Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1578

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

111-116

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1578', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 111-116. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65947 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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1578

15 January, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at Kensingeton, Dorothy Pratte alias Mounes of the parish of St. Sepulchre widow, Laurence Gybbe alias Taylor of the same parish yoman, Richard ap Robertes alias Robertes of Fleetlane in London yoman, and John Burde of St. Johns Strete co. Midd. yoman, riotously broke into the dwelling-house at Kensington of William Bingham, and there assaulted Katherine Bingham (wife of the said William), Katherine Lawzon, Anne Lawson and Elizabeth Pennant (servants of the same William) and beat, wounded and maltreated them, so that their lives were despaired of. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

22 January, 20 Elizabeth.—Imperfect File of a Special Session of Oyer and Terminer held at Westminster on 22 Jan. 20 Eliz. before John Bishop of London, Thomas Lord Buckhurste, Sir Christopher Wrey knt. Chief Justice for pleas to be held before the Queen, Robert Mounson one of the Justices of the Bench, Sir Owin Hopton knt., Gilbert Gerrard the Queen's Attorney-General esq., and William Fletewood the Recorder of the City of London; and adjourned to the 13th of February in the same year. Containing the following matters,—

(a) Precept of 'Venire Facias' to the Sheriff of Middlesex for the appearance in the Great Hall of Pleas at Westminster on Wednesday 22 Jan. 20 Eliz. at eight a.m. of twenty-four good and loyal men of each hundred of the said county, to enquire, do, present and execute all things that shall then and there be enjoined on the part of the Lady the Queen &c.

(b) Panel of good and loyal men, returned by the Sheriff, in obedience to the Precept.

(c) Panel of Jurors between the Lady the Queen, and Thomas Metham, Margary Anderson, Elinore Brome and Elizabeth Barram viz.— Henry Herne, Robert Manne, John Newenham, Thomas Verey, Richard Donnyngton, William Evans, Andrew Holbourne, John Androwes, Mathew Perrie, Thomas Webbe, William Holt, and Richard Wikes.—

(d) True Bill that Thomas Metham, late of St. Andrew's in Holborn co. Midd. clerk, on 1 Oct. 19 Eliz. at the aforesaid parish of Holborn, voluntarily said, used and celebrated a private mass against the form of a certain Statute of 1 Eliz., and against the peace crown and dignity of the said now Queen; and that Margery Anderson, late of the parish of St. Dunstain in the West of London spinster, was present at the time of the celebration of the aforesaid mass at the parish of St. Andrew aforesaid, maintaining, strengthening and aiding the same Thomas Metham to celebrate the aforesaid mass, against the peace crown and dignity of the said Queen, and to the ill example of the said Queen's other lieges and subjects. On the bill these memoranda,—

(1) That Thomas Metham confessed the indictment, but the Court wished to deliberate respecting delivery of judgment; (2) That Margery Anderson put herself 'Guilty,' but the Court wished to deliberate respecting delivery of judgment; (po se cul set cur vult auisari de judicio' rendend'); and (3) Et postea scilt' ad Session' hic tent' xiiimo die Februar' anno regni Regine Elizabeth' vicesimo coram Joh'i E'p'o London', Thoma d'n'o Buckhurste, Christofero Wrey milite Capitali Justic' d'c'e d'n'e Regine ad pl'ita coram ip'a tenend' assign', Rob'to Mounson vn' Justic' d'c'e d'n'e Regine de Banco, et Gilberto Gerrard armiger' Atturnat' d'c'e d'n'e Regine Generali Justic &c. considerat' est q'd p'fat Thomas Metham et Margeria Anderson h'eant penam statut &c." = And afterwards at the Session held here on 13 Feb. 20 Eliz. before John Bishop of London, Thomas Lord Buckhurste and Sir Christofer Wrey knt. Ch.J. &c. &c. &c. it was considered that the aforesaid Thomas Metham and Margery Anderson should have the penalty of the Statute.—

(e) True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on 8th Dec. 20 Eliz., Elinore Brome, wife of Sir Christofer Brome late of Islington knt. received and accepted from her sister, a certain Lady Pawlett widow, a certain token called an Agnus Dei, brought into this kingdom of England from the See of Rome, with the intention of using the said token; And That afterwards, viz. on the aforesaid 8th Dec. 20 Eliz. at Islington aforesaid, the same Elinore Brome "vtebatur anglice dyd weare" the said token about her neck, against the form of the Statute &c. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum—"Et p'fat' Elinora Brome po se cul Io cons' est q'd h'eat penam Statut &c."=And the aforesaid Elinora Brome put herself 'Guilty'; Therefore it was adjudged that she should have the penalty of the Statute.

