Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1664

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

336-363

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1664', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 336-363. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66062 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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1664

5 January, 15 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Sir William Parkhurst knt. J.P., of Robert Ditch of St. Katherine's co. Midd. seaman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Robert Ditch and of his wife Ursula Ditch at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to be held at Hickes Hall, to give evidence "against one Paule Badcock for selling and sending aboard of a shipp one Andrew Couch a young man, an apprentize to one Peter Dickenson, to goe beyond seas." S. P. R., 14 Jan., 15 Charles II.

18 February, 16 Charles II.—Record that, at the S. G. D. of the said date, Elizabeth Hawkins, John Stockell, John Hatton, John Cavee, Richard Salter, John Pane, Edward Ridgway, Dorothy Hunt, Mary Hall, Mary Wellington, Susan Wren, William Cooper, Richard Guy, Katherine Wright, Honora Collins, Thomas Prockter, Edward Davies, John Wallis, Anne Howard, Katherine Bentley, Elizabeth Biron, Henry Marshall, Humphrey Underwood and James Coachman, twenty-four convicted felons, pleaded the King's special pardon, dated on the 1st inst., under condition that they and each of them shall within two months go out from England and upon sea to the island of Virginia or the islands called the Barbadoes or some other part of America (versus Virginie insulam seu insulas vocatas le Barbadoes aut aliquam aliam partem Americe) inhabited by the King's subjects, and do not return to England for seven years from the end of the said two months, following the date of the same pardon. G. D. Reg.

18 April, 16 Charles II.—Order made, at G. Q. S. P. held at Westminster, in consent to the certificate and desire of the President and Governors of the Corporacion for the Poore within the parishes and places hereafter named lying and being within the parishes mencioned in the Weekely Bills of Mortality, for raising by assessment and rate within the same parishes and places the sum of £2002 10s. 0d. "for the furnishing the new workhouse at Clerkenwell with materialls and provision of clotheing and victualls and for a stocke to imploy the number of six hundred poore at worke and maintenance of a hundred aged and blind persons uncapable to labour"; the assesment on the said parishes and places being as follows:—

£s.d.
The Libertie of the Rolls01900
St. Giles-in-the-Feilds31000
St. Mary-Savoy006150
St. Clement's Danes'05600
St. Andrew's Holborne10400
St. James's Clerken-well12000
St. Sepulcher's076100
St. Mary's Islington06100
St. Giles's Cripplegate16000
Popler, Blackwall05900
Lymehouse090100
Shadwell18500
Ratcliffe11100
Wapping White-chappell13600
Carried over1494150
Lower Wapping004400
Libertie of East-smithfeild007700
Libertie of Minories0003100
Whitechappell007000
Milend002650
Bethnoll Greene001500
Hackney004400
St. Leonard's Shoreditch010800
St. Katherine's005900
Spittlefeilds003500
Libertie of Saffron Hill and Hatton Garden002600
Total£2002100
S. P. Reg.

20 April, 16 Charles II.—Three several memoranda that Francis Cottington of Hanworth co. Midd. esq. and William Gildon and Richard Gildon, both of Hanworth aforesaid gentlemen, are each separately delivered in bail to Laurence Wood tayler and George Rith victualler, both of St. Andrew's Holborne, each of the said three principals being bound in the sum of two hundred pounds, and each of the said mainpernors being bound in three several sums of one hundred pounds each; For the appearance of the same Francis Cottington, William Gildon and Richard Gildon at the G. D. S. next after Trinity term, to answer to an indictment for trespass. G. D. Reg.

2 May, 16 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Edmund Godfrey esq. J.P., of John Baker of Russell Street in St. Martin's-inthe-Fields gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Baker's appearance at the next G. S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, to give evidence "against Peter Sourceau and Everard Blake for speakeing certain scandalous seditious and treasonable words against His Majestie viz. 'The King of England is not fitting nor capable to govern his kingdomes.'" S. P. R., 24 May, 16 Charles II.

3 May, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Edmund Godfrey esq. J.P., of John Garrat of St. Clement's Danes' tailor and Fulke Vaugh of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds each, and Everard Blake of St. Martin's-in-theFields tailor, in the sum of two hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Everard Blake at the next G. D. for Middlesex to answer &c., he being charged "by one John Baker for discourseing with one Peter Sourceau and uttering certain scandalous and seditious and treasonable words against his said Majestie, saying he was not fitting nor capable to govern his kingdomes."—Also, Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J.P., of Claudius Sourceau of St. Paul's Covent Garden tailor and William Carr of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds each, and of Peter Sourceau of Covent Garden . . . ., in the sum of two hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Peter Sourceau at the same next G. D. for Middlesex, to answer &c. for his part in the same treasonable conversation. G. D. R., 25 May, 16 Charles II.

18 May, 16 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of Edward Price of Padington co. Midd. clerk, and vicar of Stonely co. Warwick, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Edward Price at the next S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, to prefer an indictment &c. "against Henry Phillips for words by him spoken against our Soveraign Lord the King tending to sedition and against the present government of this kingdom, to witt, 'That the King that now is did take the same waies that his father did to be ill beloved, and that the Chimnie-monie would prove a worse burden than formerly the Ship-monie was.'" S. P. R., 24 May, 16 Charles II.

25 May, 16 Charles II.—Record that, at G. D. S. of the said date, Dorothy Bowden, Daniel Brisley, Mary Elmes, Mary Rowe, John Bird, Mary Drew, George Vigen, William Peace, Christiana Gisburne, Mary Hull, James Johnson, William Cooke and William Harrison, thirteen persons attainted and convicted of several felonies, pleaded the King's special pardon, dated on the 21st inst. under condition, that they and each of them within the space of two months go out of England upon the sea to the island or islands called the Barbadoes or some other part of America inhabited by the king's subjects, and remain there for seven years and do not return therefrom into the said kingdom within seven years from the end of the said two months next following the date of the said pardon. G. D. Reg.

8 June, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Anthony Derrew (sic) late of the said parish labourer, in the presence and hearing of divers of the King's lieges, spoke these scandalous words, to wit, that 'The King was a vagabond and a rogue and a knave.' Found 'Not Guilty,' Anthony Derrew was acquitted. G. D. R., 6 July, 16 Charles II.

11 June, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Abell esq. J.P., of Lewis Declo weaver and John Michell weaver, both of Whitechappell, and John Leaman of Stepney yeoman, in the sum of fifty pounds, and Anthony Dereew (sic) of Whitechappell weaver, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Anthony Dereew at the next G. D. for Middlesex, to answer &c. for saying "The King is a Rogue and Knave," and also for saying "The King keeps whores and then drinking a Health to the King and all whores." G. D. R., 6 July, 16 Charles II.

11 June, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster on the said day, Fulke Bellas late of the said parish, being an inrolled soldier (existens irrotulatus ut miles) to serve the King within this kingdom of England, withdrew himself from the service of the same Lord King, with the permission of his captain. This indictment was quashed for insufficiency. G. D. R., 6 July, 16 Charles II.

15 June, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before John Smith esq. J.P., of William Parker of Crutchet Fryers London taylor and William Harvey of Whitechappell cordwayner, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Thomas Joanes . . . . at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer for being taken in Moore Feildes, where the wrasteling ground is," he being "reputed to be a comon pick-pocket." S. P. R., 4 July, 16 Charles II.

