Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1574

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

85-90

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1574', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 85-90. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65943 Date accessed: 16 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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1574

7 January, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Lincoln's Inne co. Midd. on the said day, George Gerlington late of London yoman, stole a white gelding, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Harvey. Putting himself 'Guilty,' George Gerlington was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 16 Eliz.

17 January, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hillingdon co. Midd. on the night of the said day, William Wyddyns late of London smythe broke burglariously into the house of William Robyns, and stole therefrom two iron chest-lockes worth twenty pence, two dozen iron horse-shoes worth three shillings, five hundred iron nails called "hobbe nails" worth fifteen pence, and an iron wedge worth eight pence. William Wyddyns put himself 'Guilty,' and died in prison. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

1 February, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Enfeild co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, William Brooke and William Newman senior of the said place husbandmen "occupaverunt ofincium et facultatem emptorum et venditorum grani vocatorum badgers, loders, kydders and carriers of come and grayne sine licencia contra formam statuti inde editi etprovisi." G. S. P. R., Easter, 16 Eliz.

3 March, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Enfield co. Midd. on the said day of March and at divers times before and afterwards, Robert Browne, Francis Conde, John Sherwoode and Robert Hare, all of the said place husbandmen, "exercebant officium et accionem emptorum et venditorum grani vocatorum badgers, loders, kydders and carriers of corne or graine," in contempt of the Queen and against the form of the statute in that case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 16 Eliz.

5 March, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Giles-without-Criplegate, co. Midd. on the said day, William Tyler late of London laborer, a lazy and cunning fellow, cosened Thomas Weare of the said parish out of two several sums of money, by representing that he was in possession of certain acres of wood growing near Tottenham, which he had bought of Lord Compton, who out of his good will to the deponent had himself measured and marked out the wood for him: that further, to get Thomas Weare's confidence, the same William Tyler represented himself, as staying and living in the house of Sir Hugh Cholmondeley knt. at Harnesy alias Harryngay co. Midd.; that by these false representations the said William Tyler induced Thomas Weare to give him an order for a hundred cartloads of the said wood, to give him four pence "nomine finis viz. in Earnest" on the bargain for the wood, and yet further to give him twenty shillings in partial prepayment of the price agreed upon for the hundred loads of wood; whereas it appeared on enquiry that William Tyler had no wood to sell, and was not living at Harnesey, but was a cheat. Having put himself 'Guilty,' William Tyler was sentenced to the pillory at Fynnesbury (Po se cull et adjudicatur pillorie apud Fynnesbury in com. Midd.) G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

16 March, 16 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Knightesbridge co. Midd. on the view of the body of Richard Coleman of the said place yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the same Richard Coleman was slain with a sword by Richard Cooke yoman in an affray, arising out of contention respecting the right of the same Richard Coleman and one Thomas Fearne yoman, to cut down a certain elm at Knightesbridge at the command of their master, William Mustyan of the said place gentleman; and that Richard Stutte alias Pratt yoman aided and abetted the same Richard Cooke to perpetrate the said manslaughter. Richard Stutte put himself 'Not Guilty' and Richard Cooke was at large, at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

17 March, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster, on the said day, John Tegg, Thomas Cockerell and Edward Cole, late of London yomen, stole an ell and half of black silk called vellure worth nine shillings, six ells of canvas worth fourteen shillings, with divers other articles of drapery (including four-and-a-half yards of white mockado worth seven shillings and six pence) of the goods and chattels of Edmund Milles. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' the three prisoners asked for benefit of clergy, but this was denied to them by the Justices, in consideration of the sufficient evidence that on the 13th day of the same March they had broken burglariously into the mansion-house of the aforesaid Edmund Milles at Senock co. Kent, when he and his family were in the same house, and had taken therefrom certain goods and chattels; in which case benefit of clergy was removed by the statute recently publisht and provided. Wherefore it was decreed that John Tegg and Thomas Cockerell should be hung by the neck &c. But it seemed well to the Court to reprieve Edmund Cole before judgment for further consideration. (Ideo consideratum est quod vterque predictorum Johannis et Thome suspendatur, per collum &c. Et prefatus Edwardus repri ante judicium quia Curia vult inde auisari &c.) And afterwards at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate made on 18 February, 17 Eliz., the aforesaid Edward Cole produced Queen's pardon under the Great Seal, granted to him by letters patent, dated 15 December of the same 17th year of Her Highness's reign. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

