Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1675

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

57-70

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1675', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 57-70. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66082 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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1675

9 January, 26 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Covent Garden co. Midd. on the said day, Silvester Goodfellow late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Katherine Terry spinster, and slew and murdered her by feloniously discharging at her a pistol loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, and thereby giving her in her left shoulder a mortal wound, of which she then and there instantly died. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Silvester Goodfellow gentleman pleaded his clergy effectually and was branded. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 27 Charles II.

. . . . ., 26 Charles II.—Imperfect and much defaced Recusants' Convictions Roll, comprising sixteen membranes stitched book-wise, of Charles the Second's 26th year. This roll exhibits the names and particulars of the recusancy of 580 individuals indicted at Hicks Hall in the said year and there convicted of forbearing to come to church &c. during terms varying from one to eleven months,—the said misdemeanants being described as late of one or another of the following parishes or liberties of Middlesex, to wit, St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, St. Paul's Covent Garden, St. Margaret's Westminster, St. Giles's-in-theFields, St. Leonard's Shoreditch, the Liberty of the Rolls, St. Clement's Danes', St. Mary-le-Savoy, St. Katherine's Precinct, Whitechappell, St. Paul's Shadwell, Spittlefields, St. John's Street co. Midd., Norton Folgate, Fulham. The 580 misdemeanants comprised the following 54 persons, who were either of gentle quality or of a social degree superior to that of mere gentility, to wit, (1) Ralph Haggerston gentleman, (2) Lady Mary St. John, (3) Christopher Cock gentleman, (4) James Windebanke gentleman, (5) the Lord Dunbar, (6) Charles Benifeild esquire, (7) . . . . . Peters gentleman, (8) Gabriel Cox gentleman, (9) the Countess Clenrickard, (10) . . . . Devanlet gentleman, (11) . . . . Bonnylick gentleman, (12) Robert Wywell gentleman, (13) Monsr Teverman gentleman, (14) John Carleton gentleman, (15) Robert Tennickes gentleman, (16) Sir Thomas Bond knt., (17) Charles Carrington esq., (18) Edward Shelton esquire, (19) Thomas St. John gentleman, (20) John Cowse gentleman, (21) Constantine Rodoconawe gentleman, (22) Francis Deplisse gentleman, (23) Edward Yarmouth gentleman, (24) Edward Mullylax gentleman, (25) William Gully gentleman, (26) Anthony Brochas gentleman, (27) David Raverick gentleman, (28) Frances Beddingfield spinster, (29) John Porter gentleman, (30) Rambonnett Delamott surgeon, (31) George Pariston gentleman, (32) George Sheldon gentleman, (33) Lyonell Frogmorton gentleman, (34) Richard Allibone esquire, (35) Robert Freeman gentleman, (36) Benedict Price gentleman, (37) Arthur Ashfield gentleman, (38) Francis Griffith gentleman, (39) the Countess of Abergeny (sic), (40) John Weld gentleman, (41) the Lord Strutton (sic), (42) Thomas Gulford gentleman, (43) John Disborough gentleman, (44) Charles Hickford gentleman, (45) Baptist De Casy gentleman, (46) Peter Levett gentleman, (47) John Watkins gentleman, (48) Mathew Lock gentleman, (49) William Beeston gentleman, (50) Ralph Langham gentleman, (51) Lady Child, (52) William Salwin gentleman, (53) Sir Morgan Swiney bart., and (54) Bryan Royley gentleman.

