Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1624

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

176-186

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1624', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 176-186. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66000 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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Contents

1624

13 January, 21 James I.—Ordered, that "henceforth noe person or persons which shall be convented before any of the said Justices of the Peace and accused for bawdrye or whoredom shalbe lett to baile, unles he or they can finde two sufficient househoulders, whereof one of them be a subsidie man, to enter into a recognizance to his Majesties use, for his or theire personall appearance at the next Session of the Peace." In the preamble to this order mention is made of "the many lewd and loose percons dwelling neere unto the skirts of the city of London within the County of Midd. in Turnemill Street and other places, who keepe common and notorious brothell houses and harboure and entertaine divers impudent and infamous queanes &c." S. P. Reg.

5 February, 21 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Roger Horton esq. J.P., of George Underwood of Fanshawe Streete draper, Edmund Iverson of St. Buttolls-without-Bushipgate haberdasher, Nathaniell Weller of Fleete Streete gentleman, and John Perry of St. Buttolls aforesaid merchaunt taylor, all four in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of the said George Underwood and John Perry at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answer for cheating Francis Brough of an imbrodered pettecote of the value of 300 li." G. D. R, 18 Feb., 21 James I.

20 February, 21 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Lewes Lewkenor knt. J.P., of Richard Askew victualler and Francis Salter silkweaver, both of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Richard Lambert of St. Sepulchre's yeoman, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said Richard Lambert's appearance "at the next Sessions to answer the complaint of Richard Warner, Master of the Kinges Barge, beinge by him suspected to have pickt his pockett, and to have taken away his purse with fiftene poundes of golde in itt." G. D. R., 9 April, 22 James I.

23 February, 21 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Longe late of St. Giles's aforesaid labourer stole a weather sheep worth sixteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of Rose Hart widow. Confessing the indictment John Longe asked for the book, read it, and was branded. G. D. R., 9 April, 22 James I.

24 February, 21 James I.—True Bill that, at Chancery Lane co. Midd. on the said day and from that day till the 8th of April, 22 James I., Usall Perry, Edward Smith, John Wotten, Richard Chaney, William Lambe, Nicholas Olliver, George Howland and John Cotterell, all eight of the said lane yomen, received into their said dwelling-houses "subtenentes anglice inmates cum suis familiis et eosdem subtenentes custodiverunt et quilibet eorum custodivit . . . . ad magnum periculum inficiendi diversos inhabitancium ibidem cum pestilencia et aliis morbis" = inmates with their families and kept the same sub tenents . . . . to the great peril of infecting divers of those dwelling there with the plague and other diseases. S. P. R., 12 May, 22 James I. This Session of the Peace was held at Hickes Hall on the said day of May. The file in its present state has no calendar or charge-sheet, but the indictments preserved in the packet—indictiments for breaches of the peace, selling ale without licence, keeping brothels, harbouring inmates and other misdemeanours—show the comparatively trivial matters dealt with by the Justices.

19 March, 21 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. Anthony Ellis late of St. Giles's aforesaid yoman and Humphrey Harecourt of the same parish yoman beat and maltreated Margaret Canwell wife of John Canwell.—Also, a True Bill against the same Anthony Ellis and Humphrey Harecourt, for assaulting beating and wounding, at the same parish and on the same day, Jeremiah Harris, constable of the said parish, when in the performance of his duty.—Convicted of the assaults on Margaret Canwell and the Constable, Anthony Ellis was fined twenty-five pounds, and taken back (retro prehensus) for a year and a day, for each assault. Acquitted of the assault on Margaret, but convicted of the assault on the constable, Humphrey Harecourt was fined forty pounds, and taken back for a year and a day. G. D. R., 9 April, 22 James. I.

20 March, 21 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Antony Arrington late of the said parish yoman stole a silver bowle worth forty shillings. Found 'Guilty,' Antony Arrington pleaded his clergy, read the book and was branded. G. D. R., 9 April, 22 James I.