18 March, 16 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Thomas Smyth late of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the same Thomas Smyth died within the gaol on the same 18th inst., by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

29 March, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harrowehill co. Midd. on the said day, John Allen, Elizabeth Turner, Humfrey Foxe, Henry Bower and Agnes Wort, being over fourteen years old and having no lawful means of livelihood were vagrants and had been vagrants in other parts of the country. Sentenced to be flogged severely and burnt on the right ear. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

8 April, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Stratford-at-boo on the said day, William John late of London yoman stole a cheste worth two shillings, two silver spoons worth thirteen shillings and four-pence, four gold rings and sixteen precious stones called perles worth six pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, a piece of black silk called taffita worth thirteen shillings and fourpence, and eight pounds in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of Robert Bridges. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William John asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 26 April. 16 Eliz.

9 April, 16 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Evans late of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the same John Evans died in the gaol on the 9th inst. by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

15 April, 16 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., on view of the body of John Holdernes late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said John Holdernes, being sick and weak of a certain disease called consumption, died on the same 15th inst. at the said parish, by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

26 April, 16 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Weedon late of London smith, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said William Weedon died in the gaol on the same 26th inst. by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz.

23 May, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day, William Paddye of Hadley co. Midd. gentleman, Thomas Rede of Southemymes co. Midd. husbandman, and Nicholas Crabb of Northemymes co. Midd. yoman, broke into the Queen's chase called Endfielde Chase, hunted the deer and wild animals there, and killed "unam damam." G. D., . . . . Eliz.

4 June, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Woxbridge co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Shoones late of Harmondesworth co. Midd. yoman stole a browne gelding worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Doo.—Also, on the same file, two other True Bills against the same Thomas Shoones, for horse-stealing at Harmondesworth on 12 August 16 Eliz., and at Cowley in the same county on 8 Sept. 16 Elizabeth. Putting himself 'Guilty' to all three indictments, Thomas Shoones was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 16 Eliz.

1 July, 16 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Barnard Randolph esq. J.P., of Robert Hodgson of Wynchester co. Southampton inneholder, in the sum of two hundred marks, and of George Reignoldes of the parish of St. Brigitt in Farrington-ward without-London cutler and John Parkehowse of the parish of St. Andrew in Holbern gyrdler, in the sum of one hundred marks each; for the said Robert's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., "because" says a memorandum at the foot of the bond "he is hadd in suspeccion for robbinge Thearle of Kent his howse in Barbican."—Also on the same parchment, the recognizance, in the sum of two hundred marks, whereby on the same day Giles Blofeylde of Barnardes Inne gentleman bound himself to prosecute the cause aforesaid against the said Robert Hodgson at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 16 Eliz.

27 July, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at the Queen's chase called Enfielde Chase co. Midd., Henry Lawrence of Hadley co. Midd. yoman broke into the said chase, hunted the wild animals there, and killed "unam damam vocat' a prickett." G. D., . . . . Eliz.

29 July, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Highgate co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Jackson and Robert Gillingham, both late of London yomen, stole a calf worth six shillings, of the goods and chattels of Rose Howson. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' both thieves were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 16 Eliz.

4 August, 16 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before John Southcot, one of the Justices for Pleas before the Queen, of Lancelot Bostock one of the Queen's gentlemen-pensioners and Morgan Farde, of Westminster butcher, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Thomas Clarke of the parish of St. Margaret in Westminster grocer in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Thomas Clarke's appearance at the next General Sessions of the Peace. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 16 Eliz.

