Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1643

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

85-90

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1643', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 85-90. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66035 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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1643

9 January, 18 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Richard Wynne knt. and Sir Edward . . . . knt, of John Wood of St. Margaret's Westminster clerk, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of William Greene brewer and Richard Gray baker, both of the aforesaid parish, in the sum of fifty pounds each; For the said John Wood's appearance "apud Justice Hall in le Old Bailey to answere his accusation for refusinge to reade the liturgie used by the Church of England beinge thereunto required." G. D. R., . . . ., 18 Charles I.

18 February, 18 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-leSavoy in the Strand co. Midd., John North gentleman, John Keinton gentleman, Alexander Reeve gentleman, Thomas Gibbins yeoman, Robert Stanford gentleman, John Booth alias Cavilear yeoman, Edward Hall gentleman, and Edward Kitchinge gentleman, all eight late of the said parish, broke into the dwelling-house of Paul Williams, and stole and carried away therefrom a silver salt worth four pounds, a silver bowl worth three pounds, eight silver spoones worth three pounds, sixty gold rings worth seventy pounds, a watch worth fifty shillings, two whistles worth eight shillings, a jewell of gold with an emrod and three diamonds sett in it worth eighteen pounds, two gold ringes worth forty shillings, four other jewels worth one hundred and thirty pounds, a pair of silke stockings worth thirty shillings, a cloake worth three pounds, a sad coloured cloth cloake worth fifty shillings, . . . . sarsnett worth six pounds, fourteen yards of . . . . worth fiftyfive shillings, four purses wrought with gold and silver worth forty shillings, a Queene Elizabeth peece worth . . . ., a porter's tickett of silver worth ten shillings, two dozens of silke pointes worth ten shillings, four swords worth forty shillings, together with other articles of less worth. Found 'Guilty,' John North gentleman and John Booth alias Cavilear were sentenced to be hung. The other culprits were at large. G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

1 March, 18 Charles I.—True Bill against Peter Marsh late of Hornsey co. Midd. yeoman; James Barker yeoman, George Barracke yeoman, Simon Warmington yeoman, Morris Bremingham yeoman, Humphrey Prestcott yeoman, all five late of St Sepulchre's London co. Midd.; Nicholas Brough yeoman, Jervis . . . . yeoman, Edward Brooke yeoman, Thomas Read yeoman, . . . . East pewterer, Thomas Reeve yeoman, . . . . Hobson yeoman, all seven late of St. James's Clarkenwell co. Midd.; John Gates yeoman, his wife Susan Gates, John . . . . chandler, all three late of Hanwell co. Midd.; Nicholas Jones late of St. Katherine's near the Tower of London yeoman; Joan Cole late of Heston widow; Mary Howe late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch widow; Francis Griffine yeoman, John Coxe taylor, Edward Grissell tailor, all three late of St. Giles's-in-theFields; Robert Chamberlaine gentleman, Drew Lovett goldsmith, his wife Katherine Lovett, William Lee tailor, his wife Jane Lee, Peter Atkinson "balmaker," his wife Jane Atkinson, Richard Wakeman taylor, his wife Mary Wakeman, James Tylder laborer, his wife Susan Tylder, William Cowett gentleman, his wife Mary Cowett, John Bumstead taylor, John Barter gentleman, Thomas Sharrett taylor, his wife Elizabeth Sharrett, John Freake glasier, his wife Katherine Freake, Edward Morgan barber, William Gasse . . . ., John Warden carpenter, his wife Susan Warden, John Appleton gentleman, . . . . wife of George Smithson vintner, Margaret Blake widow, Elizabeth wife of Philip Bierley esq., Margaret wife of Thomas Baylie yeoman, Bridget wife of John Firmin yeoman, all twenty-nine late of St. Andrew's in Holborn co. Midd.; Francis Overingham yeoman, and Enoch Hovvett yeoman, both late of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate London co. Midd.;—for not going to church &c. during one whole month, beginning on the said 1 March, 18 Charles I. G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

