Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1638

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

67-71

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1638', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 67-71. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66030 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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1638

10 January, 13 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, with lead tin and other false metals John Sheppard tayler and Henry Sheppard bricklayer, both late of the said parish, made ten pieces of counterfeit money in the likeness of Queene Elizabeth shillings, and ten other pieces of counterfeit money made in the likeness of Kinge Charles shillinges, and afterwards on the same day uttered the same false moneys in payment to divers of the King's lieges and subjects. Henry Sheppard was found 'Not Guilty.' John Sheppard was found 'Guilty,' and sentenced to be drawn to the gallows and there hung; but he was reprieved by the Court after judgment. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 13 Charles I.

17 January, 13 Charles I.—Upon the mocion of Mr. Ward, councell with Mr. Jeninges and his undertenauntes, touching the charging of the said Jeninges towardes reliefe of infected persons within his tenements in Purpoolelane, havinge already paid xxvi li. vs. vd., Nowe to aide him and to doe him right in this case, if he be not duly charged, and to take into consideracion by whom and how the infeccion first grew, whether by the meanes and default of the undertenauntes in willingly receiving them or by being enforced by the officers of the parish to receive them: It is by this Courte referred to Sir Henry Spiller and Mr. Herne to heare and order according to their discretions. G. D. Reg.

25 April, 14 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. in the night of the same day, James Phenixe late of the said parish laborer broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Adam Bacchus, and stole and carried off therefrom seaven dozen paire of shoes worth twelve pounds, a paire of bootes worth three pounds, and a side (sic) of leather worth seven shillings. James Phenixe was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 18 June, 14 Charles I.

9 May, 14 Charles I.—Order by the Court for stay of proceedings for recusancy against John Chamberlaine of Lindhurst co. Southampton esq.: the said order being made on consideration of His Majesty's letters patent, dated 3 Jan., 3 Charles I., and enrolled in the Court of Exchequer, whereby His Majesty "was gratiously pleased to signifie his royal pleasure that" the said John Chamberlaine esq. "should not at any time hereafter during the terme of lx yeeres be indicted of or for recusancie or for not repairing to church, chappell or usuall place of common praier." G. D. Reg.

9 May, 14 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, George Lyle late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Robert Wade, and with a sword gave him in the right part of his body a mortal wound, of which he languished from the said 9th of May to the 24th of the same month at the said parish, on which last-named day he died at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields of the said wound. On his trial at the Old Bailey, George Lyle was acquitted of felonious slaying, "sed cul se defendend' "=but Guilty of defending himself. G. D. R., 18 June, 14 Charles I.

18 May, 14 Charles I.—Coroner's Inquisition for cause of death, taken at St. Katherines co. Midd. on view of the body of Richard Carte there lying dead and slain; With Verdict that, on the 17th instant at the St. Katherines aforesaid John Poulhampton late of the said place yoman assaulted the said Richard Carte, and taking him with both hands threw him violently to the ground and by so doing gave him on his face a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly, being thus killed and slain by the said John Poulhampton. On his trial for manslaughter, John Poulhampton was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, who did not retract. G. D. R., 18 June, 14 Charles I.

7 June, 14 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Endfeild co. Midd. on the said day, Simon Jackson and John Fettiplace, both of the said parish gentlemen, assaulted Isaac Kent when he was in God's and the King's peace, and that the said Simon Jackson with a sword gave the same Isaac Kent in the left part of his body a mortal wound, of which he languished from the said 7th June to the 14th day of the same month at Endfeild, on which last-named day he died at Endfeild of that wound. On his trial at the Old Bailey, Simon Jackson was found 'Not Guilty' of manslaughter by the statute (non cul de homicid' super stat'), but Guilty of Manslaughter by Common Law (cul de homicid' ad co'em legem), whereupon he pleaded his clergy effectually and was branded. G. D. R., 18 June, 14 Charles I.

12 June, 14 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Richardson and Ralph Edridge, both of the said parish labourers, stole and carried away a silver dish, of the goods and chattels of the Most Serene Lord Charles now King. Found 'Guilty,' both culprits asked for the book, had it, could not read it, and were therefore sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 18 June, 14 Charles I.