21 March, 21 James I.—True Bill that, at the Savoy alias the Strand co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Cotten and Walter Stokes, both of the Savoy aforesaid, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Anthony Stonier, and stole therefrom a diamond ringe worth three pounds, a greate signett ringe of gould with armes worth thirty shillings, two little gould ringes worth seven shillings, one other gould ringe worth two shillings, a faire pearle worth ten shillings, a gould bracelett with a flagon cheine with two peices of inambled worke worth four pounds, a silver bodkin worth one shilling, "unum galerum castorium anglice a beuer hatt worth forty shillings," a blacke silke sipers band worth two shillings, foure fine handkercheifes worth three shillings, a box of gould waightes worth four shillings, and eighty-seven pounds in numbered money, of the goods and chattels of Joyce Jefferies. Putting themselves 'Not Guilty' Richard Cotten and Walter Stokes were acquitted. G. D. R., 9 April, 22 James I.

25 March, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, William Baynham late of the said parish yoman stole a sword worth ten shillings and ten handkerchiefs worth five shillings. Found 'Guilty' William Baynham asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R., 9 April, 22 James I.

9 April, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Nathaniel Tindall alias Grindall late of Whitechappell co. Midd. yoman killed and murdered his wife Joan Tindall alias Grindall by striking her on the throat and left breast with a knife, and so giving her two mortal wounds of which she then and there died instantly. At the head of the bill this memorandum, "Cogn Sus p'pe domum ubi perpetravit murdrum." Confessing the indictment Nathaniel Tindall alias Grindall was sentenced to be hung near the house where he committed the murder. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 22 James I.

20 May, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. on the said day, George Lewis late of the said parish yeoman killed and murdered William Sharpe, by giving him in the belly with a sword a mortal wound, of which he died on the 22nd day of the same month. Putting himself 'Not Guilty' of Murder, George Lewis was acquitted of Murder and convicted of Manslaughter. G. D. R., 25 June, 22 James I.

25 May, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. in the night of the said day, George Dugdale and Edward Coleman, both late of Westminster aforesaid labourers, broke burglariously into the house of Sir John Byrom knt., and stole therefrom three pewter (plumbeos) pye-plates worth eight shillings, two voyder dishes worth ten shillings and eighteene other "discos plumbeos" anglice pewter dishes worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir John Byrom, knt. Putting himself 'Not Guilty' George Dugdale was acquitted. Found 'Not Guilty' of burglary but 'Guilty' of felonious stealing, Edward Coleman asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R. 25 June, 22 James I.

27 May, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther, esq. J.P., of Edward Patchet of Carterlayne London cordwayner and William Carpenter of Artillerylayne chaundler, in the sum of twenty pounds each; for the appearance of Joyce Lyde, wife of William Lyde of Fosterlayne chaundler, at the next Session of the Peace, she having been "taken wandering about twelve of ye clock in ye night tyme in ye companie of a young man by ye Watch of Grubstreet." G. S. P. R., Midsummer, 22 James I.

29 May, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Fulham co. Midd. on the said day, Andrew Symons late of the said parish labourer, stole an iron chest worth ten shillings, a silver bason worth eight pounds, a silver ewer worth seven pounds, a silver-gilt salt worth five pounds, and ten silver spoons worth fifty shillings, being in the said chest, of the goods and chattels of Sir John Gill knt. Putting himself 'Not Guilty' Andrew Symonswas acquitted. G. D. R, 25 June, 22 James I.

29 May, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir John Leman knt. J.P., of John Hooper of St. Margaret's-in-Westminster, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said John Hooper's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, in the sum of twenty pounds, to give evidence against George Dugdale and Edward Coleman "for breaking into Sir John Byrom's house at Westminster." G. D. R., 25 June, 22 James I.

29 May, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of William Harris of Aldersgatestreet London, in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of Wyman Bassome gentleman at the next Session of the Peace, and for his good behaviour in the mean time, he having been "taken walking vpp and downe in ye streets about two of ye clock in ye night tyme by ye Watch of Grubstreet and charged by Francis Lenton to have his beever hatt." G. S. P. R., Midsummer, 22 James I.

30 May, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Richard Face of Oxford gentleman and Francis Lenton of Grays Inn co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Francis Lenton at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, and for his good conduct in the mean time, he having been "taken about two o'clock in ye night by ye Watch of Grubstreet, and to answer the complaint of Wyman Bassome gentleman concerning a beever hatt which he sayth Mr. Lenton tooke from him." G. S. P. R., Midsummer, 22 James I.

