Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1573

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

78-85

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1573', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 78-85. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65942 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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1573

11 January, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harnesey co. Midd. on the said day, Jane Jones late of London spinster stole "vnam ricam panni linei vocat' a kercheif" worth five pence, and "vnam amiculam panni linei vocat' a neckercher" worth four pence, of the goods and chattels of William Danyell. At the head of the bill, this memorandum, "Cognovit indicamentum; consideratum est quod confitebitur offensam suam in Ecclesia de Harnesey proxima die dominica in presencia parochianorum ibidem." She confessed the indictment: it was adjudged that she should confess her offence in Hornsey church on the next Lord's Day, in the presence of the parishioners. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz.

22 January, 15 Elizabeth.—Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate co. Midd., on view of the body of John Lowbery late of the said parish shoomaker there lying dead: With Verdict that, at nine p.m. of the 19th inst., the said John Lowbery and a certain Hugh Yenans late of London shoomaker were together in the kitchin of the house of their master, Peter Peterson, at St. Martin's-le-Grand in London, when they quarrelled and abused one another with speech; that on the 21st instant, mindful of this dispute, John Lowbery and Hugh Yenans went forth from the same house together to a certain field called Mownt Myllefield in the said parish of St. Giles, with the intention of fighting, John Lowbery having a sword in his right and a buckler in his left hand, and John Yenans having in both his hands a pycked staffe; that thus armed they fought together in the said field on the said day between the hours of seven and eight a.m.; that after they had fought there for some time, Hugh Yenans withdrew himself from the said John Lowbery to a certain place called Austen's Cloase near the same field, and returned his sword to its scabbard; that afterwards on. the same day, more contumelious words having been exchanged between them, Hugh Yenans returned to John Lowbery at Mownt Myllefeild, when the latter drew his sword and the fight was renewed; that in the ensuing affray Hugh Yenans with his pike gave John Lowbery in his left thigh a wound, of which he died within two hours; and that in so doing Hugh Yenans slew and murdered the said John Lowbery. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz.

23 January, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Brigitte in Flete strete London in the ward of Farringdon without London, Henry Welshe late of London woodmonger assaulted Thomas Vaughan late of London woodmonger, and with a piece of wood called a billett, which he (Henry Welshe) held in his right hand, struck him on the right side of the body, giving him a wound of which he died on 1 February next following. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz.

23 January, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Cockerell and John Bullock, both late of London yomen, stole a white-grey gelding worth three pounds, and a darke grey gelding worth fifty shillings, and a saddle worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Gyrton at Westminster. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' both prisoners were sentenced to be hung. Afterwards, at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate 28 May 16 Elizabeth, John Bullock produced the Queen's special pardon of his felony, granted to him under the Great Seal by Letters patent, dated 22 February 16 Elizabeth. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz.

9 February, 15 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Hounslow in the parish of Heaston co. Midd. on the view of the body of Marie Cheese alias Pyckle, an infant six days old, there lying dead: With Verdict that Joan Cheese of Hounslow spinster gave birth on the first day of the instant month to the said infant in a public place at Hounslow and in doing so fell by mischance upon the ground, by which fall the infant's head was injured, so that she died through mischance and from no other cause on the seventh day of the same month. G. D. R., 16 March, 15 Eliz.

12 February, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that Henry Morrys of Higheholborne co. Midd., on the aforesaid day at his dwelling-house there, unlawfully cooked a legge of mutton, which after being so prepared by him, was there eaten by divers persons. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

12 February, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell on the said day, Allexander Asheforde of Grubstrete bowyer assaulted beat and wounded Anne Jenkynson widow, so that her life was despaired of. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

13 February, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. on the said day, John Beckett late of London yoman stole "duo mallua ferri vocat' slegges ad valenciam vs.," of the goods and chattels of Richard Harrison, and a piece of iron called a culter, of the goods and chattels of Ipolit Lynnett. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Beckett was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz.

