Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1665

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

363-381

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1665', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 363-381. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66063 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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1665

11 January, 16 Charles II.—General Quarter Session of the Peace held at Hicks Hall on the said day, and on the 12th, 13th, 14th and 16th days of the same month, before Sir Robert Hyde knt. Ch.J. &c. Sir John Keeling knt. one of the King's Justices appointed to hold pleas before the same King, Sir Gilbert Gerrard bart., Sir Jeremiah Whichcott bart, Sir John Robinson knt. and bart. and Lieutenant of the Tower of London, Sir Hugh Smithson knt. and bart., Sir Reginald Forster bart., Sir Robert Atkins K.B. and the Queen's Solicitor, Sir William Palmer knt., Sir John Baber knt., Sir Thomas Player the younger knt., Sir Thomas Byde knt., Sir William Rider knt., Humphry Weld esq. and others, Justices of the Peace.

The Register of the proceedings at this G. Q. S. P. exhibits records of the arraignment and trial of four persons for attending an unlawful religious assembly after two previous convictions before Justices of the Peace for the same offence, with verdict of 'Guilty' against each culprit, and sentence of transportation to Jamaica for seven years; the culprits so convicted and sentenced being (1) Thomas Stoakes late of Stepney baker, (2) Bartholomew Hall late of Stepney silke-thrower, (3) Thomas Burbanck alias Burbranck late of Stepney gun-maker, and (4) Thomas Clarke late of Stepney dyer.

Followed by the copy of the Warrant for the transportation of the same culprits, addressed to the Sheriff of Middlesex, and concluding thus, "These are therefore in his Majesties name to will and command you accordingly to convey the said Thomas Stoakes, Bartholomew Hall, Thomas Burbanck alias Burbranck and Thomas Clarke and every of them to the Port of London and from thence to imbarque them and every of them, to be safely transported to the Island of Jamaica being one of his Majesties forraigne plantacions there to remaine for seaven yeares. And hereof you may not faile at your perrill. Given under our handes and seales at Hicks Hall aforesaid this eleaventh day of January in the sixteenth yeare of King Charles the Second." S. P. Reg.

21 January, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Abell esq. J.P., of William Tompkins of Boar's Head Yard in Whitechappell and Ralph Lambert of Wheeler's Street in Stepney, both tobacco-pipe-makers, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Richard Price of Boar's Head Yard in Whitechappell tobacco-pipe-maker, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Richard Price's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer the charge of "his apprentice Anne Tutchbury who upon her oath accuses him of tyeing her with a line by the wrists and thumbs upp to a beame and there unreasonably beate her." S. P. R., 17 Feb., 17 Charles II.

22 January, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Thomas Byde knt. and Charles Pitfeild esq. Justices of the Peace, of John Wellman victualler, Richard Crosby needlemaker, and Thomas Haley weaver, all three of St. Leonard's Shoreditch, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said three bounden persons at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to give in evidence against John Tisoe of St. Martin's-le-Grand London shoomaker, for being unlawfully assembled amongst divers other persons in Westbury Street in the parish of Stepney and there preaching to them &c."—Also, Recognizances, taken on 14 Feb., 17 Charles II., before the same Justices of the Peace, for the appearance of John Simcocke of Spittlefeilds beadle, Roger Thomas of the same place weaver, and the aforementioned Richard Crosby and Thomas Haley, at the next S. P., to give evidence "against severall persons taken unlawfully assembled together at a private meetinge-place in Westberry Street on the 12th day of January 1664 &c." S. P. R., 17 Feb., 17 Charles II.

29 January, 16 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before John Smith, William Bowles and Francis Blomer esqs. Justices of the Peace, of John Timberlake innholder, Christopher Comeings victualler and George Terry yeoman, all three of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of the said John Timberlake, Christopher Comeings and George Terry at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to prosecute and give evidence "against severall quakers who was (sic) this day taken at a conventicle and unlawfull assembly if it shall happen to be the third conviction of any of them." S. P. R., 17 Feb., 17 Charles II.

13 February, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Philipp Howard J.P., of John Goodchilde carpenter, Richard Street plumer, William Hardy bricklayer, and John England . . . ., all four of St. Margaret's Westminster, John Francis of Allhollowes Stainings winecoper, and Francis Church of . . . . stacioner, in the sum of . . . . each, and of Andrew Rothwod of St. Margaret's Westminster victualler, in the sum of five hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Andrew Rothwod at the next G. D. for Middlesex, to answer &c. for "being guilty of the murther of Charles the First the late King of blessed memory."—A fragmentary parchment. G. D. R., 19 Feb., 17 Charles II.