(f) True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on 8 Dec. 20 Eliz., Elizabeth Barram late of the said parish spinster received and accepted from a certain unknown person a certain token called an Agnus Dei, brought into this kingdom of England from the See of Rome, with the intention of wearing the same token; And that afterwards, viz. on 8th Dec. 20 Eliz., the same Elizabeth Barram at Islington aforesaid "dyd weare" the same token about her neck. At the foot of the bill, a memorandum, that the said Elizabeth Barram put herself 'Guilty,' wherefore it was adjudged that she should have the penalty of the Statute.

(g) True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd. on 1 Dec. 20 Eliz., Thomas Metham, late of the said parish, clerk, voluntarily said, used and celebrated a private mass, against the form of the Statute &c., and against the peace crown and dignity of the said Queen.

(h) True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on 14 Sept. 19 Eliz., a certain unknown man, being a clerk, voluntarily said, used and celebrated a private mass, against the form of the Statute &c., and against the said Queen's peace, crown and dignity; And That Eleanore Brome, wife of Sir Christofer Brome late of Islingeton aforesaid knt., was present at the time of the celebration of the said mass, maintaining, strengthening and aiding the said unknown man to celebrate the same.—On the bill, an endorsement that the Inquest was taken, at Westminster on 22 Jan. 20 Eliz., before Thomas Lord Buckhurste, Sir Owin Hopton knt., Sir Lionel Duckett knt., and William Fletewood esq. and Recorder of London, by the oath of fifteen jurors, whose names appear in the endorsement. S. S. O. T., 22 Jan. and 13 Feb., 20 Eliz.

23 February, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell on the said day Francis Skynner late of Whitechappell smith, assaulted Joan Smithe, an infant of the age of ten years, "et ipsam Johannam tunc et ibidem . . . . rapuit, defloravit et carnaliter cognovit." Et predictus Franciscus Skynner po se cul ca null sus. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

26 March, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Greisinne co. Midd. on the night of the said day, John Parnycote of London yoman broke burglariously into the chamber of Thomas Mountenay in Greisinne, and stole therefrom a black satten doublet worth six shillings, a black silk (taffita) doublet worth five shillings, and "unum par braccarum de panno laneo coloris nigri vocat' rashe ad valenciam vis," of the goods and chattels of Thomas Mountenay. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

31 March, 20 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Barnard Randolph esq. J.P., of John Bellman of St. John Streat co. Midd. showmaker in the sum of ten pounds, and of George Sewarde taylor and John Browne smythe, both of the said street, in the sum of five pounds each; For the appearance of the said John Bellman at the next General Session of the Peace, "for that he hathe lodged lewde persons in his house, and also iii or iiii lewde wemenn delyvered of chylde in his howse, and vppon search made by Grymes and Johnes, hedborowes, ther was found in his house thes persons, videlicet Agnes Jenkins, Richard Taylor and Thomas Bould, as Mr. Clerke of the Peace knoweth."—Memorandum at foot of the bill, "Venit et consideratum est that he must be carted." G. S. P. R., Easter, 20 Eliz.

4 April, 20 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Barnard Randolph esq. J.P., of Christopher Stockdale of the parish of Strand co. Midd. carpenter, and William Awdridge in the parish of St. Stephen in the ward of Colman streat merchaunt-tayler, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Hugh Stockdale in the said parish of Strand gunpoudermaker: for the appearance of the said Hugh at the next Gaol Delivery, "for that he is suspected to haue stollen about a hundrythe weight and a half of gunpowder from Samuell Thomas gunner, but hee sayeth that he bought about iii pt. of a hundreth of gunpowder at iii several tymes of Thomas Cooke and Thomas Bankes apprentices to the said Samuell Thomas gunner." G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

