Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1659

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

276-282

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1659', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 276-282. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66055 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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1659

12 January, 1658/9.—Recognizances, taken before John Waterton esq. J.P., of Edward Haward painter, John Haward baker and Francis Deane . . . ., all three of Wapping Wall in the parish of Stepney co. Midd., in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Robert Salter of Wapping-Wall aforesaid cordwayner, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Robert Salter at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answeare the complainte of Jenkin Floyd and Robert Smith who upon their oaths accuse him of speaking these words following, vizt. 'A pox confound the Lord Protector and all the Justices of the Peace.'" S. P. R., 11 Jan., 1658/9.

19 January, 1658/9.—Recognizance, taken before Tobias Lisle esq. J.P., of Anne Yend of Fenchurch Street widdow, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Anne Yend's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex to be held at Hicks Hall, to prefer an indictment &c. "against Thomas Tramplett prisoner in Newgate, whom shee accuseth and vehemently suspecteth to have feloniously taken out of an Abby, by name Kilbourne Abby, which belongs to her, sixteene iron casements and frames for casements, a barre of iron and other peeces of iron." S. P. R., 22 Feb., 1658/9.

25 January, 1658/9.—Recognizances, taken before Tobias Lisle esq. J.P., of Leonard Yates labourer and James Falloway yeoman, both of Giles-in-the-Feildes co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Grissell Corneford at the next S. P. for Middlesex to be held at Hicks Hall "to aunswer the complaynt of Godfrey Mowbray constable for being an idle loose person in life and conversation and suspected to bee a strumpett, and was taken in a disorderly house." S. P. R., 22 Feb., 1658/9

22 February, 1658/9.—Recognizances, taken before John Lord Barkstead Lieutenant of His Highnesses Tower of London and J.P., of Andrew Peast vintner and William Lincolne millener, both of the Tower Liberty, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Gabriel Benfield of Mile End in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. monyer, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Gabriel Benfield's appearance at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex after Easter, to answer &c. "for provoking slanderous and scandalous language to a souldiuor and others tending to the breach of the peace (being accused of saying that the souldiers that served the Commonwealth were all rogues, and that there was not an honest man in the army, and that the soule of his late Highnes was in hell, and that he was damned, and being accused of forcing a Health upon a souldier with these words 'To the Landlord of the Master whom you serve')." S. P. R., 14 April, 1659.

22 February, 1658/9.—Orders, made at S. P. held at Hickes Hall in St. John's Streete co. Midd., "That the churchwardens of the severall parishes of this county, that are comprehended within the said Bills of Mortalitie, shall forthwith make choise of a competent nomber of discreet persons within their said respective parishes to view and search the bodyes of all such persons as shall depart this life from tyme to tyme, and to retorne their names and nombers with deceases they dye of (so farre as it may appeare unto them) weekely to the parishe clerke of such parish for which they are to be chosen to search as aforesaid, And that the said churchwardens doe likewise forthwith retorne the names of such searchers to some of the Justices of the Peace of the said county inhabitinge in or neere to such parish, to the end they may have an oath administered unto them for the due execucion of the said offices, And that, upon retorne made by the said searchers of what they finde upon such searches to be the causes of the death of all persons dyinge in the said parishes respectively to the parish-clarke of the said parish, the said parish-clarkes certify the diseases as well as the nomber of the persons dyinge in their said parishes from tyme to tyme weekely, as it hath beene and now is used within the said citty of London, for the better prevencion of the spreadinge of the infeccion of the plague afore";—these orders being made at the instance and on the peticion of the parish-clerks of the several parishes of the City of London, complaining that the weekly bills of mortality of the Middlesex parishes, lying within the Bills of Mortality, whilst returning the deaths occurring weekly within the same parishes, neglect to state the diseases causing the deaths. S. P. Book.

7 March, 1658/9.—Recognizances, taken before John Waterton esq. J.P., of John Ley victualler and Evan Pew taylor, both of Shadwell in Stepney co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Alice Bent, wife of William Bent of Shadwell aforesaid seaman, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to "answeare for assaulting and striking in the face Capt. Valentine Jowles, Commander of the Waxford Frigett in the service of the state, making his face to bleed; Charged also by the said Valentine Jowles upon his oath of [calling him] rogue and horse-turd, and further saying that the Lord Protector and [they] that imployed him (meaning the said Valentyne) were rogues and knaves." S. P. R., 14 April, 1659.

14 March, 1658/9.—Recognizances, taken before John Waterton esq. J.P., of William Price waterman and Edward Hulstead lighterman, both of Wappin Wall in Stepney co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Mary Price, wife of the said William Price at the next S. P. for Middlesex to "answeare the complainte of John Wythers who chargeth hir of hireing him to goe with hir by water to Bugbyes Hole and carrying him on board of ship there, and leaveing him with the seamen to be transported to Surranam." S. P. R., 14 April, 1659.