17 February, 17 Charles II.—Session of Oyer and Terminer, held on the said day and the following day at Hicks Hall, before Sir Jeremiah Whichcott bart., Sir Thomas Player the younger knt., Sir Thomas Byde knt., . . . ., John Phelipps one of the auditors of the King's Exchequer, . . . ., Francis Blomer and Charles Pitfeild esqs., Justices of the Peace.—The register of the proceedings at this S. O. T. exhibits the arraignment and trial &c. of the following persons for having attended an unlawful assembly under colour of exercising religion &c. after two previous convictions of the same offence before Justices of the Peace, to wit,—(1) Thomas Weekes late of St. Sepulchre's upholster, (2) John Somerfeild late of St. Sepulchre's cordweiner, (3) Hugh Carter late of St. Sepulchre's cordweiner, (4) Charles Rogers late of St. Sepulchre's clockmaker, (5) Thomas Kemsey late of St. Sepulchre's cordweiner, (6) John West late of St. Sepulchre's yeoman, (7) Mathew Jackson late of St. Sepulchre's yeoman, (8) Sara Hawes late of St. Sepulchre's spinster, (9) John Prickett late of St. Sepulchre's cordweiner, (10) Hester wife of Henry Fruen late of St. Sepulchre's porter, (11) Mary wife of Thomas Pennell late of St. Sepulchre's yeoman, (12) John Gabb late of St. Sepulchre's cordweiner, (13) Henry Wooden late of St. Sepulchre's grocer, (14) Anne Parker late of St. Sepulchre's spinster, (15) Thomas Cooper late of St. Sepulchre's ironmonger, (16) James Penington late of St. Sepulchre's silke-throwster, (17) William Cawderwood alias Cawtherwood late of Stepney silke-weaver, (18) Henry Cummings late of Stepney weaver, (19) James Skirton alias Kirton late of Stepney weaver, (20) Bridget Dixon late of Stepney spinster, (21) John Rose late of Stepney clothworker, (22) James Kendall late of Stepney glover, (23) John Smith late of Stepney shoemaker, (24) John Harding late of Stepney tayler, (25) Mary Cox wife of John Cox late of Stepney tobacco-pipe-maker, (26) Elizabeth Mortimer late of St. Sepulchre's spinster, (27) Elizabeth Collins late of St. Sepulchre's spinster, (28) Sarah wife of Samuel Martin late of St. Sepulchre's chandler, (29) Margaret Walters wife of Humfrey Walters late of St. Sepulchre's yeoman, (30) John Frith late of St. Sepulchre's taylor, (31) Bethia Marlow late of St. Sepulchre's spinster, (32) John Tisoe late of Stepney shoemaker, (33) Sara Willoughby wife of John Willoughby late of Stepney cordweiner, (34) Isaac Chattwood alias Chattward late of St. Sepulchre's merchant.

Of these thirty-four arraigned persons the following twenty-four are recorded in the register to have put themselves on a jury, to have been found 'Guilty' and to have been sentenced to transportation to Jamaica for seven years—(1) Thomas Weekes, (2) John Somerfeild, (3) Hugh Carter, (4) Charles Rogers, (5) Thomas Kemsey, (6) John West, (7) Mathew Jackson, (8) Sara Hawes, (9) John Prickett, (10) John Gabb, (11) Henry Wooden, (12) William Cawderwood alias Cawtherwood, (13) James Skirton alias Kirton, (14) Bridget Dixon, (15) John Rose, (16) James Kendall, (17) John Smith, (18) John Harding, (19) Elizabeth Mortimer, (20) Elizabeth Collins, (21) John Frith, (22) Bethia Marlow, (23) John Tisoe, (24) Sara Willoughby.

Henry Cummings appeared, stood mute and was therefore sentenced to transportation to Jamaica for seven years.

Three of the thirty-four culprits put themselves Not Guilty on a jury, were found 'Guilty,' and escaped sentence to transportation, viz. (1) Hester Fruen who was committed to the House of Correction, there to remain for eleven months "nisi vir ejus sol' viginti libras pro redempcione sua ad usum paup'um p'och' pred'" = unless her husband should pay for her redemption twenty pounds to the use of the poor of the aforesaid (i.e. St. Sepulchre's) parish, (2) Mary Cox who was committed to the House of Correction, there to remain for eleven months unless her husband should pay for her redemption twenty pounds, to the use of the poor of the parish of Stepney, and (3) Sara Martin who in like manner was committed to the House of Correction, there to remain for eleven months, unless her husband should pay for her redemption twenty pounds, to the use of the poor of St. Sepulchre's parish.

The following six persons put themselves on trial, were found 'Not Guilty,' and were therefore acquitted, to wit, (1) Mary Pennell, (2) Anne Parker, (3) Thomas Cooper, (4) James Penington, (5) Margaret Walters, and (6) Isaac Chattwood alias Chattward.

Found 'Guilty' and sentenced to be transported to Jamaica24 persons
Standing mute, but all the same having judgment to be transported to Jamaica1 person
Found 'Guilty' and sentenced to the House of Correction3 persons
Found 'Not Guilty' and therefore allowed to go 'sine die'6 persons
34 persons

The record of the proceedings at this S. O. T. closes with a copy of the prolix Warrant, addressed to the Sheriff of Middlesex under the hands and seals of the aforementioned Justices of the Peace, which closes with these words:—"These are therefore in his Majesties name to will and command you accordingly to convey the said Thomas Weekes, John Somerfeild, Hugh Carter, Charles Rogers, Thomas Kemsey, John West, Mathew Jackson, Sara Hawes, John Prickett, John Gabb, Henry Wooden, William Cawderwood alias Cawtherwood, Henry Cummings, James Skirton alias Kirton, Bridget Dixon, John Rose, James Kendall, John Smith, John Harding, Elizabeth Mortimer, Elizabeth Collins, John Frith, Bethia Marlow, and John Tisoe and every of them to be safely transported to the Island of Jamaica being one of his Majesties forayne Plantacions there to remain for seven yeares. And hereof you may not faile at your perill. Given under our hands and seals at Hicks Hall aforesaid this Seventeenth Day of February in the seventeenth yeare of King Charles the Second." S. P. Reg.

