Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1670

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

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Pages

17-24

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1670', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 17-24. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66077 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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1670

6 February, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Hillingdon co. Midd. on the said day, Jenkin Jenkins late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Robert Raynsford esquire, and with a rapier gave him on the left side of his breast a wound, of which he languished at Hillingdon aforesaid from the said sixth day of February until the fourteenth day of the same month, on which last-named day he died of the said wound, having been slain and murdered by Jenkin Jenkins. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Jenkin Jenkins asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R., 21 Feb., 22 Charles II.

6 April, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Chiswick co. Midd. on the said day, John Thomas late of the said parish laborer assaulted Daniel Lather, and with both his fists gave him near the left groyne a mortal bruise, of which the said Daniel Lather then and there instantly died: And that in so dealing with the said Daniel, the aforesaid John Thomas slew and murdered the said Daniel. Acquitted of the murder, but convicted of manslaughter, John Thomas asked to be transported, and the Court determined to deliberate on the case till next Gaol Delivery (pet' transportari: Ideo Cur' advisare vult usq' p'x &c.).—N.B. It is worthy of notice, that by this time it has become a common practice for culprits, on conviction of the less heinous capital felonies, to petition the court for transportation. G. D. R., 13 April, 22 Charles II.

8 April, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., Mary Chaplin spinster otherwise styled Mary Litchfeild, late of the said parish, stole and carried off three silk petticoats worth eight pounds, a cloth petticoate trimmed with lace worth four pounds, five holland smockes worth thirty shillings, two cambricke whiskes worth ten shillings, a silk scarfe worth ten shillings, one pair of silke stockings worth ten shillings, two silver thimbles worth two shillings, fower pair of holland sleeves worth two shillings, and fifteen pounds and ten shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of a certain Edmund Moulton Found 'Guilty,' Mary Chaplin alias Mary Litchfeild was sentenced to be hanged; but she was reprieved by the court till the next Gaol Delivery, because she was found to be pregnant. G. D. R., 19 May, 22 Charles II.

12 April, 22 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the parish of St. Mary-le-Savoy alias Strond on the said day, on view of the body of Henry Shadwell late of the said parish gentleman, then and there lying dead; With verdict of jurors, saying that Francis Moore late of the said parish gentleman assaulted the said Henry Shadwell at the said parish on the 4th instant, and with a rapier gave him on the right side of his breast a mortal wound of which he died on the eleventh day of the same month, slain by the said Francis Moore: and that John Morthey late of the aforesaid parish laborer was present at the said manslaughter, aiding and encouraging the said Francis Moore to commit it.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the said Francis Moore esquire (sic) for slaying and murdering the aforesaid Henry Shadwell, and against John Morphey for being present at the said murder, and aiding and encouraging Francis Moore to commit it. Putting himself on a jury of the country, John Morphey was found 'Not Guilty.' The bills exhibit no clerical note, touching subsequent proceedings in the case against Francis Moore. G. D. R., 19 May, 22 Charles II.

2 May, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Philip Sampson late of the said parish laborer, stole and carried off an iron anchor worth twelve shillings, and twenty yards of cable rope worth twelve shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Sevier. Found 'Guilty,' Philip Sampson consented to be transported, 'I'o Cur' advisare vult &c. quia transportari concedat.' G. D. R., 19 May, 22 Charles II.

26 May, 22 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hands and seals of William Pulteney . . . . and Robert Filmer . . . ., Justices of the Peace for the borough of Westminster, that Edward Brookes of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields grocer, William Hooker of Southwarke brewer, Ańdrew Carter at the Bell in Tuttle Street, James Brathwayte in Wappin, Robert Comp of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, Martin Jackson of Shoreditch, John Slatter of Wentworth Street vintner, John Pennyman of Aldersgate Street woollen-draper, John Potter of Southwarke cordwainer, William Kerton of Kensington, Edward Brooke of St. Giles's grocer, Bryan Morffin of Drury Lane, John Gravener of the Bowlinge Alley chandler, William White of Drury Lane confectioner, Joan Barter of Drury Lane widow, William Watson of Golden Lane, William Gates of St. Giles's-inthe-Fields, Thomas Saunders laborer, and Richard Wheate of St. Giles'sin-the-Fields laborer, on the said 26 May, 22 Charles II. were (with twenty-two other unknown persons), present at a conventicle unlawfully assembled at the dwelling-house of Richard Beach in St. Margaret's, Westminster, under colour of exercising religion otherwise than &c., and that John Barnell of Spittlefields co. Midd. took upon himself to preach to and teach the said Assembly: Which offences having been proved against the aforesaid persons, John Barnell forfeited twenty pounds, and each of the other persons forfeited for their first offence the sum of five shillings. S. P. West. R., 14 July, 22 Charles II.

