Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1671

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

24-33

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1671', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 24-33. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66078 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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1671

2 January, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Dunstan's-in-theWest co. Midd. on the said day, George Rutlidge late of the said parish stole and carried off "a paire of Spanish leather shoes" worth six-pence, and "a paire of greate leather golorshoes" worth six-pence, of the goods and chattels of a certain Richard Hunt. Not Guilty. G. D. R. 13 Jan., 22 Charles II.

11 January, 22 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the General Quarter Session of the Peace held at Hicks Hall in St. John's Street on the said day, the Justices of Peace then and there assembled in G. Q. Session tendered the Oath of Allegiance contained in a certain Act of Parliament of 3 James I. to Theophilus Greene waterman, John Wren sadler, Thomas Paull weaver, Francis Cooly laborer, Richard Cocks silkethroster, Richard Guy chandler, John Smith carpenter, Joshua Sparrowe shipwright, George Tipping weaver, and John Maddocke porter, all late of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. and that they each and all obstinately and pertinaciously then and there refused the said oath, so tendered to them by the Justices of the Peace in open session. On 17th of July, 1671, each of the said culprits, with the single exception of George Tipping, put himself on a jury, was found 'Guilty,' and had judgment that he be put without the protection of the Lord the King, that his goods and chattels be forfeited to the same Lord the King, and that he be committed to the Gaol of Newgate, there to remain during the king's pleasure.—Instead of putting himself on a jury, George Tipping said nothing ('nichil dicit'), at his arraignment on the same 17th of July. The refusal to plead did not affect the course of the proceedings against him . . . . His silence notwithstanding, George Tipping received the same judgment as the other culprits. S. P. R., 11 Jan., 22 Charles II.

26 February, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Constable esq. otherwise styled Robert Viscount Dunbar in the kingdom of Scotland, Peter Savage esq. otherwise styled Peter Lord Savage, and John Fennick esq. all three late of the aforesaid parish, assaulted one Peter Varnall, And that the said Robert Constable slew and murdered the same Peter Varnall, by giving him with a rapier a wound on the right side of his head, of which wound he then and there instantly died, And That Peter Savage otherwise called Lord Savage and John Fennick alias Fenwick esq. were present and aided and abetted the said Robert Viscount Dunbar to commit the said murder. Each of the three culprits appeared at the Gaol Delivery, held at the Old Bailey on 3 May, 23 Charles II., and confessed the indictment; whereupon the Court decided to deliberate on the case till next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 3 May, 23 Charles II.

27 February, 23 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem taken at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields on the said day, on view of the body of Peter Varnall late of the said parish yeoman: With Verdict of jurors saying, that Robert Constable Lord Dunbar in the kingdom of Scotland, Peter Savage otherwise styled Peter Lord Savage, and John Fennicke, esquire, all three late of the aforesaid parish, with divers other persons to the jurors unknown, assaulted the said Peter Varnall in the said parish on the 26th inst., And That Robert Constable aforesaid slew the said Peter Varnall by giving him with a rapier on the right side of his head a mortal wound, of which he then and there instantly died, And That the aforesaid Peter Savage and John Fennicke were present, aiding maintaining abetting the said Robert Constable to commit the said homicide. G. D. R., 3 May, 23 Charles II.

2 March, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Pitfield esq. J.P., on the said day, of John Langworth weaver and Margarett Prick widow, both of Knockvergis in Stepney co. Middlesex, in the sum of one hundred pounds each: For the appearance of Mary Flowers, the wife of John Flowers of Knockvergis waterman, at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer to what shall be objected against her by George Smaley, "who vehemently suspecteth her to be one of the four persons, that assaulted him in the highway in Church Lane neere Whitechappell upon Sunday the six-and-twentieth day of February last about three of the clock in the morning, where he pretendeth he was gagged, and with a stick thrust downe his throat by one of them, lost his speech, and had fifteene shillings taken away from him." S. P. R., 8 March, 23 Charles II.