17 February, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of Peter Blewett of Crutched Friars in St. Olave's Hart Street London sadler, Edward Riccotts of King's Street in Wapping in Stepney waterman and William Lambert of the precinct of St. Katherine Tower waterman, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of the said three bounden persons at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex to be held at Hickes Hall, to give evidence &c. "against Robert Ditch committed to Newgate by the Right Honble. the Lord Cheife Justice of England for taking up people and selling them beyond sea against their wills." S. P. R., 17 Feb., 17 Charles II.

20 February, 17 Charles II.—Record that, at the S. G. D. of the said date, Anne Watson, Elizabeth Baily, Thomas Roberts, Samuel Gilmore, John Austin, Francis Benbow, John Symons, Richard Coney, John Weekes, Grace Beechley, John Westwood and John Pound, twelve persons convicted of felonies, pleaded the King's special pardon, granted to them under condition of their transportation to "the island or islands called Jamaica or some other part of America now inhabited by the king's subjects," and remaining there, and not returning to England within seven years from the end of two months next following the date of the same pardon. G. D. Reg.

28 February, 17 (sic) Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Jegon esq. J.P., of John Howton locksmith and William Pepper millayner, both of St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Elizabeth Baldwin wife of Benjamin Baldwin, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to annswer the suspition of having feloniously imbezilled goods of John Maynston, who died of the sickness of the pestilence, being trusted therewith." S. P. R., 23 April, 18 Charles II.

7 March, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, in the presence and hearing of divers of the King's lieges, William Neale late of the said parish yeoman uttered these malicious and seditious words, to wit, "The Bishopps of this realme are murdring rogues and the veryest rogues that live upon the earth." William Neale was found "Non compos mentis," and discharged on account of his insanity. G. D. R., 5 April, 17 Charles II.

17 March, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-intheFields co. Midd. at nine o'clock in the night of the said day, Thomas Carryll, Roger Cusake, Dennys Carryll, Garrett Stake, Christopher Moone, Charles Moone, Cload De-Vall, George Somerfeild, Richard Gold, John Fitz-Gerrard and Darby Scowland, all eleven late of the said parish gentlemen assaulted James Tyrrill gentleman, and that the said Thomas Carryll with a rapier murdered the said James Tyrrill by then and there giving him with the said rapier in the left part of his body a mortal wound, of which he died at the eleventh hour of the same night at St. Margaret's Westminster, and that all the other aforesaid ten culprits were present at the said affray and aiding and abetting to the said murder.—Clerical minutes certify that Cload DeVall, Richard Gold, John Fitz-Gerrard and Darby Scowland put themselves on trial at S. G. D., 14 Jan., 21 Charles II., and were all found 'Not Guilty'; but the bill exhibits no clerical minute touching any of the other culprits. G. D. R., 5 April, 17 Charles II.

21 March, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Croydon co. Surrey on the said day, Walter Hatcher gentleman, Henry Hoare gentleman and William Wilson laborer assaulted George Nevill esq., and that with a rapier the said Walter Hatcher then and there gave the said George Nevill in his left thigh near the groin a mortal wound, of which he languished from the said 21st March to the 25th day of the same month, when he died of the said wound at St. Paul's Covent Garden co. Midd., being thus murdered by the said Walter Hatcher, Henry Hoare and William Wilson. All three were found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 10 May, 17 Charles II.

21 March, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Gwinne late of the said parish spinster assaulted Elionore Davis, and with her feet kicked and bruised the said Elionore Davis on the left thigh near the groin, so that the said Elionore languished from the said 21st of March to the 6th day of April next following, on which day she died of the injury she sustained by being thus kicked, and that in the aforesaid manner Mary Gwinne murdered the said Elionore Davis. On her trial Mary Gwinne was found 'Not Guilty,' the Jury further finding that Elionore Davis died a natural death. G. D. R., 10 May, 17 Charles II.

28 March, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Perrott gentleman and John Denham alias Deereham gentleman, and Edmund Crouch gentleman, all three late of the said parish, assaulted Richard Sedgewicke, and that Edward Perrott with a rapier then and there murdered the said Richard Sedgewicke, by giving him with the said rapier in the left part of his breast a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly, and that John Denham and Edmund Crouch were present and aiding and abetting to the said murder. Found 'Guilty' Edward Perrot was sentenced to be hung. Edmund Crouch was found 'Not Guilty.' No clerical minute touching John Denham. G. D. R., 5 April, 17 Charles II.