30 June, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-le-Savoy on the said day, Margaret Wye late of the said parish spinster, knowing that a certain Arabella Churchill was a customer of a certain John Cushion of the aforesaid parish salesman, induced Mary Cushion, wife of the said John Cushion, to deliver and entrust to her a certain silk gowne for a woman worth thirty-five shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said John Cushion, by falsely and fraudulently representing that she came and asked for the said gown at the bidding of the said Arabella Churchill who would pay for it: and having got possession of the gown by this false and fraudulent statement, Margaret Wye disposed of it to her own use. Found 'Guilty,' Margaret Wye was sentenced to pay a fine of five marks, which she forthwith paid, and to find sureties for her good behaviour. G. D. R., 12 Oct., 22 Charles II.

3 July, 22 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Ralph Hawtrey esq. J.P., of Thomas Spicer and Thomas Langston, both of Woxbridge co. Midd. inn-holders, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Thomas Spicer and Thomas Langston at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "then and there to give evidence against Theophilus Greene for speakinge certaine seditious words in a conventicle or meetinge held in Woxbridge aforesaid upon the third day of July." S. P. R., 6 Oct., 22 Charles II.

13 July, 22 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Josiah Ricroft esq. J.P. for Middlesex, of Richard Parham of Hangman's Acre, in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. victualler, Robert . . . . of East Smithfield in St. Mary's Whitechapple co. Midd. barber, and William Porter of Rosemary Lane in St. Mary's Whitechapple aforesaid plummer in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Stephen Scudamore of Welclose in Whitechapple gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Stephen Scudamore's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for being a lewd person, and for keeping a certaine booth for dancing on the ropes and other unlawful exercises in Welclose, whereon he is an actor with other lewd persons his servants, who use much obscene and profane language, by meanes whereof many idle persons doe assemble, from whence proceede many tumults and disorders &c."—Also, on the same file, Recognizance of George Paul, servant to the aforesaid Stephen Scudamore gentleman, at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being an idle person and being an Actor in a certaine Booth of his aforesaid Master, in Well Close, in the practice of unlawfull enterludes and playes, and using much obscene and profane language" &c. S. P. R., 22 August, 22 Charles II.

20 July, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Worrall late of the said parish spinster alias Mary Worrall wife of John Worrall late of the said parish yeoman, obtained and took into her keeping certain fire-balls, made of gunpowder, sulphur, and other combustible materials, with the malicious and diabolical purpose of setting fire to and thereby destroying the dwellinghouses of divers of the King's lieges. Putting herself on trial, Mary Worrall was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R. 31 Aug., 22 Charles II.

24 July, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, on the said day in the parish of St. Leonard's Shorditch co. Midd. (when there was speech between one Thomas Godfrey and Robert Ciprey respecting certain fireballs made of gun-powder and sulphur and other ingredients, that were said to have been lately taken at Wapping, and to be in the possession of a certain woman to the jurors unknown), Robert Ciprey of the said parish laborer, and a seditious man of ill repute and life, said in the presence and hearing of divers of the King's lieges, 'I doe knowe where there are fireballs enough in Wapping, but I will not disclose them; I had seaven shillings and sixepence at one time for removing them, and I was bidden by them that set mee on worke to have a care that noe candle came neare the fire-balls; I can helpe any man to forty pounds, that will keepe my secrets, and I am bound and under an oath never to disclose the said balls.' Found 'Guilty' of having spoken these words to the alarm and terror of very many of the King's lieges and subjects, Robert Ciprey was sentenced to pay a fine of thirteen shillings and four pence, and to stand on the pillory, one day in Holborne, on another day at Charinge Crosse, and on a third day at West Smithfeild, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. of each of the said days, with a placard on his head, declaring his offence. G. D. R., 31 August, 22 Charles II.