4 March, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster, co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Palmer late of Westminster aforesaid bookseller, a pernicious and seditious person, with the intention of causing discord between the Lord the King and his subjects, uttered and published a certain scandalous and seditious book, entitled 'Directions to a Painter for describing our Navall Business, in imitation of Mr. Waller, being the last worke of Sir John Denham, whereunto is added Clarendon's House-Warming by an unknowne author, printed in the year 1667,' and containing the following scandalous and seditious words, to wit, 'And then the King to Westminster is brought, imperfectly to speake the Chancellor's thought, In which, as if no age could parallell a Prince and Councill that had rul'd so well, he tells the Parliament he cannot brook whate're in them like jealousy doth look, Adds that no greviances the Nations load, while we're undone at home, despis'd abroad, Thus past the Irish with the money bill, the first not halfe so good as th'other ill,' and further containing these false and scandalous words, to wit, 'After two millions more lay'd on the nation, the Parliament grows ripe for prorogation, they rise and now a Treaty is confest, 'gainst which these State cheats did protest, a Treaty which so well makes it appear, their's not the Kingdom's Intrest is their care. Statesmen of old thought Armes the way of peace, Ours scorne such thread-bare policyes as these, All that was given for the States defence, they think too little for their owne expense.'—Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Palmer was sentenced to pay a fine of twenty marks, was committed to Newgate until he should pay the same fine, and was further sentenced to stand on the pillory on one day at the New Exchange and another day in the Palace Yard, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., with a paper showing his offence on his head. G. D. R. 10 March, 23 Charles II.

6 March, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Humphrey Weld esq. J.P., of Thomas Phillips and Thomas Evans laborers, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each: For the appearance of Elizabeth Phillips at the next Quarter Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there "to answer to what shall be objected against her by Richard Wattkiff, for saying 'The King keepes a company of rogues about him.'"—Also, the similar recognizances, taken on the some day before the same Justice of the Peace, of the same Thomas Phillips and Thomas Evans: For the appearance of Jane Shepherd at the same next Quarter Session of the Peace, to answer for saying 'The king keepes a company of rogues about him.' S. P. R., 1 May, 23 Charles II.

9 March, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Palmer late of Westminster bookseller sold and uttered a scandalous and seditious book, entitled 'Nehushton or . . . . and peaceable discourse concerning the abolishing of things abused to superstition and . . . . which may serve as one intire and sufficient argument to evince that the liturgy and [cere] monyes and other things used at this day in the Church of England ought neither to be imposed nor retained, but utterly extirpated and layd aside, and to vindicate the Nonconformists in their refusall to close with them,' and containing the following scandalous passages, to wit, 'Now as for those buildings that have been abus'd in Idolatrous services and are in respect of their situation figure or the like unfit for profitable uses and remaine deckt with their Idol's attire, and stand amongst such people as are scandalized with the use of them, and . . . . such places where there is danger of the returne of Idolatry, such are utterly unlawfull . . . . as well as the high places and groves to be removed,' and also containing in another place these scandalous words, to wit. 'As for pompous Cathedrals and . . . . places that serve for little but to mind us of the superstitions ostentation and vanity of former tymes and bolster up usurping Prelates in their pride and lordliness, I have noe more to say for them, but that it were well if with the high places they were pull'd down and the materials thereof converted to a better use,' and further containing in another place this scandalous passage, to wit, 'It being made out unto you what things on their being abused are to be laid aside and to whome the doing of it do's belong, namely to all of us in one respect or other, I shall here shew you after what manner we must doe . . . . wee must do it with zeal and indignation, they are such things as are enemies to true religion and therefore we must appeare with an holy rage and fury against them,' and containing in another place these scandalous words, to wit, 'Wee must not stand looking on abused things, and wishing they were removed, or resolving that thereafter we will endeavour it, but forthwith lay our hands to the worke and gett it done,' and further containing in another place this scandalous and seditious passage, to wit, 'Whatever persons names tymes places utensills ceremonies we find amongst us, that have been grossly abused in superstitious and idolatrous services let us indeavour the rooting of them out and the laying them aside,' and also containing in another place these words, to wit, 'I know I shall be censured for appearing against such things, they being of such esteeme with divers amongst us, and being backt and fenced with authority and law,' and yet more containing these scandalous words, to wit, 'The present liturgy, though there be many good and usefull things in it, hath been so much abused both heretofore amongst the Idolatrous Papists from whome we had it and since amongst ourselves that it hath for many yeares beene the desire of several thousands of sober . . . . people of all degrees in these nations that it should after the other Popish trash . . . . the howse of God in the beginning of the reformation, be laid aside.'—Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Palmer was sentenced to pay a fine of twenty marks, was committed to the Gaol of Newgate until the same fine should be paid, and was also sentenced to stand on the pillory on two several days, one day at the New Exchange, and the other day at Pallace Yard near Westminster Hall Gate, from eleven a.m. to one p.m.—N.B. This parchment has been so greatly injured by rot, as to have lost much of its original written matter. G. D. R., 10 March, 23 Charles II.

