Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1673

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

38-45

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1673', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 38-45. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66080 Date accessed: 16 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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1673

14 January, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Finchley, co. Midd. on the said day, Symon Jones late of the said parish gentleman assaulted James Henley on the highway, and then and there robbed him of six hundred yards of thread bone-lace worth seventy pounds, and a box worth three pounds, and a cloak-bagg worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said James Henley. Found 'Guilty,' Symon Jones gentleman was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 26 Feb., 25 Charles II.

20 January, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Dunstan's-in-the West co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Milbourne gentleman and John Featherstone-Haugh gentleman, both late of the said parish, common players at cards and common cheats and defrauders of the King's Majesties liege people, in order to sustain the vain and evil courses of their lives, lured and enticed one Thomas Kidwell, late of the same parish gentleman, to play at cards with them at a game called 'Put,' and in playing the said game with him craftily and fraudulently cheated him of seven pounds in numbered money, of the proper money of the said Thomas Kidwell. On 7 April, 1673, Thomas Milbourne put himself on a jury of the country and was found 'Not Guilty.' No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case against John Featherstone-Haugh. S. P. R., 24 Feb., 25 Charles II.

24 January, 24 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Philip Mathews esq. J.P., of John Bond cordwayner and Margaret Beck widow, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, in the sum of ten pounds each: For the appearance of a certain Richard Grace at the next Session of the Peace to be held at Hicks Hall, "then and there to answer for the haunting and frequent playing at The Wheele of Fortune in Covent Garden."—Also, on the same file, two other sets of Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of Mathew Douty and Nathaniel Ryder at the same next Session of the Peace, "to answer for being taken playing at The Wheele of Fortune in Covent Garden." S. P. R., 24 Feb., 25 Charles II.

25 January, 24 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Vyner late of the said parish gentleman stole and carried off three silver tankards worth fourteen pounds, four silver cups worth six pounds, eleven silver pottengers worth thirteen pounds, two silver saltsellers worth eight pounds, a silver trencher salt-seller worth ten shillings, three silver beakers worth five pounds, four silver Belly Cupps worth twenty-two pounds, ten silver wine-cupps worth seven pounds, five silver sugar dishes worth five pounds, twenty-four silver spoones worth thirteen pounds, eight silver money-boxes worth thirty-five shillings, thirteen silver medalls worth thirty shillings, three silver wine-tasters worth four pounds, two little silver spoones worth eight shillings, three silver hat-bands worth . . . . shillings, thirty-two gold rings set with precious stones worth one hundred and fifty pounds, four necklaces of pearles worth twenty pounds, twelve rough diamonds worth twelve pounds, nineteen jewells worth twenty pounds, a gold bodkin set with nine diamonds worth ten pounds, of the goods and chattels of John Perrin. The clerical note at the head of the indictment runs thus, "Po se cul ca nul cre in London et pet transpor' T'o rem quia Cur advisare vult usq" = he puts himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury, and the jurors say that he is 'Guilty,' he has no chattels for forfeiture, and has been branded in former time in London; whereupon he begs to be transported, and therefore remains in prison till next Gaol Delivery, because the Court wishes to deliberate on the case. G. D. R., 23 February, 24 Charles II.

28 January, 24 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Richard . . . . on the said day, of Thomas Jorden and Thomas Cellier both of St. Andrew's Holborne brewers, in the sum of one thousand pounds each, and of John Phillips of St. Sepulchre's London brasier, and Daniell Norton of St. Bartholomew's-the-Great London, . . . . and Samuell Wells of Greenehith London salter, and Richard Fincher of St. Sepulchre's London salter, and John Wilcox of St. Sepulchre's aforesaid salter, and Henry Lavender of St. Sepulchre's aforesaid vintner, in the sum of five hundred pounds each: For the appearance of the said Thomas Jorden and Thomas Cellier at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to be holden at the Justice Hall in the Old Bailey. G. D. R., 26 Feb., 25 Charles II.