26 June, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Prockter, Nathaniel Snape and James Northfolke esqs. and Justices of the Peace, of Robert Doyley of London silkeman and William Polhiet of Hatton Street glasier, and John Wood of Whitechappell scalemaker, in the sum of one hundred marks each; For the appearance of the said John Wood at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex to be holden at Hickes Hall, to answer &c. "for being taken at a conventicle in Hatton Streete" on the same 26th June.—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justices of the Peace, for the appearance at the same G. S. P. of the following persons, to wit, Abraham Holmes of Chissell Street London laborer, Edward Brookes of Spittlefeilds silkeweaver, John Clerke of Aldermanbury yoman, Edward Holden of Petticote Lane yeoman, Philipp Taylor of Whitechappell water-bearer, John Church of Norton Folgate taylor, Thomas Birket of Bishoppgate Street laborer, Nathanial Sindenham of Whitechappell porter, William Towerson of Canon Street London plateworker, Henry Witherington of Croydon co. Surrey glover, David Barrett of Aldermanbury shoemaker, Edward Sherwin of Suffolke Lane porter, and Joseph Timplon of Petticoat Lane imbroyderer, to answer "for being taken at a Conventicle in Hatton Streete, the day and yeare abovesaid." S. P. R., 4 July, 16 Charles II.

5 July, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Robinson knt. and bart. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Richard Wincles vintner and Francis Burt salesman, both of Stepney co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and of William Williams of . . . ., in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said William Williams at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "then and there to answer for saying (as hath been alleaged) to Thomas Rankin (one of the Dukes watermen, who at that time had the Duke of Yorkes cloth and Plate of Armes on), that hee should pull off his Foole's Coat and give it to his sonne." S. P. R., 29 August, 16 Charles II.

17 July, 16 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hands and seals of Sir William Rider knt. and George Marche esq. Justices of the Peace, that on the said day Alexander Parker of Watlin Street London gentleman, Richard Clifson of St. Martin's-le-Grand taylor, Francis White an apprentice of John Newell of St. Katherine's near the Tower of London block-maker, Daniel Martin of Whitechappell nailsmith, Maximilian Keates of Cheapside London coateseller, Thomas Davis of Stepney broker, Francis Moore of Stepney distiller, Miles Knowles of St. Katherine's aforesaid tobaccoe-cutter, Richard Waples of Houndesditch in St. Botolph's London mercer, Sir John Vaughan of London, K.B., Benjamin Greeneway of St. Botolph's Bishopsgate grocer, Richard Bryan apprentice of Samuel Wing of Milke Streete iremonger, Francis Collins of Ratcliffe in Stepney bricklayer, John Cowdrey of Stepney carpenter, Peter Pennington of Stepney marriner, Samuel Groome of Stepney maryner, Roger Evans of Stepney smith, Richard Knowlman of Stepney seaman, Samuel Bowlton of Poster Lane London goldsmith, John Noble of New Gravel Lane in Stepney maryner, Francis Plumsteade apprentice of Clement Plumsteade of Little Tower Hill London iremonger, Anthony Lingwood alias Ringwood of Outer Tower Hill London iremonger, John Price of Lawrence Powntnes Lane London packer, John Goodwin of Old Change London clothworker, John Terry of St. Botolph's-without-Algate London salesman, Edmund Barkley apprentice of John Fordham of Walbrooke skinner, Roger Melledge apprentice of Richard Greenway of Blackfryers London taylor, Joseph Scott of Bartholomewes London upholster, William Mathews of East Smithfeild taylor, Thomas Dry of Whitechappell grocer, and William Ward of Yarmouth co. Norfolke maryner came before the said Justices of the Peace at Stepney co. Midd. on the said 17th July, 16 Charles II., and were duly convicted of having assembled unlawfully on the same 17th July at the dwellinghouse of William Beanes in Stepney aforesaid, together with one hundred other and unknown malefactors besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, under colour of exercising religion otherwise than is allowed by the liturgy and practice of the Church of England; and that on the said day for the said offence the aforesaid Justices of the Peace committed the said Alexander Parker to Newgate gaol there to remain for three months, unless he should pay a fine of five pounds, and committed the aforesaid Richard Clifson, Maximilian Keates, Sir John Vaughan K.B., Benjamin Greeneway, Samuel Groome, William Ward and Thomas Dry to the same gaol of Newgate, there to remain for three months unless they should each pay severally a fine of forty shillings (nisi quilibet eorum separatim pro seipsis predictis justiciariis solveret quadraginta solidos pro fine &c."), and committed all the others to the same gaol of Newgate, there to remain for three months unless each of them should pay a fine of five shillings.—Also, in the same packet with this document, forty-seven similar certificates, dated respectively on one or another of the following days, to wit, 24 July, 31 July, 7 Aug., 14 Aug., 21 Aug., 28 Aug., 4 Sept., 11 Sept., 18 Sept., 25 Sept., 2 Oct., 9 Oct., 23 Oct., 4 Nov., 6 Nov., 20 Nov., 27 Nov., 11 Dec, 25 Dec, 9 Jan., 22 Jan., and 29 Jan. of 16 Charles II., and 12 Feb., 19 Feb., 26 Feb., 12 March, 21 March, 14 April, 21 May, 11 June and 31 Dec of the 17th year of Charles II., and certifying the conviction of persons for assembling unlawfully at such meetings under colour of religion, as were prohibited by the Conventicles Act of 16 Car. II. In all, these forty-eight certificates exhibit particulars of 909 convictions, viz. 548 convictions of male offenders and 361 convictions of female conventiclers. The number of the individuals to whose conviction of a particular offence these notable writings give testimony is of course smaller than the number of the certified convictions, as three of the certified convictions sometimes relate to the same individual, and in a considerable number of cases a single offender is certified to have been convicted twice. In all, the number of individuals, pointed to by the certificates as convicted conventiclers is 782,—viz. 479 males and 303 females. The 479 males were 1 knight (Sir John Vaughan K.B.), 8 gentlemen, 2 physicians, 6 merchants, 3 goldsmiths (to wit, 20 persons of a condition superior to that of the mere commonalty), 1 apothecary, 8 apprentices, 9 bakers, 2 barbers, 1 basket-maker, 2 blacksmiths, 1 bookbinder, 1 bodice-maker, 2 brewers, 3 bricklayers, 5 brokers or factors, 1 butcher, 1 button-maker, 1 cabinet-maker, 1 capmaker, 1 carman, 13 carpenters, 1 carrier, 1 carver, 12 chandlers, 4 cheese-mongers, 1 cloth-drawer, 4 cloth-workers, 1 coat-seller, 1 combmaker, 11 coopers, 25 cordwainers, 4 distillers, 1 draper, 1 'dustmaker' (sic), 4 dyers, 5 felt-makers, 2 glaziers, 13 glovers, 8 grocers, 1 gunsmith, 1 hat-maker, 6 haberdashers, 1 heel-maker, 4 hosiers, 6 husbandmen, 1 inn-keeper, 3 ingravers, 5 ironmongers, 1 jeweller, 11 joyners, 21 laborers, 1 leather-dresser, 1 leather-seller, 1 lime-maker, 19 marriners, 1 mason, 1 meal-man, 1 mercer, 1 nailsmith, 1 oilman, 1 packer, 1 painter, 3 patten-makers, 2 perfumers, 1 pewterer, 1 pinmaker, 1 plasterer, 1 plumer, 1 porter, 1 poulterer, 2 rope-makers, 1 salter, 2 sadlers, 1 saleman, 6 sawyers, 1 scrivener, 9 servants, 2 shipwrights, 14 shoe-makers, 2 silk-stocking-makers, 1 silk-stocking-framemaker, 10 silk-weavers, 3 skinners, 7 smiths, 2 spectacle-frame-makers, 1 soap-boiler, 1 stocking-seller, 1 sugar-baker, 1 tanner, 46 tailors, 3 tallow-chandlers, 2 tin-men, 1 tobacconist, 1 tobacco-cutter, 2 tobaccopipe-makers, 3 turners, 1 vintner, 5 upholsterers, 1 watch-maker, 2 watermen, 21 weavers, 1 wine-cooper, 1 wire-drawer, 3 woodmongers, 1 wool-comber, 4 yarn-men, 24 yeomen and 17 men of unknown avocations=total, 479 male persons. The females were—5 wives of gentlemen, 2 wives of physicians and 2 spinsters of gentle condition, viz. 9 gentlewomen, 3 wives of bakers, 1 wife of a barber, 1 wife of a blacksmith, 1 wife of a bookseller, 1 wife of a button-maker, 5 wives of chandlers, 1 wife of a cloth-drawer, 1 wife of a cloth-worker, 6 wives of cordwainers, 1 wife of a cutler, 1 wife of a dyer, 1 wife of a glazier, 3 wives of glovers, 2 wives of grocers, 1 wife of a hatmaker, 1 wife of a haberdasher, 2 wives of hosiers, 1 wife of a husbandman, 1 wife of a founder, 1 wife of a jacksmith, 5 wives of laborers, 19 wives of mariners, 1 wife of a maltster, 1 wife of a meal-man, 4 wives of porters, 1 wife of a rope-maker, 3 wives of sawyers, 1 wife of a scrivener, 1 wife of a ship-caulker, 2 wives of shipwrights, 1 wife of a shoe-maker, 3 wives of smiths, 10 wives of tailors, 1 wife of a tobacconist, 1 wife of a tobacco-pipe-maker, 1 wife of a trumpetter, 1 wife of an upholsterer, 1 wife of a victualler, 1 wife of a waterman, 3 wives of weavers, 3 wives of yeomen (= 108 wives), 50 widows, 139 spinsters (no one of whom appears from the description given of her to have been of gentle quality), and 6 females not sufficiently described for classification = total, 303 female persons.—A comparison of this summary of 782 persons indicted for attending religious conventicles in the 16th and 17th years of Charles II. with the lists of persons indicted in the previous reign for not going to church will satisfy the student, that in respect to social quality the conventiclers of Restoration London were greatly inferior to the Middlesex recusants (for the most part, catholics) who refrained from attending the services of the established church in the time of Charles the First.

