Inquisitions
1588

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

E. A. Fry (editor)

Year published

1908

Pages

105-128

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'Inquisitions: 1588', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 3 (1908), pp. 105-128. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65896 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Robert Younge, Citizen and Fishmonger.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 3 July, 30 Eliz. [1588], before George Bonde, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Younge, citizen and fishmonger of London, by the oath of Robert Dickinson, Roger Hole, Thomas Sewell, John Harrison, William Harvy, John Bonde, John Jackson, John Stodderd, Robert Elder, William Feake, William Crowche, William Cooke, George Robartes, Hugh Ingram, Nicholas Hawkesforde and Peter Noxeson, who say that

Robert Younge was seised in his demesne as of Fee of 1 messuage wherein John Osbourne formerly dwelt, with all shops, cellars, &c., lying in the street called Billingsgate in the parish of the Blessed Mary Athill in the ward of Billingsgate within the City of London, on the west part of a piece of land there called Romelande: which said messuage is held of the Queen by fealty only, and is worth per ann., clear, £3.

Robert Younge died 25 November, 1576; Thomas Younge is his son and next heir, and was then aged 17 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 216, No. 4.

David Smith, Citizen and Imbrotherer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 26 October, 30 Eliz. [1588], before George Bonde, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of David Smithe, citizen and Imbrotherer of London, by the oath of Robert Dickinsonne, Thomas Russell, John Harrison, John Jackson, Thomas Sewell, John Stoddard, William Povey, Roger Hole, John Bonde, John Stevens, William Harvie, William Cooke, William Crowche, Edmund Owen, George Roberts, Stephen Porter, Thomas Wigges, Thomas Smithe and Hugh Ingram, who say that

David Smithe long before his death was seised in his demesne as of fee of all that capital messuage, sometime in the tenure of Adrian Poyninges, knight, and now or late in the several tenures of George Moore, Esq., Francis Bourne, trumpeter (buccinatoris) Richard Blethin, merchant tailor, Roger Lockeley, joiner, and William Watson, " imbrotheror," situate in the parish of St. Benedict alias Bennett near Powles wharfe in the City of London, with all the shops, cellars, entries, yards, &c., to the said capital messuage belonging, or at any time used by the said Adrian Poyninges: which said capital messuage the said David Smith lately purchased to him and his heirs for ever of the grant of George Moore, esq., and Anne his wife one of the daughters and heirs of the said Adrian Poyninges; also of all that messuage lying in the parishes of St. Peter and St. Benedict in the ward of Castle Baynarde, London, late in the tenure of John Goldinge, citizen and "imbrotheror" of London, with all shops, cellars, &c.: which said messuage the said David Smith lately purchased to him and his heirs of the feoffment of Edmund Hilles, late citizen and woodmonger of London, deceased; all those 4 tenements following, viz., the tenement late in the tenure of Margery Stanley alias Greene, the tenement late in the occupation of Richard Butt, and afterwards occupied by Matthew Greene, hatmaker, the tenement in the tenure of John Forman, waterman, and afterwards occupied by Patrick Welche, and the tenement late in the tenure of Patrick Tegge, and afterwards occupied by John Whittacres, dyer: which said 4 tenements are situated between the mansion house now or late of Matthew Prellio in Theamesstreate in the parish of St. Benedict, London, on the east, and a large messuage of the said David Smithe, lately occupied by Dame Juliana Holcrofte, widow, on the west part; also all that piece of waste ground abutting upon the brick wall of a certain garden of the capital house lately called Mountjoye place and now anglice called the Doctors Commons towards the north, and upon the said tenement now or late in the occupation of the said Margery Stanley and the tenement late in the tenure of the said Richard Butt towards the south, and lying between the lower (posteriores) parts of the said mansion house of the said Matthew Prellio on the east and the said tenement now or late occupied by the said John Whittacres on the west, and 3 of the said tenements and the entry of the said tenement so occupied by the said John Whittacres abbutting upon the street called Thamesstreate towards the south, the said tenement occupied by the said John Whittacres abbutting towards the north upon a certain shed now or lately occupied by Thomas Martyn, Doctor of Civil Law, and towards the south upon the said tenement occupied by the said Patrick Welche: which said 4 tenements with the waste piece of ground contain in breadth on the south part 34 feet and 9 inches of assize, and on the north part 31 feet and 4 inches of assize, and were purchased by the said David Smithe of Matthew Prellio of London, hatmaker; also all that yard or parcel of land and a house in ruins built thereupon, being in the parish of St. Benedict next Pawles wharfe, parcel of a tenement there called le Rose abutting on the south part upon the land there late of Sencee Ibgrive, widow, on the north and west part upon certain tenements of the Queen and certain tenements of the heirs of Thomas Pierson, and upon the land sometime of Smalledge Stanley on the east: which said yard and house contain in length from the north towards the south to the yard and tenement of the said Sencee Ibgrave 47 feet, 4½ inches, and in breadth in the north part by the land of the Queen 18 feet, 7½ inches, and in length in the south part by the land there of the Queen 22 feet; also of all that way or entry leading from the street called Themestreate to the said yard and house in ruins: which said way contains in length 32 feet, 7½ inches, and in breadth 4 feet and 3 inches of assize: which said yard and house the said David Smithe purchased of the feoffment of the said Sencee.

So seised, the said David Smithe made his will as follows: I will that Katheryn my wife shall have and enjoy my lands, tenements, &c., in Thamestreet in the said parish of St. Bennetts near Paul's wharfe, at Pawles wharfes hill and St. Peter's Hill and elsewhere within the said City of London for her life; after her decease, I give to my son Jordaine Smithe and the heirs of his body the remainder of those my messuages late in the several tenures of Henry Benneman, deceased, Humfrey White and Richard Freth, lying in Theamestreet against Baynardes Castle; for default of such issue, the remainder thereof to William Smithe my son and the heirs of his body.

After the death of my said wife I give to my said son William the remainder of my 4 messuages late parcel of a late capital messuage or mansion house sometime of Sir Adrian Poyninges, knight, deceased, situate in Pawles wharfe hill, as they are now divided from the back part of the said late capital house: which back part opens to St. Peter's Hill, and which said 4 tenements open towards Paul's wharf hill, and now are or late were in the several tenures of Francis Bourne, trumpeter, Richard Blethenn, merchant tailor, William Watson, imbrotherer, and Roger Lockley, joiner, together with 1 little yard on the back part of the yards of—Blethen and Watson, late in the tenure of one Smith a baker and now in my own hands, which opens upon St. Peter's Hill: to hold the same with the use of the well to the said William Smithe and the heirs of his body; for default, the remainder thereof to the said Jordan Smithe and the heirs of his body. If both my said sons die without issue, I give to my said wife if living, or if she be dead, to the Mayor, Commonalty and citizens of the City of London, governors of the possessions of the hospitals of King Edward the VI. called Christs, Bridwell and St. Thomas the Apostle and to their successors, full power and authority to sell the said lands to any person in fee simple to the best profit they can, and to divide the money coming from such sale amongst my 6 daughters, or if they be dead, to their issue, £10 only to be reserved to the only use of the treasurer and governors of Christ's Hospital. If the said Mayor and Commonalty will buy them for the use of the said Christ's Hospital, they shall have them £20 "better cheape" than any one else.

