Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1630

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

30-37

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1630', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 30-37. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66022 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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Contents

1630

14 January, 5 Charles I.—Order, made at S. P. at Hickes Hall, for the admission and licensing of Edward Donington of Shorditch co. Midd. victualler to keep an alehouse in the said parish, in nullification of a previous order by the Court forbidding him, as a needy man with a family likely to fall upon the parish, to establish himself at Shoreditch in that calling; the present order being made on evidence, that the certificate, which moved the Justices to make the order now rescinded, "was procured by some alehousekeepers dwelling neare the said Donington and by the landlords of the said alehouses for their particler endes," and also on testimony, given by the Rt. Honourable the Earl of Mulgrave and by the Masters of the Trinity House, "that the said Edward Donington heretofore lived in good creditt and fashion amongst his neighbours, and that of late hee was in his passage northwards surprised and taken prisoner by the Frenchmen of Warre, and not only deprived of his shipp and all his goodes therein, but was also himselfe and wife carried prisoners unto Fraunce, and stripped of all theire apparell and there detayned a longe tyme in great want and misery." S. P. Reg.

20 January, 5 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Drury Lane co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Hodges late of the said lane laborer stole and carried away one moe-haired man's gowne laced with gold twist and lyned with gray squirrell, worth twenty pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir John Danvers knt. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Hodges pleaded his clergy and was branded, and taken back to prison till he should put in good sureties for his good behaviour. G. D. R., . . . . ., 5 Charles I.

22 February, 5 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Drury Lane co. Midd. on the said day, John Pittman late of the said lane yoman, broke into the dwelling-house of Sir Richard Titchborne knight, and stole therefrom a black plush coat worth ten pounds, a blacke plush doublet worth fifty shillings, and a pair of blacke plush breeches worth sixty shillings, together with other things set forth in the bill, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Richard Titchborne knt. G. D. R., 9 April, 6 Charles I.

24 February, 5 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Charterhouselane co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Hall late of the said lane spinster stole and carried off a silver cup worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble William the Lord Gray de Warke. Found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, Elizabeth Hall was nevertheless "r' domo correccionis" = reprisoned in the House of Correction. G. D. R., . . . ., 5 Charles I.

1 March, 5 Charles I.—True Bill for not going to church &c. during two months, beginning on the said day, against Sir Ralph Ellarker late of St. Margaret's Westminster alias &c. of Risby co. York knt., Margaret Lady Curwen late of St. Margaret's Westminster alias &c. of Rottington co. Cumberland widow, George Gage of St. Margaret's Westminster alias &c. of Framefeild co. Sussex esq., and also Sir Thomas Mathews knt. and James Hamond esq., both of St. Margaret's Westminster. G. D. R., 12 May, 6 Charles I.

1 March, 5 Charles I.—True Bill for not going to church &c. during one month beginning on the said day against one hundred and twenty-nine persons, comprising—William Skippare yoman, Edward Fawne yoman, Edward Grizell yoman, Thomas Franklein yoman, Oswell Plunkett gentleman, Margaret Marquesse spinster, John Swinglehurst yoman, his wife Judith Swinglehurst, Nicholas Roberts esq., Mary Pewter spinster, Elizabeth wife of Thomas Ceeley yoman, Francis Robins yoman, George Hopkins yoman, his wife Katherine Hopkins, George Matchett gentleman, Anthony Pryce yoman, Henry Spincke yoman, all seventeen late of St. Andrew's-inHolborne; Sir William Sturton knt., Sir John Gage knt., Elizabeth Lady Browne widow, Barnaby Deakins gentleman, Francis Quaite gentleman, all five late of St. James's Clerkenwell; John Hawkins M.D., Florence wife of George Edwards, Dorothy Stoakes widow, all three of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd.; Robert Allen gentleman, Tristram Woodward gentleman, Thomas Godbolt yoman, William Clay shoemaker, Mary Russell widow, Mary Berisford widow, Thomas Stoaks gentleman, Reinold Fountaine gentleman, John Phenixe yoman, his wife Anne Phenixe, Philip Thomas yoman, William Ayris yoman, all twelve late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields; Roger Wood late of Endfield gentleman and his wife Margaret Wood; Hubert Hacon late of Ken sington esq. and his wife . . . . Hacon; Margaret wife of Francis Kippinge late of Chelsey chaundler; Alice Monday late of Stanmore widow; . . . . Countess Banbury, wife of the Most Noble Lord Knowles Earl of Banbury, late of Twickenham.—Those of the one hundred and twenty persons not mentioned in this lot of names, are individuals whose names appear in the indictment for recusancy, described in this volume under date 1 March, 4 Charles I. G. D. R., 9 April, 6 Charles I.