Most of the 580 misdemeanants were indicted for keeping away from church for no more than a single month, and on conviction forfeited only one sum of 20£; but whilst several were accused and found guilty of forbearing to come to church &c. for two or three consecutive months, a considerable minority were convicted of refraining from coming to common prayer for still longer periods. Found guilty of having neglected to go to church chapel or any other usual place of common prayer during the nine months beginning on 26 March, 25 Charles II., Frances Beddingfeild late of Fulham co. Midd. spinster, forfeited the sum of 180£. Convicted of having offended in like manner for eleven months, Laurence Vanham late of St. Katherine's yeoman, Elizabeth Exham wife of Robert Exham late of St. Katherine's yeoman, Francis Brigman of St. Katherine's yeoman, Elizabeth Rogers wife of John Rogers, Margaret Batt wife of Richard Batt late of St. Katherine's yeoman, Sir Morgan Swiney late of St. Katherine's bart. (?), James Briggman late of St. Katherine's yeoman, Elizabeth Briggman wife of the same James Briggman, Thomas Bishpan late of St. Katherine's yeoman, Susan Bevin late of Whitechappell widow, Margaret Bettly late of Whitechappell widow, Elizabeth Bettly late of Whitechappell spinster, Elizabeth Higgs late of Whitechappell widow, Laurence Bancum late of Whitechappell yeoman, Michael Hackett late of Whitechappell yeoman, Hester Vincitayler late of Whitechappell spinster, Walter Bradwick late of Whitechappell chapman, Michael Doyle late of Whitechappell labourer, Patrick Gibbons late of Whitechappell labourer, Roger Kelley late of Whitechappell labourer, Bryan Royley of Whitechappell gentleman, William Sympson late of Whitechappell labourer, William Hambleton late of Whitechappell labourer, Robert Welsh late of Whitechappell labourer, Richard Phenix late of Whitechappell labourer, William Summers late of Whitechappell labourer, Edward Savage late of Whitechappell yeoman, all and each had judgment of having forfeited 220£, the sum of the twenty-seven several forfeitures of 220£ amounting to 5,940£, equivalent to about 29,700£ of Victorian money. R. C. R., 26 Charles II.

1 April, 27 Charles II.—True Bill. for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer during three months, beginning on the said day, against Thomas Smith victualler and Christopher Hill shoemaker, both of St. Mary's-le-Savoy co. Midd. S. P. R., 5 July, 27 Charles II.

4 April, 27 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during three months beginning on the said day, against Anne Nuttall late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. Over Anne Nuttall's name appears a clerical minute at the head of the indictment, to this effect, "Proclamation was made according to the form of the statute, and afterwards, to wit, on 8th October, 1675, she was convicted, and her forfeiture was estreated in the Lord King's Exchequer." S. P. R., 5 July, 27 Charles II.

2 May, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. James's Clerkenwell on the said day, Samuel Swan late of the said parish gentleman, after marrying a certain Dorothy Keene at St. Mary's Sumersett London on 24 August, 26 Charles II., and whilst his said wife Dorothy was still living, married Anne Chedwick at the parish of Abbington co. Northampton on the aforesaid 2 May, 27 Charles II. Found 'Guilty,' Samuel Swan asked for the book, read it, and was branded. G. D. R., 19 May, 27 Charles II.

14 May, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Peter Smith late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Claude Duroach, and slew and murdered him, by giving him with a sword a mortal wound in the right side of his belly, of which wound he languished in the aforesaid parish and in St. Margaret's Westminster, from the said 14th May to the 17 th day of the same month, on which last-named day he died of the said wound. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Peter Smith pleaded his clergy effectually, and was branded. G. D. R., 19 May, 27 Charles II.

10 June, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day and at divers other times before and afterwards, John Worseley late of the said parish traitorously endeavoured to persuade and withdraw one . . . . . Wheeler of the said parish curryer from the obedience he ought to render the king, and also to withdraw the same Wheeler from the religion established by law in this kingdom to the Roman religion. No clerical notes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 11 Dec, 30 Charles II.

11 June, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Pancras co. Midd. on the said day, John Pattison, Thomas Griggs and Robert Taylor, all three late of the said parish laborers, assaulted James Smithsbey gentleman on the highway, and then and there robbed him of a gold watch with a studded case worth ten pounds, a gold ring worth twelve shillings, four pieces of coined gold called "ginneyes" worth four pounds and six shillings, and three shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said James Smithsbey. Found 'Guilty,' all three highwaymen were sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

22 June, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Lillyman, wife of William Lillyman late of the said parish labourer, assaulted her said husband, and slew and murdered him, by giving him with a knife a mortal wound on the left side of his breast, of which wound he then and there died instantly.— On the bill's face, over Elizabeth Lillyman's name appears this clerical note, to wit, 'Po se ca nl' trahi ad locum executionis et ib'm cum igne comburi' = She puts herself on a jury and is found 'Guilty'; she has no chattels: Adjudged to be drawn to the place of execution, and there to be burnt with fire. G. D. R., 5 July, 27 Charles II.

1 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during four months beginning on the said day, against Thomas Sambourne, late of St. Margaret's Westminster, gentleman. S. P. West. R., 7 January, 27 Charles II.