6 February, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's Savoy co. Midd. on the said day, William Pyers gentleman, James Pringle gentleman, John Trotter gentleman, Arthur Grey gentleman, Alexander Citterne gentleman, and Charles Mackmath labourer, all six late of the said parish, assaulted Alexander Hume esq. otherwise styled Alexander Earl Hume, and that William Pyers fired a pistol loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet at the said Alexander Earl Hume, and thereby gave the said Earl Hume in the right arme-hole a mortal wound of which the said Earl languished at the aforesaid parish and at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields from the said 6th February, 25 Charles II. to the 9th day of the same month, on which day the said Earl died of the said wound at the last-named parish, having been in the aforesaid manner slain and murdered by the said William Pyers; And that the aforesaid James Pringle, John Trotter, Arthur Grey, Alexander Citterne and Charles Mackmath were present at the said murder, encouraging aiding and abetting the said William Pyers to perpetrate it. Putting themseves on trial, William Pyers, Arthur Grey, and Charles Macmath were found 'Not Guilty.' The Bill exhibits no further clerical notes touching James Pringle, John Trotter and Alexander Citterne.—Also, on the same file, the Coroner's Inquisition, taken on the eleventh day of February, 25 Charles II., on view of the said Earl Hume's body, for the cause &c. of his death. G. D. R., 26 Feb. 25 Charles II.

11 March, 25 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Philipp Mathews bart. J.P., of John Edwards of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields waterbearer and Simon Bird of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields water-bearer, in the sum of five pounds each, and David Davis of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields porter, in the sum of ten pounds: For the appearance of the said David Davis at the next Session of the Peace for the city and liberties of Westminster, "to answer for being taken late at night by the watch of St. Paul's Covent Garden, endeavouring to bilk a hackney coachman and assaulting him." S. P. West. R., 2 April, 25 Charles II.

26 March, 25 Charles II.—True Bill against Frances Bedingfield late of Fulham co. Midd. spinster, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer during nine months beginning on the aforesaid day.—At the head of the bill appears this marginal minute, to wit, "Postea 27°. Apr. 1674, po se Et 15° Julij 1674 Jura' cul Finitur clxxx li. sedm form' statut, extrahi et adtunc extract' fuit in Scac' D'ni R'is"=Afterwards on 27th April, 1674, she puts herself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country: And on 15th July, 1674, the Jurors say that she is 'Guilty'; she is fined 180£. according to the form of the statute. To be estreated and it was then estreated into the Exchequer of the Lord the King. S. P. R., 7 Jan., 25 Charles II.

27 March, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Fulham co. Midd. on the said day and continually from the said day down to the day of the present inquisition, to wit, 7th January then next following in the aforesaid year, being two hundred and eighty-six days, Frances Bedingfield late of the said parish spinster of her own authority unlawfully took upon herself to keep, and throughout all the aforesaid time did keep "quandam scholam pro educacione ac gubernacione adolescentularum anglice of young woemen, Et in eadem schola adtunc fuit Magistra anglice School-mistress (dicta schola adtunc non existente infra aliquam Universitatem vel Collegium hujus Regni Anglie nec adtunc existente communi vel libera Schola Grammatica anglice a publick or free Grammar Schoole, nec eadem Francisca Bedingfeild adtunc custodiente dictam Scholam in aliqua domo talis Primatis viri anglice Nobleman vel Primatis femine anglice Noblewoman vel Generosi anglice Gentleman sive Generose anglice Gentlewoman qualis adtunc non fuit recusans anglice a Recusant, nec eadem Francisca adtunc existente specialiter licentiata abinde per Archiepiscopum Episcopum vel Guardianum spiritualitatum anglice of the Spiritualities ejusdem diocesis." On 27th April, 1674, Frances Bedingfeild put herself on a jury of the country; and on 15th July, 1674, the jurors declare her 'Not Guilty.' S. P. R., 7 Jan., 25 Charles II.

28 April, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, William Ivie late of the said parish gentleman assaulted a certain William Pew, and slew and murdered him by 'discharging and shooting off' at him a pistol loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, and thereby giving him a mortal wound in his left shoulder with the bullet so discharged from the said pistol, of which wound he then and there instantly died. Confessing the indictment, William Ivie was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 14 May, 25 Charles II.