From this imperfect series of Certificates of Convictions of Conventiclers it appears that the unlawful assemblies were held at one or another of the following eleven places, to wit—(1) The Dwellinghouse of William Beanes at Stepney, (2) A Building or Room in the possession of an unknown man in Stepney, (3) A House late in the possession of a certain . . . . Brock in Milend, (4) The Dwelling-house of John Elson carpenter in St. Sepulchre's parish, (5) The Dwelling-house of Peter Burdett in Holloway Street, St. Leonard's, Shorditch, (6) The Dwelling-house of Peter Burdett in Westbury Street in Stepney, (7) The Dwelling-house of Mary Winch widow in St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate, (8) The Dwelling-house of Richard Swift weaver in Hendon, (9) The Dwelling-house of Sibil Heaman widow in Limehouse in Stepney, (10) The Dwelling-house of Joseph Robinson in the Liberty of Norton Folgate, and (11) The Dwellinghouse of Margaret Hammond in Hackney.

I. The twenty conventicles held at William Beanes's dwelling-house in Stepney were held on (1) Sunday 17 July, 16 Car. II., when some 134 persons were present, of whom 34 were convicted, (2) Sunday 31 July, 16 Car. II., when some 56 persons were present, of whom 16 were convicted, (3) Sunday 7 Aug., 16 Car. II., when some 79 persons were present, of whom 29 were convicted, (4) Sunday 14 Aug., 16 Car. II., when some 61 persons were present, of whom 21 were convicted, (5) Sunday 21 Aug., 16 Car. II., when some 51 persons were present, of whom 11 were convicted, (6) Sunday 28 Aug., 16 Car. II., when some 14 persons were present, 4 of whom were convicted, (7) Sunday 28 Aug., 16 Car. 11., when some 84 persons were present, of whom 34 were convicted, (8) Sunday 4 Sept., 16 Car. II. when some 36 persons were present, of whom 16 were convicted, (9) Sunday 11 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 53 persons were present, of whom 20 were convicted, (10) Sunday 18 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 50 persons were present, of whom 20 were convicted, (11) Sunday 25 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 37 persons were present, of whom 17 were convicted, (12) Sunday 2 Oct., 16 Car. II., when some 53 persons were present, of whom 23 were convicted, (13) Sunday 9 Oct., 16 Car. II., when some 41 persons were present, of whom 16 were convicted, (14) Sunday 30 Oct., 16 Car. II., when some 53 persons were present, of whom 23 were convicted, (15) Sunday 6 Nov., 16 Car. II., when some 28 persons were present, of whom 8 were convicted, (16) Sunday 20 Nov., 16 Car. II., when some 33 persons were present, of whom 13 were convicted, (17) Sunday 27 Nov., 16 Car. II., when some 21 persons were present, of whom 9 were convicted, (18) Sunday 11 Dec, 16 Car. II., when some 25 persons were present, of whom 11 were convicted, (19) Sunday 25 Dec, 16 Car. II., when some 24 persons were present, of whom 4 were convicted, (20) Sunday 19 Feb., 17 Car. II., when some 48 persons were present, of whom 18 were convicted.

II. The eight conventicles, held at the Building or room of a certain unknown man in Stepney, were held on (1) Sunday 24 July, 16 Car. II., when 57 persons were present, of whom 17 were convicted, (2) Sunday 7 Aug., 16 Car. II., when some 26 persons were present, of whom 12 were convicted, (3) Sunday 28 Aug., 16 Car. II., when some 60 persons were present, of whom 30 were convicted, (4) Sunday 4 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 62 persons were present, of whom 32 were convicted, (5) Sunday 11 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 30 persons were present, of whom 15 were convicted, (6) Sunday 23 Oct., 16 Car. II., when 54 persons were present, of whom 27 were convicted, (7) Friday 4 Nov., 16 Car. II., when 32 persons were present, of whom 16 were convicted, (8) Sunday 12 Feb., 17 Car. II., when 64 persons were present, of whom 44 were convicted.

III. The one conventicle held at the house late in the possession of one . . . . Brock at Milend was there held on Sunday 24 July, 16 Car. II., when some 123 persons were present, of whom 23 were convicted.

IV. The twelve conventicles held at the Dwellinghouse of John Elson carpenter in St. Sepulchre's parish were held on (1) Sunday 21 Aug., 16 Car. II., when some 59 persons were present, of whom 29 were convicted, (2) Sunday 4 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 100 persons were present, of whom 50 were convicted, (3) Sunday 11 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 65 persons were present, of whom 32 were convicted, (4) Sunday 25 Sept., 16 Car. II., when some 44 persons were present, of whom 22 were convicted, (5) Sunday 2 Oct., 16 Car. II., when 21 persons were present, of whom 10 were convicted, (6) Sunday 22 Jan., 16 Car. II., when 31 persons were present, of whom 24 were convicted, (7) Sunday 29 Jan., 16 Car. II., when some 54 persons were present, of whom 47 were convicted, (8) Sunday 12 Feb., 17 Car. II., when some 66 persons were present, of whom 32 were convicted, (9) Sunday 26 Feb., 17 Car. II., when some 26 persons were present, of whom 13 were convicted, (10) Sunday 12 March, 17 Car. II., when some 11 persons were present, of whom 4 were convicted, (11) Sunday 19 March, 17 Car. II., when some 25 persons were present, of whom 9 were convicted, (12) Tuesday 21 March, 17 Car. II., when some 52 persons were present, of whom 22 were convicted.

V. The one conventicle held at Peter Burdett's dwellinghouse in Holloway Street, St. Leonard's, Shorditch, was held on Sunday 11 Dec, 16 Car. II., when 6 persons besides the members of the said Peter Burdett's family were present, of whom 1 was convicted.

VI. The one conventicle, held at Peter Burdett's dwellinghouse in Westbury Street in Stepney, was held on Sunday 22 Jan., 16 Car. II., when some 31 persons were present, of whom 1 was convicted.

VII. The one conventicle held at the Dwellinghouse of Mary Winch widow in St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate was held on Monday 9 Jan., 16 Car. II., when 9 persons besides the persons of. the said Mary Winch's household were present, of whom 2 were convicted.