12 April, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Josiah Ricroft esq. J.P. on the said day, of John Busby of Shadwell co. Midd. victualler and William Peasely of Ratcliffe in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. . . . ., in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Thomas Ford of Shadwell aforesaid waterman at the next Session of Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer to what "shall be objected against him, upon the complaint of Stephen Pheasey and Edward Deane, for being a confederate with William Kempthorne and Charles Carter in trapanning and spiriting of John Deane and Clement Tallis on board the Shipp Assistance, intending to send them beyond sea." S. P. R., 1 May, 23 Charles II.

2 May, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that the Justices of Peace for Middlesex, being assembled in open court at General Quarter Sessions on the aforesaid 2 May, 23 Charles II., at Hicks Hall in St. John's Streete, tendered the Oath of Allegiance, contained in a certain Act of Parliament of 3 James I., to John Ellis bricklayer and Edward Pattyson taylor, both late of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd., and that the same John Ellis and Edward Pattyson both and each of them refused to take the said oath, so tendered to them in open court. On 17 July, 1671, John Ellis and Edward Pattyson put themself on a jury, and were both found 'Guilty:' whereupon it was adjudged that each of them should be put without the protection of the Lord the King, that the goods and chattels of each of them should be forfeited to the same King, and that each of them should be committed to the Gaol of Newgate, there to remain during the King's Pleasure. S. P. R., 1 May, 23 Charles II.

2 June, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Robinson knt. and bart., Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Thomas Griffith of the parish of St. Pancras cowkeeper and Henry Browne citizen and mercer of London, in fifty pounds each, and John Ballard of Stepney co. Midd. carpenter, in the sum of one hundred pounds: For the said John Ballard's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to "answeare his erecting new buildings in the hamlett of Spittlefields in the parish of Stepney, contrary to Lawe and his Majestie's proclamacion." S. P. R., 6 June, 23 Charles II.

2 June, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborn co. Midd. on the said day, John Mathews and Richard Lawrence, both late of the said parish gentlemen, assaulted Bartholomew Gregory gentleman; and that the said John Mathews with a sword then and there gave the said Bartholomew Gregory on his throat a wound, of which the same Bartholomew languished at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields from the said 2nd of June till the 12th day of the same month, on which last named day he died of the same wound; and that in thus dealing with the said Bartholomew Gregory, the said John Mathews and Richard Lawrence slew and murdered him.—Acquitted of the charge of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, John Mathews asked for the book, read it and was branded. Richard Lawrence was acquitted of both charges. G. D. R., 19 July, 23 Charles II.

5 June, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Bayley esq. J.P., on the said day, of Patrick Ball victualler and Garnett Austin yeoman, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and Isaac Bringhurst of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Isaac Bringhurst's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer &c. for "being a great disturbance to the neighbourhood in keeping a figured Lottery Board at Charing Crosse." S. P. R., 27 July, 23 Charles II.

10 June, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, John Baptista Damascene, an impious profane and irreligious person, spoke and proclaimed these impious, blasphemous and heretical words, to wit, 'Jesus Christ, Moyses and Mahomet were three greate rogues.' Found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 16 Jan., 23 Charles II.

11 June, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Bartlet Phillipps late of the said parish yeoman, in the course of conversation with Isaiah Fritwell a servant of the Most Noble John Earl of Rochester, with the intention of raising discord between the nobles and commonalty of the kingdom of England, maliciously and scandalously uttered these words in the presence and hearing of very many of the king's lieges, to wit, 'Thy Lord is a Hector and Shabb, and you are a rogue for serving him.' Putting himself on a jury of the country on 9th October, 1671, Bartlet Phillipps was found 'Not Guilty.' S. P. R., 28 August, 23 Charles II.

1 July, 23 Charles II.—Entry touching Fifth Monarchy Men in the Newgate Kalender of 19 July, 23 Charles II.—Committed by Sir John Robinson knt. and bart. and Lieutenant of the Tower and . . . . esquire, for being dangerous and seditious persons against the Peace, owning themselves to be be of the sect of Sabbatarians or Fifth Monarchy Men and exercising their pretended religion: Therefore tendred unto them the Oath of Alleagiance and they obstinately denied and refused to take the same, or promise not to take armes against the King, Date 1st of July 1671:—viz. William Mason, Richard Parnam, William Gibson, John Mason, Robert Hopkin, William Russell, Thomas Strickland, Edward Marshall, Richard Fenton, Richard Crossby, George Dane, George Shimmen, Richard Ware, Edmond Fox, Christopher Tempest, John Labory, Robert Woodward, Richard Hicks, William Honyburne, Samuell Clarke, Francis Macey, John Suadon, John Porter, William Gadberry, Edward Marten, Hugh Hassellop, Symon Brunt. G. D. R., 19 July, 23 Charles II.