I give to the said Mayor and Commonalty the 6 new built tenements (built by me) for 6 poor widows to dwell in rent free: which said tenements are built upon the back of the said late house late in the tenure of the said Sir Adrian Poyninges towards St. Peter's Hill, and stand within the Ward of Castle Baynard, and from henceforth I wish them to be called the "poore widowes Alley or poore widowes Inne"; also my capital house called Woodmonger's Hall which I lately purchased to me and my heirs of Edmund Hilles of London, woodmonger, being directly at the west end of the said "poore widowes Alley," and standing between the "Colledge of the Harroldes on the north side and the 4 tenements given by me to my said son William on the south side, and opening to Pawles wharfe hill on the west side, where the said woodmongers and Sir William Herbert, knight, have their way and passages into the street; also all those my "neather Rowmes" lying within the stone walls under the said house called Woodmongers Hall, now in the occupation of Samuel Pratt "imbrotherer," which I purchased to me and my heirs of George Moore, esq., and his wife; also a little yard or backside leading into a well on the south side of the same containing in breadth from east to west, with the use of the said well with the rest of the tenements and poor widowes [alley] there, with free ingress, egress and regress to and from the same from the said alley to and from St. Peter's Hill: to hold the said 6 tenements immediately after the death of my said wife for the term of 1,000 years, and the residue of the said premises to the only use of the Governors of Christ's Hospital for ever, as by the said testament dated 7 April, 1587, more fully it may appear.

The capital messuage in the parish of St. Benedict and the said messuage late in the tenure of John Goldinge in said parishes of St. Peter and St. Benedict are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, £8. The 4 tenements and piece of waste ground in the said parish of St. Benedict are held of the Queen in free and common socage by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £5. The said yard and ruinous house and the entry in the said parish of St. Benedict are held of the Queen by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, 13s. 4d.

David Smithe died 10 August, 29 Eliz. [1587]; William Smithe is his son and next heir, and was then aged 22 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 217, No. 109.

Andrew Garrett, Gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 26 October, 30 Eliz. [1588], before George Bonde, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Andrew Garrett, gent., by the oath of Robert Dyckenson, Thomas Russell, John Harryson, John Jackson, Thomas Sewell, John Stoddard, William Povye, Roger Holl, John Stevens, William Harvye, William Cooke, William Crowche, Edmund Owen, George Robertes, Stephen Porter, Thomas Wiggs, Thomas Smithe and Hugh Ingram, who say that

Andrew Garrett was seised in his demesne as of fee of 6 messuages lying in the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft; and 4 messuages lying within the close of the late priory of St. Helen within Bisshoppesgate in the parish of St. Helen; and 3 other messuages in the said parish of St. Andrew Undershaft within the City of London: all which said premises are held of the Queen in chief by the 20th part of a knight's fee, and by the yearly rent of 19s. 11d., and are worth per ann., clear, £5.

Andrew Garrett died 31 July last past; Robert Garrett is his son and heir, and was then aged 38 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 218, No. 6.

John Morley, Esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 2 January, 30 Eliz. [1588], before George Bond, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Morley, esq., by the oath of Robert Diconson, Thomas Russell, John Harryson, William Layer, John Jackson, John Stoddard, Robert Elder, William Harvye, William Feake, John Bonde, John Stevens, George Roberts, Thomas Seawell, Stephen Porter, Nicholas Haukesford, Peter Noxton, Thomas Smyth, Thomas Wigges, Richard Trafford and Hugh Ingram, who say that

John Morley and Elizabeth Morley late the wife of the said John were seised, viz., the said Elizabeth in her demesne as of free tenement for the term of her life, and the said John in his demesne as of fee of 1 capital messuage wherein he dwelt which before was called lez Werslers, situate in the street called Aldrichgate alias Aldersgate streete in the parish of St. Buttolph without the gate of the City of London called Aldersgate; a certain yearly rent of 10s. issuing out of certain messuages and tenements called Lambe alley alias Mayden alley, situate in the said parish and street, purchased by the said John Morley and Elizabeth of Anthony Roue and Etheldreda his wife now deceased; 5 tenements and 1 garden now divided into 5 gardens, lying in the said parish of St. Buttolph, abutting between the said capital messuage and the said tenements called Lambe alley, purchased by the said John Morley and Elizabeth of William Necton of London, esq., and Elizabeth his wife: which said 5 tenements and garden were charged by the said William Necton and are still charged with a yearly rent of £12 for 9 years next following the feast of St. Michael, 27 Eliz. [1585]: which said yearly rent the said John Morley confirmed by deed dated 18 March, 28 Eliz. [1586], and charged as well the said capital messuage as the said 5 messuages and other the premises.

The said John Morley was also seised in his demesne as of fee of a yearly rent of 40s. issuing out of a messuage in the tenure of Edward Wotton, citizen and merchant tailor of London, formerly divided into 2 tenements situate in the street called Woodstreet in the parish of St. Alban, as by an indenture dated 7 July, 29 Eliz., made between the said John Morley of the one part and the said Edward Wotton of the other part more fully appears.

So seised, the said John Morley by indenture tripartite dated 9 November, 29 Eliz., made between himself of the one part, John Sotherton 4th baron of the court of Exchequer, Robert Frere (?), Robert Petre, Thomas Crompton and Edmund Downinge of London, esquires of the 2nd part, and John Morley, Edward Morley and William Morley sons of the said John, and Mary, Elizabeth and Magdalene Morley daughters of the said John, of the 3rd part assured the said premises to the use of himself for life; after his decease, to the use of Elizabeth Morley then his wife for life, in recompense of her jointure; after her decease, to the use of the said John Morley the son and the heirs male of his body; for default, to the use of the said Edward Morley and the heirs male of his body; for default, to the use of the said William Morley and the heirs male of his body; for default, to the use of the heirs male of the body of the said John Morley the father; for default, then to the use of the said Mary Morley, and the heirs of her body; for default, to the use of the said Elizabeth Morley, 2nd daughter of the said John Morley; for default, then to the use of the said Magdalen Morley and the heirs of her body; for default, then to the use of the heirs of the body of the said John Morley the son; for default, then to the use of the heirs of the body of the said Edward; for default, to the use of the heirs of the body of the said William Morley; and for default, then to the use of the right heirs of the said John, Edward and William Morley the sons for ever.

The said capital messuage and garden called lez Wreslers, the said 5 tenements and garden and the said yearly rent of 10s. are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, by the — part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, only 10s. until the end of the said term of 9 years, and afterwards they will be worth per ann., clear, £8. The said yearly rent of 40s. issuing out of the tenements in the parish of St. Alban is held of the Queen in free burgage by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s.

John Morley died 14th November last past; John Morley is his son and heir and was aged 15 years and not more on the 20th day of July last past.

