Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1595

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

225-230

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1595', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 225-230. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65964 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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1595

1 January, 37 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Josia Ryley of the said parish widow practised the wicked and devilish arts called "witchcraftes enchauntementes charmes and sorceries" upon Herbert Apshawe, so that he languished from the same detestible arts, from 1 Jan. 37 Eliz. to the second day of the same month, "per spacium trigint' horarum et amplius," and died on the same 2nd of January. At the bill's head, this memorandum, "Po se mortuus [sic] in facie curie."—Also, on the same file, a True Bill that the same Josia Ryley widow, at the same parish on 11 July 39 Elizabeth, practised the same impious and detestable arts of witchecraftes &c. on a certain Margaret Burroughes, so that "languebat et languidus (sic) vixit et adhuc in periculo vite sue existit" =so that she languished and lived feebly and still remains in danger of her life. The same clerical memorandum (Po se mortuus (sic) in facie curie) at the head of this indictment also. G. D. R., 27 July 39 Eliz.

6 February, 37 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the Savoy co. Midd. in a house called "the Savoye," John Kidd late of London yoman assaulted Margaret Darsye, an infant under ten years of age, and then andthere "eandem Margaretam Darsye felonice illicite et carnaliter cognovit." Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Kidd was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz.

19 February, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Suffeild late of London yoman: With Verdict that the said William died by Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sicknes" on the 18th inst. after nine days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz.

3 March, 37 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Stanhop and John Fatte, both late of London yomen, stole twenty-nine yards of woollen broadclothe, of the colour muskecullor, worth nine pounds, and fifty yards of the woollen cloth called "bayes," of black colour, worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of Robert Atkinson. G. D. R., 10 July, 37 Eliz.

3 March, 37 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before George Asshebye esq. J.P., of Thomas Lovegroe of Westminster yoman and William Woodwarde of the same city yoman, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Thomas College of Westminster yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Thomas College's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, then and there to answer concerning a felony, of which he is suspected. G. S. P. R., Easter, 37 Eliz.

9 March, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Crisp late of London yoman: With Verdict that the said William died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sicknes" on the 8th inst., after thirteen days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz.

11 March, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of Anthony Barnes late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on the 9th instant, between the hours five and six p.m., a certain James Perte late of the said parish yoman was within the same parish, and making his way in God's and the Queen's peace towards St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, when the said Anthony Barnes with his rapier drawn made an assault upon him; that James Perte vainly retreated from his assailant in order to escape from him; and that in the affray thus forced upon him James Perte, fighting lawfully in selfdefence and for the safety of his life, with his sword gave Anthony Barnes in the right part of his belly a mortal wound, of which he then and there instantly died. G. D. R., 3 Sept, 37 Eliz.

25 March, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Elizabeth Scott late of London spinster, there lying dead: With Verdict that she died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sickness" on the 23rd inst. after five days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz.

—April, 37 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Knyvett esq. J.P., of Thomas Lea of London esq. in the sum of twenty pounds, and of John Burbadge and Edward Burbadge, both of London gentlemen, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of the said John and Edward at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, and in the mean time for their peaceful bearing towards all people and more especially towards William Craggar of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields yoman. G. S. P. R., Easter 37 Eliz.

11 April, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Robert Scott late of London yeoman: With Verdict that the said Robert died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sicknesse" on the present 11th inst. after seven days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz.

11 April, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of John Langton late of the said parish cutler: With Verdict that, on the 10th inst. between three and four p.m., the said John Langton and a certain Michael Pinkney late of the same parish, exchanged insulting words and had an affray in a certain place of the said parish, Michael Pinkney fighting with a rapier and John Langton fighting with a staff; in which affray Michael Pinkney with his rapier gave John Langton on the upper part of his right arm a mortal wound, of which he died within a quarter of an hour.—On his arraignment, acknowledging the indictment, Michael Pinkney asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz.

13 April, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of James Seeny late of London yeoman: With Verdict that the said James Seeny died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyning sicknes" on the present 13th inst., after three days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz.

21 April, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within the Gaol of Newgate, on view of the body of Mary Shaw late of London spinster: With Verdict that the said Mary died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyning sicknesse" on the 20th inst. after eleven days of illness. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz.

26 April, 37 Elizabeth.—Recognizance, taken before Thomas Fowler of Islington esq. J.P., of Richard Craddock of St. John's Streat co. Midd. locksmith, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said Richard Craddock's appearance at the next Session of the Peace in co. Midd., to give evidence against John Cromwell, for a certain felony of which he is suspected. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz.

28 April, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within the Gaol of Newgate on view of the body of William Esson late of London yeoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said William died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyning sicknesse" on the 27th inst., after a day's illness. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz.

1 May, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within the Gaol of Newgate on view of the body of Richard Wallys late of London yeoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said Richard died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyning sicknesse" on the 29th of last April, after twelve days' illness. G. D. R.. 2 May, 37 Eliz.

31 May, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the parish of St. Leonard-in-Shordiche co. Midd., on view of the body of Nicholas Tompson, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said Nicholas, at his dwelling-house in the said parish, died by Divine Visitation of the infirmity called "a pyninge sicknes" on the 29th inst., after three days of illness. G. D. R., 3 Sept., 37 Eliz.

28 June, 37 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin Hopton knt. J.P., of Richard Hurste of the parish of St. Buttolph without Bushopsgate vintenour, and Thomas Hurste of the parish of St. Buttolph without Aldgate merchant-taylor, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Teale Magansa van Gulique in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Teale Magansa van Gulique at the next Session for Middlesex, to answer "for a mutineus conspiracy by him and others against Mr. Tice Fersis?" G. D. R., 10 July, 37 Eliz.

