, citizen and brewer of London, deceased, was seised in his demesne as of fee, and so seised by his will dated 8 April, 1567, gave the same to the said Thomas Randall and his heirs for ever.

A certain Agnes Randall late of Apsden in co. Hertford, widow, at the time of her death living in London, by her will bequeathed inter alia 2 messuages in Adlingstreat in the said parish of St. Andrew in le Wardroppe as follows: I give to Thomas Randall my eldest son and to Izabell his wife my 2 messuages in Adlingstreat, now or late in the tenure of Mr. Mathewe Carewe; after their decease I give the same to the heirs of the body of the said Thomas; for default, to Henry Randall my second son and the heirs of his body; and for default, to William Randall my younger son and to the heirs of his body for ever, as by the said will dated 29 December, 1585, more fully appears.

The 2 messuages in Adlingstreet, late in the tenure of Matthew Carewe, Doctor of Laws, and now in that of—Shevington, Doctor of Laws, are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £6. The messuage in the said parish of St. Andrew is held of the Queen in free socage by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Thomas Randall died 14 July last past; Matthew Randall is his son and next heir, and was then aged 15 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 213, No. 77.

Footnotes

1 Document torn away.


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1586