Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1653

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

212-220

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1653', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 212-220. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66049 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1653

11 January, 1652/3.—Order, made at S. P. held at Hicks Hall in St. John's Street co. Midd., touching the price of coals.—Whereas by order of the Parliament of 11th of January instant (sic) it was referred to the Lord Mayor and the severall Courts of Sessions of the Peace for London and Middlesex at their next sitting (being at this present tyme) and they were thereby impowered to give in charge to the Grand Jury to enquire what is a fitt and indifferent price for Sea Coles and upon their presentment to sett such rate and price as they shall thinke fitt both within the citties of London and Westminster and liberties thereof, the borrough of Southwarke and county of Middlesex, And that all woodmongers colemerchants and others that sell either in grosse or by retayle within the said citties and liberties thereof, the burrough of Southwarke and county aforesaid, be enjoyned to sell the coles in their possession not exceedinge the rate and price which shall be so sett accordingly, And that the Lord Mayor and Justices of Peace within the said cittyes and liberties thereof and borrough and countyes aforesaid respectively doe take care that this Order be duly observed and putt in execucion with all possible speede for the advantage and relieffe of the poore, And Whereas this Court in pursuance of the said Order and by virtue thereof have given in charge to the Grand Jury for the said county to enquire and make presentment accordinge to the said Order, And accordingly the said Grand Jury have made and delivered in their presentment to this Court in this behalfe, And now upon serious consideracion thereof had with the Lord Cheife Justice Rolle, the Lord Cheife Baron Wilde . . . . Justices, This Court doth thinke fitt and hereby order that noe colemerchant, woodmonger, chaundler or other person or persons whatsoever, that sell Sea Coles either in grosse or by retayle within the said county and citty of Westminster and liberties thereof doe from henceforth sell or utter any Sea Coles either in grosse or by retayle above the rate and price of twelve pence the bushell, nor above that rate and price in proporcion for any greater or lesser measure or quantity of Sea Coles, untill further or other Order shall be duely given in this behalfe, And that for better observance hereof this Order be openly published. By the Court. S. P. Book.

N.B.—According to book, from which this order is transcribed, the Order of Parliament and the subsequent Order of the Court were both dated on the same day; but this apparent inaccuracy is doubtless due to the fact that the Order of the Court was made on one of the later days of the S. P., whose first sitting was held on the 11th of January.

21 January, 1652/3.—True Bill that, at Pancras parish co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Hanscombe late of the said parish laborer broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Nicholas Hele esq., and stole therefrom and carried away one silver tankard worth seven pounds, a sattin cloake worth six pounds, one belt embroidered with silver and gold worth four pounds, one sword with a steele hilt worth forty shillings, and divers other articles described severally in the indictment, of the goods and chattels of the said Nicholas Hele esq. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Hanscombe was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 23 Feb., 1652/3.

2 February, 1652/3.—True Bill that, at the parish of Giles-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Reynolds late of the said parish spinster, stole and carried away one silver tankerd worth four pounds, two silver wine cups worth forty shillings, one silver salt worth thirty-five shillings one silver tobacco-box worth twenty-eight shillings, and "one beaver hatt of the value of three pounds," of the goods and chattels of Germaine Crespion.—Over Elizabeth Reynolds's name appears this obviously erroneous clerical minute, to wit, "She putteth herselfe &c. not guiltie &c. she pleadeth pregnancy, she is not pregnant, Repr. after judgment." Had she been found 'Not Guilty,' this culprit would not have received judgment; nor would she have pleaded pregnancy. This error in the record is worthy of observation. G. D. R., 23 Feb., 1652/3.

4 March, 1652/3.—True Bill that, at Giles's-without-Cripplegate co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Clavell late of the said parish yeoman assaulted one John Milton and with a certain cane worth a penny struck the same John Milton and gave him on his right knee a certain mortal bruise, of which he died on the 10th of June then next following at Giles's-without-Cripplegate, being thus killed and slain by the said Richard Clavell. Over Richard Clavell's name at the bill's head appears this clerical minute, to wit, "He putteth himselfe &c. not guiltie &c he did not flie &c."—Also, the Coroner's Inquisition-postmortem, taken at Giles's Cripplegate co. Midd. on the view of the body of the said John Milton on 11 June 1653, with verdict against the same Richard Clavell. Neither from the Inquisition nor from the indictment does one learn the quality or employment of John Milton. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

11 April, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before Gearvas Elwes esq. J.P., of . . . . and John Gwyn, both of Clement's Danes' cordwayners, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Thomas Willett at the next S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, "then and there to answer for beinge found with a woman danceing naked supposed to be Ranters." S. P. (West.), R., 18 April, 1653.