1 June, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before William Daniell esq. J. P., of Anthony Carter alias Church of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Anthony Church's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, there to prosecute a bill of indictment against Joseph Hudlestone esq. being accused to be a Seminarie Priest and to be a common seduser of His Majestie's people from their religion."—Also, on the same file, Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace; For the appearance of John Clarke, tailor, his wife Isabel Clarke and Katherine Church, wife of Anthony Church, all of St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. at the next Gaol Delivery to give evidence against the same Joseph Huddlestone. G. D. R. 25 June, 22 James I.

12 June, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Richard Ashtoun of Oldstreet co. Midd. blacksmith and John Mathews of St. Johnstreet co. Midd. nayler, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Alice Carter widdow at the next General Session of the Peace, to answer to a charge of "having lyved incontinently for ye space of a yeere and more with one Anthony Gale under colour of being married unto him." G. S. P. R., Midsummer, 22 James I.

12 June, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Allen Apsley knt. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of William Paxall gentleman and Robert Ewbanck vintner, both of St. Katherine's near the Tower of London, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Anthony Whaley of the same precinct of St. Katherine gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Anthony Whaley's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer to such matters as shall be charged against him "by Samuell Baker gentleman belonging to the Prince's Court."—G. S. P. R., Midsummer (23 June) 22 James I.—It should be observed that this is the first Midsummer General Session of the Peace Roll, to be found amongst the Middlesex MSS. Only a portion of the wrapper remains, and this defaced fragment of the wrapper does not in its present state show where the Session was held. As the fragmentary roll has lost its calendar, the editor can give no general view of the charges on which the Justices of the Peace adjudicated.

19 June, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Allen Apsley knt. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Thomas Ravening of the Liberty of the said Tower, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Thomas Ravening's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to prefer an indictment and "prosecute the same against one Thomas Holdich for certeine speeches which the said Holdich is there bound to answer concerning the late Queene Elizabeth and His present Majestie." G. D. R., 25 June, 22 James I.

18 July, 22 James I.—True Bill that, on the said day at High Holborne co. Midd., John Whittakers and Abraham Allen alias Pendleborough both late of High Holborne aforesaid yomen stole and carried away "unam picturam deauratam anglice a picture with a case of silver" worth twenty shillings, another picture with a case of ebonye worth twenty shillings, a scarfe embrodered with silver worth ten shillings, a gould hatband worth . . . shillings, a paire of greene silke stockinges worth ten shillings, "unam pixidem deauratam anglice a silver ciuett box" worth twenty shillings, four paire of silke stockinges worth forty shillings, a gould quoife worth fifteen shillings, "un' plagul' anglice a croseclothe" worth fifteen shillings, a blacke silke scarfe embroydered with silver worth twenty shillings, "un' galeric' anglice a gould hatband" worth five shillings, "duas pursas anglice two purses" worth ten shillings, a picture with a silver case worth twenty shillings, another picture with a case of ebony worth five shillings, a gould seale with a stone in it worth ten shillings, a silver tablet worth thirty shillings, a gould ringe worth five shillings, a head-bracelett of gould enambled sett with twenty-three sparkes of diamondes worth eighty pounds, an eare jewell set with seven sparkes of diamondes worth ten . . ., a crosse sett with nine green sparkes of diamondes worth thirty shillings, a rose-jewell sett with seven rubies worth ten pounds, an eare jewell of pearle with a harte of gould worth . . . ., a "little chaine of gould diamond cutt" worth five pounds, a silver picture worth twenty shillings, a purse of glasse bugle worth five shillings, "one paire of knifes with redd haftes and damaske" worth five shillings, "a knife with a silver and jeate hafte" worth two shillings, four paire of ribban roses worth four shillings, a paire of spangle roses worth five shillings, a silver chaine with a paire of silver flowers worth . . . . shillings, a silke and silver woven ribban with five knoppes of silver worth ten shillings, a bracelet worth a shilling, three "quarters of fine cambricke" worth five shillings, " an old crimson wire girdle" worth two shillings, "one old silver and gould hatband" worth one shilling, "a paire of . . . . garters with gould and silver spangle lace" worth five shillings, two cambricke handkercheifes . . . . bone lace" worth five shillings, a glasse frame of silver guilte enambled with . . . ." worth . . . ., a cambricke smocke sleeve edged with bone lace worth two shillings, a blacke enameled gould ringe worth fifteen shillings, a jewell with nine diamondes and three pendantes hangeinge at it worth ten pounds, a feather-jewel worth three pounds, and one hundred and fifty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of a certain Venetia Standeley. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' John Whittakers was acquitted. Found 'Guilty,' Abraham Allen alias Pendleborough asked for the book, could not read it, and was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 22 James I.

