Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1612

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

78-84

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1612', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 78-84. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65988 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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1612

6 January, 9 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any other place of Common Prayer on the said day nor for the six months then next following, against Joan Davyson wife of Richard Davyson taylor, Fardinand Emerson cutler, Joan Emerson his wife, Joan Hutchenson widow, Isabel Moodye wife of George Moodye taylor, John Dam alias Adam cutler, William Champney yoman, William Mathewes cutler, Margaret wife of William Woodfall taylor, Susanna Saule wife of Edward Saule gentleman, William Cooke gentle man, his wife Mary Cooke, Elizabeth Everidge spinster, Catherine Parker spinster, Ann Hippon widow, Ann Douce widow, Francis Hut ton shoomaker, Ambrose Beswicke yoman, Joan Strang wife of Thomas Strang taylor, John Coe stacioner, his wife Hellen Coe, Thomas Knighte scrivener, his wife Joan Knighte, George Matchet yoman, John Freake glasier, Thomas Hayward cobler, his wife Mary Hayward, William Sutton yoman, his wife Sara Sutton, Thurstan Field shoemaker, his wife Margaret Field, Joan Gressam wife of Richard Gressam carpinter, Nicholas Bosgrave gentleman, Thomas Bateman ymbrotherer, his wife Mary Bateman and Mary Dickenson spinster, all late of St. Andrew's in Holborn co. Midd. G. D. R.., 3 July, 10 James I.

4 March, 9 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Francis Darcy, Sir Richard Wiggmore, Sir Gedeon Awnsham knts., and Valentine Saunders, Edward Vaghan and Henry Spyller esqs., Justices of the Peace, assembled at 'The Three Doves' in Newbraineford co. Midd., of Henry Tunstall of Newbraineford aforesaid yoman, in the sum of forty pounds, and Richard Hawford of the same place shoemaker in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Henry Tunstall's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, to answer "for not punishing of Rogues accordinge to the lawe, beinge delivered vnto him by the Highe Constable." S. P. Reg.

25 March, 10 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of Common Prayer on the said day nor during the three months next following, against Mary Lunne widow, Mary Hildesham spinster, William Darby taylor, his wife Susannah Darby, the Lady Elizabeth Bowles, the Lady Ann Hinde widow, Alice Nashe widow, and Margaret Goodrich, wife of Robert Goodrich gentleman, all late of St. Sepulchre's parish without Newgate co. Midd. G. D. R., 3 July, 10 James I.

26 March, 10 James I.—True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on the said day, William Miller late of London yoman stole a black cow, worth three pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, of the goods and chattels of William Tipping. Found 'Guilty,' William Miller asked for the book, read it and was burnt. G. D. R., 13 Aug., 10 James I.

7 April, 10 James I.—True Bill against Agnes Godfrey, late of Endfeild co. Midd. spinster (sic), for practising certain devilish arts, called witchcraftes &c, at Endfield aforesaid on the said day upon and against William Durant, so that from the said 7th of April till the 20th day of the same month he languished and wasted away and was greatly injured in his body.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same Agnes Godfrey, wife of John Godfrey late of Endfeild yoman, for practising witchcraft at Endfield aforesaid on the 7th of April, 10 James I., upon and against William Coxe, so that he languished thereof till the 7th of April, 11 James I., on which day he died of the said practice, being thus murdered by the same Agnes Godfrey.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same Agnes Godfrey, for practising witchcraft on the 2nd of July, 10 James I., at Endfield against Robert Coxe, so that he languished thereof till the 3rd day of July then next following, when he died, being thus murdered by the said Agnes Godfrey.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same Agnes Godfrey, for practising witchcraft on the 7th of February, 16 James I., at Endfeild upon and against Henry Butterfield, so that he died thereof on the 7th of March, then next following, being thus murdered by the same Agnes Godfrey.—Described in one of these indictments as spinster, Agnes is in all the other bills described as the wife of John Godfrey yoman. Nothing is said in the indictments of the age of any one of the alleged sufferers from Agnes Godfrey's witchcraft. Putting herself 'Not Guilty' to each of these indictments Agnes Godfrey was acquitted of all of them. G. D. R., 16 May, 19 James I.

28 May, 10 James I.—Record of sentence passed, at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate of that date, upon William Scotte alias Craiforde alias Waintworthe "for treason beinge a seminary preiste and retorninge and abidinge within this kingdome"; the Sentence being the usual order for the traitor to be drawn to and hanged at Tyburne dismembered, disbowelled, beheaded quartered &c. drawing to and hanging at Tyburne, dismembering, embowelling, quartering &c. &c. G. D. Reg.