VIII. The one conventicle, held at Sibil Heaman's dwellinghouse in Limehouse in Stepney, was held on Sunday 21 May, 17 Car. II., when some 54 persons besides the persons of the said Sibil Heaman's family were present, of whom 24 were convicted.

IX. The one conventicle, held at Richard Swift's dwellinghouse in Hendon, was held on Sunday 9 April, 17 Car. II., when some 13 persons were present, of whom 12 were convicted.

X. The one conventicle, held at Joseph Robinson's dwellinghouse in the Liberty of Norton Folgate, was held on Sunday 11 June, 17 Car. II., when 44 persons were present, of whom 4 were convicted.

XI. The one conventicle, held at Hackney in the dwellinghouse of Margaret Hammond of Hackney widow, was held on Sunday 31 Dec, 17 Car. II., when some 25 persons were present, of whom 8 were convicted.

Readers should notice the word 'some' in the foregoing minutes. The numbers of persons, stated to have been present at the successive assemblies, are only approximate statements. Giving the names &c. of all the individuals convicted of having been at a particular conventicle, each certificate gives also the number of the other and unknown male factors (besides the persons of the family of the person in whose house, building or room the meeting took place), who were present on the same occasion under colour of religion &c. This latter number was of course nothing more than an approximate computation, made by the constables and headboroughs and their assistants, who whilst arresting the subsequently convicted conventiclers were more like to over-rate than to under-rate the number of the conventiclers who managed or were allowed to escape.

It remains for the manipulator of these certificates to give a summary of the judgments delivered by acting Justices on conventiclers convicted for the first or second time:—17 July, 16 Car. II., 1 conventicler sentenced to prison for three months or to pay 5£., 7 sent. to prison for three months or to pay 2£. each, 26 sent. to prison for three months or to pay 5s. each:—24 July, 16 Car. II., 40 conventiclers sent. to prison for six days or to pay 5s. each:—31 July, 16 Car. II., 13 conventiclers sent. to prison for two days or to pay 5s. each, 2 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 2s. each, 1 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 1£.:—7 Aug., 16 Car. II., 2 conventiclers sent. to prison for two days or to pay 1£. each, 1 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 10s., 12 sent. to prison for six days or to pay 5s. each, 8 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 5s. each, 18 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 2s. 6d. each:—14 Aug., 16 Car. II., 17 conventiclers sent. to prison for two days or to pay 5s. each, 1 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 1s.:—21 Aug., 16 Car. II., 29 conventiclers sent. to prison for two days or to pay 5s. each, 11 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 2s. 6d. each:—28 Aug., 16 Car. II., 30 conventiclers sent. to prison for ten days or to pay 5s. each, 31 sent. to prison for one day or to pay 2s. each, 4 sent. to prison for five days or to pay 2s. each, 1 sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s.:—4 Sept., 16 Car. II., 16 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 5s. each, 32 sent. to prison for six days or to pay 2s. each, 19 sent. to prison for three days or to pay 2s. each, 31 sent. to prison for three days or to pay 1s. each:—11 Sept., 16 Car. II., 25 conventiclers sent. to prison for three days or to pay 1s. each, 20 sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each, 22 sent. to prison for three days or to pay 6d. each:—18 Sept., 16 Car. II., 20 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each:—25 Sept., 16 Car. II., 17 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each, 22 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 6d. each:—2 Oct., 16 Car. II., 23 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each, 10 sent. to prison for two days or to pay 6d. each:—9 Oct., 16 Car. II., 16 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each:—23 Oct., 16 Car. II., 27 conventiclers sent. to prison for three days or to pay 2s. 6d. each:—30 Oct., 16 Car II., 23 conventiclers sent. to prison for two days or to pay 1s. each:— 4 Nov., 16 Car. II., 16 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each:—6 Nov., 16 Car. II., 8 conventiclers sent. to prison for two days or to pay 1s. each:—20 Nov., 16 Car. II., 13 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 2s. each:—27 Nov., 16 Car. II., 9 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each:—11 Dec., 16 Car. II., 11 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each, 1 sent. to prison for three days or to pay 4£.:—25 Dec, 16 Car. II., 4 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 2s. 6d. each:— 9 Jan., 16 Car. II., 2 conventiclers sent. to prison for three days or to pay 2s. each:—22 Jan., 16 Car. II., 24 conventiclers sent. to prison for three days or to pay 10s. each, 1 sent. to prison for three days or to pay 2s. 6d.:—29 Jan., 16 Car. II., 47 conventiclers sent. to prison for three days or to pay 10s. each:—12 Feb., 17 Car. II., 44 conventiclers sent. to prison for three days or to pay 2s. each, 32 sent. to prison for three days or to pay 10s. each:—19 Feb., 17 Car. II., 18 conventiclers sent. to prison for one day or to pay 1s. each:—26 Feb., 17 Car. II., 13 conventiclers sent. to prison for fifteen days or to pay 10s. each:— 12 March, 17 Car. II., 4 conventiclers sent. to prison for ten days or to pay 10s. each:—19 March, 17 Car. II., 9 conventiclers sent. to prison for fifteen days or to pay 10s. each:—21 March, 17 Car. II., 22 conventiclers sent. to prison for ten days or to pay 10s. each:—14 April, 17 Car. II., 11 conventiclers sent. to prison for two days or to pay 1s. each, 1 sent. to prison for three months or to pay 5£:—21 May, 17 Car. II., 1 conventicler sent. to prison for three months or to pay 5£., 1 sent. to prison for two months or to pay 5£., 4 sent. to prison for two months or to pay 50s. each, 17 sent. to prison for two months or to pay 20s. each, 1 sent. to prison for three months or to pay 20s.:—11 June, 17 Car. II., 4 conventiclers sent. to prison for fifteen days or to pay 20s. each:— 31 Dec, 17 Car. II., 7 conventiclers fined 1£. each, and 1 fined 2£., without any alternative imprisonment.

The eight conventiclers convicted on 31 Dec, 17, Car. II., were Thomas Barnadiston of Hackney gentleman, Thomas Hinde of St. Andrew's Holborn brewer, Mary Pollstead of Hackney spinster, Frances Freeman of Hackney widow, Elizabeth Barnadiston of Hackney spinster, Susan Barnadiston of Hackney spinster, Mary Sotherne of Hackney spinster, and Margaret Hammond of Hackney widow, who were sentenced by the acting Justices of the Peace (Sir Thomas Player knt. and Henry Rowe esq.) to pay fines, to wit, Thomas Barnadiston to pay forty shillings and each of the other seven to pay a fine of twenty shillings, for having assembled unlawfully on the same aforesaid day, at the dwellinghouse of the said Margaret Hammond under colour of exercising religion &c., together with seventeen other and unknown malefactors besides the persons of the said widow Hammond's family. With the exception of these eight conventiclers who were fined without being first sentenced to imprisonment, all the other conventiclers, mentioned in this imperfect series of numerous certificates as having been convicted for a first or second offence against the Conventicle Act, were committed to prison, there to remain for a stated time unless each of them (i.e. of every batch of convicts) should pay a stated fine,—the words of the judgment touching the fine or fines being in each certificate to this effect, "nisi quilibet eorum separatim pro seipsis predictis justiciariis solveret &c. pro fine &c." = unless each of them should severally pay for themselves to the said Justices the sum of &c. for a fine &c. Construed with severe literalness these words would mean that unless each individual of the batch of offenders should pay the fine imposed on him or her, all of the offenders in the same group were to endure imprisonment for the stated term; and it is certain that in later time and different parts of the country, it was the practice of law to require payment of every individual's fine before enlarging any of the offenders, committed in the same batch to prison for the same term with the option of paying the same fine. A consequence of this practice was that the richer individuals in a batch of offenders used sometimes to pay the fines of those of their companions in trouble, who were not themselves able or willing to escape detention by a sacrifice of money. But nothing appears in the Middlesex records, to show that this severe practice prevailed at the tribunals of the Justices of the County in the years covered by these certificates.