13 April, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Thomson, J.P., of Thomas Beza of Buttolph's Aldgate scrivener, and Henry Hutton of Lymehouse merchant, in the sum of eight pounds each; For the appearance of Henry Cotton and Thomas Bird at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c., they being suspected "of stealing certaine clamps of brasse belonging to the fornaces of the States Ship called the Hampshire." S. P. R., 18 April, 1653.

30 April, 1653.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Hendon co. Midd., on view of the body of John Hills gentleman, there lying dead; With verdict that, at Hendon co. Midd. on the 28th day of the said April, 1653, Thomarshe Clarke late of the said parish gentleman made an assault on the said John Hills gentleman, and with a dagger worth one shilling gave him in the left side of the breast a mortal wound, of which he then and there died.—Also, the True Bill against Thomarshe Clarke gentleman for this manslaughter, with this clerical minute at the bill's head, "He confesseth &c. he praieth the booke, he readeth as a clerke, he is burned &c." G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

8 May, 1653.—Bill (ignored) that, at Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on the said day, John Roabes late of the said parish clerk, born within this Commonwealth of England and "after the feast of St. John the Baptist," 1 Eliz., and before the said 8th of May, made and ordayned in the parts beyond the seas a "preist by authority derived and pretended from the Sea of Roome" returned from the parts beyond the seas to this Commonwealth of England, that is to say into the aforesaid parish, and there traitorously and as a traitor did stay continue and remain. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

12 May, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before Henry Scobell (esq. J.P.), of Henry Fitzjames and George Colt, both of Covent Garden co. Midd., in the sum of one hundred pounds each, and of John Hele of St. George's parish co. Somerset esq., in the sum of two hundred pounds each; the condition of the recognizances being that the said John Hele shall appear at the next G. S. P. for the City and Liberties of Westminster, and in the meantime keep the public peace towards all the good people of this Commonwealth and especially towards the Countesse of Lincolne and Charles Stanley esq.—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Henry Scobell, of Henry Viscount Falkland in the sum of two hundred pounds, and of Henry Fitzjames and George Colt, both of Covent Garden co. Midd., in the sum of one hundred pounds each; For the said Henry Viscount Falkland's appearance at the same G. S. P. and in the meantime for his peaceful bearing to the same Countesse of Lincolne and Charles Stanley esq. S. P. (West.), R., 6 July, 1653.

19 May, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of William Hearden of Gyles's-in-the-Feilds stone-cutter and Phillip Gardner of the Tower of London vintner, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of John Chinn of Gyles's aforesaid gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Chinn's appearance at the next G. S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, to answer &c. "for sayinge that if the late Kinge was adjudged a traitor for demaundinge of five members what is he that put out five-and-twenty out of the Parliament." S. P. (West.), R., 6 July, 1653.

25 May, 1653.—Order, made at S. P. held at Hicks Hall, touching a gross and revolting blasphemer.—Forasmuch as it appeareth to this Court by the informacion given upon oath by Felix Womwell, that he sawe a letter directed by Henry Walker from the East Indies to one Anne Rose at Ratcliffe in the said County of Middlesex wherein the said Walker had expressed that he had rather be in bedd with her (meaning the said Anne) then in Paradise with Jesus Christ, And forasmuch as Gabriel Lee and John Browne further informed this Court upon oath, that the said Lee demaundinge of the said Walker whether he had used the said expression before mencioned in his said letter to the said Anne Rose, the said Walker then said 'a poxe on Jesus Christ,' It is ordered therefore by this Court, That the said Henry Walker shall stand committed to the Newe Prison at Clerkenwell by the space of six moneths without bayle or mainprise, and further untill he shall find sufficient suretyes for his good behaviour for the space of one whole yeare from thence next ensueinge. By the Court.—Another Order, entered in the same book, directs that the same Henry Walker of Ratcliffe co. Midd. be suppressed from keeping any ale-house or victualling-house within the county, "to the end that there may not be such ready occasions and opportunities given for the resort of people to his house, whoe may be in danger to be corrupted with his wicked conversacion." S. P. Book.

