Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1672

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

34-38

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1672', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 34-38. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66079 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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1672

7 January, 23 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields. co. Midd. on the said day, John Hodgson late of the said parish gentleman slew and murdered Edward Owen gentleman, by assaulting him and with a rapier giving him on the left part of his breast a mortal wound, of which he then and there instantly died. The bill exhibits no memoranda, touching subsequent proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 16 Jan. 23 Charles II.

4 April, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Hounslow co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Hyde, Andrew Palmer, Richard Halse, James Slader, John Englefield alias John Oneale, and John Brittanie, all six late of the said parish laborers, assaulted Edward Elkins in the highway, and robbed him of twenty-pairs of silk stockings worth eleven pounds, and two ounces of silk worth three shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Edward Elkins. John Englefield alias John Oneale was acquitted: the five other culprits were found 'Guilty,' and sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 17 April, 24 Charles II.

14 April, 24 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St.-Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, on view of the body of John Bull gentleman, there lying dead and slain: With Verdict of jurors saying that, on the 13th inst. at the said parish, John Skelton gentleman and Claudius de Vosse Harris laborer, both late of the parish aforesaid, assaulted the aforesaid John Bull, and that John Skelton killed and murdered him, by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the left thigh near the groin, of which wound the said John Bull gentleman languished from 7 a.m. of the same 13th April, 24 Charles II., to 10 a.m. of the same day, at which last-named hour he died of the said wound; and that the aforesaid Claudius De Voss Harris was present at the said murder, and was aiding and abetting the said John Skelton to commit it. G. D. R., 17 April, Charles II.

1 May, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day, John Walkins, Roger Nayle alias Neale, John Phitton, James Bonden and Robert Orter, all five late of the said parish weavers, assembled riotously with other disturbers of the peace, to the number of five hundred persons to the jurors unknown, and then and there assaulted Francis Anguish, and unlawfully and riotously broke into the dwelling-house of the same Francis, and broke and spoiled seven pewter potts worth twelve shillings, three pewter quartern potts worth two shillings, three pewter cupps worth twelve pence, one pewter dish worth two shillings, three pewter pottengers worth four shillings and sixpence, a pewter bason worth two shillings and sixpence, two brass candlesticks worth four shillings, a cambrick whisk laced worth forty shillings, a holland neckerchiefe laced worth five shillings, eighteen gallons of sider worth thirty shillings, six dozen of earthen bottles of ale worth twenty-eight shillings, twenty gallons of ale worth ten shillings, and three barrels of strong beere worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Francis Anguish then and there being found in his said dwelling-house. Found 'Guilty,' each of the five rioters named in the indictment was fined in the amount of thirteen shillings and four pence. John Phitton and James Bonden each paid the fine to the sheriff: each of the other three rioters was committed to prison, there to remain until he should have paid his fine. S. P. R., 21 May, 24 Charles II.

1 June, 24 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Bayles esq. J.P., of George Corr of Lower Wapping in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. brewer and of Robert Strongrome of Ratcliffe in Stepney aforesaid scrivener, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Richard Read of Stepney gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds: For the said Richard Read's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to "answeare the accusation of Robert Catchpole for words spoken by the said Read against his Majisties late Declaration and publishing false news." S. P. R., 1 July, 24 Charles II.

11 June, 24 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Charles Pitfield esq. J.P. on the said day, of Thomas Shard of St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Thomas Shard's appearance at the next Generall Quarter Session of Peace and Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, then and there to prefer an indictment "against John Morris, now a prisoner in Newgate, for dangerously wounding of Phillip Gore a merchant, who languisheth, and also one other inditement for unlawfully impressing diverse persons (under pretence of being a PressMaster, but haveing no warrant for the same), and afterwards for smale reward dischargeing them againe." S. P. R., 1 July, 24 Charles II.

10 July, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Gerrard White late of the said parish laborer assaulted a certain Fulke Grosvenor upon the highway, and robbed him of a sword with a silver handle worth fifty shillings, and a hat worth six shillings, and a perywigg worth three pounds and ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of the aforesaid Fulke Grosvenor. Found 'Guilty,' Gerrard White was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 6 Sept., 24 Charles II.

15 July, 24 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Peter Sabbs esq. J.P., of Robert Peete of St. Lawrence's Jewry in London leatherseller and John Bartlay of St. Bartholomew's the Greater pinn-maker, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of George Mynn of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. barber at the next Session of the Peace for the said county, "To answer for the being suspected to have stolen an eleven shilling peece of gold from Edmond Ward, which was given him by the King about six years since, when toucht for the Evill." S.P.R., 4 Sept., 24 Charles II.

1 September, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martins-in-the Fields co. Midd. on the said day and at divers other times before and after the said day, Robert Duke alias Dukes, late of the said parish yeoman, obstinately and of his own authority, without any licence obtained and had by order of Justices of the Peace, &c., did sell and retayle certain drinks (quosdam liquores) called "Coffee Chocolate Sherbet and Tea" to divers persons to the aforesaid jurors unknown.— Also, on fourteen other parchments, on the same file, True Bills against Geoffrey Kirkham late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields yeoman, John Woodbourne alias Woodbine late of the same parish yeoman, William Peter alias Peters late of the same parish yeoman, Anne Dukeson late of the same parish widow, Patrick Wemmes late of the same parish yeoman, John Wemmes late of St. Paul's Covent Garden yeoman, Joseph Munday late of the last-named parish yeoman, Thomas Phipps late of the last-named parish yeoman, George Mareman late of St. Martin's-le-Grand London yeoman, Thomas Jackson late of the lastnamed parish yeoman, Jeremiah Andrews late of St. Clement's Danes yeoman, Thomas Eaton late of the last-named parish yeoman, William Sherwood late of the last-named parish yeoman, and Thomas George late of St. Mary's Savoy yeoman, for "selling and retayling quosdam liquores vocatos Coffee Chocolate Sherbet and Tea" to divers persons to the jurors unknown. No clerical note touching subsequent proceedings in the case appears on any-one of these bills. S. P. West R., 2 Oct., 24 Charles II.