18 June, 14 Charles I.—Record of the indictment &c. of George Lyle for the slaying of Robert Wood (? Wade): with memorandum over the record "Po se non cul de felonica interfecc'on', sed cul de se defendendo, vidlt. qd. pred' Rob'tus insult' fecit super pred'c'u' Georgiu', et eum insecut' fuit vsq. le new Exchange railes ultra quos evadere non potuit sine periculo vite, Et quia idem Rob'tus eund' Georgiu' furiose insecut' fuit, idem Georgius traxit gladiu' in sua defensione, et ipsum Rob'tum sic int'fecit'=He put himself Not Guilty on a jury of the country, and the jury says he is not Guilty of felonious slaying, but guilty of defending himself, that is to say, that the aforesaid Robert assaulted the aforesaid George, and pursued him even to the rails of the New Exchange, beyond which the said George could not escape without danger of life, and because the same Robert ran in furiously on the same George, the same George drew sword in self-defence, and thus slew the same Robert. G. D. Reg.

10 August, 14 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Margaret Michener wife of John Michener late of the said parish yoman fabricated, in the name of Christian Oxnerd of Goldinglane co. Midd. spinster, a deceitful and counterfeit letter running thus: "Sister, I remember my love very kindly unto you hopeing of your good health as I am att this present, And I give you great thankes for my wastcoate that you sent mee, And I desire you to send either a couple of smockes ready made or els as much Lockram as will make two very good and also a paire of stockinges of a good civill colour wosted I referre it to you, And also I desire you to send me vs. in money and an apron to weare every day such a one as you shall thincke fitt, for a gowne I shall need none yet, for I shall have a morninge gowne. My Lady Smith's daughter at Hammersmith is dead. The messenger is a safe woman; you need not to feare to send by her; my linnen is not good enough, itt is found fault with, itt is too course because I lye with my ladyes daughter. I will, god willing, bee with you on Bartholomewe Daye, Soe for this time I rest Your loveing sister—Christian—August the 8th 1638"; and having fabricated this letter in the name of Christian Oxnerd on the said 10th August, she, the said Margaret Michener, afterwards on the same day falsely and fraudulently delivered it to Anne Oxnerd of St. Martin's-inthe-Fields aforesaid, and by colour thereof gained possession of a waistcoate worth three shillings, a paire of stockings worth three shillings, one holland apron worth twelve shillings, one elle and a quarter and halfequarter of an elle of holland worth nine shillings, a smocke worth four shillings, and five shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Anne Oxnerd, and converted the same to her own use. Found 'Guilty,' Margaret Michener was sentenced to be whipt, and to be kept in prison during the pleasure of the Court. Broken Files, 14 Charles I.

1 September, 14 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day, John Gayer late of the said parish wyerdrawer deceitfully mingled together one hundred pounds of silver and one hundred pounds of copper, and worked them "into flatted wire" so as to resemble "sylver wyer and threed," and then fraudulently offered for sale the wire of impure composition for pure silver thread. Found 'Guilty' of offering sixteen pounds of the counterfeit thread for sale, John Gayer was sentenced to stand on the pillory at Cheapside for two hours, with a paper on his head showing his offence, to pay a fine of one hundred pounds, and to be kept in prison till he should have paid the fine and put in sureties for his good behaviour. Broken Files, 14 Charles I.

3 October, 14 Charles I.—Record of the indictment of John Gayer for fraud, and of his conviction of cheating to the amount of sixteen pounds, with judgment "to bee sett on the pillory in Cheapside for two hours with a paper shewing his offence, his fine C li, to bee remanded to prison there to remaine till his fine bee paide, and before he bee delivered to putt in suerties pro bono gestu." G. D. Reg.

13 October, 14 Charles I.—Coroner's Inquisition for cause of death, taken at St. John's Street in St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. on view of the body of Edward Evered there lying dead and slain; With Verdict that, whereas a certain man to the jurors unknown, by the permission of Salomon Sibley chandler and master of the said Edward Evered, on the 17th ult. left in the said Salomon Sibley's shop in St. John's Street aforesaid a certain sword to remain there till the evening of the said 17th Sept.; and whereas the said Edward Evered and one Samuel Gibbes, both being apprentices of the aforesaid Salomon, were together in the said shop in their said master's service, it so happened that Samuel Gibbes took in his hands the said sword then being in its scabbard and tried to draw the same weapon from its sheath, whereupon Edward Evered exclaimed to him 'Thou dunce art thou not able to draw a sword?' and forthwith then and there took the weapon in its scabbard out of the said Samuel's hands, and drew the same weapon, and after drawing it put it in the same Samuel's hands, and that having so done Edward Evered caught up a broomestaffe, and ran suddenly upon the same Samuel, depressing and striking down with the said staffe the sword which the same Samuel was handling, and whilst they were so playing Samuel Gibbes by mischance and against his wish and intention with the said sword gave the said Edward Evered in his left leg a mortal wound, of which he languished from the aforesaid 17th September until the 12th of the present October, on which last-named day he died of the same wound at St. John's Streete aforesaid. G. D. R., . . . ., 14 Charles I.