28 May, 1653.—True Bill that, at Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Dorrington late of the said parish clerk, born within this Commonwealth of England, and after the Feast of St. John the Baptist, 1 Eliz., and before the said 28th May, 1653, made and ordeyned in the parts beyond the seas "a Preist by authority derived and pretended from the Sea of Rome" returned from the parts beyond the seas into this Commonwealth of England, that is to say, into the aforesaid parish co. Midd. and there "traiterously and as a traitor to this Common Wealth did stay continue and remayne, against the forme of the statute in such case made and provided, and against the publique peace." Robert Dorrington was "at large." G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

4 June, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before William Bosseville esq. J.P., of Edward Barker inhoulder and Thomas Preshire cordwinder, both of Martin's-in-the-Feildes, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Marke Goodman of the aforesaid parish gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Marke Goodman's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer &c. for "beinge a common quarreller and fighter of duells." S. P. (West), R., 6 July, 1653.

17 June, 1653.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Barbara Bartle late of the said parish "widow being a common witch and inchantrix" practised witchcraft upon and against Elizabeth Gyan spinster, so that by reason of the same witchcraft the said Elizabeth Gyan languished in her body and "was wasted consumed pined and lame and likewise speechless" from the said 17th of June "until the day of the taking of this inquisition, to witt the twelfth day of July then next following. She putteth herselfe &c. not guiltie &c. she did not flie." G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

19 June, 1653.—True Bill that, at the parish of . . . . ham, co. Midd. on the said day, George Booth late of the said parish made and conterfeited or caused to be made and counterfeited a certain spurious writing, entitled 'An Act in the names of the Keepers of the Libertyes of England by order of Parliament,' and purporting to be dated by the same parliament, for the gathering of contributions from benevolent people towards the relief of sufferers from the great fire, which is represented in the said conterfeit writing to have "consumed four hundred and twelve dwelling-houses" and extinguished "the lives of fifty-andseven men women and children and four other women lyinge in childbirth with their young infants newly borne" at Kerswicke co. Cumberland, and that by exhibiting the same false writing in . . . . ham parish co. Midd. the said George Booth had gathered fraudulently divers sums of money from divers people of the said parish. S. P. R., 12 July, 1653.

2 July, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before William Bosseville esq. J.P., of Thomas Bryers of Savoy parish milliner and William Farmer of Dunstan's Fleetstreete salter, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of James Stuart at the next Session of the Peace to answer &c. "for beinge a napper, and for employing lewd woemen to take up gentlemen and bring them to Adam Wallis his house to be nappt." S. P. (West.), R., 6 July, 1653.

8 July, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before William Bosseville esq. J.P., of Henery Simons of Martin's-in-the-Fields vintner, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Richard Damond of the same parish . . . ., in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Richard Damond's appearance at the next S. P., to answer &c. "for keepeinge a nappinge house and for gooing to severall other houses to napp men." S. P. (West.) R., 6 July, 1653.

1 August, 1653.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Newman alias Newnam, wife of Edward Newman alias Newnam, late of the said parish weaver, practised witchcraft &c. upon and against John Gale aged nyne yeares, Elizabeth Gale aged seven yeares and James Gale aged five years, so that from said day even until now they have languished in their bodies, it being further found in this true bill that "the bodyes of the sayd John Gale, Elizabeth Gale and James Gale are much destroyed wasted consumed and pyned and lamed, and the use of the hearinge and speakinge of them the said John Elizabeth and James have wholly lost, so that the sayd John Elizabeth and James are become deafe and dumbe, and as yet are in great danger of there lives &c"—At bill's foot this clerical minute, "She putteth herselfe &c. not guiltie &c. she did not flie." G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

1 August, 1653.—True Bill (found by the Jurors for the Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland) that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Newman alias Newnam wife of Edward Newman alias Newnam late of the said parish weaver practised witchcraft &c. upon and against John Gale, Elizabeth Gale and James Gale the children of Peter Gale of London citizen and vintner, with the intention of depriving them utterly of the power to hear and speak; and further that on the same day and at the same parish the same Elizabeth Newman practised witchcraft upon and against one Joan Holland widow, so that the same Joan from the said 1st of August even to the 11th of January then next following "was wasted consumed and pyned in her body." Elizabeth Newman put herself on trial and was found 'Guilty,' but the record of her punishment is no longer legible on the much defaced parchment. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653/4.