8 August, 27 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Pitfeild esq. J.P. on the said day, of Thomas Hall of St. Butolph's-without-Bishopsgate London silke-weaver and John Pierce of St. Leonard's Shoreditch silke-weaver, in the sum of forty pounds each, and Robert Briggs of St. Leonard's Shoreditch silke-weaver, in the sum of one hundred pounds: For the appearances of the said Robert Briggs at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "to what shall be objected against him by William Crouch, Thomas Barker and others, who charge and accuse him of combining, plotting and contriving with other silkeweavers, unlawfully and riotously to assemble together and forceably to enter diverse men's houses, there to breake down and destroy their Engine Loomes." S. P. R., 6 Sept., 27 Charles II.

9 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, John Tateham, John Hicks, John Munday, Isaac Jones, William Bloodworth, John Armestrong, and Richard Hunt, all seven late of the said parish laborers assaulted Robert Viscount Yarmouth on the highway and then and there robbed him of a beaver hatt worth thirty shillings, a perrywigg worth three pounds, a silver-hilted sword worth three pounds, an embroidered belt with gold and silver upon taffaty worth thirty shillings, two pieces of coined gold called ginneys worth forty-three shillings, and nine shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Viscount Yarmouth.—John Hicks was acquitted. Found 'Guilty,' Richard Tateham, John Munday and Isaac Jones were sentenced to be hanged. No clerical notes appear on the indictment over the names of William Bloodworth, John Armstrong and Richard Hunt. G. D. R., 8 Dec, 27 Charles II.

9 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, William Piercey late of the said parish laborer, a disaffected and seditious person, together with other disturbers of the peace, to the number of forty persons unlawfully broke into the house of John Hascor, and took unlawful possession of a wooden machine called 'an Engine Weaving Loome' worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said John Hascor, and unlawfully carried it off, placed it in the highway, and there set fire to it and totally destroyed it; And That the said William Piercey then and there made a dangerous tumult, lasting for halfan-hour. William Hascor having put himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury, the Court decided to deliberate on the matter. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

9 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, William Peircey late of Stepney aforesaid laborer, a disaffected and seditious person, together with other disturbers of the peace to the number of one hundred persons, unlawfully broke into the dwellinghouse of a certain John King, and then and there unlawfully took possession of five machines called 'Engine-Weaving-Loomes' worth thirty pounds, and two ounces of silke worth five shillings, and two joynt-stooles worth three shillings, and a pair of 'Rices to wind silke on' worth four shillings, and 'unam rotam Harpedon anglice vocatam a winding wheele' worth seven shillings, and a matted chaire worth twelve pence of the goods and chattels of the said John King, and unlawfully carried off the said goods and chattels and put them in the high-way, and there set fire to them and totally destroyed them; And That the said William Piercey then and there made a dangerous tumult, lasting for an hour. Found 'Guilty' William Piercey was fined five hundred marks, and was committed to prison there to remain till he should have paid the fine, and was also sentenced to stand on the pillory from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on three several days, to wit, on a market-day in the street of Holborne near Chancery Lane, on another day in the Strond near the Maypoll, and on a third day in St. John's Street near the Bars, with a paper on his hat, setting forth his offense. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

10 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd., John Layton laborer, Samuel Walters yeoman, Arthur West laborer, Robert Stockley laborer, Thomas Barnes yeoman, William Nicholls yeoman, Sara Hill wife of Robert Hill laborer, Joan Browne wife of William Browne laborer, Jane Utherstone wife of Thomas Utherston yeoman, all nine late of the said parish, assembled riotously together with other disturbers of peace to the number of one hundred persons, and unlawfully broke into the dwellinghouse of a certain James Moore, and then and there took possession of four wooden machines called 'Engine Weaving Loomes,' worth thirty pounds, of the goods and chattels of the same James Moore, and unlawfully carried off the same looms, put them in the highway, and there set fire to them and utterly destroyed them: And that the same aforesaid rioters made a dangerous tumult, that lasted for four hours.—Found 'Guilty,' Robert Stockley was fined five hundred marks, committed to prison there to remain till he should have paid the same fine, and was also sentenced to stand on the pillory from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on three several days, to wit, on one day in Holborne, on another day in the Strand near the Maypole, and on the third day in St. John's Street near the Bars. No clerical notes over the names of the other persons, charged by the indictment.— G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