3 April, 17 Charles II.—General Quarter Session of the Peace held at Westminster on the 3rd, 4th, 6th, 7th and 8th of the said month, before Sirs Jeremiah Whichcott knt. and bart. and William Wheeler knt. and bart., and twenty-one other Justices of the Peace for Middlesex.—The minutes of proceedings at this G. Q. S. P. comprise records of the arraignment &c. of (1) Frances Morley late of St. Sepulchre's spinster, (2) John Francis Triponet late of St. Sepulchre's gouldsmith, (3) Margaret Welsby late of St. Sepulchre's widow, (4) Anne Hayley late of St. Sepulchre's widow, (5) John Horsey late of St. Sepulchre's shoemaker, and (6) Jane Lewis wife of Richard Lewis late of St. Sepulchre's tailor, for being present at an unlawful religious assembly under colour of exercising religion &c., after two previous convictions before Justices of the Peace for a like offence. All six put themselves 'Not Guilty' on the country and were found 'Guilty'; whereupon Frances Morley, John Francis Triponet, Margaret Welsby, Anne Hayley and John Horsey were sentenced to be transported to Jamaica for seven years, and Jane Lewis was committed to the House of Correction for Middlesex, there to remain for eleven months, unless her husband should pay for her redemption twenty pounds, to the use of the poor of St. Sepulchre's parish. The record of proceedings at the Session comprises copy of the warrant addressed by the Justices of the Peace to the Sheriff of Middlesex, requiring him to imbarque the five first-named convicts "to be safely transported to the Island of Jamaica." S. P. Reg.

21 May, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, on being requested by Nathaniell Sherman constable of the said parish to aid him in conducting Sibil Heaman, Margery Rively, Mary Jessey, Susan Williams and divers other persons to Newgate Gaol, in accordance with a warrant under the hands and seals of Sir William Rider knt. and George Marche esq. Justices of the Peace, for that they, the said prisoners, had been taken at an unlawful conventicle at the house of the said Sibil Heaman in the said parish, under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c., Thomas Patten late of the said parish yeoman obstinately refused to assist the said constable in accordance with his request. Confessing the indictment, Thomas Patten was fined in the sum of six shillings and eightpence which fine he paid to the Sheriff in the Court. S. P. R., 19 June 17 Charles II.

22 May, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before George Marche esq. J.P., of Daniel Tarlinge bricklayer and William Jeffery grocer, both of Lymehouse co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds each and of Thomas Fisher of the same place turner, in the sum of eighty pounds; For the said Thomas Fisher's appearance at the next S. P for Middlesex, to answer "the complainte of Nathaniell Sherman constable of Lymehouse, for refusinge to be aidinge and assistinge unto him (being required in his Majesties name) to guard him with several persons unto Newgate, which were taken att a conventicle or unlawful meetinge at the house of Sibble (sic) Heaman in Lymehouse, and committed by two of His Majesties Justices of Peace for the said offence. —Also, similar Recognizances, taken on one or another of the thre days, to wit, 22nd, 23rd, 26th May, 17 Charles II., before the sam J.P.; For the appearance of Thomas Lander of Lymehouse butcher Thomas Hasteede of Lymehouse taylor, James White of Lymehous smith, and Henry Constable of Lymehouse waterman, at the same S. P. to answer &c., they being one and all charged in the same manner by Constable Sherman, with refusing to aid him in conveying to Newgate divers persons taken at the same conventicle in Sibble Heaman's house, and committed to prison by two Justices of the Peace for that offence. S. P. R., 19 June, 17 Charles II.

7 June, 17 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of William Sidey of Churchyard Alley in Rosemary Lane in . . . . without Algate, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said William Sidey's appearance at the next S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, to prefer an indictment "against Edward Allen constable, for treasonable words by him the said Allen heard publiquely spoken in the open street by a strange woeman, unknowne to the said Edward Allen, to witt, That the King shall not live one howre, Yet the said Allen (though a constable and in his Liberty) would not apprehend her for those treasonable wordes, but let her make an escape." S. P. R., 19 June, 17 Charles II.

8 June, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Harmondsworth co. Midd. on the said day, William Briscoe late of the said parish yeoman assaulted and with both his hands threw Robert Davy violently to the ground, and the said William Briscoe "cum ambabus pedibus genibus et cubitibus ipsius Willelmi Briscoe prefatum Robertum Davy in et super testiculos . . . . ipsius Roberti Davy sic super terram jacentis adtunc et ibidem . . . . calcavit, percussit et contusit," thereby causing to the said Robert Davy injuries, of which he died on the last day of the said June, being thus slain and murdered by the said William Briscoe. Acquitted of murder, William Briscoe was found 'Guilty' of manslaughter; whereupon the Court deferred judgment till it should have taken counsel. G. D. R., 19 Feb., 18 Charles II.

9 June, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of Jerman Naylor matlayer, Richard Middleton weaver and John Woollard taylor, all three of the High Street, Whitechappell, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said three bounden persons at the next G. S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, to give evidence "against one Samuel Seares for speaking blasphemous words vizt. That hee the said Seares was really Christ, and that he should . . . . Kinges, Princes and Magistrates." S. P. R., 19 June, 17 Charles II.

20 June, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Dunstan's-in-theWest in the ward of Farringdon-without-London on the said day, Christofer Richardson, Philip Greene and William Turner, all three late of the said parish watermen, assaulted Anthony Dewe gentleman, and that with an oare of a boate the said Christofer Richardson struck the said Anthony Dewe on the left part of his skull so as to bruise and break the same skull, and that Anthony Dewe languished of the injuries thus done him from 20th June, 17 Charles II., till the 25th of the same month, on which last-named day he died of the same injuries, being thus murdered by the aforesaid Christofer Richardson, Philip Greene and William Turner. Philip Greene and William Turner put themselves on trial and were found 'Not Guilty.' Over Christofer Richardson's name appears the clerical minute "Extra" = At large. G. D. R., 19 Feb., 18 Charles II.

