Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1678

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

81-113

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1678', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 81-113. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66085 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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1678

1 January, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Naylor late of the said parish clerk, alias . . . . Carpenter late of the said parish clerk, born within this kingdom of England after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist . . . ., and before the said 1 January, 29 Charles II., made and ordained in parts beyond sea a seminary priest by authority derived from the See of Rome, weighing little the laws and statutes of this kingdom, and fearing in no degree the penalties contained in them, traitorously and as a false traitor was and remained. At the head of the bill appears this note 'Tr' sup' ali' Ind' pro eadem offens xxii Febr. xxxii R's' = He was tried upon another indictment for the same offence on 22nd Feb. in the 32nd year of the King's reign. G. D. R., 11 Dec, 30 Charles II.

1 January, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. on the said day, John Petts late of the said parish yeoman built a certain cottage to be occupied as a dwelling, and did not assign and lay to the said cottage four acres of land of the freehold and inheritance of the same John Petts, adjacent to the said cottage, and to be occupied together with the cottage, so long as the same cottage should be inhabited. No clerical minute touching any subsequent proceeding in the case. S. P. R., 25 Feb., 30 Charles II.

6 January, 29 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day, on view of the body of Henry Chapman an infant aged two years, there lying dead and slain; With verdict of jurors saying that, on 31 December last past at the said parish, Mary Manwareing late of the said parish spinster slew and murdered the said Henry Chapman, by striking him on the forehead with a pair of tonges, and so giving him on the forehead a mortal wound, of which he languished at the said parish from the said 31st of December until the 3rd of January next following, on which last-named day he died of the said wound.—Also, on the same file, the True Bill against the said Mary Manwareing for slaying and murdering the said Henry Chapman in the manner set forth in the Coroner's Inquisition. Acquitted of murder, Mary Manwareing was found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, and was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 29 Charles II.

20 January, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Charles De la Rue De Fue late of the said parish clerk did willingly heare masse said and sung by a Roman priest to the jurors as yet unknown (voluntarie audivit Missam adtunc et ibidem dictam et decantatam per quendam presbiterum Romanum juratoribus predictis adhuc ignotum) &c. On the bill appears this clerical minute "Newgate po se per ordin' cur Ind' comp't' de novo super Oier et Terminer. . . . . Cessat process' super hoc." = At Newgate; he puts himself 'Not Guilty': by order of the Court the indictment is found a-new at Oyer and Terminer; process ceases on this bill. S. P. R., 9 Dec, 30 Charles II.

26 January, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields, co. Midd. on the said day, Charles De La Rue Deffue, late of the said parish, heard mass said and sung by a Roman priest to the jurors unknown. On 15 Jan., 30 Charles II., Charles De La Rue Deffue put himself on a jury of the country. G. D. R., 11 Dec, 30 Charles II.

1 March, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St.-Dunstan's-in-the West co. Midd. on the said day, Sir Edward Rich knt. and Joseph Ward carpenter, both late of the said parish, put or caused to be put one hundred cartloads of rubbish (centum carucatas fimi et luti anglice vocat' rubbish) on the common highway for foot-passengers, leading from a certain lane called Bell Yard to Lincolnes Inne, and permitted the hundred cartloads of rubbish to remain there from the said 1 March 30 Charles II., until the day of the taking of this inquisition, and still permit the same rubbish to remain there, so that not only is the public way for foot passengers (co'is alta via regia pedestr') obstructed and stopped, but also the water which falls upon the said way has overflowed, so that the inhabitants of the locality have been and still are unable to go and pass to their dwelling-houses as they ought and were wont to do. No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case over Sir Edward Rich's name. On 25th August, 1679, Joseph Ward confessed the indictment, and was fined three shillings and four-pence which he paid to the sheriff in court. S. P. R., 8 April, 30 Charles II.

9 March, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Field co. Midd. on the said day, William Noyes and William Hammond, both late of the said parish yeomen, conspiring and designing to defraud a certain Dymock Ely of his money, and then and there having in their custody two similar bags (one of which bags contained twenty-four ounces of hair worth fourteen pounds and eight shillings, whilst the other bag contained twenty-four ounces of hair worth only fourteen shillings) came to the aforesaid Dymock Ely, and offered for sale and sold to him for fourteen pounds and eight shillings the bag, containing the twenty-four ounces of hair, worth fourteen pounds and eight shillings, and received of the said Dymock Ely the said sum, in full payment of what he had bought of them: And that immediately after receiving the said money from the same Dymock Ely, the aforesaid William Noyes and William Hammond unlawfully and secretly carried off the bag, containing the hair worth fourteen pounds and eight shillings, and fraudulently left in their place the bag containing the hair, that was worth only fourteen shillings. No clerical minutes, touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. R., 8 April, 30 Charles II.