4 April, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at a tavern commonly called the Queen's Head at Eastsmithfield co. Midd. on the said day, Peter Cornish, John Hopkins and Richard Sandes, all three late of Eastsmithfield aforesaid yomen, knavish fellows ever intent on cheating the king's lieges by unlawful arts and games, lured one Cornelius Quarris into the said tavern and there cheated him of twenty-eight pounds at a game of cards, called "My card come before your card." G. D. R., 21 June, 6 Charles I.

18 April, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's in-theFields on the night of the said day, Hellen Price late of the said parish spinster broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Sir Richard Wiseman knt. and bart., and stole therefrom a Turkey carpett worth six pounds, together with other things set forth in the bill, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Richard Wiseman knt. and bart. Acquitted of burglary, but found 'Guilty' of felony, Hellen Price was sentenced to be hung, but on being found pregnant was reprieved. G. D. R., 12 May, 6 Charles I.

26 April, 6 Charles I.—Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' on the said day, Richard Fynney late of the said parish laborer, stole and carried off one gold ring with knobes (sic) worth eight shillings, "quinque aurea annula (sic) anglice five other gold ringes sett with Bristowe stones" worth thirty shillings, "unum aliud annulum aureum anglice one other golde ringe sett with a doublett stone" worth six shillings, and another gold ringe sett with a garnett, worth six shillings, of the goods and chattels of George Courthopp. Endorsed 'Ignoramus.' G. D. R., 12 May, 6 Charles I.

30 April, 6 Charles I.—Coroner's Inquisition for cause of death, taken at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., on view of the body of Joan Smith, there lying dead and slain; With Verdict that, at the said parish on the 26th instant, Elizabeth Jordan late of the same parish threw a brick-batt at the said Joan Smith, so that it struck her on the left part of her head, giving her a mortal wound of which she died on the following day. Found 'Guilty' of feloniously slaying Joan Smith, Elizabeth Jordan was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 12 May, 6 Charles I.

1 May, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, in the high-way of Tottenham co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Smith late of the said parish yoman assaulted John Robinson, and with a sword cut off the thumb and two of the fingers of the said John Robinson's right hand, so that he has lost the use and power of the same hand. Found 'Guilty,' Edward Smith was fined in the sum of 13s. 4d., and remanded to prison, there to remain during the pleasure of the Court. G. D. R., 12 May, 6 Charles I.

1 May, 6 Charles I.—True Bill for not going to church during a month, beginning on the said day, against Andrea Lucar late of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. widow, alias &c. late of Munkwicke co. Essex widow. G. D. R., 21 June, 6 Charles I.

31 May, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Edgware co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, when divers of the inhabitants of Edgware were visited with the pestilence, William Thompson of the said parish yoman, then being constable of the said parish, permitted the same sick persons to stay in their houses and go at large at their pleasure, and allowed other persons to visit them in their houses, and in fact wholly refused to do what pertained to his office in respect to the said infected persons and their houses; and further that on the last day of July last past he withdrew from Edgware and wholly neglected and abandoned his office, to the great hindrance of justice, and the grave peril of dispersing the infection of the pestilence within the same parish and other places.—On the bill appears no minute touching later proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 8 Dec, 6 Charles I.