14 March, 1658/9.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Osgood late of the said parish laborer stole and bore away two silver trencher plates worth ten pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland. No clerical minute touching arraignment or the consequences thereof. G. D. R., . . . . 1658/9.

20 March, 1658/9.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of John Cole of Gyles-in-the-Feildes co. Midd. labourer, in the sum of ten pounds, and of John Garvas and Morris Follins, both of the aforesaid parish labourers, in the sum of five pounds each; For the said John Cole's appearance at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer for reviling Capt. William Staffe in the streete calling him 'Spirritt' which is soe infamous a name that many have bene wounded to death, and the said Captaine is much beaten and bruised by the multitude, beinge a verie aged man." S. P. R., 14 April, 1659.

29 March, 1659.—Recognizance, taken before Moses Keelinge esq. J.P., of Susan Netlingham of St. Olave's Southwark widow, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Susan Netlingham at the next G. S. P. to be held at Hicks Hall, "to prefer or cause to be preferred a bill of inditement against John Oates for stealing from hir a silver cup." S P. R., 30 April, 1659.

1 April, 1659.—True Bill (found by Jurors for the Keepers of Liberty of England by authority of Parliament) that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Kennit alias Smith late of the said parish spinster practised witchcraft &c. upon and against Sarah Rose spinster, so that the said Sarah "was wasted consumed pyned and lamed" by the said practice, and so remains up to the taking of this inquisition. At the bill's head over the culprit's name appears this clerical minute, 'Puse not guilty nor did fly"=Found 'Not Guilty' by Jurors, who did not withdraw from their verdict. G. D. R., 29 June, 1659.

5 April, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of William Sudlowe of Clerkenwell labourer, in the sum of ten pounds, and Thomas Witt of Clerkenwell cutler and Edward Lyne of Sepulchre's co. Midd. cutler, in the sum of five pounds each; For the said Edward Sudlowe's appearance at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, "to answere for comeing into the vestrie in Clerkenwell Church, when the antient inhabitants of the said parish were mett in the vestrie there, and saying 'The Divill take you all.' " S. P. R., 14 April, 1659.

6 April, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of Christopher . . . . of Gyles-Chriplegate joyner and George Edwards of Sepulchres London bookebynder in the sum of . . . . each, to be levied &c. to the use of the Keepers of the Liberty of England by authority of Parliament; For the appearance of Elizabeth Byron, wife of William Byron of Whitecrostreete in the parish of Gyles Chriplegate co. Midd. . . . ., at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to "answer for goeing about with bookes to present to gentlemen and ladies, by which meanes shee getts into there houses and pilfers whatsoever she can." S. P. R., 30 April, 1659.

16 April, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Hubbert esq. J. P., of Thomas Cooke of Whitechappell tayler and Henry Baker of Stepney tayler, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Bridget Ivory at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer for being charged upon suspition of conveying away Richard Cole beyond the seas." S. P. R., 17 May, 1659.

9 May, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of Fayth Cleyton of Clerkenwell singlewoman, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Robert Waller of Gyles-Chripplegate co. Midd. cordweynour and John Feltes of Algate London porter, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the said Fayth Qeyton's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer Edward Roper constable, who tooke her in an evill house in the night tyme in her smocke in a cellour standing there almost up to the twist in water."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J. P., for the appearance of Rebecca Oram of Clerkenwell co. Midd. singlewoman at the same next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer Edward Roper constable of Clerkenwell who tooke her in an evill house in the night tyme in her smocke in a celler almost up to the twist in water." S. P. R., 17 May, 1659.

12 May, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before Ra: Hall esq. J.P., of William Wintershall and Henry Eaton both of Clerkenwell gentlemen, in the sum of fifty pounds each; "Upon condicion that Anthony Turner shall personallie appeare at the next Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be holden at Hicks Hall for the said county of Middlesex; for the unlawfull mainteining of Stage playes and enterludes att the Redd Bull in St. John's Street, which house he affirms that they hire of the parishioners of Clerkenwell at the rate of twenty shillings a-day over and above what they have agreed to pay towardes releife of their poore and repairing their highwaies, and in the meane tyme to be of good behaviour and not to depart the Court without lycence.—Ra: Hall."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J.P., of the same William Wintershall and Henry Eaton gentlemen, in the same sum of fifty pounds each; For the appearance of Edward Shatterall at the next Q. S, P. for Middlesex at Hicks Hall, "to answer for the unlawfull mainteining of Stage-plaies and enterluds at the Redd Bull in St. John's Street &c." S. P. R., 17 May, 1659.