26 July, 22 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken on the said day before Josiah Ricroft esq. J.P., of Dorothy Packwood of St. Katherin's near the Tower of London and Thomas Heskins of Shackspear's Walk in the parish of Shadwell co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Garratt England of the aforesaid precinct of St. Katherine shoe maker at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. to the "complaint of Robert Waringe, for that hee with seven other Dutchmen did about eleven of the clock att night come into his house, and were rude and disorderly in their behaviour, thereby affrightinge the wife of the said Robert (who was then in child-bed) and diverse women that came to visit her." S. P. R., 29 August, 22 Charles II.

26 July, 22 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Josiah Ricroft esq. J.P., of Baldwin Merrat of Poplar in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. husbandman and John Newman of Poplar aforesaid edgetoolmaker, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of James Barnes of Billiter Lane, London, taylor at the next Session of Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "what shall be objected against him upon the complaint of Robert Waringe, for that hee with seven other Dutchmen did about eleaven of the clock att night come to his house, and were rude and disorderly in their behaviour, to the affright of the wife of the said Robert (who was then in child-bed), and divers women that came to visit her."—Also, on the same file, similar recognizances for the appearance of Adalph Vanlingden of Billiter Lane, London, taylor, William Vanrolph of Billiter Lane, London, taylor, Lucas Fonterborough of St. Margaret's Westminster boot-maker, Harman Vandursten of Bethlem shoe-maker, and Garret England of St. Katherine's near the Tower, at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer in the same matter, on the complaint of Robert Waring. S. P. R., 29 August, 22 Charles II.

28 August, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. on the said day, William Cooke late of the said parish laborer broke into the dwelling-house of Henry Chitty esquire (no person being then in the said house), and stole therefrom two silver trencher plates worth nine pounds, and four little silver "trencher salt-sellers worth thirty-two shillings, and three silver spoons worth thirty-two shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Henry Chitty esq." Found 'Guilty,' William Cooke was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 31 Aug., 22 Charles II.

29 August, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster on the said day, Mary Lady Broughton widow, keeper of the King's prison of the Gatehouse within the said parish, wittingly and wilfully suffered one Thomas Ridley, duly committed to the said prison and her custody on a charge of stealing a silver cup worth twenty-five shillings, to escape from the same prison of the Gatehouse, of which she was keeper, and to go at large. No notes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 12 Oct., 22 Charles II.

1 September, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Dunstan's-inthe-West co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Pratt late of the said parish widow "Ex iniqui lucri et questus causa apud domum mansionalem suam ibidem scituatam custodivit et manutenuit et adhuc custodit et manutenet quosdam lusus illicitos cum globulis rotundis vocatos 'playing at Billyards'" = for the sake of unjust profit and gain at her dwelling-house there being kept and maintained and still keeps and maintains certain unlawful games with round balls, called "Playing at Billyards." On her arraignment upon this indictment, on 20 Feb., 1670, Mary Pratt confessed the indictment, and was fined forty shillings, which she paid to the Sheriff. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 22 Charles II.

12 September, 22 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken on the said day before Josiah Ricroft esq. J.P., of Oliver Atherton of Foxes Lane in Shadwell co. Midd. cordweyner and John Barrett of Church Street London tailor, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of John Harrison of Tower Hill in St. Botolph's-without-Algate London at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer &c. on the complaint of James Pricke "for forcibly and violently cominge to his doore and beatinge thereat in the time of divine service and sermon, and clamouringe and revilinge him in evill language, thereby making an affray and disturbance in the streete." S. P. R., 6 Oct. 22 Charles II.

19 September, 22 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Howell knt., Serjeant-at-Law and Recorder of London, of Paul Badcock of St. Botolph's-without-Aldgate victualler and William Kirke of St. Katherine's co. Midd. cordwayner, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the appearance of John Steward of St. Botolph's aforesaid marriner at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "on suspition of spiritting away beyond sea Roger Pym, apprentice of Thomas Crispe." S. P. R., 6 Oct., 22 Charles II.

24 October, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Marturus Decarbonell late of the said parish gentleman, assaulted Thomas Grantham in the highway, and robbed him of a sword. Found 'Guilty,' Marturus Decarbonell gentleman was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 7 Dec. 22 Charles II.