9 September, 1653.—True Bill that, at Fulham co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Roger Evans alias Smith late of the said parish laborer broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Henry Marsh gentleman and stole therefrom and bore away two silver salt-cellars worth ten pounds, one silver bowle worth four pounds ten shillings, one silver cupp worth fifty shillings, two silver-and-guilt spoones worth fifteen shillings, two gold rings worth five pounds, and one hundred and ten pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Henry Marsh. Found 'Guilty,' Roger Evans was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

. . . . 1653.—True Bill that, at Saffron Hill co. Midd. in the night of the said day . . . . late of the said Liberty co. Midd. taylor, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of John Drye and stole therefrom and took away one silver tankard worth fifty shillings, two silver and guilt cuppes worth three pounds, two silver cuppes worth three pounds, one gold ringe sett with five rubies worth thirty shillings, one gold ringe worth twelve shillings, one gold ringe sett with Todstone worth fifteen shillings, one gold ringe sett with a blewe stone worth five, and divers articles of wearing-apparel described severally in the bill, and forty-four pounds of numbered money, of the goods and chattels and moneys of the said John Drye. Acquitted of burglary, but found 'Guilty' of felony, the culprit, whose name has perished from the record, asked for the book and read like a clerk, when he was reprieved by the Court. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

10 October, 1653.—Order, made at G. S. P. held at Westminster, for the inhabitants of the liberty of Saffron Hill to repair a "certain bridge within the parish of St. Andrewes in Holborne" co. Midd., "leadinge over the common sewer betweene the lower end of Chicklane and Saffron Hill," information having been given to the Court that the said bridge "is much broken ruinous and in great decay, soe that the good people of England cannot passe over the same bridge with their carriages goods chattells and cattell without great perill and daunger of their lives &c.," and there being evidence "that the inhabitants of the liberty of Saffron Hill in the said parish have been accustomed and of right ought to amend, repayre and build the said bridge as often as need did or should require." To defray the charges for restoring and "buildinge of the said bridge," the inhabitants of the Saffron Hill liberty are further ordered to survey the ruinous bridge, "take a full estimate of the charge" and levy the requisite money by rate amongst and from themselves. S. P. Book.

18 October, 1653.—True Bill that, at Martin's-in-the-Feildes co. Midd. on the said day, William Kenman alias Kinman late of the said parish laborer assaulted "Elizabeth Hill a woman-child under the age of ten yeares, that is to say of the age of five yeares and upwards, and did ravish and carnally know the said Elizabeth." Found "Guilty," William Kenman was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653/4.

22 November, 1653.—True Bill that, at Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Pantaleo De Sa-menesius esq., Alvaro Concalves (?) gentleman, Pedro Coellio gentleman and Sebastian Lyte gentleman, all four late of the said parish, assaulted Harcourt Greenoway gentleman, and that in the ensuing affray Pantaleo de Sa-menesius with a pistol, that was charged with gun-powder and two leaden bullets, shot the said Harcourt Greenoway, giving him on the right side of his head a wound, of which he died on the followin day, being thus slain and murdered by the said Pantaleo de Sa-menesius, and that the other three culprits were present at the said affray, aiding and encouraging the said Pantaleo to committ the said murder. No record touching the arraignment of the culprits and consequences thereof is now apparent on the parchment; but the bill exhibits in its upper margin the mark of the careful erasure of a clerical minute.—Also, another bill (vacated for insufficiency) and the Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem touching this affair are on the file. All three parchments are much injured by rot and dirt. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.

22 November, 1653.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of William Deakins victualler and Edward Johnsonn gyrdler, both of James's parish Clerkenwell, in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of "Jane the wife of John Morley of Clerkenwell mountebanck" at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answere for practiseing Phisick contrary to law and for cruelly beating and bruseing Anne Madison one of her patients."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J.P., for the appearance of Anne Sharpe, wife of John Sharpe of James's Clerkenwell taylor, at the same S. P., "to answere for assaulting beating and bruising Anne Madison one of Jane Morley's patients." S. P. R., 12 Dec, 1653.

24 November, 1653.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's parish in Holborne co. Midd., George Price late of the said parish laborer in the night of the said day unlawfully entered the garden of Edward Atkyns, one of the Justices of the Common Bench, "and other harmes to the said Edward Atkyns then and there did." Found 'Guilty,' George Price was fined ten pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, and required to put in sureties for his good behaviour. G. D. R., . . . ., 1653.