16 February, 15 Elizabeth.—The appeal of Henry Lobery, brother and next heir of John Lobery, in his own person appealing Hugh Yenans late of London shoemaker, in the custody of Richard Pipe and Nicholas Woodroof sherif of Middlesex, of the deathof the aforesaid John Lobery: With the Verdict of jurors, Who (at the next Gaol Delivery of 16 March 15 Elizabeth, when Hugh Yenans has declared himself 'Not Guilty' of the murder of John Lobery under the circumstances set forth in the abstract of the Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 23 January 15 Eliz.), Say upon their oath "that the aforesaid Hugh Yenans is not guilty of the murder nor of the felonious and voluntary slaying of the said John Lobery with malice aforethought, but is guilty of the homicide and wilful slaying of the same John Lobery": the same jurors further finding "qd. idem Hugo nulla habet terras tenementa nec catalla." Whereupon the same Hugh asks for the book, reads like a clerk and is delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz.

25 February, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at a certain place called "le Parke Corner" at St. James near Charingcrosse on the said day about five p.m., Richard Iseham late of London laborer assaulted a certain John Mercer alias Ashe, then and there riding in the highway, with the intention of robbing him the said John. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

3 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, John Cuttler of Higholbourne co. Midd. crosebomaker, being unmarried and not retained in the service of any one, exercised the art and faculty "factoris balistarum vocat' A Crosebomaker" in his dwelling-house there, against the form of the Statute in this case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

3 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, Nicholas Bedlowe, Gabriel Playce, Roger Turtill, John Bradshawe, Barnard Livard an alien, and Roger Asshemore, all unmarried men and duly instructed tailors, having neither lands nor tenements to the yearly value of forty shillings, nor chattels to the value of ten pounds, nor farm or tenure in tillage, exercised the art of tailors in their several houses in Higheholborne (not being retained in the service of any-one), against the form of the Statute in this case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

3 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at his mansion-house in Higheholbourne on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, Walter Arundell skynner, an unmarried man not in the service of any-one, exercised the art and faculty of a skynner, against the form of the Statute in this case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

10 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Woxbridge co. Midd. on the said day, William Welles late of London clerk stole a linen sheet and a linen smocke worth three shillings, and a linen napkin and a linen partelett worth twelve pence. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Welles produced letters of Hugh, bishop of Llandaff, under his episcopal seal, dated at Matharne a.d. 1567 and 10 Eliz., certifying that William Wells was a clerk in holy orders; which letters being allowed to the prisoner by the Court, he was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 16 March, 15 Eliz.

12 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Peter Massey, his wife Agnes Massey, Richard Clement, Edward Hutchyn and John Aleigh, strong and fit for labour, but having neither masters nor lawful vocations whereby to get their means of living, were vagrants, and have wandered about other parts of the same county. Whereupon it was ordered that each of the said vagrants should be whipt severely and burnt on the right ear, according to the statute in that case provided. Afterwards Laurence Nasshe of Fynnesberrie yoman came forward and took Edward Hutchyn into his service, binding himself in the sum of five pounds to retain the said Edward for an entire year. In like manner Francis Crompton took Richard Clement into his service for an entire year, binding himself in the same sum to keep him for a year, and at the end of the term to bring him to the General Session of the Peace, or come there with proof of his death. G. D. R., 16 March, 15 Eliz.

15 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Ratclyf co. Midd. on the said day, John Cooke, John Tanny and Mathew Furlonge, being over fourteen years of age strong of body, but having neither lands, nor masters, nor lawful means of livelihood were vagrants, and had been vagrants in other parts of the same county. On which it was adjudged that each of the three vagrants should be flogged severely and burnt on the right ear. Afterwards, James Forman of Whitechapel gentleman took John Tanny into his service, and John Russell of the parish of St. Giles without Crepulgate silkewever took Mathew Furlonge into his service for a year; each of the two masters being bound in the sum of five pounds to keep his servant for an entire year, and at the expiration of the term to produce him, or sufficient proof of his death, at General Session of the Peace. G. D. R., 16 March, 15 Eliz.