20 May, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Brockhurst late of the said parish gentleman assaulted one Thomas Slynehead, and slew and murdered him, by giving him with a constable's staffe a mortal wound on the left side of his head, of which wound the said Thomas Slynehead languished from one a.m. of the said 20th May to eight a.m. of the same day, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields aforesaid and at St. Giles's-in-theFields, at which last named hour, he died of the said wound. Francis Brockhurst was found 'Not Guilty.'—Also, on the same file, the Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem for the cause of the said Thomas Slynehead's death, with verdict of jurors &c., saying that Thomas Slynehead and other disturbers of the peace assembled riotously between midnight and one a.m. of the said day in Newport Street at the aforesaid parish, within the Liberties of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster; that in the exercise of his office of High Constable of the said Liberties the aforesaid Francis Brockhurst was with his 'watch' endeavouring to disperse the same riotous assembly, when he was opposed and hindered by the said Thomas Slynehead; and that the same High Constable, whilst endeavouring to suppress the said nightbrawl and acting in the mere performance of his duty, gave Thomas Slynehead the blow, of which he died at the ninth (sic) hour a.m. of the said day. G. D. R., 27 June, 25 Charles II.

21 May, 25 Charles II.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during eleven months beginning on the said day, against Susan Bevin widow, Margaret Betly widow, Elizabeth Betly spinster, Elizabeth Higgs widow, Lawrence Bancum yeoman, Michael Rackett yeoman, Hester Vincitayler spinster, Walter Bradnick chapman, Michael Deyle laborer, Patrick Gibbons laborer, Roger Kelley laborer, Bryan Royley gentleman, William Simpson laborer, William Hambleton laborer, Robert Welsh laborer, Richard Phenix laborer, William Limmer laborer, and Edward Savage chapman, all eighteen late of Whitechappell co. Midd. S. P. R., 27 April, 26 Charles II.

24 May, 25 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer during eleven months, beginning on the said day, against Peter Vascall yeoman, Lawrence Vanham yeoman, Elizabeth Exam wife of Robert Exam yeoman, Francis Briggman yeoman, John Rogers yeoman, his wife Elizabeth Rogers, Margaret Batt wife of Richard Batt yeoman, Morgan Swiney barber, James Briggmann yeoman, his wife Elizabeth Briggmann, and Thomas Bishopan yeoman all eleven late of St. Katherines co. Midd. S. P. R., 27 April, 26 Charles II.

10 June, 25 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Pitfield esq. J.P. on the said day, of John Thinn gardener and Henry Cratch weaver, both of Hackney co. Midd., in ihe sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Elizabeth Row, wife of Samuel Row of Hackney aforesaid victualler, at the next Session of Peace for Middlesex, to answer to all such matters as shall be "objected against her by John Tinson who accuses her of having an evill tongue, and is by him vehemently suspected to have feloniously bewitched his cow and other of his cattel to death." S. P. R., 25 June, 25 Charles II.

12 June, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, William Kirton late of the said parish laborer stole and carried away a trunk worth four shillings, four watches with silver cases worth thirty pounds, ninety-two peices of coined gold called twenty-shilling pieces of guiny gold worth ninety-eight pounds, eighteen twenty-shilling pieces of broad gold worth twenty pounds, five other pieces of coined gold worth thirty-five shillings, a silver medall worth five shillings, and ninety-nine pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods, chattels and moneys of a certain Mary Haddocke; and that Mathew Coppinger gentleman and Laurence Welch grocer, both late of the said parish, on the said 12 th June, encouraged and aided the said William Kirton to commit the said felony; and that, knowing him to have perpetrated the said felony, the aforesaid Mathew Coppinger and Laurence Welch on the same 12 th of June harboured the same William Kirton; And that on the same 12th of June, knowing him to have committed the said felony, Cornelius Dannovan, late of St. Dunstan'sin-the-West co. Midd. laborer, entertained and harboured the same William Kirton. Confessing the indictment, William Kirton was sentenced to be hanged, because he could not read. Found 'Guilty,' Coppinger, Welch and Dannovan all three pleaded their clergy and were branded.—N.B. Observe the variances of this bill and the next following bill. G. D. R., 27 June, 25 Charles II.