29 July, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Muskett late of the said parish spinster killed and murdered Clement Harrison, a girl of the age of eight years, by seizing the said Clement with both hands, and throwing her "in quoddam flumen vocatum the newe River." Acquitting her of Murder, the Jury found that she was a lunatic, and whilst 'non compos mentis' had drowned the said Clement Harrison. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 22 James I.

30 July, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before William Duckett esq. J.P., of Henry Theodoricke of . . . . in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Henry Theodoricke's appearance at the next Session . . . . for Middlesex, to give evidence "against John Senton for wishing confusion to our armie now gon into the Lowe Cuntries." S. P. R. . . . . 22 James I.

24 August, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Simon Mus kett esq. J.P., of John Hooper of Ratcliffe joyner, in the sum of ten pounds, and Thomas Cox of the same place carver, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Thomas Cox's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, "to answere for dividing one house into seaven tenements, and in the meane tyme to do his endevor to avoyde inmates." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 22 James I.

1 September, 22 James I.—Order for the correction of a runaway apprentice.—Forasmuch as it appeared to this Court this present day that Robert Ratee, the sonne of John Ratee labourer, being bound an apprentice according to the lawe by the Churchwardens and Overseers of the poore of the parishe of Iver in the county of Bucks, to Sir John Lawrence knight, hath departed without licence out of His Master's service, and doth obstinatelie refuse to serve him,—It is therefore Ordered that the said Robert Ratee shalbe committed to the House of Correction for this County and there to contynewe untill he shall become bound with good sureties to his said Master, to serve oute his tyme according to his said indentures and to be of good behaviour. S. P. Reg.

9 September, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Francis Williamson esq. J.P., of Edward Fleetwood of Lyncolns Inn co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Edward Fleetwood's appearance at the next Session of . . . . for Middlesex, to give evidence against Thomas Hoskins "for suspicion of breaking open of two chambers in Lincolnes Inn, the one Mr. Thomas Wentworth's chamber and taking from thence three gownes and the other being Mr. George Scott's chamber, and with taking from thence the better parte of three gownes." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 22 James I.

20 September, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Herstbye of the said parish spinster stole one pair of sheets worth forty shillings, a pewter chamber pott worth two shillings, and one pecke of flower worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of Sir Edward Leeche knt. Putting herself 'Not Guilty,' Alice Herstbye was acquitted. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 22 James I.

22 September, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Henry Banister esq. J.P., of Nicholas Hatch of Goldinge Lane co. Midd. coachmaker, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Nicholas Hatch's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for breaking of gates at Stoke Newington in devyne service tyme." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 22 James I.

25 September, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Simon Muskett esq. J.P., of Thomas Reynolds chandler and Henry Garrett needle-maker, both of Whitechappell co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and Richard Harris of Whitechappell victuler, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Richard Harris's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answere "for devideinge one house into 3 tenements and letting them to 3 men and their wives as Inmates." G, S. P. R., Michaelmas, 22 James I.

27 September, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Saunderson, esq. J.P., of Richard Tompson gunsmith and Edward Bendy laborer, both of Eastsmithfeild co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Walter Caine of Eastsmithfeild aforesaid laborer, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Walter Caine's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for abusing the Wardens and Company of the Barber Surgeons." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 22 James I.

30 September, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before John Bayliffe . . . . of John George of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields taylor, in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said John George at the next Gaole Delivery for Middlesex, to prefer and prosecute an indictment against Judith Musgrove, wife of Henry Musgrove of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, "for breaking into his house in the night, and for there violently assaulting and beating his wife soe outrageously, as that thereof shortly after she dyed." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 22 James I.

2 October, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Francis Williamson esq, J.P., of Thomas Buckle of St. Dunstan's-in-le-West yeoman, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Thomas Buckle's appearance at the next Session of . . . . for Middlesex, to "indite prosecute and give evidence against Edward Muggeridge, for seducing away his servants from their religion." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 22 James I.