2 September, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Nortonfolgate co. Midd. on the said day, Abigal Abbott late of Nortonfolgate aforesaid spinster stole and carried off a silver beaker worth thirty shillings, a silver taster worth six shillings, a silver tobacco-box worth thirty shillings, a scarf worth five shillings, two silk hoods worth five shillings, a silk apron worth three shillings, a cambrick cravatt laced worth five shillings, a cambrick band laced worth three shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Grant. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of ten shillings. Abigal Abbott was branded according to the statute. G. D. R, 6 Sept., 24 Charles II.

21 September, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, and at other times before and after the said day, Thomas Browne late of the said parish yeoman, for the sake of unlawful gain and profit kept and maintained at his dwelling house unlawful games with balls and dice, "et quemdam alium lusum vocatum Hazard." No minute of subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. West. R., 2 Oct. 24 Charles II.

29 September, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Covent Garden co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Hurst barber and John Rayment poulterer, both late of the said parish, lured seduced and persuaded Thomas Lawrence to enter a certain tavern in the said parish, commonly called The Crosse Keys Taverne, and there "deponere anglice to wage" with them on a certain trick with painted cards "anglice, a slight with cards vocat' Preaching the Parson," and so by artifice and cunning cheated the same Thomas Lawrence of four pounds in numbered money, of the goods and moneys of the said Thomas Lawrence. Putting themselves 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country, on 13 Jan. 1672, Edward Hurst and John Rayment were found 'Not Guilty.' S. P. R., 9 Dec., 24 Charles II.

4 October, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Chelsey co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Gwin late of the said parish laborer unlawfully and hurtfully tore off, took and carried away ninety pounds of lead worth seven pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Right Hon. Anthony Ashley, Earl Shaftesbury, then and there affixed to the freehold of the same Anthony Ashley, Earl of Shaftesbury. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Gwin was sentenced to pay a fine of three pounds, six shillings and eightpence, and to remain in prison until the said fine should be paid. G. D. R., 16 Oct., 24 Charles II.

29 October, 24 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Bennett esq. J.P. on the said day, of Edward Hodges taylor and Josiah Haynes victualler, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Mary Turner of the same parish spinster, in the sum of forty pounds: For the said Mary Turner's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for the City and liberty of Westminster, "to answer to the prosecution of George Fingall of the Post-House and Lewis Pew servant to Colonel Whitley for keeping a post office for the reception of letters without warrant."—Also, on the same file, Recognizances, taken before the same J.P. on 1 Oct. 24 Charles II.: For the appearance of George Fingall of the Post-House gentleman and Lewis Pew, servant to Colonel Whitley, at the next Session of the Peace for the City and Liberty of Westminster, "then and there to prosecute Mary Turner of the parish of St. Martins-in-the-Fields, for keeping a Post Office for reception of all letters without lycence from the General Post House." S. P. West. R., 9 Jan., 24 Charles II.

1 December, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Bride's in the Ward of Farringdon-without-London, William Lodge late of the said parish gentleman assaulted one Richard Ashwyn, and with both his hands cast and threw him to the ground, and further that, after throwing him to the ground, the said William Lodge with his hands and feet beat, struck and kicked the said Richard Ashwyn on on the head, neck, breast, belly, sides and back of the said Richard Ashwyn, whilst he was then lying on the ground, of which beating and kicking the said Richard Ashwyn languished at St. Bride's aforesaid and at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. from the said 1 Dec, 24 Charles II. to the 8th day of May next following, on which 8 May, 25 Charles II. he died of the said kicking and beating; And that in so dealing with Richard Ashwyn aforesaid, the same William Lodge slew and murdered him.—Acquitted of murder, William Lodge was found 'Guilty' of manslaughter; whereupon the Court determined to deliberate on the case till next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 14 May, 25 Charles II.

10 December, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney, co Midd. on the said day, Mary Newport the wife of Richard Newport late of said parish yeoman alias Mary Newport late of the said parish spinster, assaulted Mary Holmer and unlawfully conveyed her to a ship called The Flying Hind, then lying in the river Thames, and subsequently transported her in the same ship to the Island of Jamaica without the consent and against the will of the said Mary Holmer, with the intention of selling her in the said island. Arraigned on this charge on 24 February, 1672, Mary Newport confessed the indictment, and was sentenced to pay a fine of twenty marks. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 24 Charles II.

23 December, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, between 5 and 6 a.m. Richard Lamb and Charles Turnour, both late of the said parish laborers, feloniously and burglariously broke into the dwelling-house of the Right Hon. Philip Earl Chesterfeild, and stole and carried away from the same house a silver cesterne worth three-hundred-and-eighty-pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Earl. . . . . Putting himself on trial on 14 May, 25 Charles II. Richard Lamb was found 'Not Guilty.' The bill exhibits no clerical note, touching further proceedings against Charles Turnour. G. D. R., 9 April, 25 Charles II.