In respect to offenders, convicted before two or more Justices of the Peace of a third violation of the Conventicle Act, the certificates record that the said offenders were committed to gaol there to remain till they should be delivered by due course of law, viz., to use the words of the statute, "there to remain without baile or mainprize untill the next General Quarter Session Assizes Gaol Delivery or sitting of any Commission of Oyer and Terminer in the respective county limitt division or liberty" wherein the offence was perpetrated. In due course every offender, so committed to gaol, was arraigned at G. Q. S., G. D. or S. O. T. for the alleged third offence, when, if he were found 'Guilty' by verdict of jurors, or if he refused either to plead the general issue or to confess the indictment, i.e. stood mute, he was adjudged to be transported to some one of His Majesty's foreign plantations, other than Virginia and New England, there to remain for seven years, unless he should be able and willing to purchase exemption from so severe a punishment by paying a fine of 100£. For every subsequent offence against the same enactment, the stubborn conventicler was on conviction dealt with in the same manner as upon his third conviction before Justices of the Peace.

Some other features of these certificates deserve the student's consideration. It is noteworthy that, with two or three exceptions, the offences certified by the certificates were perpetrated on Sunday, that the offenders are shown by the certificates to have been brought and convicted before the acting Justices on the very day of the offence, that the Justices before whom they were brought sate in the immediate vicinity of the places if not in the very places of unlawful assembly, and that certificates of conviction and judgment were then and there dated on the same day and at the same place. Both from recognizances of persons, bound to appear at the next S. P. to answer for refusing to aid constables in conducting conventiclers to prison, and from indictments for such refusal of assistance, it also appears that conventiclers convicted before Justices on Sunday were forthwith taken on the same day through the streets to prison, there to remain &c. unless they paid the fines imposed upon them. It follows therefore that, for the enforcement of the Conventicle Act, a good deal of purely secular and sometimes rather tumultuous business was done on the day of sacred rest and devout exercise.

Even more noteworthy is it that the judgments on conventiclers for first and second offences were far less severe than Neale and other writers on English puritanism have represented. The maximum fine of 5£. was imposed on only a few of the misdemeanants for a first offence. Somewhat heavy fines, such as 50s., 40s., 20s. and 10s. were also inflicted in a considerable number of cases for the same offence. But the more frequent fines were of 5s., 2s. 6d., 2s., and 1s.; no more than 6d. being exacted in some cases. At the same time the certificates do not afford a single instance where the maximum fine of 10£. or any fine higher than 5£. was inflicted for a second offence. The accounts, given us by some writers of the way in which pious tradesmen were despoiled of their whole stock and devout artisans were stript of their goods by the exorbitance of the fines, appear therefore to have been not wholly free from exaggeration. Anyhow such accounts are not applicable to the way in which a harsh and mischievous law was administered in Middlesex, in any year covered by the present volume. Moreover, the general leniency of the sentences to imprisonment is no less remarkable than the general moderateness of the alternative exactions of money. C. C. C, 16 & 17 Car. II.

1 August, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before George Marche esq. J.P., of John Smarte of Ratcliffe merchant, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said George Smarte's appearance at the next S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, then and there to "give evidence against David Punnet, William Chinchin, John Harman, Robert Pollen, Daniell Smarte and Cornelius Chinchin, as well as to indict as to find them Guilty of a felony which is laied to their charge, vizt. for stealeing several parcells of Virginia tobacco in leafe from him &c." S. T. R., 29 Aug., 16 Charles II.

3 August, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Pancras on the said day, Arthur Redman, John Clifford, Francis French and Teague Mackmaney, all four late of the said parish labourers, assaulted Walter Clunne, and that Arthur Redman with a drawn sword gave the said Walter Clunne in the right arm a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly, being thus murdered by the said Arthur Redman, and that the aforesaid John Clifford and Francis French were aiders and abettors in the same murder. Found 'Guilty' Arthur Redman and Francis French were sentenced to be hanged. Declining to plead, John Clifford was sentenced to the Peine forte et dure; this sentence to the peine being recorded on the dorse of the indictment in a remarkable Latin minute, that in English runs thus, "He does not wish to plead nor to be tried; Therefore it is adjudged by the Court that he be led to the prison whence he came, and there be put into a vile and dark dungeon, and there be thrown on the ground without any straw or covering and without any raiment about him except for covering his private parts and that he lie upon his back, and be covered as to his head and naked as to his feet, and that one of his arms be extended with a rope to one part of the said dungeon, and the other of his arms to the other part of the dungeon, and his forelegs be treated in like manner, and that there be put on his body so much of iron as he is able to bear and more and more (et quod super corpus ejus ponatur tantum de ferro et plus quantum portare potest et plus), and that on the first day afterwards he have three pieces of barley bread without drink, and on the second day he thrice drink of the water nearest the gate of the prison (running water being excepted) without bread, and on what day he eats he may not drink, and on what day he drinks he may not eat, until he have died." G. D. R., 31 Aug., 16 Charles II.

14 August, 16 Charles II.—True Bills against John Higgens late of Stepney merchant, Edward Walker late of Stepney smith, and William Cocks late of Lymehouse chandler, for being present on the said day at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c., at the dwelling house of William Beanes of Stepney, after having been on two former occasions convicted of being present at a like unlawful assembly.—Also, similar True Bill against John Horne late of Stepney cordwinder, for being present on 28 October, 16 Charles II., at a like unlawful conventicle at the dwelling-house of William Beanes at Stepney in the company of fifty persons besides the persons &c., after having been on two former occasions convicted of attending a like unlawful assembly.—Also, True Bill against Thomas Zachary of St. Bartholomew's London gentleman, and John Rotten of St. Swithin's London taylor, for attending a similar unlawful conventicle on 28 Aug., 16 Charles II., at Stepney co. Midd. in a building possessed by some unknown man, in the company of thirty persons besides &c., after having been convicted on two previous occasions of being present at a similar unlawful conventicle.—Also, similar True Bills against Roger Bickerstaffe shoe-maker, William Clarke blacksmith, Anne Gold widow, and Thomas Gibson sugar-baker, all four late of Stepney co. Midd., for being present on days precisely mentioned in the respective bills of August or October, 16 Charles II., at unlawful conventicles at Stepney aforesaid, under colour of exercising religion in other manner than what is allowed by the liturgy and practice of the Church of England, after having been convicted on two previous occasions of attending similar conventicles.—No clerical minute touching arraignment or consequences thereof appears on any of these True Bills. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

23 August, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Botolph'swithout-Algate co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Foster late of the said parish laborer stole and carried off one hundred and fourscore pounds of Spanish tobaccoe worth forty pounds, of the goods and chattels of Humfrey Taylor. Found 'Not Guilty,' Thomas Foster was acquitted. G. D. R., 31 August, 16 Charles II.

29 August, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of George Parker of St. Katharine's Precinct Tower of London constable and Joseph Smith of Rosemary Lane in Whitechappell victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of John Checkeright of the aforesaid Precinct tobacco-cutter, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Checkeright's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c., he being "accused for enticeing and seduceing Thomas Rice junior, and spiriting him on board a ship ryding in the river Thames, in order to the transporting of him against his will and his friends consent to some forraign plantacion." S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

4 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, John Norton late of the said parish laborer stole and carried off "un' libr' ponder' seric' operat' anglice one pound of spun burino lege (sic) silke" worth twenty-four shillings, and one pound and a halfe of "Belladine silke" worth twenty-one shillings, of the goods and chattels of Peter Gillum." Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of ten-pence, John Norton was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R, 14 Oct., 16 Charles II.