1 June, 10 James I.—True Bill against Anne Windsor spinster, Grace Finche spinster, Rowland Mather yoman, his wife Margaret Mather, Mary Stone spinster, Susan Stone spinster, Jane Skeynidge spinster, Nicholas Bosgrave yoman, all of St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd.; and Frances James spinster, Elizabeth Mallard widow, Charity Hilliard spinster, Anne Tanner spinster, and Thomas Sleepe yoman, all five of St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd.,—for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said 1st of June, nor at any time during the twelve months then next following. G. D. R., 30 June, 11 James I.

1 June, 10 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Hill and John Newporte, both late of the said parish yomen, stole one hundred and twenty gems called pearles worth two shillings and sixpence each, two hundred and threescore pearles worth sixpence each, and one hundred and fifty gems called pearles worth threepence each, and "a gold ringe enameled" worth seven shillings, of the goods and chattels of Henry Batten. John Neweporte was at large. Found 'Guilty,' Francis Hill asked for the book, read it and was burnt. G. D. R., . . . . 10 James I.

20 June, 10 James I.—True Bill that, at St. James's in Clerken well co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Finche late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Elianore Warde and "adtunc et ibidem eandem Elianoram contra voluntatem et sine consensu ejusdem Elianore felonice rapuit et carnaliter cognovit." Robert Finche was at large. G. D. R., 13 Aug., 10 James I.

3 July, 10 James I.—Ordered, that the Clerk of the Peace for Middlesex "shall not record or certifye any conviction" of recusancy against Peter Grevyll and Charles Grevyll, on account of their neglect to yield their bodies &c. on certain indictments "for forbearinge to come to churche" during a certain three months, preferred against them at the last Session of the Peace; the Order being made on evidence that the said Peter and Charles were never in Middlesex during those months, and "did not make any abode at St. Clementes Danes." G. D. Reg.

5 July, 10 James I.—True Rill that, at St. Andrew's in Holborn co. Midd. on the said Sabboth Day, James Wilson late of the said parish gentleman gathered to himself very many unknown persons in a certain place called Eely Feild, and did play with them a certain unlawful game called footeball. G. D. R., 13 Aug., 10 James I.

7 July, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Brett knt. J.P., of Thomas Slow of Endfeild co. Midd. victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Thomas Guddison gentleman and William Hawlsey tayler, both of Endfeild aforesaid, in the sum of ten pounds each; under condition "That the said Thomas Slow shall appear at the next Sessions, to be holden for the Countye at the Signe of the Castle in St. John's Street, and then and there answer for his misdemeanor, for that he victualleth without lycence and harboreth vagrants and idle people in his howse which lyeth in the hye way all the daye longe, and shall abide such order as his Majestes Justices in that case shall thinke meete."—This bill of recognizances should have the reader's attention, as it is one of the last of such bills, lying amongst the Middlesex MSS., to make mention of The Castle in St. John's Street, and one of the very few of such bills in which 'The Castle' is spoken of as "a Sign." After the Middlesex Justices took possession of the new hall, built for them in St. John's Street by Sir Baptist Hickes, and called "Hickes Hall" in the Middlesex records after its builder, it is not often that the searcher of those records comes upon a reference to the tavern, under the sign of the Castle, in which justice was dispensed for so many years to the people of Middlesex. G. D. R., 13 Aug., 10 James I.

8 July, 10 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Edward Strickeland gentleman, William Hickes laborer, and Christopher Myles bowyer, all three late of the said parish, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Sir Thomas Lake knt., with the intention of despoiling the same Sir Thomas, and then and there put both him and his servant Thomas Sayre in fear and danger of life. Found 'Guilty,' all three culprits were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 10 James I.

9 July, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Francis Carew alias Davey knt. at Isleworth co. Midd., of Ninus Layne of St. Olive's in the city of London and . . . . in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Edward Flooud of New Braynford co. Midd. in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Edward Flooud's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for the said county, to answer &c. "conserning a Curtayne Clooke which was found in his custody, the which not longe before was feloniouslye taken out of the howse of the Lady Keligway without Algate." G. D. R., 13 Aug., 10 James I.

25 July, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Bestney esq. J.P., of Lawrence Jenninges taylor, William Greene taylor and Edward Robertes gardiner, all three of the parish of Whitechappell co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said Lawrence Jenninge's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., to answer &c., he being suspected "for stealinge vi li. of Tobacco." G. D. R., 13 Aug., 10 James I.