10 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day and on the occasion of the unlawful and forcible entry made by rioters into the dwelling-house of William Crouch in the said parish, Richard Humphreyes, one of the Serjeants under the command of Sir Thomas Byde knt., Captayne of one of the trayned bands for Middlesex, then appointed and present for the suppression of the tumult &c., forbore to exert himself duly to suppress the same tumult and to apprehend rioters taking part in it. Over the name of Richard Humphreys appears this clerical note, to wit, 'Cessat process' p' ordin' Attonat' Gen' = Process is stayed by order of the Attorney General. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

10 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Digby Miller late of the said parish laborer, a seditious and disaffected person, together with other disturbers of the peace to the number of two hundred persons, unlawfully broke into the dwellinghouse of a certain Robert Bowes, and there unlawfully took possession of ten wooden machines called 'Engine-weaving Loomes' worth one hundred and twenty pounds, and four ounces of silke worth twelve shillings, and carried the same loomes and silke to Stepney, and there unlawfully placed them in the highway, and there set fire to them and totally destroyed them; And that the said Digby Miller then and there caused a dangerous tumult, lasting for an hour and a half. Found 'Guilty,' Digby Miller was fined five hundred marks, and was committed to prison until the said fine should be paid, and was also sentenced to stand on the pillory on three several days, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., to wit, on a market-day, in the street of Holborne near Chancery Lane; on another market-day, in the Strond near the Maypoll; and on a third day in St. John's Streete near the Barrs, with a paper affixed to his hat, showing his offense. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

10 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shorditch co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Stockly late of the said parish laborer, a seditious and disaffected person, together with other disturbers of the Peace to the number of one hundred persons, unlawfully broke into the dwellinghouse of one William Crouch, and there took possession of 'duas functiones ligneorum instrumentorum textrium anglice vocat,' "wooden frames of weaveing Loomes" worth four pounds, and carried them off, and unlawfully placed them in the highway, and there maliciously set fire to them and utterly destroyed them; And That the said Robert Stockley then and there caused a dangerous tumult, lasting for the space of half-an-hour. Robert Stockley having been found 'Guilty,' the Court determined to take counsel on the matter. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

10 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Michael Snell late of the said parish yeoman unlawfully broke into the dwelling-house of a certain Robert Bowes, and was guilty of other outrages to the same Robert Bowes. Found 'Guilty,' Michael Snell was fined five hundred marks and was committed to prison, there to remain till the said fine should be paid, and was also sentenced to stand on the pillory from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on three several days, to wit, on one market-day in the street of Holborne near Chancery Lane, and on another market-day in the Strond near the Maypoll, and on a third day in St. John's Street near the Bars, with a paper affixed to his hat, showing his offense. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

10 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shore ditch co. Midd. on the said day, divers ill-disposed persons to the number of one hundred individuals assembled themselves riotously, and unlawfully broke into the dwellinghouse of one William Crouch, and then and there took, broke and carried away divers of the goods and chattels of the same William Crouch; And That Thomas Cusden gentleman and captain of one of the trayned bands for co. Midd., being there present with his company of souldiers, for the suppression of the said riot, took and apprehended one of the said rioters, and then and there delivered the said rioter (to the jurors unknown) to the custody of a certain William Tindall, an ensigne of the said company, with order that the same rioter should be led before one of the Justices of the Peace for the said county; And That, instead of taking the same unknown rioter before a Justice of the Peace, the said William Tindall then and there discharged the said rioter, and permitted him to go at large. On 13th October, 27 Charles II., Henry Tindall put himself 'Not Guilty' of this offence on a jury of the country, and was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

11 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, Joseph Fryer alias Joseph Wood, and Edward Bruncker, both late of the said parish laborers, together with other disturbers of the peace to the number of one hundred persons, broke riotously into the dwellinghouse of William Hodgson, and then and there unlawfully seized, took and carried away three machines called 'engine-weaving-loomes' of the goods and chattels of the said William Hodgson, and placed them in the high-way, and in the high-way there burnt and utterly destroyed the same looms; and that the said Joseph Fryer alias Wood and Edward Bruncker then and there caused a great tumult, lasting for the space of an hour. Found 'Guilty,' Edward Bruncker was fined twenty marks, and committed to prison, there to remain till the said fine should be paid. Found 'Guilty,' Joseph Fryer alias Wood was fined five hundred marks and was sentenced to remain in prison, until the said fine should be paid: he was also sentenced to stand for two hours on the pillory on three several days,—on one day in the street of Holborne near Chauncery Lane; on the second day at . . . .; and on the third day in St. John's Street near the bar. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