4 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill against Elizabeth Ford late of London spinster alias Elizabeth Ford the wife of Edward Ford late of St. Andrew's Holborne trumpeter, for attending on the said day at the dwellinghouse of John Elson in St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c., in the company of fifty persons besides the persons of John Elson's family; the said Elizabeth Ford having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a similar unlawful assembly. To this indictment Elizabeth Ford said nothing, whereupon she was sentenced to pay a fine of forty pounds, or be imprisoned for eleven months. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

11 September, 16 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, in a building in the possession of an unknown person, Arthur Baker of Blackfriers London taylor was present, together with fifteen unknown persons besides the persons of the family of the said unknown man, at an unlawful conventicle held under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; he, the said Arthur Baker, having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a like unlawful assembly, to wit, (a) of attending, on 24 July, 16 Charles II., such a meeting held at the same place, together with forty unknown persons, besides the family of the unknown possessor of the said place, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for six days, and (b) of attending a like unlawful assembly under colour of exercising religion &c., on 4 Sept., 16 Charles II., in a certain enclosed place of the messuage called The Bull and Mouth, and being in the ward of Aldersgate London, for which offence he was again sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for six days. On his arraignment on the present bill, Arthur Baker said nothing, whereupon he had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of the Barbadoes. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

11 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney in a building in the possession of some unknown man, on the said day, Margaret Fisher late of the said parish spinster, was present, in the company of fifteen persons besides &c., at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise than is allowed by the liturgy and practice of the Church of England; the said Margaret having been convicted on two former occasions of being present at a like unlawful meeting. No clerical minute touching arraignment or quences thereof. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

11 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwellinghouse of William Beanes at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Atwell late of the said parish spinster alias &c. the wife of Bartholomew Atwell yeoman, was present in the company of twenty persons besides &c. at an unlawful conventicle, under colour of exercising religion otherwise than is allowed by the liturgy and practice of the Church of England; the said Mary Atwell having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a like unlawful assembly. Saying nothing to the indictment, Mary Atwell was sentenced to pay a fine of forty pounds or be imprisoned for eleven months. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

11 September, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Thomas Player knt. and George Marsh esq. Justices of the Peace, of Jeremy Emings tobacconist and George Harrison laborer, both of Stepney co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Edward Hide of St. Peter's parish Paul's Wharfe London taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Edward Hide at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being taken in an unlawfull and riotous assembly upon Milend Green, disturbing the Peace after proclamacion was made by His Majesties Justices of Peace, thereby commanding all maner of persons to depart to their own homes, or to goe to church upon paine of ymprisonment, whilst his Majesties said Justices were breaking up an unlawfull meetinge of certaine people called Quakers."—Also similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justices of the Peace; For the appearance of William Yeames of Ratcliffe in Stepney co. Midd. shipwright, and Jeremy Emings of Stepney tobacconist, at the same next S. P., to answer to a charge set forth in the same terms. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

18 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwellinghouse of William Beanes at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Polly in the company of thirty persons besides &c. was present at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise than is allowed by the liturgy and practice of the Church of England; the said Anne Polly having been convicted on two former occasions of attending two like conventicles at the Bull and Mouth meeting-place. Found 'Not Guilty,' Anne Polly was acquitted. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

18 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwellinghouse of John Elson in St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. on the said day, together with fifty persons to the jurors unknown, besides the persons of the family of the said John Elson, Henry Taylor late of Stepney co. Midd., wyerdrawer, was present at an unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; he, the said Henry Taylor having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a like unlawful assembly, to wit, (a) of attending, on 21 Aug., 16 Charles II., such a conventicle at the dwelling-house of William Beanes in Stepney, in the company of forty persons besides the persons of the same William Beanes's family, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of two shillings and six-pence or be imprisoned for two days, and (b) of attending, on 28 Aug., 16 Charles II., a like assembly held in the said William Beanes's dwelling-house at Stepney, in the company of fifty persons besides the persons of the family of the said William Beanes. On his arraignment upon the present indictment Henry Taylor said nothing, whereupon he had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of Jamaica. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

18 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the dwellinghouse of William Beanes in Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Roger Roberts late of the said parish cordweiner was present, together with thirty unknown persons besides the said William Beanes's family, at an unlawful conventicle held under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; he, the said Roger Roberts having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a like unlawful assembly, to wit, (a) of being present, on 7 Aug., 16 Charles II., at a like conventicle in the same dwelling-house of the same William Beanes, in the company of fifty persons besides the persons of William Beanes's family, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of five shillings or be imprisoned for two days, and (b) of being present, on 14 Aug., 16 Charles II., at a like assembly in the same dwelling-house of the same William Beanes, in the company of forty persons besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, for which offence he, the said Roger Roberts was sentenced to pay a fine of five shillings or be imprisoned for two days. On his arraignment Roberts put himself 'Not Guilty' on the country, but he was found 'Guilty' by the jury, and had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of Jamaica. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

18 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwelling house of William Beanes at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Peter Pennington late of the said parish mariner, was present, in the company of thirty persons to the jurors unknown, besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, at a conventicle held under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; he, the said Peter Pennington having been convicted on two previous occasions of being present at a like unlawful assembly, to wit, (a) of attending, on 17 July, 16 Charles II., a like conventicle at the same dwelling-house of the same William Beanes, in the company of a hundred unknown persons, besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of ten shillings or be imprisoned for three months, and (b) of being present, on 11 September, 16 Charles II., at a like meeting in the same dwelling-house of the same William Beanes, in the company of twenty-five persons unknown, besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for twenty-four hours. On his arraignment upon the present indictment, Peter Pennington said nothing, whereupon he had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of Jamaica. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

25 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwellinghouse of John Elson at St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. on the said day, John Crane late of the said parish sawyer was present at an unlawful conventicle, together with twenty-two persons besides the persons of John Elson's family, under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; the said John Crane having been convicted on two former occasions of being present at a like unlawful assembly. No clerical minute touching arraignment or consequences thereof. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

25 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the dwellinghouse of one William Beanes in Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, William Roberts late of the said parish, servant of John Leaver feltmaker, together with twenty-five persons to the jurors unknown besides the persons of the family of the said William Beanes, was at an unlawful convenlicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise &c.; he, the said William Roberts having been convicted on two former occasions of attending an unlawful religious conventicle, to wit, (a) of attending, on 21 August, 16 Charles II., such a meeting at the dwelling-house of John Elson in St. Sepulchre's co. Midd., together with thirty other persons besides the persons of the said John Elson's family, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of five shillings or be imprisoned for four days, and (b) of being, on 4 September, 16 Charles II., present at another such unlawful meeting at Stepney co. Midd., together with thirty unknown persons, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of two shillings or be imprisoned for six days.—On his arraignment on the present indictment, William Roberts said nothing, whereupon he had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of the Barbadoes. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

25 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the dwellinghouse of one John Elson in St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. on the said day, Margaret Jackson late of the said parish spinster, was at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion &c. otherwise than &c., together with twenty-five persons to the jurors unknown, besides the persons of the family of the said John Elson; she having been convicted on two previous occasions of attending an unlawful conventicle, to wit, (a) of attending, on 11 September, 16 Charles II., with seven other persons to the jurors unknown, at a certain messuage called the Bull and Mouth in the ward of Aldersgate in London, for which offence she was, upon conviction thereof, sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for four days, and (b) of attending, on 18 September, 16 Charles II., a similar religious conventicle at an enclosed place of the same messuage called the Bull and Mouth, for which second offence she was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for five days. Touching her arraignment for the third offence and its consequences, there appears on the bill this clerical minute, to wit, "Nihil dicit h'et judicium quod transportetur ad insulam de le Barbadoes existen' un' forinsec' plantac'on' d'c'i D'ni Regis nunc ib'm remanere septem annos juxta formam statuti=She says nothing; she has judgment that she be transported to the island of the Barbadoes being one of the foreign plantations of the Lord now King, there to remain seven years according to the form of the statute." S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