15 May, 1659.—True Bill (found by Jurors for the Keepers of the Liberty of England by authority of Parliament) that, at St. Paul's Covent-Garden co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Peter Phillipps late of the said parish laborer broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Rt. Hon. John Henry Lord Killman, Embassadour to the Duke of Hollstine, and stole therefrom and carried away one stuff doublett trimd with silke lace and ribbon worth four pounds, one stuffe paire of breeches trimd with silke lace and ribbon worth foure poundes, one stuffe coate worth three pounds, one paire of scollopp lynnen knee cuffs worth three pounds, one paire of silke stockinges worth twenty shillings, one laced band worth forty shillings, one hatt with a plume of feathers worth forty shillings, one sword with a silver hilt worth seven pounds, one picture worth forty shillings, . . . . &c.—Acquitted of the burglary, Peter Phillipps was found 'Guilty' of felony, whereupon he pleaded his clergy; but the book having been allowed him in former time, he was now sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 18 May, 1659.

9 June, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Loton esq. J.P., of John Boswell of Whitechappell co. Midd. brewer's servant, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Jacob Peirson and John Menday, both of Whitechappell victuallers, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the said John Boswell's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex held at Hicks Hall, "to answer the complainte of George Masterman for that he with others made aridinge (sic) and when they came before his doore they raised a tumult whereby dirte was throwne into his shopp and they cryed out 'This is Mastermans wife the whore that beats her husband,' and threw a horne into his shoppe, and he lost out of his shopp a quarter of lambe."—Also, three other sets of similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J.P., for the appearance of Richard Sterlinge brewer, John Holloway brewer's servant, and George Masterman brewer's servant, all three of Whitechappell, at the same next S. P. held at Hicks Hall, to answer for taking part in the same social demonstration against George Masterman. S. P. R., 27 June, 1659.

14 June, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Loton esq. J.P., of Marie Miller of St. Katherin's Tower Ditch spinster, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Henry Downes of St. Katherin's afore said cordwinder (sic) and John Gey of Tower Hill haberdasher, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the said Marie Miller's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex at Hicks Hall, to answer for being "an idle lewd and disorderly person, liveing out of service at her own hand, and for dancinge at a Garland at twelve o'clocke at night and carrienge of the Garland home upon her head in companey of people being meet together." S. P. R., 27 June, 1659.

16 July, 1659.—True Bill (found by Jurors for the Keepers of the Liberty of England by authority of Parliament) that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Madlocke late of the said parish spinster, with the intention of killing "one Paull Younge her master by poysoninge" him, mixed and made a poisonous potion of milk and mercury, and administered the said drink to her said master, who took it of her hands and not knowing it to be poisonous drank it, whereupon he forthwith languished and still remains in a languishing state from the poison thus taken into his body. Found 'Guilty,' Anne Madlocke was fined twenty shillings. G. D. R., 17 Aug., 1659.

9 December, 1659.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the parish of Pancras co. Midd. on view of the body of William Barnes there lying dead; With Verdict "that Thomas Collins late of the parish of Pancras aforesaid . . . . yeoman with Edward Daniell, John Ladd, George Taylor and the said William Barnes being in a certaine hall in the house of Henry Earle of Kingston scituate at Highgate in the said parish . . . . the said Thomas Collins a certaine birding peece loaded and charged with gunpowder and small leaden shott of noe value then and there being under his right arme did take the same into his hand with a purpose to lay the same up under the mantletree of the said hall and pulling the muzle of the saide peice forwards in the laying it upp as aforesaid the said William Barnes standing neere to the chimney there where the said Thomas Collins was laying upp the said birding-peice out of the hands of the said Thomas Collins and it soe happened that the said birding-peice did fire and goe off in the hands of the said Thomas Collins . . . . so that . . . . the said Thomas Collins by misfortune and against his will did give unto the said William Barnes in and upon the left side of the body . . . . one mortall wound . . . . of which the said William Barnes then and there instantly died."—The verdict omits to state the precise day of the fatal accident. G. D. R., 13 Jan., 1659/60.

31 December, 1659.—Recognizances, taken before John Ireton (Alderman) J.P., of Edward Northen vintner and Mathew Scales gentleman, both of Queen's Street in the parish of Giles-in-the-Feildes, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Edward Endarby of Queens Street aforesaid gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said Edward Endarby's appearance at the next G. D. for Middlesex, to answer &c. At the bill's foot appears this memorandum— "Edward Endarby voluntarily entred into this recognizance, hearing he was charged to be a popish priest." G. D. R., 13 Jan., 1659/60.