11 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. on the said day, John Heberd late of the said parish laborer, a seditious and disaffected person, together with divers other disturbers of the peace, to the number of one hundred persons broke riotously into the dwelling-house of Thomas Rowe, and then and there unlawfully took and carried away a certain machine, called an Engine-Weaving-Loome worth six pounds and ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of one Nicholas Constable, and placed the same Engine-Weaving-Loome in the highway, and then and there maliciously burnt and utterly destroyed it; And That the said John Heberd then and there caused a riot and tumult, lasting for the space of one hour. Found 'Guilty,' John Heberd was fined five hundred marks and sentenced to remain in prison till the said fine should be paid, and was further sentenced to stand on the pillory from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on three several days,—to wit, first on a market-day in the street of Holborne near Chancery Lane, on another market-day in the Strond near the Maypole, and on a third day in St. John's Street near the Bars. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

11 August, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, John Serjeant late of the said parish yeoman and Richard Maynard late of the same parish yeoman, two ill-disposed and seditious persons, with other disturbers of the peace to the number of thirty persons, unlawfully broke into the house of George Harrison, and took possession of ten wooden instruments called 'Weavers Batternes,' worth forty pounds, of the goods and chattels of a certain Robert Bowes, and then and there placed them in the highway, and unlawfully set fire to them and totally destroyed them; And That the same John Serjeant and Richard Maynard then and there made a dangerous tumult, lasting for an hour.—Richard Maynard was acquitted. Found 'Guilty,' John Serjeant was fined five hundred marks, and was committed to prison, there to remain until the said fine should be paid; and was also sentenced to stand on the pillory from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on three several days, to wit, on a market-day in Holborne near Chancery Lane, on another market-day in the Strond near the Maypoll, and on a third day in St. John's Street near the Barrs, with a paper fixed to his hat, showing his offence. G. D. R., 9 Sept., 27 Charles II.

9 September, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, John Rudd late of the said parish yeoman assaulted one John Hewlett, the apprentice of William Burbridge taylor, and without the knowledge and consent of the said William Burbridge took the said John Hewlett and transported him to parts beyond the sea called Virginea, and there sold him for the profit and advantage of the same John Rudd. John Rudd "po se" = put himself on a jury of the country. No clerical note touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. R., 4 Sept., 29 Charles II.

10 September, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Middis late of the said parish yeoman assaulted Hannah Watton spinster, and conveyed her from the said parish to a certain ship called The Dragon lying in the River Thames, and afterwards transported her against her will in the same ship to the island called Jamaica, and there sold her for his own advantage and profit. Thomas pleaded 'Not Guilty,' and on 21 Aug. 1676, the jury was discharged by the Court from returning a verdict, because it appeared from the evidence that the offence was committed in the county of . . . . (the name of the county being obliterated). S. P. R., 26 June, 28 Charles II.

20 October, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Eleanor Neale late of the said parish spinster, designing to intoxicate and murder (intoxicare et murdrare) her mother, Anne Neale, administered a poison called Ratts-bane mixed in beer to her said mother; and that Anne Neale took the poisoned beer thus administered on the said 20th Oct. 27 Charles II., and languished of the said poison from the same 20th Oct. till the last day of the same month, on which last-named day, she died of the said poison, so given to her by her daughter. Putting herself on trial, Eleanor was acquitted. G. D. R., 11 July, 29 Charles II.

19 November, 27 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of Richard Allen, there lying dead and slain: With verdict of jurors saying that Robert Overend, John Deakins, Thomas Goodman, Thomas Croshall, William Neale and Christopher Downes, all six late of the aforesaid parish laborers, on the 17th instant, assaulted the said Richard Allen, and that Robert Overend slew and murdered him, by giving him with a sword called "a hanger" a mortal wound in the hinder part of his head, of which wound he languished at the said parish from the said 17th November till he died of it on the following day: And that the other culprits, to wit, John Deakins, Thomas Goodman, Thomas Croshall, William Neale and Christopher Downes were present at the said murder, encouraging and aiding the said Robert Overend to commit it.—Also, on the same file, the True Bill against Robert Overend and the other culprits for their respective parts in the perpetration of the crime. On trial, Thomas Goodman and Thomas Croshall were acquitted. Found 'Guilty,' Robert Overend, John Deakins and William Neale were sentenced to be hanged. No clerical note over the name of Christopher Downe. G. D. R., 8 Dec., 27 Charles II.