17 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Highholborne co. Midd. and elsewhere in the same county on the said day, Nicholas Welshe, Anthony Musgrove, Hugh Morice, John Thomas, Philip Thomas, Alice Morice and Katherine Hevans, being over fourteen years of age, and strong and fit for labour, were masterless vagrants without any lawful means of subsistence. Whereupon it was decreed that each of the said vagrants should be whipt severely and burnt on the right ear. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

25 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Eltham co. Kent in the highway leading from Woolwyche to St. Mary Cray, George Browne late of London gentleman assaulted George Saunders late citizen and merchant-taylor of London, and murdered him: And That, knowing him to have committed the said murder, Roger Symes late of the parish of St. Gabriel in Fanchurche Streate yoman, on the 26th of March, 15 Eliz., and at divers subsequent times received, comforted and aided the same George Browne. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Roger Symes was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 8 May, 15 Eliz.

27 March, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields on the said day, Henry Amptill and Roger Mascall, both of the said parish brewers, set at large certain suspected persons, whom William Westone, a hedborowe of the said parish, had taken in a certain tenement of the said Henry Amptill, and had by virtue of his office imprisoned G.S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz.

9 April, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Twychell late of the said parish spinster stole "a petecote vpper bodied with red mockadowe" worth five shillings, eight pieces of linen cloth called kerchefes worth five shillings and three pence, three linen crosclothes worth sixpence, a worsted apron worth sixteen pence, a linen pillowbere worth eight pence, and a linen smocke worth sixpence, of the goods and chattels of Magdalene Hardinge widow. "Et p'dca Johanna Twychell po se cul ca null pl'itat qd. est pregnans Et comp't' est p' sacr'm matronarum qd. est pregn': I'o repi." G. D. R., 8 May, 15 Eliz.

23 April, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, William Burfield late of London yoman stole a black woollen-cloth cloak worth ten shillings, and an English book called a Bible worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Barnard Marcus alias Gilham. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Burfield was sentenced to be hung; but afterwards, viz. at the Gaol Delivery of 2 Sept. 15 Eliz. he asked for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. At the head of the bill, "Po se cul ca null sus'"; and at the foot, "Et postea scilt' ad deliberacionem gaole predicte hie fact 11do. die Septemb' anno xv°. p'dco coram Thoma Offeley, Alex'o Avenon militibus et Will'o Fletewood Recordatore London p'dcus Will'm's Burfield petiit librum legit vt cl'icus et tradif Ordinario." G. D. R., 8 May, 15 Eliz.

25 April, 15 Elizabeth.—Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the parish of the Blessed Mary-de-le-Strond co. Midd., on view of the body of Thomas Adderton late of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that on the 24th inst. John Jeynes late of London was in St. Paul's Church between three and four p.m., when Thomas Adderton came to him, and exchanged insulting words with him; and that afterwards Thomas Adderton went out of the church and waited in the churchyard till he saw John Jeynes come out of the church, when he drew out his sword with his right hand and his dagger with his left hand, and assaulted the said John Jeynes, who trying to get out of his assailant's way withdrew for the space of twenty yards even to a dunghill, beyond which he could not go by reason of the crowd of men there: when he drew his sword in self-defence, and with it gave the said Thomas Adderton a wound, of which he died within the space of an hour in the said parish of St. Mary of the Strond. G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz.

18 May, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at Wilsdon co. Midd., Simon Platte of Wilsdon co. Midd. laborer stole "tres pecias auri cuniati vocat' angelles ad valenciam xxxs., unam aliam peciam auri cuniati vocat' a sufferen ad valenciam xs.," and twelvepence in numbered money, of the chattels and moneys of John Walbancke. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Simon Platte was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz.