The said Elizabeth wife of the said John Morley still survives in the said parish of St. Botolph without Aldersgate.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 218, No. 20.

Robert Trappes, Esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 12 March, 30 Eliz. [1588], before George Bonde, Mayor and escheator, William Necton, gent., feodary, and William Onslowe, gent., Commissioners, after the death of Robert Trappes of London, Esq., by the oath of Robert Dickonson, Thomas Russell, John Harryson, John Jackson, John Stodderd, William Povey, William Harvie, William Feake, John Bond, John Steavens, William Cooke, George Robertes, Stephen Porter, Nicholas Hawkeford, Peter Noxton; Thomas Seawell, Hugh Ingrome and Robert Elder, who say that

Long before the death of the said Robert Trappes, one Robert Trappes his father was seised in his demesne as of fee of 9 messuages lying in the parishes of St. Leonard and St. John Zachary in Foster Lane in the City of London, in the tenures of William Atkinson, Evans Thomas, William Squier, John Dallie, John Lockley and Thomas Rosse; 5 messuages situate in the lane called Saint Brides lane in the parish of St. Bridgett in Fleatstreate, in the tenure of Thomas Cranmer; 5 messuages lying in the parish of St. Laurence in Old Jewry in Catteton and Mylkestreate in the said City, in the several tenures of John Foxe, goldsmith, Henry Wetherid, William Chritlowe, Robert Bate and William Style; 45 messuages in the parish of Christchurch in the said City in the tenure of John Lawne, Francis Greene, Richard Merian, William Mascall, Francis Clearke and Gamelin Pie; 6 messuages and 3 gardens in Whitecrosse streate and Shusshestreate in the parish of St. Giles without Creplegate, without the bars of the City of London, in the tenures of Thomas Nash, John Hewer, Thomas Reade, Richard Lee, Bartholomew Barnes, John Harrison and Henry White; 6 messuages in the tenure of Roger James in Whitecrosse streate and Shusshestreate; the manor of Trendies in Rawreth in co. Essex; 1 messuage and 40 a. of land in Hockeley in co. Essex in the tenure of Thomas Speake, 1 messuage and 140 a. of land called Moones in Essex in the tenures of John Wryght and Lawrence Hollingsworth, in the said county of Essex; 1 messuage and 200 a. of land called Northpittes in Canondon in the tenure of John Locke; 1 rent charge of £20, issuing out of the manor of Alberough in the said county, 1 water mill in Lewsham in co. Kent; 1 tenement there called le Mill Tenement; 10 a. of land, 6 a. of meadow there in the tenure of Thomas Stephens and Edmund Arthure, the manor of Barmondsey with the fishing and fowling in the waters and marshes of Barmondsay and Reddreth Marshes in the said county in the several tenures of divers tenants by indenture; 60 a. of land in Barmondsay in the tenure of William Peake in co. Surrey; and the manor of Deptforde Strand in Camerwell and Reddreth in said counties of Kent and Surrey, now in the tenures of Margery Reade, widow, and Christopher Horwoode.

And so seised he took to wife Dorothea Browne late his wife.

And afterwards the said Robert Trappes the father died at London, and the said Dorothea survived him.

All the said premises then descended to the said Robert Trappes named in the said commission, as his son and heir, and he being thereof seised assigned to William Atkinson and Dorothy his wife for her dower happening out of the lands and tenements of the said Robert the father, the said 9 messuages in the said parishes of St. Leonard and St. John Zachary in Foster Lane, the said 8 messuages with the Slaughterhowses in the parish of Christchurch, the said 45 messuages in said parish of Christchurch, the said 60 a. of land and meadow in Barmondsey, the said manor of Trendeis and the premises in Asheldon called Moones; and the 3rd part of all the said lands and tenements in Lewsham and Deptford Strand, by pretext whereof the said William and Dorothy entered into the said premises and were and still are thereof seised in their demesne as of free tenement for the term of the life of the said Dorothy in her right: which said Dorothy still survives at Bansted in co. Surrey; the reversion thereof belonging to the said Robert Trappes and his heirs.

So seised, the said Robert Trappes made his will as follows [here given in English]: I give the disposition of all my goods, money, jewels, &c. to my wife Katherine Trappes.

To my sister Dorothy Trappes I give 200 marks, at her day of marriage or age of 21.

I give to each of my brethren Roger, Rowland, Giles, William, Ralph, Andrew, and Richard £10 yearly.

Touching the disposition of my lands I will that where Dorothy Atkinson "my naturall Mother" holds certain lands of my assignment in recompence of her dower, the reversion thereof belonging to me and my heirs for ever; and whereas in consideration of our marriage I assured to Katherine my wife for life certain lands in satisfaction of her dower, the reversion thereof likewise being to me and my heirs; and whereas I am indebted to divers persons and have given divers legacies, I make my will as follows: I leave to descend to my son and heir apparent Robert Trappes all my lands and tenements in Whitecrossestreate in the several tenures of Roger James, . . . Reade, John Hewer, . . . Harrison, . . . Barnes, and . . . Nashe, and all my lands and hereditaments in the tenure of . . . Peake in co. Essex, and a yearly rent of £20 issuing out of certain lands in Alberough Hatch in the said county, being a full third part of all my lands, but if the said Katherine refuse to stand to the said lands then I assign to her my lands and tenements in the tenure of John Locke in co. Essex, my manor of Barmondsey, all my lands and tenements in Barmondsey and Redderyffe, and the advowson of the parish Church of Barmondsey, all my lands, &c., late in the tenure of Christopher Horwoode in co. Surrey, all his lands, &c., at Lewsham, and all his lands, &c., in the parish of Christchurch in the City of London in the tenures of . . . Lawne, Francis Grene and . . . Clearke. The residue of my lands I give to my uncles Henry and William Kylligrewe, esquires, my father-in-law Thomas Owen, and to William Atkinson and William Onslowe, esquires, to perform my will. If my said son Robert die in his minority, then I give my lands, &c., to my said uncles, father-in-law and friends to pay the legacy to my said sister Dorothy and to perform my will. When my said son attains the age of 21, the said lands shall remain to him.

I give to the poor of the parish where I shall die £3, and to the poor of Barmondsey £3.

To my cousin Mistress Wyne 40s.

If my brother Rowland Trappes shall be cast in arrearages in account to his mistress or Mr. Burnell, I give towards his discharge £40.

I make Katherine my wife exrĩx and my said uncles and friends supervisors.