20 March, 30 Charles II.—True Bills, on two several parchments, for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Mary Picks spinster, and five men described as weavers, all six persons late of Stepney co. Midd.; and against fifteen persons late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch, including Mary Bestin the wife of William Bestin gentleman and Alice Overall the wife of Hugh Overall gentleman, all the other misdemeanants being craftsmen and artisans, or women of simple degree. Clerical minutes on one of the two bills show that Paul Turpeney silkweaver, Henry Pamfrit silk-weaver and Joseph Gaba silk-throwster, all three late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch, confessed the indictment, and that after confession each of them was fined in the sum of twenty pounds, according to the statute. S. P. R., 28 April, 31 Charles II.

. . . . March, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Covent Garden co. Midd. on the . . . . day of March, John Adlam alias Aylworth late of the said parish clerk, born within the dominions of the said Lord now King, and being made and ordained a priest by authority derived from the See Rome after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist in 1 Eliz, neither weighing the laws and statutes of this kingdom, nor fearing in any degree the penalties contained in the same, traitorously and as a false traitor of the said Lord the King, was and remained. Putting himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country on 10th January, 30 Charles II., John Adlam alias Aylworth was found 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be drawn to the place of execution, and there to be executed in the way prescribed for the execution of culprits convicted of High Treason. G. D. R., 11 December, 30 Charles II.

1 April, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Dunstan's-in-theWest co. Midd. on the said day, John Gamball late of the said parish yeoman received into his dwelling-house in the same parish divers subtenants with their families and kept the same subtenants and permitted them to dwell with him in the aforesaid dwelling-house from the said 1st of April, 30 Charles II. to the day of the taking of this inquisition, to the great danger of infecting divers of the inhabitants there with pestilence and other contagious diseases, and to the great impoverishment of the parishioners of the said parish, and to the burdening of the said parish with a multitude of paupers &c. On his arraignment, John Gamball confessed the indictment, was fined in the sum of forty shillings, and was committed to the New Prison, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine.—The indictments, of which the foregoing bill is an example, to wit, the indictments for harbouring subtenants or lodgers without a special licence to do so, are no less numerous in the files temp. Charles II. and James II. than they were in the files temp. James I and Charles I. S. P. R., 1 July, 30 Charles II.

19 April, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Magdalen Clinch late of the said parish widow, stole and carried away a silver trencher plate worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of the most excellent Don Francisco De Mallo, then being the ambassador of the King of Portugal. G.D.R., . . . . May, 30 Charles II.

19 April, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day, Andrew Sole late of the said parish typographer, with the intention of causing discord between the Lord now King and the prelates and subjects of the same King, printed or caused to be printed a scandalous and seditious book, entitled Persecuted Under Episcopacy, and containing the following malicious, scandalous and schismatical words, to wit, "Wee witness against the unlawful pompous hierarchy and priesthood of this nation, as utterly disagreeing from the Testament of Christ and Ministry there appointed in their offices, callings, administrations and lord-like livings and maintenance against the confuse profane and irreligious multitude of all sorts of vitious livers, baptized into and retained in the body of the Church of England, without voluntary profession of, and holy walking in the Faith of the Gospel; against their manner of worship and service by reading prayers out of a book, instead of spiritual invocation on the name of the Lord; and briefly against all the popish abuses and relicks of the Man of Sin whatsoever. And because this our testimony maketh against the irregular authority of the prelates, reproveth their evil actions and disproveth their pomp, stateliness, rich revenues, stipends &c., therefore they have in all hostile manner set themselves against us, persecuting us unto bands (sic), exile and death itselfe, reproaching us as schismaticks, donatists, Brownists, seditious persons &c." On 10 Oct., 1678, Andrew Sole pleaded 'Not Guilty,' and on 9 Dec., 1678, he was declared 'Not Guilty' by a jury. S. P. R., 1 July, 30 Charles II.