12 June, 25 Charlel II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, William Kirton laborer, Matthew Coppinger gentleman, and Laurence Welch grocer, all three late of the said parish, stole and carried away a trunk worth four shillings, four watches with silver cases worth thirty pounds, and two hundred and twenty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Mary Haddock spinster. Confessing the indictment William Kirton was sentenced to be hanged, because he could not read ('Cogn' Sus quia non legit,' runs the clerical note over his name in the indictment): Matthew Coppinger and Laurence Welch were found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R. 27 June, 25 Charles II.

23 July, 25 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Josiah Ricroft esq. J.P. on the said day, of John Boycoat senior of Marybone co. Midd. yeoman and William Mercer of St. Dunstan's London haberdasher, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of John Boycoat the Younger at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answer the complaint of Mary Boycoat, for spiritting her aboard the ship Amity bound for Barbados, and by force carrying her aboard the sayd ship, to carry her beyond seas against her consent."—Also, on the same file, Recognizances, taken before the same Justice of the Peace on the same day, for the appearance of Elizabeth Russell at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex to answer to what shall be objected against her "on the complaint of Mary Boycoat, for spiritting her aboard the shipp Amity bound for Barbadoes, and by force carrying her aboard the said ship, in order to carry her beyond sea against her consent." S. P. R., 3 Sept., 25 Charles II.

27 July, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at.St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day, Lewis Thomas gentleman, Arnold Williams gentleman, and James Du Bor gentleman, all three late of the said parish, assaulted one Richard Adams, and that the said Lewis Thomas gentleman slew and murdered the said Richard Adams, by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound on his right thigh, of which wound the said Richard Adams then and there instantly died: And that Arnold Williams and James Du Bor encouraged and aided Lewis Thomas to commit the said murder. Found 'Guilty,' Lewis Thomas was sentenced to be hanged: and Arnold Williams was acquitted. The clerical notes on the bill give no further particulars touching James Du Bor. G. D. R., 5 Sept., 25 Charles II.

15 August, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Salusbury late of the said parish gentleman, assaulted Edward Butler, and slew and murdered him, by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the right side of his breast, of which wound the said Edward Butler then and there instantly died. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Thomas Salusbury pleaded his clergy effectually and was branded. G. D. R., 5 Sept., 25 Charles II.

23 August, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd., on the said day between 4 and 5 p.m., John Wright and William Cooke otherwise styled William Godward, both late of the said parish, unlawfully entered the dwelling-house of the most illustrious Prince James, Duke of York, and with false keys attempted to open the lock of a certain chamber of the said dwelling-house, with the intention of stealing and carrying away the goods and chattels in the same chamber. Found 'Guilty,' John Wright was fined twenty marks and required to find sureties for his good behaviour; and Will Cooke was acquitted of the charge. G. D. R., 5 Sept., 25 Charles II.

27 August, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Shadwell co. Midd. on the said day, Nathaniel Fermedge late of the said parish laborer, in the presence and hearing of divers of the King's lieges, openly uttered these words, to wit, 'I have had fireballs in my pockett and I will have more,' to the great alarm and terror of very many of the king's faithful subjects. Nathaniel Fermedge was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 5 Sept., 25 Charles II.

1 September, 25 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Runborne gentleman, Nathan Layton gentleman and Richard Edwards gentleman, all three late of the said parish, assaulted a certain Thomas Brangman, and that Henry Runborne aforesaid slew and murdered the said Thomas Brangman, by giving him with a rapier a wound in the short ribs, of which wound the said Thomas Brangman languished at the said parish from 1 Sept., 25 Charles II. to the 4th of the same month, on which last named day he died of the same wound: And That the said Nathan Layton gentleman and Richard Edwards gentleman were present at the said murder, and encouraging and aiding Henry Runborne to commit it.—Also, on the same file, the Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem for the cause of the said Thomas Brangman's death. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Henry Runborne, Nathan Layton and Richard Edwards, gentlemen, all three pleaded their clergy effectually, and were branded. G. D. R., 5 Sept., 25 Charles II.