The said 45 messuages in the parish of St. Nicholas in le Fleshshambles now in that of Christchurch are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not. The 8 messuages with le slaughterhowses in the parish of Christchurch assigned to the said Dorothy are worth nothing during the lifetime of the said Dorothy, but afterwards they will be worth £15 per ann. The residue of the premises in the said parish of Christchurch are worth per ann., clear, £15. The premisses in the parish of St. Leonard and St. Johns Zachary are held of the Queen in free burgage, and during the life of the said Dorothy they are worth nothing, but afterwards they will be worth per ann., clear, £26 13s. 4d. The messuages in Milkestreate and Catteton and Fleetstreate are held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £33 4s. 8d. The premises in Shusstreate and Whitecrossestreate in said parish of St. Giles are held of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London, as of their manor of Fynesburie by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £36. The manor of Trendies in co. Essex, the premises in Hockley in the said county, the lands in Ashendon called Moones in the said county and the said marsh called Northpittes in Canondon are held of Henry Lord Honesdon, chamberlain of the Queen, as of his manor of Rawreth by fealty and suit at the court of his said manor every 3 weeks: the said manor called Treindeis is worth nothing during the life of the said Dorothy, and after her death it will be worth per ann., clear, £6: the said lands in Hockley are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d.: the said lands called Moones are worth nothing during the life of the said Dorothy, and afterwards they will be worth per ann., clear, £5. The marsh called Northpittes is worth per ann., clear, £10. The water mill and other the premises in Lewsam are held of the Queen as of her honor of Eltam, and are worth per ann., clear, 40s. during the life of the said Dorothy, and after her decease £4. The manor of Barmondsey with the fishing and fowling in the waters and marshes of Barmondsey and Redereth Marshes and the lands in the several tenures of divers free tenants, and other the lands in Barmondsey now in the tenure of William Peake are held of the Queen by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not: the said manor and lands are worth per ann., clear, £10. The said 60 a. of land in Barmondsey and Redereth in the tenure of the said William Peake are worth nothing during the life of the said Dorothy, and afterwards they will be worth per ann., clear, £5. The manor of Deptford Strond and all the premises in Deptford, Camerwell and Redreth late in the tenure of Margery Reade and Christopher Horwoode are held of the Queen as of her honor of Eltam by fealty and suit at court, and are worth per ann., clear, during the life of the said Dorothy £8, and after her death £12.

Robert Trappes died 27 April last past, Robert Trappes is his son and next heir, and was aged 6 years on the nth day of June last past.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 218, No. 46.

Edward Earl of Rutland.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 3 July, 30 Eliz. [1588], before George Bonde, knight, Mayor of the City of London, John Sotherton, esq., one of the Barons of the Exchequer, William Fletewode, esq., serjeant at law and recorder of the said City, and William Necton, gent., feodary of the said City, commissioners, after the death of Edward Earl of Rutland, by vertue of a commission to them and Henry Graye, knight, William Cooke, esq., and Jeronimus Hawley, esq., directed, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Roger Hole, Thomas Sawell, John Harrison, William Harvey, John Bonde, John Jackson, John Stoddard, William Feake, William Crowche, William Cooke, George Robertes, Hugh Ingram, Nicholas Haukesford, Peter Noxton and Thomas Wigges, who say that

Edward late Earl of Rutland on the 8th day of January, 17 Eliz. [1575] was seised in his demesne as of fee of the manors of Warter, Seyton, Rose, Landrick, Nessemore, Storthwayte with Melborne and Snaylesworth in co. York; the late priory of Walter; 300 messuages, 100 tofts, 10 mills, 10 dovecotes, 200 gardens, 200 orchards, 3,000 a. of land, 1,000 a. of meadow, 2,000 a. of pasture, 1,000 a. of wood, 1,000 a. of furze and wood, 500 a. of marsh, 300 a, of moor and 10 librates of rent in Warter, Seyton, Rose, Landrick, Nessemore, Storthwayte, Melborne, Snaylesworth, Middleton, Thornton, Ripplingcotes, Bisshopsburton, Lownd and West Elley; the rectories of Warter and Lownd, the manor of Waltamstowe Tonye in co. Essex; 60 messuages, 60 cottages, 30 tofts, 60 gardens, 60 orchards, 1,000 a. of land, 500 a. of meadow, 1,000 a. of pasture, 200 a. of wood, 200 a. of furze and heath, 200 a. of marsh, 100 a. of moor and 40s. rent in Walthamstowe Tony and common of pasture there, in co. Essex; and 50 messuages, 10 gardens, 30 shops and 20 cellars in London.

So seised, the said Earl by indenture dated on the said 8th day of January, made between himself of the one part, and Dame Juliana Holcroft of Vale Ryall in co. Chester, widow, of the other part, in consideration of the sum of £1,000 to him paid by the said Dame Juliana, and in consideration of a certain grant made by her of a certain estate or term of years in the rectory of Fordsham in co. Chester, and in consideration of a marriage then before had between the said Earl and the Lady Isabella then Countess of Rutland wife of the said Earl and daughter of the said Dame Juliana—agreed that he before the 1st day of June then next following would convey all the said premises by fine or otherwise to the said Lady Isabella, Dame Juliana Holcrofte, Thomas Manners, knight, John Manners, esq., Gilbert Gerrard, esq., then the Queen's Attorney General, Robert Marckam, esq., and Thomas Holcroft, esq., brother of the said Countess and their heirs for ever, to the use of the said Earl and Countess and the heirs of the said Earl for ever.

Afterwards, viz., in Easter term, 17 Eliz. (before the said 1st day of July) the said Dame Juliana and others by writ de ingressu super disseisinam in le post recovered the said premises against the said Earl to the use of the said Earl and Countess and the heirs of the said Earl for ever: by pretext whereof and by force of the Statute of Uses the said Earl and Countess were thereof seised, and the said Isabella still is thereof seised as of free tenement for the term of her life.

The said Earl was likewise seised in his demesne as of fee or fee tail of the reversion of 1 mansion or messuage called le new Eagle, the reversion of the site and demesne lands of the preceptory called le Eagle in co. Lincoln; the reversion of the manors of Wragbie and Melton Roos in co. Lincoln; and of divers lands, tenements and hereditaments in Wragbie, Pannton, Este Terrington, West Terrington, Hardwick, Melton Roos, Glamsford, Brigg or elsewhere in the said County of Lincoln, then used and had as parts of the said manors of Melton Roos and Wragbie, immediately expectant on the death of the Lady Bridget Countess of Bedford mother-in-law (socr') of the said late Earl, viz., late the wife of Henry late Earl of Rutland father of the said Earl named in the writ, and whereof the said Countess of Bedford was then seised in her demesne as of freehold for the term of her life, and agreed with the said Dame Juliana that he within 6 months then next following would make to the said Dame Juliana and others by fine or otherwise a good and sufficient estate in the law in fee simple of the reversion of the said premises in co. Lincoln: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Earl and Countess and the heirs of the said Earl for ever.

A fine was levied at Westminster in the Morrow of the Ascension of Our Lord, 17 Eliz., between the said Dame Juliana Holcrofte, Thomas Manners, John Manners, Gilbert Gerrard, Thomas Holcrofte and Robert Marcham, plts., and the said late Earl, deforciant, of the same reversion, whereby the said Earl acknowledged the said premises to be the right of the said Dame Juliana, as those which she and the said Thomas and others had of his gift, and the same remised to them and the heirs of the said Dame Juliana for ever: which said fine was levied to the uses specified in the said indenture.

The said Bridget Countess of Bedford still survives at Cheyney in co. Hartford.

