Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1668

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

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Pages

6-12

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1668', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 6-12. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66075 Date accessed: 30 October 2014.


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1668

3 January, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd, on the said day, Timothy Field late of the said parish laborer stole and carried off two linen bags worth four pence, and one hundred and sixty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Sir Edward Sprague knt.—At the head of the bill this clerical note,—Po se cul ca nl pe li le C=Ponit se; culpabilis; catalla nulla; petit librum, legit, crematur=He puts himself on trial; is found 'Guilty'; has no chattels; asks for the book, reads, is branded. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 Charles II.

9 January, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. on the said day, Samuel Pratt late of the said parish laborer, stole and carried of "unam citharam musicalem anglice vocatam a Cittern" worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of Francis Bentham. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of tenpence, Samuel Pratt was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 Charles II.

10 January, 19 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., on view of the body of Edward Jeremy there lying dead and slain: With Verdict that, on the 7 th inst. at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, James Anderson late of the said parish laborer assaulted the said Edward Jeremy and with a rapier gave the said Edward Jeremy in the belly a certain mortal wound, of which he died on the ninth day of the same month, being thus killed and slain by the said James Anderson.—16 Jan., 19 Charles II.

26 January, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Grymshaw esq. J.P., of James Rose of St. George's Southwark marriner, John Huckle of Totinham co. Midd. laborer, and Emery Ensworth of Totinham aforesaid victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of the said three bounden persons at the next S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, to give evidence &c. "against Henry Worthett for speaking treasonable words against his Majestie." G. D. R., 17 Feb., 20 Charles II.

17 February, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Pancras co. Midd. on 21 October, 17 Charles II. Robert Ridgley co. Midd. late of the said parish gentleman assaulted George Dale gentleman, and slew and murdered him by giving him with a rapier a wound in the left breast, of which wound the said George Dale died on the same day:— And that Beatrice then the wife of the aforesaid George Dale, and now the wife of the aforesaid Robert Ridgley on the said 21 October, 17 Charles II. procured, aided and abetted the same Robert Ridgley to perpetrate the aforesaid murder of her then husband George Dale:— And further on the same 21st October, after the perpetration of the same murder, the said Beatrice, knowing him to have so murdered her said husband, received, harboured and maintained the same Robert Ridgley. Found 'Guilty,' Robert Ridgley gentleman and his wife Beatrice were both sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 17 Feb., 20 Charles II.

24 February, 20 Charles II. Recognizance, taken before Robert White gentleman, coroner within the City and Liberties of Westminster, of . . . . esq., George Farewell gentleman, . . . ., Edward Denham merchant, John Gurney merchant and . . . . vintner, . . . ., all of . . . . Westminster, in the sum of one hundred pounds each: For the appearance of . . . . esq., George Farewell, Robert Sanderson, George Horsenett, Francis Knolles, Edward Denham, John Gurney . . . . &c, at the next G. S. P. for the City of Westminster and the Liberties thereof, to prosecute the law with effect and give evidence against Sir Thomas Halford bart. for the death of Edmund Temple esq. This parchment is much defaced. S. P. West. R., 26 March, 20 Charles II.

24 February, 20 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition post mortem, taken on the said day at St. Margaret's Westminster on view of the body of Edmund Temple esq., then and there lying dead and slain: With verdict of jurors that, on 14th January, 19 Charles II., in the parish of St. Helen, within the ward of Bishopsgate in London, Sir Thomas Halford late of London baronet threw a glass bottle worth two pence at the said Edmund Temple, so that the same bottle struck him on the left side of his head near the crown, and gave him on that part of his head a mortal wound of which he languished at St. Helen's aforesaid and at St. Margaret's Westminster, until he died of the same wound at the last-named parish on 23rd February, 29 Charles II.; And that by so dealing with the said Edmund Temple esq. the aforesaid Sir Thomas Halford killed and slew him.—Also, in the same file, a True Bill against the same Sir Thomas Halford, late of St. Helen's parish in the city of London, baronet, for slaying and murdering Edmund Temple esq. by throwing a glass bottle at him; with notes on the bill showing that Sir Thomas Halford put himself on trial, was acquitted of the murder but found 'Guilty' of the manslaughter, that in respect to the conviction Sir Thomas Halford pleaded his clergy, and further that the branding was respited at the king's special order. G. D. R., 1 April, 20 Charles II.—Also, in the file of the Gaol Delivery, held on 17 June, next following, the King's Writ, addressed to the Keepers of the Peace and Justices &c. for Middlesex, certifying that Sir Thomas Halford bart. has received by Letters Patent the King's pardon of the said manslaughter, and ordering that he be no further molested in respect to the said felony.

23 March, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Poplar co. Midd. on the said day, John Sharpies late of Poplar aforesaid labourer, together with a multitute of people, to the number of five hundred persons, arrayed and armed in warlike manner, to wit, with iron barrs, polaxes, long staves and other weapons traitorously prepared, ordered and raised war against the Lord the King &c. John Sharpies put himself on a jury, and was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R. 1 April, 20 Charles II.