11 March, 18 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Butolph's-withoutBishoppsgate London co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Holmes yeoman and his wife Elionore Holmes, both late of the said parish, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Frances Lady Vaughan widow, and stole therefrom and carried away thirteen diamonds sett in gold worth twenty-eight pounds, fifteen fossett diamonds sett in gold and enameled worth fifteen pounds, one hundred and thirty-six gems called pearles worth seven pounds, seven jewells for a caroonett (sic), quadraginta carbunculos anglice rubies, seven little diamonds sett in gold and two gems hanging from them worth seven pounds fourteen shillings, a bracelett of round pearles worth four pounds and six shillings, a chaine of pearles strunge with . . . . between the pearles worth six pounds, a greate pearle sett in gold like an acorne worth fifteen shillings, a gold bodkin worth twelve shillings, together with divers other articles of jewellery, and one hundred and ninety pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Elizabeth the Lady St. John widow, being there found in the said dwelling-house of the said Frances the Lady Vaughan. When Elionore Holmes was on 6 Dec., 19 Charles I., found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, who did not retract, her husband was still 'at large'; but afterwards, at the Gaol Delivery held on 4 Sept., 20 Charles I., Thomas Holmes confessed the indictment and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 6 Dec, 19 Charles I.

11 March, 18 Charles I.—Recognizance, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Robert Hands of Whitecrostreete "bodyes-maker," in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Robert Hands at the next Gaol Delivery for London and Middlesex, "there to answere for the pretended scandalous words against his Majesty, viz. "That the King was a traitour and his Crowne was the whore of Babilon." G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

18 March, 18 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before John Herne, esq. J.P., of Joseph Brandon of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields gentleman in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of John Gosforth of Sandwich co. Kent gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Joseph Brandon's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, "to answeare unto certaine words by him spoken, charged by Alice Jackson nowe prisoner in Newgate, the words viz. [That he] wished the Parliament Howse to fall on the Right Honourable the Lord Saye, Mr. Pymme and all other traytors to theire Kinge as they were, and wishinge the nowe Lord Mayor of London, callinge him the supposed Mr. Mayor, hanged, and hoped to see him drawne in peeces." G. D. R., . . . . 19 Charles I.

19 March, 18 Charles I.—Recognizance, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of John Parke of Whitecrossestreete brick-maker, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said John Parke's appear ance at the next Sessions of Peace for Middlesex, "to answere the complainte of Robert Hand for the pretended scandalous words against the Parliament, viz. That the Parliament were all roagues and rascalles." G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

26 March, 18 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before John Herne J.P., of Joseph Brandon of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields gentleman and Joan Winkfield of St. Andrew's Holborn . . . ., in the sum of forty pounds each; For their appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence "against Alice Jackson for sayeinge when she sawe two sheeps heades in a poll shee wished the Kinges and Prince Rupertes heades were there instead of them, and then the Kingdome would bee settled, and the Queene had not a foote of land in England and the Kinge was an evill and an unlawfull Kinge, and better to be without a Kinge than to have him Kinge." G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

20 April, 19 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-withoutCriplegate co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Browne late of the said parish yeoman, by a certain writing dated on the said day of the said year, wickedly diabolically and feloniously made an agreement with an evil and impious spirit, that he the same Thomas Browne would within ten days after the death of him Thomas Browne give his soul to the said evil and impious spirit, to the intention (ad intencionem=in consideration) that the said evil and impious spirit yearly at the Feasts of Pentecost and the Purification of the blessed Virgin Mary should pay or cause to be paid to the same Thomas Browne the sum of one thousand pounds of current English money on each of the said Feasts for and during the term of the natural life of the same Thomas Browne, And to the intention (ad intencionem = in consideration) that the said evil and impious spirit should defend the same Thomas from all perils of body and goods for and during the full term of forty-one years, and that the same Thomas should have and marry a woman who should be pleasing to the same Thomas, and that the same Thomas should have and enjoy all health riches and worldly pleasure for and during the natural life of the same Thomas, And for the performance thereof the same Thomas then and there impiously and blasphemously as an impious apostate promised and vowed to renounce the Lord and Saviour Christ against the Catholic Christian faith, and to the grave scandal of the Christian religion, and of all pious Christians, and to the great displeasure of God Almighty, and to the evil and pernicious example of all others in a case of this kind failing in duty (omnium aliorum in hujusmodi casu delinquentium), and against the peace of the said Lord now King his crown and dignity, and also against the form of the statute for a case of this kind published and provided. Putting him self 'Not Guilty' on the country, Thomas Browne was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, who did not retract. G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