Theophilus Adams of London, gent., and Robert Adams of London, grocer, were seised in their demesne as of fee of the manors of Highehall and Lawehall alias Walthamstowe Tony and Walthamstow Fraunces in the said county of Essex; 2 woods, one whereof is called Hale Brynck and the other Bakers marche, containing 4 a., parcel of the lands and possessions lately called Copertners lands; and divers lands and tenements in Boynton in the said county of York, late parcel of the possessions of Leonard Dacres, esq., attainted of high treason, and so seised, by indenture dated 14 Oct., 25 Eliz. [1583] made between themselves of the one part, and the said Earl and Countess Isabella of the other part, for a certain sum of money to them paid by the said Earl, sold to the said Earl and Countess the said premises and the reversion thereof: to hold to them and the heirs of the said Earl for ever, in as ample manner as the said Theophilus and Robert held the same of the gift of the Queen by her Letters Patent dated at Wheldhall in co. Essex, 27 July, 25 Eliz., to be held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich in co. Kent by fealty only, in free and common socage and not in chief or by knight's service, and paying yearly for the said premises in Essex 26s. 8d., and for those in Boynton 6s. 8d. By pretext whereof the said Earl and Countess were thereof seised to them and the heirs of the said Earl for ever.

The said Earl was seised as of fee and right of the reversion or remainder of the manor of Eykering in co. Nottingham, and 20 messuages, 20 cottages, 10 tofts, 20 dovecotes, 20 gardens, 20 orchards, 500 a. of land, 300 a. of pasture, 200 a. of wood, 300 a. of furze and heath, 300 a. of moor and 40s. rent in Eckring expectant on the death of the said Countess Bridget, who then held and still holds the same for her life; and so seised by other indentures dated 10 March, 21 Eliz. [1579] made between himself of the one part, and the said Gilbert Gerrard and Thomas Holcrofte of the other part, in augmentation of the jointure of the said Countess Isabella and for divers other considerations agreed that he before the last day of Trinity Term then next following would sufficiently assure by fine or otherwise the said reversion to the said Gilbert and Thomas: after which said fine and assurance the said Gilbert and Thomas should be seised of the said reversion to the use of the said Earl and Countess Isabella and the heirs of the said Earl for ever.

Afterwards, viz., in the Octaves of St. Michael, 21 Eliz., a fine was levied between the said Gilbert Gerrard and Thomas Holcrofte, plts. and the said Earl, deforciant, of the said manor and premises in Eckering, whereby the said Earl acknowledged the said premises to be the right of the said Gilbert, and granted that the said premises which Francis then Earl of Bedford and Bridget his wife then held for the life of the said Bridget of the inheritance of the said Earl, and which after her decease should revert to the said Earl and his heirs, should wholly remain to the said Gilbert and Thomas and the heirs of the said Gilbert: which said fine was levied to the uses specified in the said last recited indenture.

The said Francis Earl of Bedford afterwards died, and the said Lady Bridget is still thereof seised as of free tenement for her life, the reversion thereof belonging to the said Lady Isabella for her life.

The said Edward late Earl of Rutland on the last day of February, 25 Eliz., made a certain deed as follows [here given in full in English]: whereas I by fine and other conveyances have assured, inter alia, the manors of Fryston and Butterwick in co. Lincoln, and all other my lands and tenements in Fryston, Rakethorpe, Haltoft, Braydethorpe, Butterwick and Outhouse in the said county to the uses expressed in an indenture dated 29 March, 21 Eliz., made between myself of the one part, and William Lord Burleigh, High Treasurer of England, Thomas Earl of Sussex, Henry Earl of Huntington and others [not named] of the other part, wherein is contained a proviso that it should be lawful for me at any time to alter any uses therein contained, and to appoint the use of the said premises to the persons therein nominated or to any other persons whatsoever in fee simple, fee tail or term of life or years at my free will: I now hereby limit the use of the said premises to the said Lady Isabella my wife for her life if she survive me and the said Lady Bridget now Countess of Bedford, provided always that if my said wife do not permit the persons to whom I shall have demised the said premises to occupy the same without expulsion or suit, then, after such eviction I limit the use of the said premises to the heirs male of my body; for default, then to the heirs male of the body of Thomas late Earl of Rutland my grandfather; for default, to the heirs of the body of Sir Robert Manners, knight, grandfather of the said Thomas late Earl of Rutland; and for default, then to my heirs. By pretext whereof the said Lady Isabella is now seised as of free tenement for the term of her life of the reversion of the said premises in co. Lincoln, expectant upon the estate of the said Lady Bridget who now holds the same for life.

The said Edward late Earl of Rutland being seised of the said premises, and moreover being seised in his demesne as of fee of the manors of Kilvyngton, Thornbraugh, Midleton and Semer Lynton on the Ouse, the rectories of Warter and Lund in co. York, and divers manors, lands, tenements, rents, services and hereditaments in Storthwayte, Melbourne, Llandricknes upon the moor of Storthwayte and Melbourne, Seton, Roos Seton, Warter, Warterholme in Spalding, Meltingby, Keswick, Ferreby, Swanland, Westlebye, Alborough, Chery Burton, Busshopsburton, Newton Garth, Lound, Barton, Levenyng, Westlowe, Acclome, Kelvington, Thornbarche, Midleton, Wheldrake, Marcflete, Ulram, Barmsburton, Fossam, Oldburgh, Kingburgh, Wydernewick Ryall, Attwick, Wassand, Benyngham, Grymston, Garton in Holdernes, Monckwick, Tonstall, Waxam, Hompten, Hornesey, Ottringham, Ederwick, Estnewton, Pale Heydon, Seymer, Boynton, Homanby and Halykeld in the said county of York, the reversion of the fee farm and rent of the City of York, the reversion of the manor of Rosse in Holderness, and divers lands and tenements in Rosse expectant on the death of John late Earl of Rutland, the reversion of the manor of Turnam Hall and Cliff expectant on the death of Thomas Manners, knight, and Theodocia his wife; the manor and rectory of Surfleete, and divers lands and tenements in Surflete, Gosberton and Maynfleete and elsewhere and the manor of Gouerby in co. Lincoln—made his will 20 Nov., 1583, as follows [here given in English]: I will that my body be buried in the parish Church of Bottesford in co. Leicester where other of my ancestors lie buried, and that my executors shall spend £100 at the least upon my tomb.

I make my brother John Manners, esq., exõr., provided that he being in England at the time of my death do within 3 months enter into bond in the sum of £10,000 to the supervisors of this my will to satisfy all my legacies and debts.