25 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd., in the dwelling-house of William Beanes on the said day, Patience Wilson late of Bowe Lane London spinster, together with twenty persons to the jurors unknown, was present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; she, the said Patience Wilson, having been on two former occasions convicted of attending a like unlawful meeting, to wit, (a) of being present at a like conventicle in the same dwellinghouse of the same William Beanes, on 28 August, 16 Charles II., in the company of fifty persons besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, for which offence she was sentenced to pay a fine of two shillings or be imprisoned for one day, and (b) of being present, on 11 September, 16 Charles II., at a like conventicle in the same dwelling-house of the same William Beanes, in the company of twentyfive persons besides the persons of William Beanes's family, for which offence she was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for twenty-four hours. On her arraignment upon the present indictment, Patience Wilson said nothing, whereupon she had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of Jamaica. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

25 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwellinghouse of John Elson at St. Sepulchre's co. Midd., Joan Niccolls, the wife of John Niccolls late of St. Margaret's Westminster hattmaker, was present at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c., in the company of twenty persons besides the persons of the said John Elson's family; she, the said Joan Niccolls having been convicted on two previous occasions of being present at a like unlawful conventicle at the Bull-and-Mouth meetingplace. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

25 September, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the dwellinghouse of John Elson in St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Lee late of Old Change London cordwayner was present at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion, in the company of twenty persons to the jurors unknown, besides the persons of the said John Elson's family; he, the said Edward Lee having been convicted on two previous occasions of attending a like unlawful assembly, to wit, (a) of attending, on 14 August, 16 Charles II., a like conventicle at a certain inclosed place late a parcel of the messuage commonly called The Bull and Mouth, in the parish of Sts. Anne and Agnes in the ward of Aldersgate London, in the company of twenty persons besides the persons of the family in the same messuage, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of twelve pence or be imprisoned for four days, and (b) of attending, on 11 September, 16 Charles II., another such unlawful assembly at the same inclosed place late a parcel of the aforesaid messuage commonly called The Bull and Mouth, for which offence he was again sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for four days. To the present indictment Edward Lee on his arraignment said nothing, whereupon he was sentenced to be transported to the island of Barbadoes, there to remain seven years. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

2 October, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwelling-house of William Beanes at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Boycott late of the said parish chandler was present at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c. in the company of fifty persons besides &c.; the said Edward Boycott having been convicted on two previous occasions of attending a like unlawful assembly, to wit, (a) of being present, on 14 Aug., 16 Charles II., at such a conventicle at an inclosed place late a parcel of the messuage known as The Bull and Mouth in the ward of Aldersgate London, in company of twenty persons besides the persons of the family in the same messuage, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for fourteen days, and (b) of being present, on 28 Aug., 16 Charles II., at a similar unlawful meeting, held in a building at Stepney, in the possession of a certain unknown man, in the company of thirty persons besides &c., for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of five shillings or be imprisoned for ten days. To the present indictment Edward Boycott on his arraignment said nothing, whereupon he was sentenced to be transported to the island of the Barbadoes, there to remain seven years. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

2 October, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwelling-house of William Beanes at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Hubbard late of the said parish smith, was present, in the company of twenty persons to the jurors unknown, besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, at an unlawful assembly held under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; he, the said Thomas Hubbard having been convicted on two previous occasions of attending a like unlawful meeting, to wit, (a) of attending, on 31 July, 16 Charles II., such a meeting in the same dwelling-house of the said William Beanes, in the company of forty persons besides the persons of William Beanes's family, for which offence he was sentenced to pay a fine of five shillings or be imprisoned for two days, and (b) of attending, on 4 Sept., 16 Charles II., another like meeting, at the same dwelling-house of the same William Beanes, in the company of twenty persons unknown besides the persons of the same William Beanes's family, for which offence he, the said Thomas Hubbard, was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for twenty-four hours. To the present indictment Thomas Hubbard on his arraignment said nothing (dicit nihil), whereupon he had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of Jamaica. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

2 October, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwelling-house of William Beanes at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Hannah Trigg late of the said parish spinster was present at an unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c., in the company of thirty persons to the jurors unknown, besides the persons of William Beanes's family; she, the said Hannah Trigg, having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a like unlawful meeting, to wit, (a) of attending, on 21 August, 16 Charles II., such an assembly at an inclosed place late a parcel of the messuage called The Bull and Mouth, in the parish of Sts. Anne and Agnes in the ward of Aldersgate, London, for which offence she was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for four days, and (b) of attending, on 11 September, 16 Charles II., in the company of seven persons another such meeting at the same inclosed place, late a parcel of The Bull and Mouth in the ward of Aldersgate London, for which offence she was again sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for four days. Whether, at her arraignment on the present indictment, Hannah Trigg confessed the indictment, or put herself 'Not Guilty' or stood mute, does not appear; but a clerical minute on the bill certifies that she was sentenced to be transported to the island of the Barbadoes, there to remain seven years. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

2 October, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. in the dwelling-house of John Elson, Douglas Templer late of St. Bride's London spinster, together with eleven unknown persons besides the persons of the said John Elson's family, was present at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c.; she having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a like unlawful assembly, to wit, (a) of attending such a meeting on 4 Sept., 16 Charles II., at an inclosed place of the messuage called The Bull and Mouth in the ward of Aldersgate London, for which offence she was sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for four days, and (b) of attending, on 11 Sept., 16 Charles II., with seven persons unknown, a like unlawful meeting held at the same place of The Bull and Mouth, for which offence she was again sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling or be imprisoned for four days. On her arraignment upon the present bill, she said nothing; whereupon she had judgment to be transported for seven years to the island of the Barbadoes. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

6 October, 16 Charles II.—The Record, in S. P. Reg., of Proceedings at G. Q. S. P. held at Westminster on the said day before Sir Gilbert Gerrard bart. and thirty-seven other Justices of the Peace for Middlesex, exhibits particulars of the arraignment before the Court of the following seventeen persons for having been present at a conventicle under colour of exercising religion &c. after two previous convictions for a like offence, to wit, (1) Peter Pennington late of Stepney mariner, (2) Thomas Hubbard late of Stepney smith, (3) Roger Roberts late of Stepney cordweiner, (4) Patience Wilson late of Bowe Lane London spinster, (5) Henry Taylor late of Stepney wyerdrawer, (6) Hanna Garnish wife of Nicholas Garnish late of St. Sepulchre's mariner, (7) Joan Niccolls wife of John Niccolls late of St. Margaret's Westminster hatt-maker, (8) Mary Atwell wife of Bartholomew Atwell late of Stepney yeoman, (9) Elizabeth Ford wife of Edward Ford late of St. Andrew's Holborne trumpeter alias Elizabeth Ford late of London spinster, (10) Edward Lee late of Old Change cordweiner, (11) Hanna Trigg late of Stepney spinster, (12) Arthur Baker late of St. Anne's Blackfriers London taylor, (13} Douglas Templer late of St. Bride's London spinster, (14) Edward Boycott late of Stepney chaundler, (15) Anne Polly late of Stepney spinster, (16) William Roberts late of Stepney feltmaker, and (17) Margaret Jackson late of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. spinster. Of these seventeen persons only two, viz. Roger Roberts late of Stepney cordwainer and Anne Polly late of Stepney spinster put themselves on a Jury of the country; all the fifteen others appeared and said nothing. Anne Polly was found 'Not Guilty' and was therefore dismissed. Found 'Guilty' by a jury Roger Roberts had judgment of transportation to Jamaica for seven years. Peter Pennington, Thomas Hubbard, Patience Wilson and Henry Taylor, who all "said nothing" to the indictment, were sentenced to be transported to Jamaica for seven years. Hanna Garnish, Joan Niccolls, Mary Atwell and Elizabeth Ford were each committed to the House of Correction, there to remain for eleven months, unless her respective husband would redeem her by a payment of forty pounds. Edward Lee, Hanna Trigg, Arthur Baker, Douglas Templer, Edward Boycott, William Roberts, and Margaret Jackson each had judgment to be transported for seven years to the Island of the Barbadoes. Hence, at this session twelve conventiclers were sentenced to be transported for seven years to the West Indies, for the offence of assembling unlawfully under colour of exercising religion &c. S. P. Reg.