21 June, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on the said day, John Brakes late of the said parish yeoman stole and carried off "unam penulam seric' cum holoseric' duplicat' anglice vocat' Farendine cloake lined with velvett" worth eight pounds, one "farendine doublett" worth six pounds, a pair of "Farendine breeches" worth six pounds, and a pair of silke stockens worth fifteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of Philip Forrest "in Medicinis Doctoris." When the indictment was found, John Brakes was at large, but at S. G. D. 2 July, 18 Charles II., he put himself on trial and was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 19 Feb., 18 Charles II.

21 June, 17 Charles II.—At the S. G. D. of this date twelve culprits were convicted of capital felonies and sentenced to be hanged (one woman for murdering her child, three men for highway robbery, three men for horse-stealing, five men for burglary) and though two of the horse-stealers were reprieved after judgment, all twelve were sent to the gallows. This Session was the last to make actual war against crime for seven months. Sessions of Gaol Delivery were indeed opened and held formally before the Lord Mayor and two or three magistrates on nth Oct., 6th Dec., and 12th Jan., but each of these Sessions was adjourned instantly (instanter adjornata fuit), possibly to the relief of culprits awaiting trial, who might escape death by gaolfever but could not hope to escape a capital verdict, when they came to be tried.—On 19 Feb., 18 Charles II., the pestilence having passed from the city it had scourged so terribly, there was a regular Gaol Delivery, at which fourteen men were sentenced to death (for their respective crimes of burglary, high-way robbery, house-breaking, horsestealing &c.), one woman was sentenced to death for murdering her child, another woman was sentenced to be hanged for stealing money, and one man (who stood mute to an arraignment for high-way robbery) was committed to the peine forte et dure. No one of the sixteen, sentenced to death by the rope, was reprieved after judgment. G. D. Reg.

1 July, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Joseph Ayloffe esq. J.P., of Thomas Will of St. Andrew's Holborne clothworker and William Arnold of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields brick-layer, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Jeane Prichard spinster at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answere for living out of service, and for bringing goods out of an house then infected into an house in Graies Inne Lane, without the knowledge of the Master of the house." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

6 July, 17 Charles II.—The brief account of the G. Q. S. P. held on this day at Hicks Hall (when the Great Plague was raging) certifies that the Session was no sooner opened before Sir Hugh Smithson knt. and bart. and nine other Justices of the Peace than it was adjourned till the 4th of October. The only business done, or at least recorded in the Register as having been done at this formal Session was the granting of licenses to John Mills and John Truly both of Hendon and John Weedon of Wilsdon to be kidders, and to Bennet Hammond of Fulham and Edward Allen of Isleworth to be badgers.—On the 4th of October, 17 Charles II., a G. Q. S. P. was held at Westminster before Sir Reginald Forster bart., Thomas Swalowe esq., William Geery esq. and Edmund Godfrey esq. Justices of the Peace; but it was a hasty and formal meeting, that was instantly adjourned till the 4th December (Sessio ista pacis instanter adjornata fuit per prefatos Justiciarios hic usque diem Lune scilicet quartum diem Decembris).—On the 4th of December four Justices of the Peace (Sir Hugh Smithson knt. and bart., Sir Reginald Forster bart., Erasmus Moyse esq. and Charles Pitfeild esq.) met in G. S. at Hicks Hall, but do not appear from the S. P. Reg. to have done anything but adjourn the session instantly till the 9th of January.—At the G. Q. S. P. held at Hicks Hall on the last-named day (9th Jan.) there was a better assembly of Justices (William Earl Craven and nineteen other Justices of the Peace); but after it had granted licenses to six kidders and fifteen badgers, it was adjourned on the following day (10th Jan.) till the 15th Feb., 18 Charles II., at Hicks Hall.—On this last-named day the gathering of Justices at G. Q. S. P. was numerous, Earl Craven, Sir John Keeling knt. Ch.J. and Sir Orlando Bridgman knt. and bart. Ch.J., appearing in Court with thirty-three other magistrates for the County.—The most remarkable Order made by this full Court runs in the following words:—"This Court takeing into consideracion "the manifold mischiefes and inconveniences, which doe arise and happen to the Inhabitants of this County, and more especially to the inhabitants of the parishes and places conteyned within the weekely bills of mortallity, by receaving harbouring and placeing of inmates and undersitters in houses and cellars, and by erecting of new buildings, and by devideing and parcelling out the said buildings and other houses into severall petty tenements and habitacions, and pestering and filling the same with inmates and poore indigent and idle and loose persons, whereby the health and safety of all his Majesties subjects is greately endangered and the burthen is growen soe heavy to many of the said parishes within the weekely bills of mortallity, that the wealthy are not able to releive the poore in time of health, much lesse in time of sicknesse or infeccion, as hath appeared in the late visitacion of the plague:—For the redresse of the said mischiefes and inconveniences, doth thinke fitt and accordingely doth order (the right honorable the Lord the Cheife of His Majesties Court of King's Bench and of his Court of the Common Pleas being present and directing the same) That all houses devided into severall habitacions or dwellings shall be restored to their former state, soe as there shall bee noe more habitacions than dwellings before the said devisions; And that all inmates or undersitters receaved and harboured into any new erected buildings and other houses, whether they be devided or not devided, or into any cellars, shall be forthwith removed from thence, by the owners thereof, that there may be noe more families then one abideing in the said houses; And to the end that these direccions may bee more carefully executed, This Court doth thinke fitt and thereupon doth desire and order, that the Justices of Peace of this County and of the City and Liberties of Westminster within the same county (but more especially the Justices of the Peace in the severall parishes and places within the weekely bills of mortallity) once or twice in the weeke (or oftener if occasion require) and untill this most insufferable annoyance to the publique be thoroughly reformed, doe meete and assemble togeather, and doe use their utmost care and dilligence for the more effectuall and speedy putting in execucion of this Order, and that if any person or persons shall wilfully refuse or neglect to restore their devided houses in such a condicion as they were in before the deviding thereof, or if they shall not remove their inmates or undersitters out of their said new erected buildings or other, and out of their cellars, by a certaine time to them prefixed by the said respective Justices of Peace, That then the said Justices of Peace shall from time to time bind the persons offending in the premisses with sureties to appeare at the respective Sessions of Peace, there to answer their said offences and contempt, And likewise to bind over some of the officers of the respective parishes and places to prosecute and preferr bills of indictment against the said offenders untill they conforme herein. And this Court doth declare that all and every landlord and owner of any devided house, new erected buildings or of any other houses or tenements or celler, into which such inmates poore and indigent people have been, now are, or hereafter shall bee received and placed shaull and ought to beare and pay all charges and expences which the parish shall susteine or be putt unto for and by reason of any such inmates poore and indigent people inhabiting within the parish, and shall and ought to be likewise rated and assessed to pay their rateable share and proporcion with the inhabitants of the parish for and towards the releife of the poore of such parish allthough the said landlord or owner dwell out of the parish. By the Court." S. P. Reg.