23 May, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Jones Streate co. Midd. on the night of the said day, Richard Stubbes and John Barlooe, both late of London laborers, broke burglariously into the house of William Dawes, then being at rest, and stole therefrom a "horse-fleshe collored" woollen cloak worth twenty shillings, a pair of black woollen breeches worth three shillings, "vnam diploidem de blewe-striped sackclothe anglice vocatam A Dowblette of blewe-striped sackclothe ad valenciam iis. viiid.," and four pounds in numbered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of Edward Elt then living there. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Richard Stubbes was sentenced to be hung: but John Barlooe "po se non cul nec rec." G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz.

31 May, 15 Elizabeth.—Iqnuisition-post-mortem, taken on the said day at Whitechappell co. Midd. on view of a male infant, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on the 27th inst, between ten and eleven a.m., Jane Stanly, late of London spinster, gave birth to the said male child in a certain field called Cookes Cloase at Whitechappell, and forthwith at the instigation of the devil assaulted the said male child, which was born alive, and murdered it by crushing the child's head with both her hands, so that it died then and there instantly. At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that on her arraignment. Jane Stanly put herself 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz.

7 June, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Stepney on the said day, Jane Page of London spinster stole "vnum annulum auri vocatum a hande in hande ad valenciam vis. viiid. et tres pecias annuli aurei v'catas three pieces of a rynge called a deathes heade ad valenciam vis. viiid.," of the goods and chattels of a certain unknown man. G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz.

15 June, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that Amy Gooderiche, Henry Churche, Henry Lyde and Roger Kynward, being over fourteen years old, strong of body and fit for work, and having no masters or lawful means of livelihood, were vagrants at Fynnesberrie co. Midd. on the said day, and have been vagrants at divers other places of the same county—"Super quo consideratum est quod quilibet predictorum Amie Gooderiche, Henrici Churche, Henrici Lyde et Rogeri Kynward graviter flagelletur et cremetur in dextra auricula." G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz.

31 August, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harmondsworthe co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, Nicholas Gibbes husbandman had exercised the office "emptoris et venditoris grani vocat' badgers, loders, laders, kydders, or carriers of corne and graine," against the form of the statute. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 15 Eliz.

2 September, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Enfield co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, John Hunesdon of the said parish exercised the office of a buyer and seller of grain, called a badger, loder, kydder or carrier of corne or grain, against the form of the statute in that matter provided. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 15 Eliz.

8 October, 15 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Acton co. Midd. on the said day of October, William Smyth late of Acton aforesaid laborer bought of Ralph Cokerell, rector of Acton, eight loads of wheat "in garbis" worth sixteen pounds, seven wainloads "de silignis in garbis" worth fourteen pounds, and ten wainloads of oats (avenarum in garbis) worth ten pounds, with the intention of selling the grain therefore for forty pounds, and then and there ingrossed the same grain, against the form of the statute in that case provided, G. D. R., 15 Feb. 16 Eliz.

11 December, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day of December, Joan Ellyse spinster alias wife of William Ellyse late of the said city brewer, practised witchcraft against and on four horses worth eight pounds, of the goods and chattels of Edward Williamson of the same city yoman, so that she destroyed and killed them; against the Queen's peace and the form of the statute, in that case provided.—Also, on the same file, three other True Bills against the same Joan Ellyse for practising witchcraft &c.—viz. (1) for bewitching William Crowche laborer of Westminster on 16 Feb. 14 Eliz. so that he was wasted in his body and lay languishing and "mutilated" for four months from the said date; (2) for bewitching, at Westminster on 21 July, 14 Eliz., a certain cow worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Edward Williamson, so that it died; and (3) for bewitching the same Edward Williamson of Westminster, on the 13 Oct. 14 Eliz. at Westminster, so that he lay languishing and mutilated, and was wasted and consumed in his body for three months. Joan Ellyse put herself 'Guilty' to all these indictments; but judgment was not delivered on her in respect to them, because she was already sentenced to be hung, in consideration of a previous indictment for witchcraft. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.