17 July, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Hicks Hall in St. John Street in St. Sepulchre's parish co. Midd., the Justices of the Peace then and there assembled in General Quarter Session of the Peace tendered the oath of allegiance, contained in a certain Act of Parliament of 3 James I., to William Mason upholsterer, Richard Parnam silversmith, William Gibson joyner, John Mason weaver, Robert Hopkin shoemaker, William Russell taylor, Thomas Strickland yeoman, Edward Marshall laborer, Richard Tenton laborer, Richard Crosby cutler, George Dane taylor, George Shimmen waterman, Richard Ware plasterer, Edmund Fox hat-maker, Christopher Tempest butcher, John Labory yeoman, Robert Woodward laborer, Richard Hicks hat-maker, William Honyburn smith, Samuel Clarke laborer, Francis Masey scrivener, John Suadon taylor, John Porter laborer, William Cadberry bookbinder, Edward Martin taylor, Hugh Hasslopp apothecary and Simon Brunt taylor, all twenty-seven late of St. Sepulchre's, and that each of the said twenty-seven persons obstinately and pertinaciously refused to take the same oath. Over each of the twenty-seven persons appears the clerical minute 'Po se'=He puts himself. No note touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. R., 17 July, 23 Charles II.

11 August, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Peter Sabbs esq. J.P. on the said day, of Michael Sparkes of St. James's Clerkenwell yeoman and John Webb of the Liberty of the Rolls co. Midd. cordwynder, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearances of Margaret Wyatt, the wife of Thomas Wyatt of St. Mary Overies in the county of Surrey, at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "To answer the Complaint of the Master Wardens and Assistants of the Company of Glasse-sellers, London, for wandering up and down to sell glasses." S. P. R., 28 August, 23 Charles II.

14 August, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes, co. Midd. and divers other places of the said county, on the said day and on divers other days before and afterwards, Margaret Wyatt the wife of Thomas Wyatt late of St. Mary Olave's co. Surrey yeoman, alias Margaret Wyatt late of the aforesaid parish of St. Mary Olave's co. Surrey spinster, was and still is an idle and vagrant person, wandering abroad with glasses for drinking and other glasses, and offering the same drinking-glasses and other glasses for sale and purchase to divers of the King's lieges, in their private houses and not in open fairs or market, with the intention of thereby colouring her vagrancy with an appearance of lawful industry, and so escaping punishment for her said vagrancy (Ac in hujusmodi sua circumvagacione apud parochiam mencionatam et diversos alios locos infra comitatum Middlesexie predictum adtunc ac diversis aliis diebus et vicibus callide et subtiliter vendidit et utteravit quam plurima vitrea diversorum generum diversis ligeis et subditis dicti Domini Regis (juratoribus predictis adhuc ignotis) in privatis domibus suis et non in apertis feriis sive mercatu, Ea intencione ad colorandam dictam circumvagacionem et ad escapiendum a punicione pro ejus circumvagacione): And that on the said day and other times before and afterwards, at St. Clement's Danes, and elsewhere in Middlesex, the said Margaret Wyatt was a vagabond (fuit vagabunda). Putting herself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country, on the 9th of October, 1671, Margaret Wyatt was found 'Not Guilty' and allowed to go in that respect without a day. S. P. R., 28 Aug., 23 Charles II.

9 October, 23 Charles II.—True Bills, on four several parchments, against John Jones yeoman, John Belcher yeoman, Richard Goodgroome yeoman and Arthur Squibb gentleman, all four late of St. Sepulchre's parish co. Midd., for obstinately refusing to take the Oath of Allegiance, contained in a certain Act of Parliament of 3 James I., when the said oath was tendered to them at Hicks Hall on the said day, by the Justices of the Peace assembled at General Quarter Session of the Peace in the said hall in St. John Street. A clerical minute ('Po se') on three of the indictments shows that John Jones, John Belcher and Arthur Squibb pleaded 'Not Guilty' and put themselves on a jury of the country. Declining to confess the indictment or plead to it, Richard Goodgroome 'said nothing.' No clerical notes touching subsequent proceedings in the four cases. S. P. R., 5 Oct., 23 Charles II.

2 November, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Thomas Byde knt. J.P., of John Tonge gentleman and Charles Walton . . . ., both of St. Giles's-in-the-Feilds, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Stephen Hobson of the aforesaid parish at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "there to answere for keeping an unlawfull game in Lincolnes Inne Fields, being called the Indion Game." S. P. R., 4 Dec., 23 Charles II.