15 May, 20 Elizabeth.—Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Heston co. Midd. on view of the body of Harmond Johnson, late of Heston aforesaid yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on the night of the 13th instant, between the hours of nine and ten, the said Harmond Johnson and a certain Robert Cooke also of Heston yoman were together in the stable of the house of Sir Thomas Gresham knt. called Asterley in the parish of Heston, and railed at one another with abusive speech, when Harmond Johnson with his right hand struck Robert Cooke on the face: Whereupon Robert Cooke with a meat-knyffe dealt Harmond Johnson in his right breast a mortal blow, of which he died in the course of the next hour and half. At the subsequent Gaol Delivery, Robert Cooke put himself 'Guilty,' asked for the book, read it like a clerk, and was delivered "juxta formam statuti." G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

18 May, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Wilsdon co. Midd. on the said day, Oliver Powell late of London yoman stole a fustian doublet worth sixteen shillings, a pair of canvas breeches worth five shillings, a pair of woollen-cloth breeches ("coloris stamen") worth thirteen shillings, a petticote worth twenty pence, "tres decem pecias auri cuniati vocat' Angelles ad valenciam vi li. xs., vndecem pecias auri vocat' soueraignes ad valenciam v li. xs." and twenty pounds in numbered money. Po se cul ca null': Sus. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

10 June, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day, Morgan Jones broke into the mansion-house of Nicholas Maddox in the parish of St. Clement Danes without the bar of the New Temple, London co. Midd. and stole therefrom "vnum librum vocat' a byble ad valenciam xxxs." G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

13 June, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day, Henry Hardewicke and Henry Harrison, both late of London yomen stole "vnum par calligarum vocat' knytte nether stockes ad valenciam iiis," of the goods and chattels of Margaret Parson. Henry Hardewicke "po se non cul nee rec." Over Henry Harrison's name the memorandum "po se cul ca null repi ante judicium." G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

14 June, 20 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Westminster on said day of June, on view of the body of Alice Foxe, late of Westminster spynster, there lying dead: With Verdict that, in the night of the 9th instant, between eleven and twelve, the said Alice was in the house of Anthony Percyvall vyntener at Westminster, when Margaret Dorryngton alias Mason late of the same city spynster feloniously, diabolically and with malice aforethought assaulted the said Alice Foxe with a knife, with which, holding it in her right hand, she gave the said Alice in the left side of her breast a wound of which she died on the 13th inst.; and that thus and in no other way the said Margaret slew and murdered the said Alice. At her trial Margaret put herself 'Guilty' and pleaded pregnancy.

19 June, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harmondesworth co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Walker alias Whitefoote, late of London yoman, broke burglariously into the house of William Duck, and stole therefrom "duodecem virgatas fibule vocat' billimant lace ad valenciam vs., et tres virgatas de silk freinge ad valenciam iiis." Po se cul de parvo latrocinio Et jur app'ciaver' bona et catall' ad decem denar.' He put himself 'Guilty' of petty larceny, and the jury appraised the goods and chattels at ten pence. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

7 August, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Shordiche on the said day, Thomas Munnynges late of London yoman stole stealthily and secretly a silk-purse worth two pence, a piece of coined gold called an angel worth ten shillings, apiece of coined gold called "an half angell" worth five shillings, another piece of coined gold called "An Inglishe Crowne," and thirteen shillings and four pence in numbered money, of the chattels and moneys of Nicholas Mosse, from the person of the said Nicholas. Po se cul ca null sus. G. D. R., 3 Sept., 20 Eliz.

13 August, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Lymehouse in the parish of Stebunheth co. Midd., Alice Harvye late of London spinster stole a linen coverlet worth ten pence, of the goods and chattels of John Donnynges. Po se cul ca null Et delib'atur solvendo feodo. G. D. R., 3 Sept., 20 Eliz.

2 September, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Greis Inne on the said day, John Hyghfeild late of London taylor broke into the house of Geoffrey Osberdson, and stole therefrom a pair of breeches, of black woollen cloth laid out with silk called sarcenett, worth thirty shillings, a linen coverlet worth five shillings, and a black woollen cloak worth twenty shillings. Po se cul ca null petit librum legit vt clericus et delib'atur juxta formam statut'. G. D. R., . . . 3 Sept., 20 Eliz.