1 July, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Burman and Edward Seaman, both late of the said parish yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Most Noble Edward Lord Gorge, and stole and carried off therefrom, together with other things set forth in the bill, one paire of stagges leather gloves turned over with muske-coloured plush worth eight shillings, one paire of perfumed gloves turned over with blacke plushe worth six shillings, one paire of gloves laced with three silke broad laces worth twenty shillings, two pairs of Spanish gloves worth fifteen shillings, one paire of gloves with crimson satten topps ymbrodered with gold and silver and edged with a gold and silver lace, one perfumed leather doublett with blacke satten sleeves worth eight pounds, one perfumed leather doublet with cloth of silver sleeves cut and laced with blacke satten ymbrodered laces . . . ., one perfumed leather jerkin worth fifty shillings, one paire of blacke garters laced with silver and gould bone lace worth forty shillings, one paire of garters woven with gould and silver worth nine pounds, one paire of silver spurres worth four pounds, "unam peram anglice one Taffata bag ymbrodered with silver" worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Edward Lord Gorge; And That, knowing him to have committed the said felony, William Pecke late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman on the 2nd of the aforesaid July received, harboured and comforted the said Richard Burman. Acquitted of burglary, but found 'Guilty' of felony, Edward Seaman pleaded his clergy effectually and was branded; Richard Burman was "at large." At the Gaol Delivery held on 6 Oct., 7 Charles I., William Pecke was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 28 April, 7 Charles I.

20 July, 6 Charles I.—Coroner's Inquisition for cause of death, taken at Fulham co. Midd. on view of the body of Thomas Edinges there lying dead and slain; With verdict that on the 18th inst. Nicholas West, Richard Pegg, Godfrey Crown, William Kinges, and Nicholas Lowen, all late of Fulham yomen, assaulted the said Thomas Edinges at the said parish, and that Nicholas West then and there with a knife gave the said Thomas Edinges in his breast a wound, of which he then and there died instantly, thus being killed and slain; the Jurors further certifying that immediately after the said homicide, Nicholas West withdrew himself to places unknown to them, and that they are ignorant what goods chattels lands or tenements the same Nicholas, Richard, Godfrey, William and Nicholas had at the time of said felony thus committed by them. G. D. R., 28 July, 6 Charles I.

26 July, 6 Charles I.—Record that (at S. P. held at Hickes Hall) Theodosia Lady Thresham was committed to Newgate, there to remain till she should acknowledge her offense "for sayeing in open court, that a theefe had more friends here than an honest bodie"; it being further ordered that after making this confession the Lady Thresham should restore to Helen Haddocke before the next Session of the Peace divers articles of wearing apparel; the record further showing that at the same 'next Session' her Ladyship was again committed to Newgate "for affronting the Court in a most uncivill manner, and sayeing to Mr. Longe 'Your authoritie set aside you are a scurvy companion,' and sayeing to him shee would bee revenged upon him, and for sayeing to the Court she cared not a button for any in the Court," together with other expressions of disdain for the Justices. From a subsequent and much lengthier account of Lady Thresham's 'contempt of Court,' it appears that Helen Haddocke was a servant, whom this virago of quality had retained for an entire year's service, and within a month had turned out of doors without her wages and wearing apparel, for no "cause shewne or allowed by any Justice of Peace of this county contrary to the statute in such case provided." S. P. Reg.

31 August, 6 Charles I.—True Bill for not going to church &c. during one month beginning on the said day, against one hundred and eleven persons, late of St. Andrew's Holborn, St. Giles's-in-theFields, St. James's Clerkenwell, St. Sepulchre's, St. Clement's Danes, Cheswicke, Endfeild, Heston or New Brainford co. Midd., who, with only a few exceptions, were proceeded against for the same kind of recusancy by a bill, set forth in this volume under date 1 March, 4 Charles I.; the persons indicted by the present bill, who were of gentle degree or some higher rank, being William Gibbes M.D., his wife Katherine Gibbes, Susan wife of Edwin Saule gentleman, all three of St. Andrew's, Holborn; James Woods gentleman, John Bartlet M.D., Rowland Berry gentleman, his wife . . . . Berry, and Elizabeth wife of Sir . . . . Gardner knt., all five late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields; Sir William Sturton knt., William Kempe esq., Sir John Cage (sic— ? Gage) knt., Barnard Deakins gentleman, all four late of St. James's, Clerkenwell; Thomas Foster esq., and John Hawkins gentleman, both of St. Sepulchre's; Mary wife of John Standishe of St. Clement's Danes' gentleman, William Saunders esq., his wife . . . . Saunders, William Saunders gentleman, Bridget wife of Henry Fryer, all four late of Cheswicke; John Woods gentleman, and his wife . . . . Woods, both of Endfeild. G. D. R., . . . . 6 Charles I.