28 June, 37 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin Hopton knt. J.P., of Anthony Wryte of St. Katherin's co. Midd. yeoman and John Edwards of Blackefryers London lynnen-draper, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Walter Myhelson of St. Katherin's aforesaid joyner, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Walter's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "for that he was charged with the suspicion of stealinge a Signe in St. Katherine's." G. D. R., 10 July, 37 Eliz.

28 June, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Stepney co. Midd. on view of the body of Richard Achan late of London gentleman: With verdict that, on the 27th inst. between five and six p.m., the said Richard Achan and a certain William Carvell late of London gentleman, being together at Stepney in the "London fielde," exchanged insulting words, and drawing forth their rapiers made an affray with one another, in which affray William Carvell with his sword gave Richard Achan a mortal wound, of which he then and there instantly died. G. D. R., 3 Sept., 37 Eliz.

8 September, 37 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Southall in the parish of Heese co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Weekes alias Hartrowe late of London gentleman and Thomas Simpson late of London yoman, assaulted Thomas Kidwell on the highway, and robbed him of forty-six pounds nine shillings and ninepence of numbered money. On their arraignment Thomas Sympson put himself 'Guilty' and was sentenced to be hung; but Richard Weekes, standing silent, was committed to the peine dure, the clerical memorandum over his name in the bill being, "Mutum se tenet Ideo consideratum est per Curiam quod eat ad penam duram." G. D. R., 3 Oct., 37 Eliz.

8 September, 37 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at Hampsted co. Midd. and in Warne Lane near the highway leading from London to Edgeware, John Hurford alias Marvyn alias Browne yoman, and Th6mas Simpson yoman, and Richard Weekes alias Hartrowe gentleman, all late of London, assaulted George Beer late Hampsted laborer; that the said Thomas Simpson with a dagg charged with powder and ball then and there shot the same George Beer in the said lane at Wilsdon in Hampsted, giving him on his forehead a mortal wound, of which he languished from the said 8 Sept. 37 Eliz. to the 13th day of the same month of September, on which lastnamed day he died; and that John Hurford &c. aforesaid was present with the said Thomas Simpson, aiding and encouraging him thus to murder George Beere. Putting himself 'Guilty,' George Hurford was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz.

13 September, 37 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Hampsted co. Midd. on view of the body of George Bere, there lying dead: With Verdict that, in the night of the 8th inst. between the hours eleven and twelve p.m. the said George Bere was at Wilsdon co. Midd. in God's and the Queen's peace, when he was assaulted by Thomas Sympson yoman, Richard Weekes alias Hartrowe gentleman and John Marvyn gentleman, all late of London, and that with a certain instrument charged with powder and ball Thomas Sympson shot the said George Bere in the forehead, giving him a mortal wound of which he died on the present 13th inst.; and Further that Richard Weekes alias Hartrowe and John Marvyn were present at Wilsdon, aiding and abetting the same Thomas Sympson to commit the said felony and murder. On the bill appear clerical memoranda that Thomas Sympson put himself 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung, that John Marvyn was at large, and that Richard Weekes alias Hartrowe held silence, wherefore it was adjudged "quod eat ad penam duram." G. D. R., 3 Oct., 37 Eliz.

21 October, 37 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Young esq. J.P., of George Pullyard of Easte Smithfield co. Midd. shoemaker and Peter Cornellis of the same place knifemaker, in ten pounds each, and of Henry Milles of the same place carpenter, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Henry Milles's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, and his forbearance in the meanwhile from building a certain new house, lately by him erected in Easte Smithfield against the form of the statute in that case provided. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 38 Eliz.

6 November, 37 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Paddington co. Midd. on the said day, Philip Collyn alias Osborne, late of London yoman, stole "vnum equum castratum vocat' a Geldinge" of roane colour, worth eight pounds, and a graye geldinge worth eight pounds, of the goods and chattels of William Morgan esq. Refusing to speak, Philip Collyn was committed to the peine forte et dure. Stat mutus Ideo cons' est p' cur' qd. habebit penam fort' et dur'. G. D. R., 1 Dec, 40 Eliz.

8 December, 38 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the night of the said day between eleven and twelve p.m., Robert Howarde and James Greye, both late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the house of George Royle at Hadley co. Midd., and stole therefrom a womman's gowne trimmed with violet-coloured velvet lace worth five pounds, a flannell petticote trimmed with "billament lace" worth thirty shillings, a woman's kyrtle trimmed with tawney-coloured "billament lace" worth forty shillings, a woman's kyrtle of puke-colour worth thirteen shillings and fourpence, a hatt worth twelve shillings, a taffeta apron worth twenty shillings, a woollen-cloth keverlett worth five pounds, two pairs of wemmen's stockens of violet colour worth six shillings, six shirtebandes worth ten shillings, a cubbardcloth of "seal" worth ten shillings, a child's vestment called a faceclothe worth seven shillings, a gold ring worth six shillings and eightpence, six woollen-cloth cushinges worth fifty shillings, the valence of a bedd worth three pounds, five woollencloth curtens worth thirty shillings, "unum parr geminorum argenti . . . vocat' a paire of bracelettes of silver innamelled ad valenciam xiiis. iiiid.," and forty-eight shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods and chattels of the said George Royle. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 38 Eliz.