24 March, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborn on the said day, Richard Woodward labourer, Thomas Lymerick sawyer, and John Richardson labourer, all three late of the aforesaid parish, together with a multitude of people to the number of three hundred persons, armed and arrayed in warlike manner &c. traitorously prepared, ordered and levied public war against the Lord the King &c.—Richard Woodward and John Richardson were found 'Not Guilty.'—By special verdict, set forth on the dorse of the indictment, the jury found in respect to Thomas Lymerick, "Wee finde that the day yeare and place in the indictment mencioned a greate number of persons to the number in the indictment mencioned assembled themselves upon pretence of pulling downe Bawdy Houses, and being arrayed and armed with clubs and staves marched in warlike manner, and the said Limerick led them as their Captaine with a club in his hand; and was owned by the Company to bee their Captaine; that the said Limericke led the said persons to the house of Peter Burlingham, and they pulled down the said house and destroyed and took away divers goods of the said Burlingham to the value of xxx li. And if upon the whole matter it shall seeme to this Court that the said Thomas Limericke is guilty &c." as in the special verdicts set forth on pp. 9, 10, 11.—A note at the foot of the indictments certifies that in the opinion of the Court Thomas Limericke was 'Guilty' of high treason, and that, at the Gaol Delivery held for the county of Middlesex on 6th of May, 20 Charles II. he had judgment to be executed in the usual way of the execution of culprits, convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 1 April, 20 Charles II.

24 March, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. James's Clerkenwell on the said day, Edward Bedell of the said parish taylor and Richard Lattymer of the same parish laborer, together with a multitude of persons to the number of three hundred, armed and arrayed in warlike manner with swords, half-pikes, halberts, long staves and clubs, traitorously prepared and levied war against the Lord now King. Both prisoners put themselves (po se) on a jury of the country; and the jury returned the following special verdict,—"Wee doe find that the day, year, and place in the indictment mencioned, a great number of persons, to the number in the indictment mencioned, arraied and armed with swords, halfe-pykes, halberts, long staves, clubbs and other weapons prout in the indictment, did meet together at Clerkenwell Greene in the parishe of St. James Clerkenwell in the county of Middlesex, upon pretence of breaking prisons and releasing of prisoners, and that one of them, who had a halfe-pyke in his hand owned himselfe to bee their captaine. That the same soe assembled together to a place called New Prison situate at the parishe and county aforesaid, and then and there said they came to search for prisoners there, and then and there brake open the prison doors and lett out foure prisoners two whereof were committed thither for felony, and the other two for other offences: And that then and there being charged to depart, they replyed that they had been servants long but now they would bee masters; That some being taken they cryed out 'One dye and all dye;' That Lattimer was among them and active in breakeing open the said prison and was with the rest in the prison when it was broken open. And that Beadell was there and being pursued by one of the King's Soldiers called out to the rest of the company to face about and not to leave him: And if upon the whole matter aforesaid, it shall seeme to this court that the said Edmond Beadell is guilty of the offence mencioned in the indictment, then wee say hee is guilty prout in the indictment, and that hee hath noe goods and chattels &c. And if it shall seeme to this court that hee is not guilty of the offence mencioned in the indictment, then wee say hee is not guilty of the High Treason therein mencioned. Nor that hee did fly for itt. The like conclusion against Richard Lattimer." G. D. R., 1 April, 20 Charles II.

24 March, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoreditch on the said day, John Earle, William Wilks, William Ford, Richard Farrell and Edward Cotton, all five late of the said parish labourers, together with a multitude of people, to the number of four hundred persons, armed and arrayed in warlike manner with swords, halfe-pykes, halberts, long staves, clubs and other arms, traitorously prepared, ordered and raised public war against the Lord now King &c. . . . .With special verdict of the jurors, in respect to Edward Cotton, running in the following words:—"We find that at the time and in the place in the indictment mencioned a great many persons to the number in the bill mencioned were mett togeather armed with swords, staves, clubs and other weapons upon pretence of pulling downe Bawdy Houses, and had a cloth on a staffe for an ensigne carryed before them, And that Sir Phillipp Howard with a troope of the King's guard found them in such an armed and seditious manner, and commanded them to disperse, that they refused soe to doe, but threw stones at him, that some of them inquired who it was that led those gards, whether it was the Duke of Yorke, and being told it was they presently threw stones at Sir Phillipp Howard, who led the horse, and some of them said unlesse the King would give them the Libertie of Conscience, May-day should bee a bloody day, and others said that they would be with them at Whitehall, That others bid kill the gards, and others said they would come and pull downe Whitehall (the King's capitall Palace), and that they cared not for the gard, for they were but two or three hundred, and they could easily knock them on the head, that they continued many hours till they [were] dispersed by the gards, that Cotton was one of them that was in this manner assembled, and that Cotton was amongst them the next day, when they assembled in the same manner, pulling downe a house in the parish of St. Leonard Shorditch within the county of Middlesex, And if upon the whole matter aforesaid it shall seem to this Court that the said Edward Cotton is guilty of the offence mencioned in the indictment then wee say hee is guilty prout in the indictment, And that hee hath noe goods and chattels &c., but if it shall seeme to this Court that hee is not guilty of the offence mencioned in the Indictment, then wee say hee is not guilty of the High Treason mencioned therein. Nor that hee did fly for itt."—Notes on the bill show that John Earle, William Wilks, William Ford and Richard Farrell were found 'Not Guilty.' A memorandum at the foot of the indictment certifies that at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, held on 6 May, 20 Charles II., Edward Cotton had judgment of death for high treason, and to be executed in the usual way of executions for high treason. G. D. R., 1 April, 20 Charles II.

