Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1572

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

73-78

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1572', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 73-78. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65941 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


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1572

1 January, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Johns Strete co. Midd. on the said day, Sir George Penruddock knt. of the said street encroached on the highway thereof to the quantity of two feet, by a house built there by him. G. D. R., 30 June, 14 Eliz.

1 April, 14 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Hornesey co. Midd. on view of the body of Hugh Moreland late of Hornesey yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on 29 March last past, between three and four p.m., the said Hugh Moreland and a certain Henry Yonge of the same place yoman were together in the yard of the house of Thomas Aglyonby of Hornesey aforesaid gentleman, when they quarrelled and fought, the said Hugh Moreland having in his hands a shovel and the said Henry Yonge being armed with "a shackfork"; when in the affray had between them Henry Yonge with the said 'shackfork' gave Hugh Moreland in his left eye a blow, of which he died on the present first day of April. G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz.

7 April, 14 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Fynnesbury on view of the body of John Stocker late of London shomaker, there lying dead: With verdict that, on the same day between two and three p.m., the said John Stocker was in the street called Bysshoppes Gate Streate within the city of London, together with a certain John Tyson late of London yoman and John Keys also late of London yoman, when the same John Stocker and John Tyson exchanged insulting words, after which speech John Tyson, having business to do at a certain house called the Red Lyone at Islington with a certain William Peirson of Buckby co. Hertford yoman and a certain John Knighte of the same parish and county, went off to Islington; and That, seeing whither he was going, John Stocker with malice lay in wait, to intercept and assault the same Tyson on his return; and That afterwards being together in Fynnesbury Feild the two men fought together, John Stocker having a sword in his right hand and a dagger in his left hand, whilst John Tyson had a sword in his right hand, and in his left hand a cloak; and That in the affray, thus fought between them in Fynnesbury Feild, John Tyson with his sword gave John Stocker under the left side of his breast a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz.

10 April, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Friarnebarnett on the aforesaid day, Evan Davie late of London tayler stole two black woollen-cloth cloaks worth thirty shillings, two linen shirts worth five shillings, "duo superinterula panni linei vocat' shirtebandes ad valenciam iijs. iiiid.," a hat worth twelve pence, "unum par calligarum panni lanei vocat' a pare of nether stockes ad valenciam xvid., vnum aliud par caligarum vocat' a pare of Jarsey nether stockes ad valenciam iis. vid." and a pair of gloves worth two pence, of the goods and chattels of John Byrkehead. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Evan Davie asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz.

— April, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill, on the presentment of Thomas Wetherley and William Kyrton, Searchers of tiles (Scrutatores tegularum vocatarum tiles) co. Midd., appointed in accordance with the form of the statute of 17 Ed. IV. in this matter provided, that, . . . . Wynchester, John Wynchester, Thomas . . . ., Richard Readinge, John Readinge, William . . . ., Henry Barynger, all of Ruyslippe tylemakers, who dug and threw out earth for making tiles at Ruyslippe aforesaid before 1 November 13 Eliz., scilicet xviij October of the said year, did not move or turn the same earth as they should have done before the first day of February next following. G. S. P. R., Easter, 14 Eliz.

— April, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in consideration of service to be rendered to Sir Thomas Gresham knt., Richard George of Heston co. Midd. baker received on 20 February 14 Eliz. of the said Sir Thomas a lyvery cote, which the said Richard George used through the space of two months next following at Heston and elsewhere in the said county, "whereas the same Richard George is not nor ever has been the familiar servant or officer of the said Sir Thomas Gresham knt, nor a scholar learned and instructed in either of the laws (nec in lege vna seu altra eruditus aut instructus).—With similar true Bills, on the same parchment, against (1) Robert Gridyorn alias Gridyron of Westminster yoman, for taking and wearing the livery of Sir Robert Constable knt.; (2) William Burton of Hackeney yoman for taking and wearing the livery of Robert, earl of Leicester; (3) John Nichollson of Hackeney yoman, for taking and wearing the livery of the same Earl; (4) Henry Warley of Hackeney yoman, for taking and wearing the livery of Sir Ralph Sadler; (5) George Lynnett of Hackeney yoman for taking and wearing the livery of John Dudlaye gentleman; (6) Geoffrey Rochebell of Hampton co. Midd. yoman, for taking and wearing the livery of Sir Owen Hopton knt.; (7) Thomas Adams of Twyckenham yoman, for taking and wearing the livery of Sir Thomas Gresham knt.; (8) John Bridges of Brayneforde co. Midd. yoman, who without being the domestic servant of Sir Francis Knolles knt. or a literate learned in either law, was retained in Sir Francis's service by an argreement made between them on 20 February 14 Elizabeth, since which time the said Thomas Adams at Brayneford and elsewhere has worn the said Sir Francis Knolles's livery. G. S. P. R., Easter, 14 Eliz.

4 May, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hackney on the said day, Richard Neyler, late of London fishmonger, stole certain hairs worth three pence from the tail of Henry Warley's mare, and certain hairs worth three pence from the tail of John Finkes gelding. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Richard Neyler was sentenced to stand in the pillory at Cheapside (ponatur super collistrigium in Cheape Side London). G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz.