6 October, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before William Daniell esq. J.P., of Edward Irby of the parish of Allhallowes London grocer, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Edward Irby's appearance at the next Gaole Deliuery for Middlesex, to give "evidence against Elizabeth Paine concerning the felonious stealing of a peece of imbrodered Peropus from the Right Honble. the Earle of Bridgwater and by her sold to the said Irby." S. P. R. . . . . 22 James I.

20 October, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Heston co. Midd. on the said day, Hewes Gower late of Heston aforesaid labourer stole one wether sheep worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of Henry Dewell, gentleman. Confessing the indictment, Hewes Gower pleaded his clergy, read the book and was branded. G. D. R., . . . . 22 James I.

22 October, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. on the said day, Samuel Sawyer and William Sawyer, both late of Edmonton aforesaid laborers, stole and carried away one ewe sheepe worth eight shillings, of the goods and chattels of a certain Edward Bilcock. Over Samuel Sawyer's name in the first line of the indictment, appears the memorandum "Po se cul ad xd. ca null flag."= Putting himself on trial Samuel Sawyer was found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of ten pence, had no chattels for forfeiture and was sentenced to be whipt. Over William Sawyer's name, the clerk wrote between the first and second lines of the bill "Po se cul et vt supra" = Puts himself &c.; 'Guilty,' and as above. Both the culprits were flogged for an offence that, had the law been enforced strictly, would have sent them both to the gallows. G. D. R. . . . . 22 James I.

23 October, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Saunderson esq. J.P., of William Brooke of St. Michael's, Bashinshaw London smith and Stephen Hosier of St. James's Westminster, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Dorothy Turner at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for cruelly beatinge and abusinge her husband Anthony Turner." S. P. R. . . 22 James I.

30 October, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at the parish of Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Nicholas Finche late of Pettycote Lane in the said parish yoman stole two boxes worth two-pence and sixty-six stones called diamonds worth a hundred pounds, of the goods and chattels of Peter Requesence. Nicholas Finche put himself 'Not Guilty,' but his trial was deferred by order of the Court, because he was indicted for the same offence in London. G. D. R. . . . . 22 James I.

2 November, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Walcot esq. J.P., of Henry Gillingham and Joseph Bradford, both of Duckes Lane London glovers, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Thomas Collins also of Duckes Lane glover, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Thomas Collins's good behaviour, and also for his appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer to "the complaint of the Officers of the Fortune plaiehouse." S. P. R. . . . . 22 James I.

8 November, 22 James I.—Recognizances, taken before George Longe esq. J.P., of James Squire and Simon Cooke both of Turmil streete bucklemakers, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Sara Phillips at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex and in the mean time for her good behaviour, "she being a suspected whore and being one of the company that vpon the Sabboth Day was routously assembled at the Red Crosse in St. John's Streete to daunce for a garland." S. P. R. . . . . 22 James I.

20 November, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Turnemill Streete co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Price late of the said street spinster stole one paire of sheetes worth three shillings, one rugg worth six shillings, and a blanckett worth eighteen pence, of the goods and chattels of Margaret Goodale, widow. Over her name at the bill's head appears this noteworthy memorandum "Po se cul ad ixs ca null cre sedm form statut"=She puts herself 'Not Guilty,' is found 'Guilty' to nine shillings, is burnt according to the form of the Statute. G. D. R. . . . . 22 James I.

25 November, 22 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Francis Wiliamson esq. J.P., of Peter Hitchins of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. yeoman, in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of the said Peter Hitchins at the next Session . . . . for Middlesex, to give evidence "against Richard Barken for suspicion of taking 4 Mellagstoone trees, 4 Apricock trees, 4 Plumm trees, 3 Nectren trees, and two May Cherrie trees forth of the garden of one Mr. Whitakers of Chisweeke." S. P. R. . . . . 22 James I.

18 December, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at High Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Dethicke late of High Holborne laborer stole a graye mare worth twelve pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir John Colbrone knt. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' Thomas Dethicke was acquitted. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 22 James I.

24 December, 22 James I.—True Bill that, at Harfeild co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Marke late of Harfeild aforesaid laborer stole six cows (kyne) worth three pounds each, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Alice Countess of Darby widow. Confessing the indictment, he pleaded his clergy and was branded. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 22 James I.