4 November, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Thomas Lake knt. J.P. on the said day, of Patrick Griffin of St. Giles'sin-the-Fields victualler and Ralphe Pile of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields yeoman, in the sum of five pounds each, and of Edward Foster of St. Giles's-in-the-Field laborer, in the sum of ten pounds: For the said Edward Foster's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex to be held at Hicks Hall, "then and there to answer for being an idle person, taken in Lincolnes Inn Feilds at a certaine lottery called 'The Wheele of Fortune.'" S. P. R., 4 Dec, 23 Charles II.

18 November, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Josiah Ricroft esq. J.P., of Phillip Sanctey baskett-maker and Christopher Saltmarsh husbandman, both of Milend in Stepney co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Mary Manering of Milend aforesaid widow, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Mary Manering's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "then and there to answer &c. the complaint of Thomas Garberant for being a hawker and forestaller of the marketts, by selling of Linen Cloath from doore to doore about the streete."—Also, on the same file, similar Recognizances, taken before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of Morgan Thomas of the Minories in St. Buttolph's Aldgate chapman at the same Session of the Peace, to answer, at the complaint of Thomas Garberant of Cornehill, for being a hawker and forestaller of the markets, by selling linen-cloth from door to door about the streets. S. P. R., 4 Dec. 23 Charles II.

25 November, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Humphrey Weld esq. J.P. on the said day, of John Partington of St. Clement's Danes' distiller and William Watts of St. Alholloes-within-theWall brushmaker, in the sum of five pounds each, and of George Chambers of the parish of St. Mary Overs Southwark chapman, in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of the said George Chambers at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there "to answer the complaint of the Companie of Turners, for crying and selling in the streetes as a pedler several wares belonging to the Trades of Turners." S. P. R., 4 Dec. 23 Charles II.

25 November, 23 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Thomas Byde knt. J.P., of George Morris of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields scrivener and Roger Wamsley of St. Andrew's Holborn victualler in the sum of forty pounds each, and of John Hewson of St. Andrew's Holborn gentleman, also in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said John Hewson gentleman, at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "There to answere for being an idle loose and disorderly person, and one that cannot give a good and honest accompt of his livelyhood, and for throwing of a five shilling piece on the ground in Lincolne's Inne Feilds and enticeing of one John Sampson, a countryman passing by, to take share of what they found, and then produced cards and cheated him of twelve shillings."—Also, on the same file, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, of the same George Morris and Roger Wamsley, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Francis Winn, of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. gentleman, also in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Francis Winn gentleman at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "There to answere for being an idle loose and disorderly person, and one that cannot give a good and honest accompt of his livelyhood, and for throwing of a five shillings' piece on the ground in Lincolnes Inn Feilds, and enticeing one John Sampson, a countryman passing by, to take share of what they found, and then produced cards and cheated him of twelve shillings." The two 'gentlemen,' who thus preyed on the same day on the same countryman, were doubtless confederates." S. P. R., 4 Dec, 23 Charles II.

15 December, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. and divers other places within the said county, on the said day and at divers other times before and afterwards, Anne Woodward late of the said parish spinster has been and still is an idle and vagrant person, wandering abroad with linnen cloth and offering it for sale, has wandered about carrying the said cloth about with her, and has unlawfully, cunningly and craftily sold and uttered divers yards and parcels of the said cloth to divers of the King's lieges and subjects, in their private houses and not in open fairs and markets, with the intention of colouring her said vagrancy, and escaping punishment for it, and in so doing was and still is a vagabond. On her arraignment, Anne Woodward confessed the indictment and was sentenced to pay a fine. The sum, in which she was fined, is not given. S. P. R., 11 Jan., 23 Charles II.

20 December, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. and divers other places within the same county, on the said day and at divers other times before and afterwards, Alice Hall wife of John Hall of the aforesaid parish yeoman, was and still is an idle and vagrant person, wandering abroad with linnen cloth and offering it for sale, and carrying the same cloth about with her has unlawfully, cunningly and craftily sold and uttered divers yards and pieces of it to divers of the Lord King's lieges and subjects (to the jurors as yet unknown) in their private houses, and not in open fairs and markets, with the intention of colouring her vagrancy and escaping punishment for it, and in so doing was and still is a vagabond. Over Alice Hall's name, at the head of the indictment, appears this clerical minute, to wit, "Cogn' Ind' h'et judiciu' flagellari &c. judiciu' resp'" = She confesses the indictment: has judgment to be whipt &c., the judgment (i.e. execution of sentence) is deferred. S. P. R., 11 Jan. 23 Charles II.

29 December, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Charles Turnor late of the said parish gentleman slew and murdered George White gentleman, by assaulting him and with a rapier giving him on the right part of his breast a mortal wound, of which he then and there instantly died. Acquitted of the murder, Charles Turnor was found 'Guilty' of the manslaughter. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 23 Charles II.