7 July, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Pitfeild esq. J.P., of Edward Cantrell victualler and Thomas Coleman fisherman, both of Hoxton in St. Leonard's Shorditch, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Edward Smallie of Hoxton aforesaid victualler, in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Edward Smallie at the next S.P. for Middlesex, "to answer for receiving and taking into his house three children out of Whitecrosstreet neere unto a house visited with the plague and there being one that died in the house from whence they came but fower daies before, and refusing to remove them after warning." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

14 July, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Henry Rowe esq. J.P., of John Savadge of St. Giies's Cripplegate brewer and Robert Roberts of Stoke-Newington victualler, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of William Michell . . . . in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said William Michell's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to "answere his assaulting and striking of Richard Gytters constable for questioning him for bringing goods into the said parish without a certificate from a house in St. Gyles Cripplegate suspected to be visited with the plague." 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

19 July, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Jegon esq. J.P., of Christopher Holt of St. George's Southwark . . . . and William Prescod of St. Sepulchre's blacksmith, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Joan Barnet of St Sepulchre's spinster at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to aunswere the offence of imbezilling infected goods out of infected houses, being apprehended by the constable &c." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

23 July, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Henry Rowe esq. J.P. of William Chapman and John London both of Hackney laborers, in the sum of five pounds each, and of William Francis of Hackney laborer in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of the said William Francis at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer for "receivinge into his house at Hackney severall children, who were brought out of a place in London very much visited by the plague, to the endangeringe of the inhabitants of the sayd parish of Hackney." 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

24 July, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Henry Rowe esq. J.P., of Thomas Wint of Shoreditch weaver and Edward Linley of Stoke Newington joyner, in the sum of five pounds each, and of John Hancocke of Hackney . . . ., in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of the said John Hancocke at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answere for his receiving goods out of a house in Shoreditch infected with the plague, to the indangering of the inhabitants of the parish of Hackney." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

30 August, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, William Saunderson alias Saunders yeoman, John Rathbon gentleman, John Beech tailor, Henry Tucker tailor, Thomas Flynt gentleman, Thomas Evans millener, John Milles carpenter, William Westcott yeoman, John Cole tailor and Samuel Swinfen tailor, all ten late of the said parish, conspired to overthrow the ancient government of this kingdom of England, and to depose the now king thereof and totally deprive him of his crown and royal rule, and to make war against him, and on the same day for the accomplishment of these treasons and traitorous designs and imaginations conspired and agreed to put the said now king to death, and to seize and take possession of the same king's palace called Whitehall, and the City and Tower of London, and divers other strongholds and fortified places of the said Lord King within this kingdom of England. John Beech and Samuel Swinfen were found 'Not Guilty.' The other eight culprits, to wit, William Saunderson, John Rathbon, Henry Tucker, Thomas Flynt, Thomas Evans, John Milles, William Westcott and John Cole, were found 'Guilty,' and were sentenced to be taken to the Gaol of Newgate whence they came, and thence be drawn to the place of execution ("ad locum execucionis trahantur," the name of the place not being given), and there be executed in the manner appointed for the execution of felons convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 25 April, 18 Charles II.