21 May, 14 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, on the highway at Islington on the aforesaid day, John Skargill laborer assaulted, beat and bound William Brian, and robbed him of a sworde "de ferro et calibe," called a Rapier and worth eight shillings, and of five shillings in numbered money. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Skargill was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz.

23 May, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Gilesin-the-Fields, Robert Corbett late of London laborer stole . . . pairs of leather shoes worth ten shillings, "duo paria calceorum de correo Anglice vocata ii paire of pantacles of lether ad valenciam iis. iiijd.," and two paires of lether bootes worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Tandi. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Robert Corbett asked for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 30 June, 14 Eliz.

31 May, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill, that William Shawe of Edmonton co. Midd. yoman, who on the said day had at Edmonton "vnam carucam vocatam a ploughe or draught," will not work with any cart and other necessaries for the reparation of the highway there. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 Eliz.

26 June, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields on the said day, James Kynge of London yoman stole "vnum diploidem panni linei vocatum A Canvas Dublett ad valenciam xxs., vnum par braccarum panni lanei colons Horsefleshe coler ad valenciam xxvis. viijd.," of the goods and chattels of Robert Jones. Putting himself 'Guilty,' James Kynge was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 30 June, 14 Eliz.

2 August, 14 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Chancery Lane on view of the body of Lucy Jones, late of Chancery Lane spinster, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on the night of the first inst. between ten and eleven p.m., the said Lucy Jones was at Chancery Lane in God's and the Queen's peace in the house of her master, a certain Thomas Hearne cook, when at the instigation of the devil he made an assault on the said Lucy, and with a sword of iron and steel worth eight shillings and four pence murdered her, by striking her on the lower parts of her legs and on her thighs, giving her six several wounds in them, and in her left thigh one deep wound, of which she died instantly. At his subsequent arraignment Thomas Hearne put himself 'Not Guilty' of the murder, and was found guilty of manslaughter, when he asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 3 Oct., 14 Eliz.

7 August, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Milende co. Midd. on the said day, and at divers times before and afterwards, Richard Bailey of the said place baker bought "faggotes by the greate" to sell to the Queen's lieges at one penny for each faggot, and before so selling them withdrew the "greate woode" from the said faggots to the deception and injury of buyers.—With another True Bill that, on 10 July last past and at divers times before and afterwards, the same Richard Bailey made "cakes" of unwholesome grain and sold them at Milende. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 Eliz.

31 August, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day, and at divers times before and afterwards, John Clayton of Knightesbridge co. Midd. yoman, maintained an unlawful game called Shovegrote in his dwelling-house there. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 Eliz.

17 September, 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes without the Bars of the New Temple on the said day, William Carley late of London yoman stole a paire of linen sheetes worth twenty shillings, and thirty-six shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Anne Gilbert widow. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Carley was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 3 Oct., 14 Eliz.

28 September. 14 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, whereas Alice Arthur late of Hendon spinster was on the 11th of the aforesaid month indicted before John Southcott (one of the Queen's Justices for pleas to be held before her) and other Justices, and before them convicted of vagrancy, and was at that time retained in the service of John Naylor of Wenloxebarne co. Midd., she departed from the service of the said John Naylor against his will on the said 28th of September. Wherefore it was adjudged that Alice Arthur be whipt severely, and burnt on the right ear. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 Eliz.

25 November, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Phillpott of Christchurch co. Southampton yoman wrote and counterfeited a certain writing in the name of his master Ambrose Kellaway esq., and counter feited the sign-manual of the said Ambrose, without the said Ambrose's knowledge or authority, which writing he (the said John Phillpott) directed to Richard Howson of London citizen and mercer, that the same Richard would send to the same Ambrose, by the hands of the same John, two yards of velvett of the price of forty shillings; which two yards of velvett the said John received of the said Richard without payment of the forty shillings by colour of the said writing, and fraudulently converted to his own use. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

3 December, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. John's Strete co. Midd. on the said day, William Spaldinge late of London yoman stole "vnum annulum vocat' a ringe of wyre" worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Richard Weste. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Spalding was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 18 May, 15 Eliz.

5 December, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Saynt John's Strete on the said day of December, Richard Sutton late of London yoman stole a felt hatt worth fifteen shillings, and a pair "de le galligascoyns panni lanei coloris nigri ad valenciam xxxiijs.," of the goods and chattels of Manus Linthey. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Richard Sutton pleaded his clergy, when William Pickering in the Queen's behalf urged that the plea should not be admitted, as under the name of Richard Dutton, for a felony by him in former time committed at Tottenham, the prisoner had on the same plea been burnt on the left hand, and delivered to the Bishop of London, of that place the Ordinary. At the next Gaol Delivery a jury, chosen and sworn to discover the truth of the matter, having found that Richard Dutton and Richard Sutton were one and the same person, the said Richard was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 18 May, 15 Eliz.