9 November, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Mary Savoy in le Strand co. Midd., in the night of the said day, George Inman alias John Inman, George Colledge and John Grigson, all three late of the said parish laborers, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Most Serene Lady Mary Queen of England, and stole and carried off therefrom five table-clothes worth twenty pounds, one paire of sheetes worth ten pounds (sic), a picture of our Saviour garnished with gold worth fifty shillings, a picture of our Lady Mary garnished with silver worth forty shillings, a cabinett with silver plate worth twelve pounds, a silver standishe worth eight pounds, a laced sheete worth five pounds, six little boxes covered with crimson velvett and gold and silver lace worth six pounds, and "unam seriam argenteam anglice a silver locke" worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Most Serene Lady Mary Queen of England; and also ten French hoodes of velvet worth ten pounds and six books worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of George Garney esq.; And further that on the same day, to wit 9 Nov., 6 Charles I., knowing the said George Inman, George Colledge and John Grigson to have perpetrated the said felony, Samuel Bowlinge late of St. Giles's-in-theFields tailor, received and harboured them at the said parish. Found 'Guilty' George Colledge and John Grigson were sentenced to be hung (George Colledge "sus in London"). On his arraignment, George Inman put himself 'Not Guilty,' when his trial was deferred.—Found 'Guilty' Samuel Bowlinge pleaded his clergy effectually and was branded.—Also, a True Bill for the same burglary against the same George Colledge and John Grigson: with True Bill against George Inman alias John Inman alias Pothecary of St. Mary's Savoy &c. laborer, for being accessory to the felony before its committal, and also for harbouring &c. the said George Colledge and John Grigson after the felony, knowing them to have committed it. Acquitted of being an accomplice before the fact, but convicted of having been an accomplice after the fact, George Inman pleaded his clergy and was allowed the book, but being unable to read it was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 8 Dec, 6 Charles I.

17 November, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Lymehouse co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Cord well alias Hewett late of Lymehouse aforesaid . . . . stole and carried away "bibliothecam (sic) anglice one bible" worth thirteen shillings, "et unum alium librum vocatum the Practice of Christianity" worth eighteen pence, of the goods and chattels of Richard Frethe. Joan Cordwell was found 'Not Guilty.'— Also, on the same file, a True Bill against Katherine wife of Richard Chesson yoman and Magdalen Lewes spinster, both late of Lymehouse, for stealing the same two books; in which bill the draughtsman after writing the word 'bibliothecam' erased part of the word, and altered it into 'biblion.'—On their trial, Katherine Chesson was found 'Not Guilty,' whilst Magdalen Lewes was found 'Guilty,' when she pleaded pregnancy effectually and was reprieved. G. D. R., 8 Dec, 6 Charles I.

1 December, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd., Frances Taylor late of the said parish spinster stole and carried away "unum anulum deauratum anglice a gold ringe with a rubie and sett with two Amitus (?) stones" worth five pounds, two pendant jewelles sett with dyamonds worth fifty pounds, and three yards of lace worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Charles Harbert esq. Found 'Not Guilty,' Frances Taylor was acquitted. G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Charles I.

8 December, 6 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Graies Inne in St. Andrew's Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Michaiah Niccolson of Graies Inne gentleman, and John Bowles and George Leigh, both of the said parish yomen, broke into the dwelling-house of Tobias Cradocke esq., and stole therefrom a feather-bed worth four pounds, a bolster worth ten shillings, a pillow worth five shillings, and a blankett worth ten shillings, and eighteen pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Tobias Cradocke esq. Michaiah Niccolson and John Bowles were found 'Not Guilty'; George Leigh was at large. G. D. R., 30 March, 7 Charles I.

17 December, 6 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Roger Bates, D.D. and J.P., of Edward Dauntsey chirurgeon, Thomas Hannson merchant and Isaack Swifte haberdasher, all three of London, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the said Edward Dauntsey's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, then and there "to answeare to such matters as shalbe objected against him by Thomas Newton gentleman concerning forty pounds and fower shillings in gold which was taken out of a truncke of the Lady Fraunces Freckleton's." G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Charles I.