20 December, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Katherine Knight late of the said parish widow, with the intention of disturbing the tranquillity of the kingdom, and of causing discord between the Lord the King, the Prelates and Nobles and others of the said King's lieges and subjects, and of bringing the same Lord the King and divers Nobles and Prelates and the ecclesiastical government of this kingdom of England into odium with the subjects of the said Lord the King, seditiously published sold and publicly offered for sale a certain malicious and seditious book concerning divers nobles and prelates of this kingdom of England, entitled "A Letter from a Person of Quality to his Friends in the Country, Printed in the yeare 1675," containing these scandalous and seditious words, to wit, "Sir, This session being ended, and the Bill of Test neer finished at the Committee of the whole house, I can now give you a perfect account of this State Masterpiece. It was first hacht as almost all the mischiefs of the world have hitherto been amongst the Greate Churchmen, and is a project of severall years standinge, but found not Ministers bold enough to goe through with it, untill these new ones, who wanting a better bottom to support them betook themselves wholly to this, which is no small undertaking if you consider it in its whole extent, First to make a distinct party from the rest of the nation of the high Episcopal man and the Old Cavalier, who are to swallow the hopes of enjoying all the power and office of the Kingdom, being alsoe tempted by the advantage they may recieve from overthrowing the Act of Oblivion, and not a little rejoycing to thinke how valiant they should prove, if they could get any to fight the old quarrell over again, now they are possest of the. armes, forts and ammunition of the nation. Next they design to have the government of the Church sworne to as unalterable, and tacitely owned to be of Divine Right, which though inconsistent with the Oath of Supremacy, yet the churchmen easily break through all obligations whatsoever to attain this station, the advantage of which the Prelate of Rome hath sufficiently taught the world. Then in requital to the Crowne they declare the Government absolute and arbitrary, and allow Monarchy as well as Episcopacy to bee jure divino, and not to be bounded and limited by humane lawes: And to secure all this they resolve to take away the power and opportunity of parliaments to alter any thing in Church or State, only leave them as an instrument to raise money and to . . . . the Court and Church shall have a mind to, the attempt of any other, how necessary so ever it may be . . . . And as the topstone of the whole Fabrick a pretence shall be taken from the jealousies they . . . . and a reall necessity from the smallnesse of their party, to increase and keepe up a standing army, and then in . . . . Cavalier and Churchman will bee made greater fooles but as errant slaves as the rest of the nation. In order . . . . the first step was made in the Act for regulating Corporations, wisely beginning that in those lesser Governmentes which . . . . afterwards to introduce upon the Government of the Nation, sweare to a declaracion and beliefe of such propositions as themselves afterwards upon debate were enforct to alter and could not justify in those words, so that many ( ?) of the wealthyest worthyest and soberest men are still kept out of the magistracy of those places, the next step was the Act of . . . . which went for most of the Chiefest nobility and gentry being obliged as Lord Lieutenants Deputy Lieutenants &c. to swear to the same declaration and belief with the addition onely of those words, in pursuance of such military commissions, which makes the matter rather worse than better. Yet this went downe as smoothly as Oath in fashion and testimony of loyalty, and none adventureing freely to debate the matter, the humour of the age, like a strong tyde, carries wise and good men down before it. This Act is of a piece, for it establisheth a standing army by law, and sweares us into a military government. Immediately after this followeth The Act of Uniformity, by which all the Clergy of England are obliged to subscribe and declare what Corporations Nobility and Gentry had before sworne, but with the additional clause of the Militia Act omitted. This the Clergy complyed with, for you know that sort of men are taught rather to obey than understand, and to use that learning they have to justifye, not to examine, what their superiours command. And yet that Bartholomew day was fatall to our Church and religion, in throwing out a very great number of worthy learned pious and orthodox divines, who could not come up to this, and other things in that Act. And it is an oath upon this occasion worth your knowledge, that soe great was the zeal in carryeinge on this church-affair, and soe blind was the obedience required, that if you compute the time of the passing this Act with the time allowed for the clergy to subscribe the Booke of Common Prayer thereby established, you shall plainely find it could not bee printed and distributed, soe as one man in forty could have seen and read the booke they did so perfectly assent and consent to. But this matter was not compleat untill the Five Mile Act passed at Oxford, wherein they take the opportunity to introduce the Oath in the termes they would have it. This was then strongly opposed by the Lord Treasurer Southampton, Lord Wharton, Lord Ashley and others, not onely in the concerne of those poor Ministers that were soe severely handled by it, but as it was in itselfe a most unlawfull and unjustifiable Oath. However the zeal of that time against all Nonconformists easily passed the Act. This Act was seconded the same sessions at Oxford by another Bill in the House of Commons to have imposed that oath on the whole nation. And the Providence by which it was thrown out was very remarkable, for Mr. Peregine Bertie (?) being newly chosen was that morneing introduced to the House by his brother the now Earle of Lyndsey and Sir Thomas Osborne now Lord Treasurer, who all three gave their votes against that bill, and the members were soe even upon that division, that their three votes carryed the question against it. We owe that right to the Earle of Lyndsey and the Lord Treasurer, as to acknowledge that they have since made ample satisfaction for whatever offence they gave either the Church or the Courte in that vote. Thus our Church became triumphant and . . . .;" and also containing the following false and scandalous words, to wit, "Now comes the memorable session of April 13, '75, then which never any came with more expectation of the Courte, or more dread and apprehension of the people. The Officers, Court Lords and Bishopps were clearly the Major Vote in the Lords' House, and they assured themselves to have the Commons as much at their dispose, when they reckoned the number of the courtiers, officers, pentioners increased by the addition of the Church and Cavalier party, besides the addresse they made men of the best quality there by hopes of honour, great employment and such things as would take. In a word the French Kinges ministers, who are the great chapmen of the World, did not outdoe ours at this time. And yet the over-ruling hand of God has blown away their politiques, and the nation has escaped this session, like a bird of the snare of the fowler."—The long indictment embodies other passages of publication, that are no longer clearly legible on the decayed and defaced parchment.—Found 'Guilty,' Katherine Knight was sentened to pay a fine of £26 13s. 4d., and was committed to Newgate Gaol, there to remain till the should have paid the fine, and should also have found good sureties for her appearance at the Session of the Peace for Middlesex, next following the payment of the fine. S. P. R., 11 January, 27 Charles II.