I give to my supervisors for the performance of this my will 2 full parts of all the premises mentioned in an indenture (mentioned above) dated 29 March, 21 Eliz., and made between myself and Lord Burleigh and others, and of all other my manors, lands and tenements within the realm of England: to hold to my said supervisors to the use of my exõrs. for the performance of this my will for 7 years. If the heir of my body be within age at the end of the said term, then I appoint 2 parts of all the manors, lands, &c., which ought to descend to such heir to my said supervisors to the said uses until the said heir ought to have livery out of the Queen's hands. If Elizabeth my eldest daughter be of the age of 16 years at my death, or attain that age during the said term, then so much of the said use of all the said premises as is bequeathed to the said Elizabeth and the heirs of her body as is hereafter mentioned shall cease, and such manors, lands, &c., shall go to the said Elizabeth and the heirs of her body. If my said brother will not enter into such bond, I make my 3 uncles John Manners, Roger Manners and Sir Thomas Manners, knight, and my cousin George Chaworth, esq., my exõrs., and if I have no heir male of my body my daughter Elizabeth shall hold for the life of my said brother all the premises specified in the said indenture, but if she die during the life of my said brother then my said last named exõrs. shall enjoy the same during the life of my said brother. After his death the same shall remain to such person to whom the same are limited by the said indenture.

I give to my wife all my term of years in the rectory and parsonage of Fordsam alias Frodsham in co. Chester which I have, by grant made by the said Dame Julian Holcrofte.

I give to Mary Manners daughter of the said Sir Thomas Manners 400 marks, viz., 200 marks on the day of her marriage, and 200 marks within 6 months of her marriage, provided she marry a gentleman having 300 marks land of inheritance in possession, or such a person as shall be heir apparent to a gentleman having inheritance to the yearly value of 300 marks. The residue of my goods I give to my exõrs to perform my will, and they shall be answerable to the said heir male of the body of the said Thomas late Earl of Rutland at his age of 21. If the heirs male of my body do not yearly pay to the said Sir Thomas Manners my uncle a yearly rent of £80 for his life then I give to the said Sir Thomas so much land, parcel of my manor of Ryvalx in co. York as is now let for £100. Whereas the style and dignity of my barony of Roos for want of heirs male of my body is to descend to my heir general because one of my ancestors whose heir I am married the heir of the Lord Roos by virtue whereof my ancestors enjoyed the title and dignity of the Lord Roos as descended on the part of the mother, and have so continued until their creation to the Earldom of Rutland: therefore because I suppose the style and dignity of the said barony not to be utterly extinguished but to remain suspended because the earldom of Rutland is entailed to the heirs male of Thomas late Earl of Rutland my grandfather, and the said barony is descendable to the heirs general: and whereas also I have assured by fine and otherwise divers of my honors, castles, manors, lands, &c., to the use of myself and the heirs male of my body, and for default, to the use of the heirs male of the body of the said Thomas my grandfather, and for default, to the use of the heirs of the body of the said Sir Robert Manners, knight, grandfather of the said Thomas, and for default, to the use of my right heirs upon certain conditions declared in the said indenture of 29th March; and whereas I have since purchased divers messuages, lands, &c., lying within the manors, &c., mentioned in the said indenture which I desire may be conveyed in like manner, do not only give all the said premises so purchased, but also the manor of Snaylesworthe in co. York and the parsonage and rectory of Hoose in co. Leicester and the manor of Gonnerby and the portions of tithes in Ropesly, Hungarton and Wyvell in co. Lincoln—to the heirs male of my body; for default, to the heirs male of the body of the said Thomas late Earl of Rutland; for default, to the heirs of the body of the said Sir Robert Manners; and for default, to my right heirs upon the same conditions expressed in the said indenture.

I give to the said Elizabeth my daughter, if I have no heir male of my body my manors and lordships of Storthwayte in Melborne, Llandricknes upon the moor of Storthwayte and Melborne, Seyton Roose, Seyton Warter, Warter, Dighton Ingmanthorpe, Kilvyngton Thornbraugh, Mydleton, Rose in Holdernes and Semerlynton upon Ouse, Tarram Hall and Cliff in co. York, the rectories and parsonages of Warter and Lunde in the said County, and all other my manors, messuages, lands, &c., in Storthwayte, Melborne, Landricknes, Seyton Roose, Seyton Warter, Warter, Home in Spalding More, Meltingby, Risewik, Fereby, Swanland, Westleby, Alborough, Chery Burton, Busshopsburton, Newton, Garth, Lund, Barton, Levenyng, Westowe, Acclome, Dighton Ingmanthorpe, Kelvington, Thornbaugh, Midleton, Wheldrake, Rose in Holdernes, Marefleete, Ulram, Barnesburton, Fossham, Oldborough, Kingborough, Wydernewik, Riall, Attwick, Wassand, Bennyngham, Grymston, Garton in Holdernes, Mountewike Tonstall, Waxham, Hornpton, Hornesey, Ottringham, Edderwick, Est newton, Paleheydon, Seymer, Boynton, Homanby and Hallykeld in co. York, the fee farm and rent of the City of York, my manor and parsonage of Surfleete and all my lands and tenements in Surfleete, Gosborton and Waynflete in co. Lincoln, my manor of Walthamstowe Tony alias Highehall in co. Essex, and all my messuages, lands and tenements in co. Essex, and all that messuage and tenement lying in St. Andrews Undershaft in the City of London commonly called Barkeleyes Inne, and the reversion of all the said premises: to hold after the said terms limited to my supervisors to the said Elizabeth and the heirs of her body; and for default, to remain to my right heirs for ever, provided that if the said Elizabeth marry any person other than a baron or heir apparent of a baron or one above the degree of a baron or the heir apparent of such a one, or other than a gentleman having lands of inheritance of the yearly value of £1,000, or the heir apparent of such gentleman, or if the said Elizabeth by herself or jointly with her husband shall attempt to levy any fine or suffer any recovery of the said premises, then the said manors, lands, &c., shall remain to my nephews William, Francis and Thomas Courtnay sons of Sir William Courtnay, knight, and my sister Elizabeth his wife and their heirs during the life of my said daughter Elizabeth, after her decease the same nevertheless to remain to the heirs of her body; and for default, to my right heirs for ever.

I give to the said Elizabeth if I have any heir male of my body when she shall attain the age of 18 £4000, provided she marry such a person as is above mentioned. My said executors to pay to her until she accomplish the said age of 18 £200 yearly towards her maintenance and finding.

Whereas I by deed dated the last day of February, 25 Eliz., have appointed that the manors of Fryston and Butterwick and all my lands, &c., in Friston, Rakethorpe, Haltoft, Braydethorpe, Butterwick and Outhouse in co. Lincoln immediately after the deaths of myself and the said Dame Bridget shall remain to the said Lady Isabell my wife for life in augmentation of her jointure: I now will that if my said wife or any of the tenants of the said premises shall be disturbed by the heirs male of my body, that as often as such disturbance shall happen my said wife shall have and enjoy the castle of Helmesley in co. York, and my manors of Helmesley, Haram and Sproxton in the said county, for so long as my said supervisors shall appoint.

In order that all my debts and legacies may be paid, and if the said 2 parts of all my manors, lands, &c., be not enjoyed by my supervisors in the manner above appointed I give to them my manors of Ravensthorpe, Bolteby and Thirleby in co. York, they to make sale thereof for the payment of my debts and legacies, and the performance of this my will, and so much thereof as shall be left unsold shall be by them assured to the heirs male of my body.