12 September, 17 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Edmond Warcupp esq. J.P., of John Lawrence of Southwarke co. Surrey felt-maker, in the sum of two hundred pounds; For the appearance of James Billing, Elias Day and John Church of Southwarke laborers at the next S. P. for the City and Liberties of Westminster," then and there to take the Oathes of Allegiance and Supremacie.— Also, Recognizance, taken on 8 Dec, 17 Charles II., before the same J.P., for the appearance of William Mervili of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields taylor, at the next S. P. for the City and Libertie of Westminster, "to take the oathes of Allegiance and Supremacy."—Also, Recognizances, taken before same J.P. on 1 Feb., 18 Charles II., for the appearance of Caleb Nicholas of Abchurch Lane London chirurgion at the next S. P. for the City and Liberties of Westminster "to doe and receave what by the Court shallbee enjoined of him," and in the mean time for his loyalty in "discovering all treasons and traitours that shall come to his knowledge." S. P. West., R., 20 April, 18 Charles II.

26 September, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Jegon esq. J.P., of Thomas Peirce yeoman and Jane Wood widow, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Eleonore Unckles of the same parish widow in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Eleonore Unckles at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to aunswere the imbezilling the goods of Doctor Parker late dead of the plague &c." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

26 September, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Jegon esq, J.P., of John Wilmot of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields barber, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Una Watty of St. Sepulchre's widow, in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Una Watty at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to aunswere the imbezilling the goods of Doctor Parker lately dead of the plague &c."— Also, Recognizances, on two several parchments, taken on the same day before the same J.P.; For the appearance of Elizabeth Moyes of St. Stephen's Coleman Street London widow, and Elizabeth Collier wife of James Collier of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . . . ., at the same next S. P., "to aunswere the imbezilling the goods of Doctor Parker lately dead of the plague &c." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

29 September, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of William Hickes haberdasher, John Ash victualler and Timothy Adams taylor, all three of Golding Lane in St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Elizabeth Williams of Ship Yard in St. Giles's aforesaid widow in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Elizabeth Williams at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "Then and there to answer the complaint of the Churchwardens, Overseers for the poore, constables and other auntient inhabitants of the Liberty of East Smithfeild in the parish of Botolph's-without-Aldgate in the county of Middlesex, who charge her to have illegally gott into the possession of the house of one Sarah Stapleton of East Smithfeild aforesaid, who lay sick in bed, and the sayd Williams then and there combined with one William Hickes and Thomas Whitmell unjustly to keep in possession of the same house, whilst they ransacked, pillaged and carryed away the said Stapleton's goods fraudulently and secretly, without her consent, in the night time, the said Stapleton lying sick of the plague, unable to resist them, and the said Elizabeth Williams resisting the High Constable and his watch, when they demaunded entrance into the said house, to secure the goods for the use of the said Stapleton, to releive her in her sick ness and keep her from being chargeable to the parish &c." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

29 September, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, on two severall parchments, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P.; For the appearance of Thomas Whitmell joyner and William Hickes haberdasher, both of Golding Lane in St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer the complaint of the Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poore of East Smithfeild who charge 'them' to have illegally gott into the possession of the house of one Sarah Stapleton of their said Liberty, whilst shee lay sick in bed, and thereout and from thence privately and secretly carryed away the household goodes and other things of the said Stapleton in the night-time, without her consent, shee lying sick of the visitation called the plague, and not able to resist them, insoemuch that shee is now destitute of subsistance and thereby soe much impoverished, that shee is already become chargeable to their said Liberty." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

12 October, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Edmond Warcupp esq. J.P., of James Breach of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman and Thomas Smith of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields chandler, in the sum of one hundred and fifty pounds each, and of John Catch of Staines co. Midd. tobacco-cutter, in the sum of three hundred pounds; Under condition "that John Catch shall personally appear at the next" S. P. for the City and Liberties of Westminster, "and in the meane time shall not speake teach or meete in any conventicle or unlawfull assembly &c." S. P. West, R., 20 April, 18 Charles II.

17 October, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of William Wildbore silkweaver and Robert Mason victualler, both of Shorditch, and Henry Bardwell of St. Sepulchre's porter, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Isabella Petty of Wentworth Street in Whitechappell widow, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Isabella Petty at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for that shee (with others) did illegally break into the house of one Richard Scarvell lately deceased, in . . . . of the night, notwithstanding a padlock was hanged on the dore, which they broke off and . . . . carried off a considerable quantity of goodes to the value of above one hundred pounds of one Mary Scarvell's, spinster, natural sister and administratrix of all the goodes of the said Richard Scarvell, her said brother, and for imbezelling and making away the same goodes &c." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

18 October, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Jegon esq. J.P., of Richard Maddock of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields and Elizabeth Ellis of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields spinster, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Elizabeth Ellis at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to aunswere the suspition of having feloniously imbezilled the goods of Sir John Underhill in the house of Dr. Parker late deceased." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

21 October, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Pancras on the said day, Robert Ridgley late of the said parish gentleman assaulted George Dale gentleman, and with a rapier gave the said George Dale on the left part of his breast a mortal wound, of which he died on the following day, being in the aforesaid manner slain and murdered by the said Robert Ridgley. When this indictment was found Robert Ridgley was at large; but at G. D. 17 Feb., 21 Charles II., he was tried on another indictment and sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 19 Feb., 18 Charles II.