18 August, 10 James I.—Memorandum that Magdalen, wife of William Smythe of Endfield husbandman is delivered in bail to mainpernors "for that shee being a schoolemistress intyced the childe of Thomas Warde to steale from hir father."—This memorandum appears amongst the minutes of proceedings at the Session of Peace, held on the said day at the Castle in St. John's Streete co. Midd. before Sir William Waad knt. and Lieutenant of the Tower of London, Sir Gedeon Awnsham knt., Sir William Smythe knt., and Valentine Saunders, Edward Vaughan, Henry Spyller, Nicholas Kempe, Edward Dobledaye, Nicholas Collyn, Thomas Saunderson and Nicholas Bestney, esquires, Justices of the Peace:—the last Session of the Peace held at The Castle. S. P. Reg.

27 September, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before John Hare esq. J.P., of John Spilsbery (?), Arthur Felder and John . . . ., all three of the parish of St. . . . . near Aldersgate London whitbakers, and Richard Wentford of Whitefriers London, John Brekett of Fryern co. Midd. laborer, and Thomas Lucy of Totteridge co. Hert. laborer in the sum of . . . . each; For the appearance of each of the said persons, bound by the bill, "at the next Sessions to be holden for the County of Midd. and there give evidence agaynst Henry Conyngsby, Phillipp Conyngsby and William Wiggett and everye of them concerninge the death of Walter Lucy lately slayne at Whetstone in the Countye of Midd."—Also, the Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, of Henr Conyngsby and Phillip Conyngsby both of Twigmore co. Lincolne gentlemen, and of Phillip Briscoe and Ralph Briscoe both of Chippinge Barnett co. Hertford gentleman in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Henry Conyngesby and Phillipp Conynsgby at the next Sessions to be holden for the co. of Midd., to answer &c. "concerning the death of Walter Lucy lately slayne at Whetstone co. Midd." G. D. R, . . . ., 10 James I.

1 October, 10 James I.—Remarkable Order touching the Fortune Play-House, made at the General Session of the Peace, held on the said day at Westminster before Sir Thomas Fowler, William Bowyer, Gedeon Awnsham, Robert Ashebye, Ralph Conyngsbye, Baptiste Hickes and William Smyth knts. and Valentine Saunders, Richard Brownlowe, Edward Dobledaye, Henry Spyller, Nicholas Collyn, Ralph Hawtrey, Francis Roberts, Thomas Saunderson, George Gouldman Doctor of Sacred Theology, Nicholas Bestney and Mathew Smale esqs., Justices of the Peace.—"An Order for suppressinge of Jigges att the ende of Playes.—Whereas Complaynte have (sic) beene made at this last Generall Sessions that by reason of certayne lewde Jigges songes and daunces vsed and accustomed at the play-house called the Fortune in Gouldinglane divers cutt-purses and other lewde and ill disposed persons in greate multitudes doe resorte thither at th'end of euerye playe many tymes causinge tumultes and outrages wherebye His Majesties peace is often broke and much mischiefe like to ensue thereby, Itt was hereuppon expresselye commaunded and ordered by the Justices of the said benche That all Actors of euerye playehouse within this cittye and liberties thereof and in the Countye of Middlesex that they and euerie of them utterlye abolishe all Jigges Rymes and Daunces after their playes And not to tollerate permitt or suffer anye of them to be used vpon payne of ymprisonment and puttinge downe and suppressinge of theire playes, And such further punishment to be inflicted upon them as their offences shall deserve And that if any outrage tumult or like disorder as aforesaid should be committed or done that then the partyes so offending should forthwith be apprehended and punished accordinge to theire demeritt For the better suppressinge of which abuses and outrages These are to will and require you and in His Majesties name streightelye to charge and commaunde you that you diligently and stryctlye looke vnto the performaunce of the same order And that if either the players do persiste and contynewe their sayd Jiggs daunces or songes as aforesayd or any disordered persons doe committ or attempt any violence or outrage in or about the sayd playe-houses That then you apprehend all and euerie such person of either kind so offendinge and forthwith bringe them before me or some other of His Majesties Justices of Peace to answeare theire contemptes and further to be dealt [with] as to Justice shall appertayne.— By the Court. S. P. Reg.

1 October, 10 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, on the said day nor during the four next following months, against Thomas Warde of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. gentleman. G. D. R., . . . ., 10 James I.

15 October, 10 James I.—True Bill against Daniel Knowlinge late of New Brainford co. Midd. chaundelor, Drugo Lovett late of Highe Holborne goldsmith, Mary Gower late of St. James's Clerkenwell widow; and William Sutton dyer and his wife Mary Sutton, both late of Saffron Hill,—for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said 15th of October, nor at any time during the six months then next following. G. D. R., 19 May, 11 James I.