I give to Sir Robert Constable, knight, the use of 2 closes which he now occupies, being parcel of the demesnes of the castle of Newark, called Apleton and the great close during my term therein without paying any rent for the same; also an annuity of £30 issuing out of the said demesnes.

I will that my house and family shall be kept together for 1 month after my death.

My said wife to have the use of my lease and term of years of the castle and demesnes of Newark, and the parsonage of Newark, except the said 2 closes during the term of years yet to come in the same, she paying the said annuity and £20 to Edward and Thomas Leverott. If my said wife marry again, I give the same to the said Elizabeth my daughter.

And whereas I am possessed of several leases for several terms of years of the demesnes of the manor of Benyngton in co. Lincoln, and of the mills there, and of the rectories and parsonages of Bareston and Plungar in co. Leicester, and 1 portion of tithes in Botesford in co. Leicester and the lands and tenements in Wollesthorpe in co. Lincoln, parcel of the inheritance of Thomas Sandes, esq., and the manor of Osewalby Soken in the said county of Nottingham, I now will that my first issue male shall have all the said premises for the said several terms of years; after his decease, the next issue male of the said issue shall enjoy the same, and so from issue male to issue male, but none of them to have power to alienate the whole interests.

I make Sir Thomas Bromley, knight, Lord Chancellor of England, Sir William Cicill, knight, Lord Burghley, Lord High Treasurer of England, Sir Francis Walsingham, knight, Principal Secretary to her Majesty, Sir Walter Mildemay, knight, Chancellor of her Majesty's Exchequer, Sir Christopher Wraye, knight, Lord Chief Justice of England, Sir Gilbert Gerrard, knight, Master of the Rolls, Sir Edmond Anderson, knight, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, Sir Phillip Sidney, knt., and Thomas Egerton, esq., the Queen's Solicitor, supervisors.

The said Earl was likewise seised in his demesne as of fee of the manor and priory of Newsteed in co. Lincoln, and 1 capital messuage called Crokehowse in . . . in co. Northumberland, and divers lands, tenements, &c., to the said messuage belonging, now or late in the tenure of Richard Collingwood; 1 other messuage in Uplande in said co. Northumberland and divers lands, &c., therewith used, now or late in the tenure of Richard . . . and 1 other messuage in Woller in the said county late in the tenure of L. [sic] Kyvelles, widow, late the wife of Francis Kyvelles; divers lands and tenements in Shotton in the said county adjoining the confines of Scotland, and now lying waste for default of tenants; divers lands and tenements in Bamborough in the said county, now or late in the tenure of John Foster, knight; 13 messuages and 1 carucate of land called oxganges of land in Pottowe in co. York; 1 messuage in Newarke in co. Nottingham; 1 messuage in London in the parish of St. Andrew in the Wardrobe, now or late in the tenure of . . . Toplyff; and the advowson of the moiety of the Church of St. Andrew in the Wardrobe.

Richard Cholmeley, knight, and Robert Roosse, esq., were seised in their demesne as of fee of the manors of Churchedighton alias Kirkedighton and Ingmanthorpe in co. York; and of 60 messuages, 10 tofts, 1 windmill, 60 gardens, 2000 a. of land, 300 a. of meadow, 3000 a. of pasture, 2500 a. of wood, 2000 a. of furze and heath and £5 of rent in Churchedighton, Ingmanthorpe and Newson in co. York; the advowson of the Church of Churchdighton and view of frank pledge of Churchdighton.

They being so seised, a fine was levied at Westminster in Michaelmas Term, 4 Eliz. [1561–2], between Henry Earl of Westmoreland, George Earl of Shrewsbury, Thomas Lord Wharton, Thomas Gargrave, knight, Nicholas Fairefax, knight, Marmaduke Constable, knight, John Manners, Roger Manners, Thomas Manners, Oliver Manners, Henry Savell, Christopher Crofte, Thomas Husey, Anthony Thorolde, esq., John Sidenham, William Segrave and Thomas Conyers, plts., and the said Richard Cholmeley and Robert Roosse, deforciants, whereby the said Richard and Robert acknowledged the said premises to be the right of the said Henry Earl of Westmoreland, as those which he and the others abovenamed had of their gift, and the same remised to the said Earl of Westmoreland and the others abovenamed and to the heirs of the said Earl for ever: which said fine was levied to the use of the said Robert Roosse for his life; after his decease, if he should happen to have a lawful wife, then as to said manor of Churchdighton to the use of such wife in the name of her jointure. If the said Robert have issue male and a daughter or daughters and no wife, then as to all the said premises to the use of the said daughters until each of them shall have received the sum of 200 marks. After such sums have been levied, then to the use of the first-born son of the body of the said Robert, and the heirs male of the body of such first-born son; for default, then to the use of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th son of the body of the said Robert Roose and the heirs male of each of them; and for default, to the use of the said Edward Earl of Rutland and his heirs for ever. If the said Robert should die having a wife and issue male and female then as to all the said premises, except the said manor of Churchedighton and the reversion of the said manor immediately after the death of the said Robert to the use of the said daughters until the said several sums of 200 marks have been levied, afterwards to the use of the said 1st to the 10th son of said Robert and the heirs male of each of them and then to the use of the said Edward late Earl of Rutland and his heirs for ever. And if the said Robert should die having a wife and daughters and no son, then as to all the said premises and said reversion to the use of such daughters until each of them shall have taken the sum of 500 marks, and afterwards to the use of the said Edward Earl of Rutland and his heirs for ever. If the said Robert die having a wife, son or daughter then immediately after his death and before the raising of any such sums to the use of the executors of the said Robert until they have raised £300 towards the performance of his will, and afterwards to the use of the said daughters; but if he should die without wife, son or daughter, then to the use of the said executors until they have raised £400 to perform the said will, and immediately afterwards to the use of the said Edward late Earl of Rutland and his heirs for ever, as by certain indentures dated 30th April, 3 Eliz. [1561] made between the said Richard Cholmeley and Robert Roosse of the one part and Henry late Earl of Rutland of the other part more fully appears.

Afterwards, in the 23rd year of Eliz. the said Robert Roosse made his will, and appointed the said John Manners late Earl of Rutland and . . . Esq., to be his executors, and on the 22nd day of June, 25 Eliz. [1583] the said Robert died at Helmesley, leaving Frances his wife now the wife of Charles Clappam of Helmesley in co. York, gent., and an only daughter called Bridget, and no son. By pretext of the premises the said Frances entered into the said manor of Churchedighton and was and still is thereof seised in her demesne as of free tenement for term of her life. The said 500 marks were never raised to the use of the said Bridget.

The said Edward late Earl of Rutland died seised of the said manor of Ingmanthorpe and of the remainder of Churchdighton in his demesne as of fee, viz., to him and his heirs for ever.

The said Frances and Bridget still survive at Helmesley.