9 October, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the dwelling-house of William Beanes at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Evanden late of Stepney co. Midd. spinster was present, together with twenty persons besides &c., at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion &c., the said Elizabeth Evanden having been convicted on two former occasions of attending a similar meeting. No clerical minute touching arraignment or consequences thereof. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 16 Charles II.

12 October, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before William Gery esq. J.P., of Nicholas Blackman blacksmith and Joseph Girle farrier, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of William Steere of St. Pancras fellmonger at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer "for suffering unlawfull conventicles in his house on the 9th of October instant being Sabboth day."—Also, Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J.P.; For the appearance of Henry Corpe and Joseph Corpe, both of Noble Street London dyamond-cutters, and of James Billing of Thames Street felt-maker, at the same next S. P., to answer "for being in the house of Mr. William Steere at an unlawfull conventicle on the 9th of October instant being Sabboth day." S. P. R., 5 Dec., 16 Charles II.

22 November, 16 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the highway at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Rogers glover and John Barett furrier, both late of the said parish, assaulted Ellen Bridges wife of Anthony Bridges, and stole from her person fifty yards of "ferrett ribband" worth sixteen shillings, twenty yards of bone-lace worth thirty shillings, five yards of taffaty ribband worth six shillings, two holland coifes worth twelve-pence, and thirty-six shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Anthony Bridges. —Edward Rogers and John Barett were both found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 17 Dec, 16 Charles II.

Po' se Jurat' &c. Cul' h'et Judiciu' qd. transportetur ultra maria ad Insulam Jamaice existed un' forinsec' plantac'on' d'c'i D'ni Regis nunc i'b'm remanere sept em annos juxta form' statut' &c.

5 December, 16 Charles II.—Session of Oyer and Terminer, held on the said day and the two following days at Hicks Hall before Sir Robert Hyde Ch. J. &c, Sir Robert Twisden knt. one of the King's Justices appointed to hold pleas before the same King, Sir John Keeling knt. another of the King's Justices appointed &c., Sir John Robinson knt. and bart. Lieutenant of the Tower of London, Sir William Palmer knt., Francis Crawley esq., Richard Procter esq., John Phelipps esq. one of the Auditors of King's Exchequer, Francis Blomer esq., Thomas Swalowe esq. and Charles Pitfeild esq., Justices of the Peace &c.

Edwardus Barkeley nuper de parochia de Stebunheath alias Stepney skinner, pro illicito conventiculo post duas separales convicciones coram Justiciariis pacis &c.

[In English.]

He puts himself; The jurors say that he is Guilty; he has judgment that he be transported beyond seas to the Island of Jamaica being one of the foreign plantations of the said Lord now King, there to remain seven years according to the form of the statute, &c.

Edward Barkeley late of the parish of Stebunheath alias Stepney skinner; for an unlawful assembly after two several convictions before Justices of the Peace &c.

Followed in the S. P. Reg. by similar record of arraignment, trial, verdict and sentence for the same offence in respect to each of the following persons, to wit,—(i) William Mathews late of Stepney taylor, (2) Diggory Marshall late of Stepney taylor, (3) William Brenn alias Brend late of Stepney yeoman, (4) Vincent Gerrard late of Stepney joyner, (5) John Goodwin late of Old Fishstreete London clothworker, (6) John Noble late of Stepney mariner, (7) Nathaniel Harding late of Stepney yeoman, (8) Edward Mallitrat late of Stepney distiller, (9) Francis Tersey alias Toursey late of Stepney joyner, and (10) Martin Groshia late of Stepney barber.

Hence, eleven male persons were sentenced at this S. O. T. to be transported to Jamaica for seven years, for attending an unlawful religious assembly, after two previous convictions before Justices of the Peace for the same offence.

The records of this S. O. T. conclude with an Order which, after reciting the names of the said offenders and particulars of their offence &c. closes with these words, "According to which judgment soe given against the aforenamed persons, the Shereiffe of this county by warrant under the hands and seales of severall of his Majesties Commissioners of Oyer and Terminer assembled at this Sessions is required and commanded to convey the above-named persons and every of them to the Port of London and from thence to imbarque them and every of them to be safely conveyed to the said Island of Jamaica being one of his Majesties forraine plantacions there to remain for seaven yeares. It is therefore thought fitt and ordered by this Court that the Constables head boroughs and tithingmen of the parish of Stebunheath alias Stepney aforesaid or of the respective places where the estate reall or personall of the said offendors or any of them shall happen to bee doe and shall forthwith upon the receipt hereof sequester into their hands the profitts of the lands and doe distraine and sell the goods of the said offendors and every-one of them for the reimbursement of the saide Shereife all such reasonable charges as he shall be at for the conveying and imbarqueing of the said offenders soe to be transported as aforesaid rendering to every of the said partyes or his or her assignes the overplus of the same if any bee unles any of the said offendors or some other on behalfe of the said offendors soe to bee transported shall give the said Shereiffe such security as hee shall approve of, for the paying of the said charges unto the said Shereiffe." S. P. R.

11 December, 16 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition for cause of death, taken at St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on view of the body of Charles Oliver, there lying dead and slain; With Verdict that, on the 3rd instant Henry Hopgood, then being tythingman of St. Giles's-inthe-Fields co. Midd., appointed in the King's name Thomas Bridges, William Palmer, William Wilson, James Haydon, James Peaton, John Reynolds and Robert Marshall to be "vigilatores anglice watchmen" for the said parish in the night of the said day, And That the aforesaid watchmen thus appointed were discharging the duties of watchmen in the said parish in accordance with their appointment, when between twelve and one o'clock in the said night the aforesaid Charles Oliver, and Miles Hoberts esq., Patrick Miche gentleman, and Arthur Gelthroppe gentleman, with divers unknown persons, with swords drawn made an assault on them the aforesaid watchmen, beating and wounding them, so that they the said watchmen were constrained to defend themselves against their said assailants, and that in the affray thus caused by the said rioters Charles Oliver received on the fore-part of his head a mortal wound, of which he languished from the said 3rd Dec, 16 Charles II., to the 8th day of the said month, when he died thereof.—In this record we have an example of the nocturnal broils, between companies of roisterers and companies of watchmen, that were of frequent occurrence in the western suburbs of Charles the Second's London. G. D. R., 13 Jan., 16 Charles II.

17 December, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Blomer esq. J.P., of Jefferey Hewson of Endfeild co. Midd. tanner and Thomas Gardener of Rosemary Lane in St. Buttoll's Allgate victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of William Matthewes at the next S. P. for Middlesex to answer &c. for that "hee, having a commission from the Right Honorable the Earle of Berksheire to sease upon all forraigne pictures, did take tenn shillings of a person whom hee did meete with, who had such pictures, to connive and winke at them, and said, 'A t. . . d for the Earle of Berkshire.'" S. P. R., 20 Jan., 16 Charles II.

25 December, 16 Charles II.—True Bills on four several parchments against Thomas Clarke late of St. Olave's Southwarke co. Surrey dyer alias &c. late of Stepney co. Midd. dyer, Thomas Burbanck apprentice of Samuell Windmill of the Minories London gun-maker alias Thomas Burbranck late of Stepney co. Midd. gun-maker, Bartholomew Hall late of Whitechappell silke-thrower alias &c. late of Stepney co. Midd. silke-thrower, and Thomas Stoakes late of Stepney co. Midd. baker, for being present on the said day in the dwelling-house of William Beanes, in the company of twenty persons besides the persons of the said William Beanes's family, at an unlawful conventicle under colour of exercising religion otherwise than is allowed by the liturgy and practice of the Church of England; each of the said four culprits having on two former occasions been convicted of being present at a similar unlawful assembly. Each of the four culprits put himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country, and on being found 'Guilty' by a jury at G. Q. S. P. was sentenced to be transported to the island of Jamaica, there to remain for seven years. S. P. R., 20 Jan., 16 Charles II.