20 December, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Breach late of the said parish spinster, otherwise styled Anne Roberts wife of Anthony Roberts late of the said parish gentleman, an evil and designing woman, with the intention of disturbing the tranquillity of this kingdom of England, and of creating discord between the said Lord the king, the Prelates and Nobles and other lieges and subjects of the said Lord the King, and of bringing the same Lord the King, prelates nobles and other subjects into odium and contempt, published, sold, and publicly offered for sale a certain scandalous and seditious book of and concerning the government of this kingdom of England, entitled "a Letter from a Person of Quality to his Friends in the Countrye, Printed in the year 1675." Setting forth the same passages of the libellous and seditious book, that are embodied in the indictment against Katherine Knight, this true Bill displays the following clerical minute on the superior margin of its face, to wit, "Po se et Juaor' per consensum t'm prosecutor' qam def' immediate Cul Finitur xxvili xiiis iiiid. Committitur Nove Prisone ib'm rem' quousq' sol &c." = She puts herself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country; and the jurors, by the consent as well of the prosecutor as of the defendant, immediately say that she is 'Guilty'; She is fined £26 13s. 4d., and is committed to the New Prison, there to remain till she shall have paid the fine. S. P. R., 11 Jan., 27 Charles II.

31 December, 27 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Willowbey late of the said parish spinster a woman of ill name and fame, knowing that John Dix needed "artificem expertem in arte architecti anglice a carpenter," to work in his said art for the said John Dix in a certaine place called Nevis in parts beyond sea, came to the dwelling-house of the said John Dix, and deceitfully told him, that she had procured a skillful carpenter, well-provided with tools, who would serve him John Dix in foreign parts for a term of four years, and that she had placed this expert carpenter on a certain ship called The Trevilla Merchant, belonging to the same John Dix, for which service so rendered to him she demanded a sum of twenty-five shillings: And that John Dix believing her statement then and there paid her twenty-five shillings, whereas her statement was false and fraudulent &c. The bill shows no clerical minute, touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. R., 11 January, 27 Charles II.