3 May, 19 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster on the said day, Thomas Towers late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. gentleman, Robert Stradling late of Seething-lane within the parish of Alhollowes Barking in the ward of the Tower of London gentleman, and Henry Langley of St. Sepulchre's without Newgate in the ward of Farringdon without London gentleman, stole and carried off one paire of gloves worth twenty shillings, twoe brasse pistolls worth three pounds, "unam armaturam equestrem probatam anglice one armour of proof for a horsman" worth three pounds, one horsrnan's sword worth ten shillings, a woman's garment made of purple satten worth four pounds and five shillings, a Scottish dagger worth twenty shillings, a pair of stirrops worth eighteen pence, one bridle bitt worth three shillings, one other bitt called a snaffle worth twelve pence, one silver porringer worth forty shillings, three pieces of broken silver worth forty shillings, a piece of gold called "a role noble" worth seventeen shillings and six pence, three pieces of coined gold worth twenty shillings, nine gold rings worth eight pounds, "unum annulum aureum cum margarita anglice a diamond gold ring" worth five pounds, another gold seale ring worth thirty shillings, and sixty shillings of numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of George Bland gentleman. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Towers was hung. Robert Stradling and Henry Langley were at large. G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

1 July, 19 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before George Longe esq. J.P., of John Widdons vintner and John Hutchins winecooper, both of St. Buttolph's Algate in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Thomas Aldberry of Eastsmithfeilde gunsmith, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Thomas Aldberry's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for London and Middlesex, then and there to answer "for saying there is noe King and that hee woulde acknowledge noe King." G. D. R., . . . ., 19 Charles I.

10 November, 19 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-leSavoy co. Midd. in the night of the said day, James Younge alias James Browne late of the said parish laborer, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Most Honourable Henri de Louraine, Prince of Harecourte, then being the ambassador of the King and Queen of France, and stole therefrom one large peece of plate in fashion of a shipp worth three hundred pounds, three great silver basons gilded worth one hundred pounds, four other silver basons worth eighty pounds, four silver-gilt ewers worth one hundred pounds, six silver ewers worth sixty pounds, thirty-one silver dishes worth three hundred pounds, twelve gilded silver plates worth one hundred pounds, six dozen plaine silver plates worth one hundred and ninety-six pounds, eight silver candlestickes worth sixty pounds, four other silver and gilt candlestickes worth twenty-four pounds, three silver saltes worth fifteen pounds, one silver and gilte salt worth five pounds, a great payre of snuffers with a silver chaine worth ten pounds, four silver boxes worth ten pounds, two small silver ewers worth eight pounds, four dozen silver spoones worth twenty-four pounds, foure greate silver flagons with silver chaines fastened unto them worth forty-four pounds, four dozen silver forks worth twenty-four pounds, a silver bason worth seven pounds, a silver pott worth eight pounds, a silver chalice with a cover belonging to it worth forty pounds, a silver candlestick worth five pounds, a surplice worth twenty shillings, a coape of cloth of silver worth ten pounds, and two pieces of gilded plate worth thirty pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Henri de Louraine, Prince de Harecourte. James Younge was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, who did not retract; but he was sent back to prison till the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 19 Charles I.

. . . December, 19 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. James's Clarkenwell co. Midd. on some day (no longer discoverable from the decayed record) of the 19th year of Charles I., John Draycott late of the said parish yeoman, with the intention of bringing the parliament into contempt, spoke these opprobrious and scandalous words in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects, to wit, "This Parliament heere is only a parliament of roagues, for they have plundred all honest men, and have not left above three or four honest men in the Cittye of London, but what they have plundred and imprisoned." Putting himself on trial, John Draycott was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 4 Dec, 20 Charles I.

20 December, 19 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Sarah Dennis late of the said parish, a mischievous and evil woman, spoke publicly these words, to the dishonour and defamation of parliament, to wit, "The Parliament men are roundheaded rogues"; and that, in her malice, the same Sarah Dennis said of the most honourable lord, William Fiennes Viscount Say and Seale, being one of the magnates of this kingdom and one of the Lords of Parliament, these scandalous words, "The Lord Say is a round-headed rogue: a Poxe take him!" Found 'Guilty,' Sarah Dennis was fined forty pounds, and sentenced to be imprisoned for three months, and not to be enlarged till she had put in good sureties for her good behaviour. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 19 Charles I.