10 November, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Katherine's, co. Midd. on the said day, William Thew late of St. Katherine's aforesaid assaulted Guilford Slingsby son of Walter Slingsby esquire, and on the same day took him against his will from St. Katherine's aforesaid to a certain ship called the John of London, lying in the river Thames, and in the aforesaid ship transported the same Guilford Slingsby to Virginia in parts beyond the sea, with the intention of selling him in Virginia to the gain and profit of the same William Thew, and to the utter ruin of the same Guilford Slingsby. Found 'Guilty,' William Thew was sentenced to pay a fine of one hundred marks, and was committed to prison until he should have paid the fine, and was further sentenced to stand on the pillory on three several days from eleven to one o'clock, to wit, on one day on the pillory at Tower Hill, on the second day on the pillory at St. Katherine's, and on the third day on the pillory in the Strond near the Maypole, having on his head a placard, setting forth his offence. G. D. R., 7 June, 23 Charles II.

20 November, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Isleworth, co. Midd. on the said day, Joseph Thistlethwaite late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Richard Anguish gentleman, and slew and murdered him, by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound on the right side of his breast, of which wound the said Richard Anguish died on the following day. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Joseph Thistlethwaite asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R., 7 Dec, 22 Charles II.

21 November, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, John Streete late of the said parish laborer assaulted a certain Gilbert Shelley, and with a rapier gave him a wound in and upon the breast, of which wound the said Gilbert Shelley then and there died immediately. No record of subsequent proceedings in the case.. G. D. R., 13 Jan., 22 Charles II.

10 December, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, George Story late of the said parish yeoman, a person greedy of gain, and not scrupulous as to the ways by which he might get profit to himself, albeit to the loss and injury of other persons, assaulted Edward Hanscomb, and conveyed him on the same day to a certain ship called The Endeavour, then being in the River Thames, and subsequently transported the same Edward Hanscomb in the said ship to an island called The Barbadoes, without the consent and against the will of the said Edward, and in the said island for his own gain sold the aforesaid Edward Hanscomb to a certain man, to the jurors unknown. On 17 July 1671 George Story put himself on a jury of the country, who found him 'Not Guilty.' S. P. R., 17 July, 23 Charles II.

15 (?) December, 22 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition post mortem taken on the said day at St. Margaret's Westminster within the Liberty of the Dean and Chapter, on view of the body of Peter Lasall, gentleman, there lying dead and slain: With verdict of jurors saying that, in the parish aforesaid on the . . . . day of December aforesaid, George de Hertoye late of the same parish esquire assaulted the said Peter Lasall and with a rapier gave him a mortal wound on the left part of his breast, of which wound he then and there immediately died.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same George de Hertoye (described in the indictment as George de Hertoye alias George Lord de Valkenburgh for slaying and murdering the said Peter Lasall in the manner set forth in the finding of the coroner's jury. 'Po se' is just legible at the head of the bill, which affords no particulars of subsequent proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 13 Jan., 22 Charles II.

20 December, 22 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken on the said day before J. Kelynge (C. J. ?) on the said day, of Francis Thompson of Croley co. Bedford gentleman, in the sum of two hundred pounds, and of John Thompson of Croley aforesaid gentleman, and of William Askew of the city of Lincolne gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds each: For the said Francis Thompson's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, held after next Michaelmas at the Old Bailey, in order to 'there pleade his discharge on the Coroner's inquisition for manslaughter.' It is noted on the bill that this 'recognizance was taken by the King's order.' G. D. R., 3 May, 23 Charles II.

21 December, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Sir Thomas Sandys knt., Charles Obrian esquire, Symon Parry gentleman, Miles Reeves gentleman, Henry Lake gentleman, and Edward Wroth gentleman, assaulted a certain William Wilkes in the highway, and robbed him of a sword worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of the late William Wilkes. G. D. R., 13 Jan., 22 Charles II.

21 December, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Sir Thomas Sandys knt., Charles Obrian esq., Simon Parry gentleman, Miles Reeves gentleman, Henry Lake gentleman, and Edward Wroth gentleman, all six late of the aforesaid parish, assaulted Sir John Coventry K.B. in the highway and robbed him of one perywigg worth seven pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir John Coventry. No record of subsequent proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 13 Jan., 22 Charles II.