24 September, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Islington on the night of the said day, John Brooke late of London laborer broke burglariously into the house of Richard Smythe, and stole therefrom "unum par' tibialium de panno laneo coloris nigri, Anglice vocat' A Payre of black netherstockes" worth twelve pence, a pair of shoes worth eight pence, and three shillings in numbered money. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Brooke was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 16 Eliz.

26 September, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at le Stronde co. Midd. and in other parts of the same county, William Hewett, Thomas Maynerd and Peter Stevens, being over fourteen years of age and strong and fit for labour were masterless vagrants, without any lawful means of subsistence. It was ordered that each of the same vagrants should be whipt severely and branded on the right ear. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 16 Eliz.

3 October, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of Stebunheth co. Midd. on the said day, William Fyppes (sic) gardener and William Reynolds laborer, both late of London, stole a gray gelding worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of Andrew Butcher. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Phyppes (sic in the memorandum at the foot of the bill) was sentenced to be hung; William Reynolds was at large. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 17 Eliz.

23 October, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Heston in a certain place called Honesloweheathe co. Midd. on the said day, John Seyntlyger alias Sellenger, John Carrowe and William Hutton, all of London gentlemen, assaulted on the highway, and beat and wounded Thomas Phillpott esq., and robbed him of a gold chain worth one hundred marks. William Hutton put himself 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung; John Seyntlyger and John Carrowe were "extra prisonam," —not in custody. G. D., . . . . Eliz.

5 November, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, James Forman late of Whitechappell co. Midd. yoman, Chief Constable of the Hundred of Ossulston of the said county, devising and intending to violate the concord and love between William Daye of Whitechappell blacksmith and his wife Mary Daye, impudently and impiously pursued the said Mary and had carnal knowledge of her, so that the said William means to repudiate her.—G. D. R., June, 17 Eliz.

15 November, 16 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Estsmythefeilde co. Midd. on the said day, John Rodes and George Arthur, both late of London yomen, stole a piece of coined gold called "an halfe soueraigne" worth ten shillings, and twenty shillings in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of Alexander Sapcotes. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Rodes was sentenced to be hung and reprieved after judgment. Putting himself 'Guilty,' George Arthur was reprieved before judgment. And afterwards at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, made 24 Oct., 17 Eliz., John Rodes asked for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 3 Dec., 17 Eliz.

4 December, 17 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Higheholbourne on the night of the said day, John Wrighte of Lyons Inne gentleman, Robert Somerstall of London scryvener, William Chamberlayne of Seint Johns Strete co. Midd. yoman, Richard Browne of the same street yoman, Philip Cary and Thomas Flower, both of the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields yomen, with ten unknown disturbers of the peace, armed with swords, bucklers, daggers &c. assembled in warlike manner, between the hours of nine and ten, and broke into the house of William Bradley at Highholbourne, breaking and destroying the doors of the said house, and put the said William Bradley and all his family (then being in God's and the Queen's peace) in great bodily fear, and also assaulted, beat and wounded Thomas Tayler clerk, then being and resting in the said house, and maltreated him so that his life was despaired of. G. D., . . . . 17 Eliz.

30 December, 17 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, about eight a.m. of the said day, Thomas Browne late of Acton co. Midd. miller, and Giles Palmer late of London yoman, on the highway at Acton assaulted Robert Lockwell, then and there riding on horseback in God's and the Queen's peace, and robbed him of a little sword of iron and steel called "a Sceana" worth three shillings and four pence, and also took from him "unum penularium de panno laneo coloris mottley anglice vocat' a motley cloke-bag worth xiid.," two leather waste girdles worth four pence, and three shillings and three pence in counted money. Putting themselves severally 'Guilty,' with no chattels, Thomas Browne and Giles Palmer were sentenced to be hung. G. D., . . . . 17 Eliz.