24 March, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, on the said 24th of March, 20 Charles II, at East Smithfield co. Midd., Peter Messinger, Richard Bazley, William Greene and Thomas Appletree, all four late of East Smithfield aforesaid laborers, traitorously compassed, imagined and intended to raise and excite war, rebellion and insurrection against the aforesaid Lord the the King, with a multitude of people to the number of five hundred persons, armed and arrayed in warlike manner, to wit, with swords hand-pikes, halberts, long staves, clubs and other arms offensive and defensive traitorously prepared, ordained and levied against the Lord now King his crown and dignity, and against the statute in this case published and provided.—On the dorse of the bill appears the special verdict of the jury, running in these words,—"Wee find that on the xxiiii th day of March last past a great multitude of persons, to the number mencioned in the Indictment, were assembled and mett together in East Smithfield in the county of Midd. and in Moorefields within the said county, armed with the armes and weapons mencioned in the Indictment, upon pretence of pulling downe Bawdy Houses; That Bazely led them and was called their Captaine by them, and had in his hand a naked sword, which hee brandished over his head; and Messinger had a peice of a greene apron on a staffe, which he flourished as colours in the head of the Company; and that Bazeley and hee led the company about as their Leaders; that they did the like on Wednesday the 25th of March, and were breaking downe houses, that Peverell one of the Constables of Midd., having a constable's staffe in his hand, came to them with some persons to aide to him, and charged them to depart and keepe the peace, and that thereupon Bazely stroke him with his sworde severall times, and wounded him, and severall of the said persons there soe assembled stroke him downe and tooke away his staffe: That the said William was amongst them, casting up his cap and hollowing with a staffe in his hand, and that while hee was amongst them hee was knocked down amongst them by a party of the King's souldiers, that came to suppresse them, and was then taken; That Bazely stroke at the Ensigne that led the souldiers; That Appletree was amongst them both dayes, and was the first that stroke at Peverell the Constable, and was amongst them at Burlingham's house at Saffron Hill in the county of Midd', and pulled part of that house downe, and the next to itt, and stroke at one that admonished him to bee quiett. And if upon the whole matter aforesaid it shall seeme to this court that the said Peter Messenger is guilty of the offence mencioned in the Indictment, then we say that he is guilty prout in the Indictment, and that hee hath noe goods or chattells &c. And if it shall seeme to this Court that hee is not guilty of the offence mencioned in the Indictment, then wee say hee is not guilty of the High Treason mencioned. Nor that he did fly for itt.

'The like conclusion against Thomas Appletree.

'The like conclusion against Richard Bazeley.

'The like conclusion against William Greene.'"

At the foot of this remarkable bill of indictment appears a note, recording that, at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, held for the county of Middlesex at the Justice Hall in the Old Bayley on 6 May, 20 Charles II., Peter Messenger and Richard Bazely had judgment, that they should be executed in accordance with the usual sentence for executing persons sentenced to death for High Treason. G. D. R. 1 April, 20 Charles II.

28 March, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields on the said day between two and three p.m., William Sherwood, Henry Godfrey and Howard Coney, all three late of the said parish, feloniously broke into and entered the King's dwelling-house called Whitehall, and stole therefrom and carried away a gold ring set with seven diamonds worth sixty pounds, another gold ring set with eight diamonds worth eighty pounds, a gold ring set with three precious stones worth thirty pounds, and divers other jewels and things of value, described and appraised in the indictment, and forty-two pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Joseph Williamson esq.—William Sherwood and Henry Godfrey were found 'Guilty' and sentenced to be hung. No clerical note touching Howard Coney. G. D. R., 1 April, 20 Charles II.

11 July, 20 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Abraham Goodman late of the said parish gentleman, devising and designing traitorously to remove and depose the said Lord now King from his royal style and name, spoke certain false and scandalous words of and against the said Lord the King, and of the most noble Lord George, Duke of Albemarle, and also of the judges of the kingdom of England, saying and declaring "quod adtunc fuit magna pestilentia in Terra anglice the Land quia Judicium non fuit execut' anglice executed in portis . . . . et amoveret eos anglice would remove them si potuit habere accessum sive opportunitatem et quod querebat oportunitatem pridie contra Imperatorem anglice the Generall (Ducem Albemarle predictum innuendo) contra debitum ligeancie sue &c." Found 'Guilty' of high treason, Abraham Goodman gentleman was sentenced to be hanged, dismembered, and quartered &c., after the usual manner of the execution of felons, convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 9 December, 20 Charles II.