30 October, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Jegon esq. J.P., of Philipp Argoe needlemaker and Thomas Baker tobacco-pipe-maker, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Peter Prosser of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields laborer at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to aunswere the imbezilling feloniously the goodes of John Roberts in tyme of his sicknes." S. P. R,, 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

7 November, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Robert Jegon esq. J.P., of Grace Wright and Constance Bolton, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Feilds widows, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Rebecca Wilts of the same parish widow, in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Rebecca Wilts at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to aunswere the opening and entring a house infected &c." S. P. R., 15 Feb., 18 Charles II.

6 December, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Philip Beaver, John Jones and Henry Boyle, all three late of the said parish laborers, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Lord the King called Whitehall, and stole therefrom and carried off a pair of gloves worth eight shillings, "unum manile anglice vocatum a blacke muffe" worth five shillings, and a book called The Holy Court worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Dorcas Nun widow. Acquitted of the burglary, Philip Beaver and John Jones were found 'Guilty' of felony, whereupon Philip pleaded his clergy effectually and was branded. Judgment on John Jones was deferred, because the Court wished to take counsel. No clerical minute touching Henry Boyle. G. D. R., 19 Feb., 18 Charles II.

6 December, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Philip Beaver, John Jones and Henry Boyle, all three late of the said parish laborers, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Lord the King called Whitehall and stole therefrom and carried off two silver standishes worth twenty-four pounds, two silver sugar-boxes worth six pounds, five silver spoones worth forty shillings, "viginti uncias teniole auree et argent' anglice vocat' gold and silver lace " worth five pounds, fifty medalls of gold worth fifty pounds, one hundred medalls of silver worth twenty pounds and one hundred copper medalls worth ten pounds, "et centum et vigint' fibulas argent' anglice vocat' silver plate buttons" worth twelve pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Henry Viscount Cornebury. Philip Beaver and John Jones were found 'Not Guilty.' No clerical minute touching Henry Boyle. G. D. R., 19 Feb., 18 Charles II.

14 December, 17 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Edmund Warcupp esq. J.P., of Richard Moore, of St. Catherine's near the Tower of London brewer and John Spring of Amsterdam marriner, in the sum of two hundred pounds each; Under condition "that the said John Spring (a Dutch prisoner released out of Chelsey Colledge at the speciall instance and request of the said Richard Moore, upon condicion to be a true prisoner to His Majesty within London and Middlesex) shall not depart out of the Citty of London or County of Middlesex without an absolute discharge from his Grace the Duke of Albemarle under his hand and seale first obtained, and shall personally appeare at the next Sessions to be held for the Citty and Liberty of Westminster." S. P. West., R., 20 April, 18 Charles II.

31 December, 17 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Covent Garden co. Midd. between four and five p.m. on the said day, Gerrard White laborer, Mary Barrett wife of William Barrett laborer alias Mary Barrett spinster, and Elizabeth Davenant widow, all three late of the said parish, broke into the dwelling-house of George Agard, and stole therefrom and carried off eighteen silver thimbles worth twenty-seven shillings, "vigint' par' spintror' argent' anglice vocat' silver shoe-buckles" worth three pounds, five silver issue plates worth twenty shillings, two silver ink-horns worth twenty-four shillings, twelve silver toothpicker cases worth twenty-four shillings, one hundred small pearles worth thirty shillings, a gold ring with a picture of King Charles the First on itt worth six shillings, a picture of King Charles the Second sett in gold with a pearle hanging at itt worth forty shillings, three silver fountaine penns worth fifteen shillings, three silver money-boxes worth fifty shillings, two coralles sett in guilt dockettes with silver bells worth forty shillings, a silver watch-case worth six shillings, a silver box worth five shillings, "trigint' et sex adea argent' anglice vocat' silver counters" worth twenty shillings, "unam thecam argent' cum scopula barbat anglice vocat' a silver case with a beard brush in itt" worth ten shillings, eighteen silver trencher salts worth fifty shillings, an ovall peece of silver with a picture upon itt worth . . . ., "picturam argent' Ducis Albemarle anglice vocat' the Duke of Albemarles picture in silver" worth five shillings, a silver crucifix guilt worth eight shillings, two silver pencills worth ten shillings, "unum cor argent' anglice a silver hart" worth four shillings, two ruby doubletts sett in a gold pendant worth ten shillings, eight pairs of silver buttons worth sixteen shillings, seventy-two silver seales worth four pounds, ten wedding gold rings worth ten pounds, sixteen other joynt gold rings worth five pounds, twelve hollow gold rings worth forty shillings, "quinquagint' rosariola agathis et christalline anglice vocat' Aggat and Christall beades" worth ten shillings, two hundred small coralls worth ten shillings, a cornelian bracelett sett in gold worth forty shillings, "duos annulos aureos cum floribus operat' anglice vocat' gold rings for locks of haire wrought with tulipps" worth twenty shillings, five gold rings for locks of haire enameled worth forty shillings, twelve gold rings enameled worth four pounds, six other gold rings worth thirty shillings and a silver buckle for a belt worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said George Agard. Found 'Guilty' Gerrard White was sentenced to be hung; found 'Guilty,' Mary Barrett was reprieved by the Court before judgment. Elizabeth Davenant was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 19 Feb., 18 Charles II.