The said Earl long before his death was seised as of fee and right of the reversion of the manors of Turneham Hall and Clyff in co. York and of the said messuages, lands, &c., which are reputed to be parcel thereof, expectant on the death of Thomas Manners, knight; and so seised, by charter dated 22 May, 25 Eliz., granted the same to Theodocia Manners then the wife of the said Thomas for her life.

The said Earl was also seised in his demesne as of fee of all that grange, lands and tenements in co. York called Moreton Grange.

The manors, priory and rectories of Warter, Warter Seyton, Seyton Roosse and other the premises in Warter, Warter Seyton and Seyton Roosse together with the said rectory of Lound and other the premises in Holme in Spaldingmore, Fereby, Mettingby, Beswick, Swanlande, Westleley, Alborough, Cherryburton, Bisshopsburton, Midleton, Thornton, Kipplingcote, Weldrake and Newton Garth are held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of 1 knight's fee, and by the yearly rent of £121 1s. 6d., and are worth per ann., clear, £25. The mano of Seyton Roosse and other the premises there are held of the heirs of the Earl of March by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear £12 12s. The manor of Storthwaite with Melbourne and other the premises in Storthwaite, Melborne and Landrick on the moor of Storthwaite are held of the said heirs of the Earl of March by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £32 17s. 5½d. The manor of Snaylesworth and other the premises there are held of . . . and are worth per ann., clear, 100s. The manor of Walthamstowe Tony is held of the Queen by the service of the 20th part of 1 knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, £30. The messuage and premises in London are held of the Queen in chief, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, 59s. 8d. The manors of Highehall and Lowehall and the woods called Haylebrinck and Bakers Marshe and the premises in Boynton are held of the Queen as of her manor of Eastgreenwich in co. Kent, by fealty only, in free and common socage and not in chief or by knight's service, and paying by the year to the said Queen for the said manors of Highehall and Lowehall 26s. 8d., and for the said premises in Boynton 6s. 8d., and they are worth per ann., clear, £10. The manor of Eagle and the site of the late priory of Eagle, together with the preceptory of Eagle and other the premises in Egle, Whisby and Haddington are held of the Queen in chief by the 15th part of a knight's fee and the yearly rent of £3 3s. 6d., and are worth per ann., clear, £17 12s. The manor of Wragbie and the advowson of the Churches of Esterrington and Haughton and other the premises in Wragbie, Paunton, Esterrington, Westerrington and Hardwick in co. Lincoln are held of the Queen by knight's service in chief by the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £14 18s. 4d. Of whom or by what service the manor of Melton Roos and other the premises in Melton Roosse and Glameford Briggs in co. Lincoln are held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £20 4s. 6d. Of whom the manor of Eykring and other the premises there are held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £16 9s. 4d. The manor of Friston and Butterwick and other the premises in Friston, Rakethorpe, Haltofte, Braidsthorp, Outhowse and Butterwick in co. Lincoln are held of the heirs of Walter Bedwarden by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and they are worth per ann., clear, £26 13s. 4d. Of whom the manor of Turneham Hall with Clyff is held the jurors know not: it is worth per ann., clear, £40. Of whom the manor of Linton upon Owse and other the premises there are held is not known: they are worth per ann., clear, £50. Of whom the manor of Roose in Holdernes is held is not known: it is worth per ann., £40. The manor and rectory of Surfleete and other the premises in Surfleete are held [sic] and are worth per ann., clear, £20. The premises in Barton, Levington and Acclam are worth per ann., clear, £3 13s. The manor of Kilvyngton and Thornebargh are held . . . and are worth per ann. clear, £12. The manor of Seymor is worth per ann., clear, £13. The premises in Hallikeld are worth per ann., clear, 38s. 8d. The premises in Homanby are worth per ann., clear, £3 10s. The manor of Midleton is worth per ann., clear, 40s. The messuage and premises in London and the advowson of the moiety of the Church of St. Andrew in le Wardrobe are held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 500th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, 5s. The manor and priory of Newsted are worth per ann., clear, £15. Of whom the premises in Pottowe are held is not known: they are worth per ann., clear, 35s. The grange and lands, &c., called Moreton Grange are held of . . . and are worth per ann., clear, 30s. Of whom the manor of Ingmanthorpe and other the premises there are held is not known: they are worth per ann., clear, £16. Of whom the manor of Churchdighton with the advowson of the Church there and other the premises in Churchdighton and Newson is not known: they are worth per ann., clear, £10. Of whom the residue of the premises is held is not known: it is worth per ann., clear, 20s.

Edward Earl of Rutland died in London 14 April, 29 Eliz. [1587] without issue male; Elizabeth now Lady Roosse is his daughter and sole heir, and was then aged 11 years, 3 months and 27 days: she still survives in London.

The said Isabella late the wife of the said Earl, the said Bridget now Countess of Bedford and formerly wife of the said Henry late Earl of Rutland father of the said Edward the late Earl, and the said Thomas Manners, knight, and Thcodocia his wife still survive, viz., the said Isabella at London, the said Bridget at Cheyney, and the said Thomas and Theodocia at Nottingham.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 218, No. 52.

Winifred Cowper.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7 May, 30 Eliz. [1588], before George Bonde, knight, Mayor and escheator, to enquire concerning the idiotcy of Winifred one of the daughters and co-heirs of William Cowper, deceased, late of the said City, haberdasher, by the oath of Robert Dickinson, Thomas Russell, Roger Hole, Thomas Sewell, John Harrison, William Layer, John Bonde, John Stoddard, Robert Elder, William Crowche, Edmund Owen, William Cooke, William Povey, George Robertes, Hugh Ingram and Thomas Wigges, who say that

The said Winifred Cowper is an idiot, and not fit to govern herself or her manors, messuages, lands, &c., and has been an idiot since her birth and has not enjoyed lucid intervals.

The said William Cowper father of the said Winifred was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage and certain lands, meadows and pastures thereto belonging lying in Arlesey in co. Bedford, and so seised, by indenture made between himself of the one part and John Pelsant citizen and grocer of London and Edmund Brasey citizen and clothworker of London of the other part, in consideration of a marriage to be had between the said William Cowper and Joan Allen, widow, and for a competent jointure to be assured to the said Joan, agreed with the said John Pelsant and Edmund Brasey that he and his heirs would henceforth be seised of the said premises to the use of himself and his heirs until the said marriage should be solemnised, and afterwards to the use of the said William and Joan and the heirs of the said William for ever, as by the said indenture dated 18 June, 28 Eliz. [1586], more fully appears.

Shortly afterwards the said William Cowper married the said Joan, and died on the 5th day of March last past: the said Joan survived him and still survives and holds the said premises for her life, the reversion thereof belonging to the said Winifred as one of the 2 daughters and coheirs of the said William Cowper.

Of whom the said premises are held the jurors know not: the moiety thereof is worth per ann., clear, £3.

Thomas Silvester son of Thomas Silverster and Samuel [sic] late the wife of the said Thomas deceased the other daughter and coheir of the said William Cowper is the kinsman and next heir of the said Winifred, and on the 1st day of March last past was aged 9 years.

Chan. Inq. p. m., vol. 219, No. 55.



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