24 April, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas White clerk alias Thomas Whitebread clerk, John Fenwicke clerk, William Harcourt clerk alias William Harrison clerk, John Gavan clerk, Anthony Turner clerk and James Corker clerk, all six late of the said parish, together with other false traitors to the jurors unknown, traitorously and as false traitors of the said Lord now King, proposed and intended to raise rebellion within this kingdom of England, and to cause 'stragem miserabilem' between the said Lord the King and his lieges, and to depose the same King from his royal state and power, and to bring the same King to death and final destruction, and to change the government and lawfully established religion of this kingdom, and to levy war within this kingdom against the said Lord the King; And that, on the said day at the said parish, the aforesaid Thomas White alias Whitebread, John Fenwick, William Harcourt alias Harrison, John Gavan, Anthony Turner and James Corker treacherously and as false traitors came together consulted together and agreed to put the said Lord the King to death and final destruction, and to change the lawful established religion of this kingdom to the superstition of the Roman Church, and to subvert the government of this kingdom of England, And That a certain Thomas Pickering and John Grove should slay and murder the Lord now King, and that the aforesaid Thomas White alias Whitebread, John Fenwick, William Harcourt alias Harrison, John Gavan, Anthony Turner, James Corker and other false traitors of the Lord the King should celebrate and perform a certain number of masses then and there agreed upon for the health of the soul of the same Thomas Pickering, and further more should pay to the same John Grove a certain sum of money then and there agreed upon among them; And That the aforesaid Thomas White alias Whitebread, John Fenwick, John Gavan, Anthony Turner, William Harcourt alias Harrison, and other false traitors to the jurors unknown on the said day and at the aforesaid parish took an oath upon "the sacrament" and then and there swore and promised to conceal and not divulge their most wicked treasons and treasonable designs; And That the aforesaid Thomas White alias Whitebread, John Fenwick, William Harcourt alias Harrison, John Gavan, Anthony Turner, James Corker and other false traitors to the jurors unknown afterwards on the said day and at the said parish traitorously prepared, persuaded, incited and encouraged four other persons, to the jurors unknown, to slay and murder the said Lord the King.—On the dorse of the indictment appears this clerical note, to wit, "Titus Oates, Will'us Bedlow, Steph'us Dugdale—jur'"=Titus Oates, William Bedlow, Stephen Dugdale— sworn. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas White alias Whitebread, John Fenwick, William Harcourt, John Gavan and Anthony Turner were sentenced to be executed in the manner prescribed for the execution of culprits convicted of high treason. Over James Corker's name appears this clerical note, to wit, "po se postea xvi° Julii xxxi Car Se'di Regis non cul nec se retr'."—He puts himself on a jury afterwards on 16 July, 31 Charles II., and the jurors say that he is 'Not Guilty' and that he did not make flight. G. D. R., 5 June, 31 Charles II.

24 April, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas White alias Whitebread clerk, William Ireland clerk, John Fenwicke clerk, Thomas Pickering clerk, and John Grove gentleman, all five late of the said parish, designing to upset the true religion hitherto used and by law established within this kingdom of England, and to cause rebellion within the same kingdom, and to extinguish the cordial affection and true obedience, which the subjects of the said King should bear and show to him, traitorously proposed, compassed and intended the death and final destruction of the said Lord the King, and for accomplishment of their said traitorous designs assembled and came together on the aforesaid day in the aforesaid parish and there agreed that the said Thomas Pickering and John Grove should slay and murder the said Lord now King (et agreaverunt quod ipsi predicti Thomas Pickeringe et Johannes Grove ipsum dictum serenissimum Dominum Regem nunc interficerent et murdrarent), And That the aforesaid Thomas White alias Whitebread and William Ireland and John Fenwick, and other false traitors to the jurors unknown, should celebrate and perform a certain number of masses for the health of the soul of the same Thomas Pickering . . . ., and should pay to the same John Grove . . . .; And That on the aforesaid day and on divers subsequent days, at the aforesaid parish and also at other places within the same county of Middlesex, the said Thomas Pickering and John Grove "did lye in waite" diabolically and traitorously to slay and murder the said Lord now King, And That the same Thomas White alias Whitebread, William Ireland and John Fenwick, together with other false traitors to the jurors unknown, on the aforesaid 24 April, 30 Charles II., persuaded and encouraged the same . . . . to slay and murder the said Lord the King.—At the head of the bill, over the name of Thomas White alias Whitebread appears the note 'po se' = he puts himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury; over the name of William Ireland appears 'Po se Cul ca nul' = he puts himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury, and the jurors say that he is 'Guilty' and has no chattels for forfeiture; over the name of Thomas Fenwick appears 'Po se'; over the name of Thomas Pickering appears 'Po se cul ca nul'; and over the name of John Grove appears 'Po se cul ca nul.'— At the foot of the bill appears the record that William Ireland, Thomas Pickeringe and John Grove had judgment to be drawn to the place of execution, and there to be executed in the manner prescribed for the execution of culprits convicted of high treason.—The parchment of this long bill is perfect, but dirt and friction have rendered the writing in many places illegible.—On the dorse of the indictment appears the clerical memorandum, to wit, "Titus Oates, William Bedloe:—Jur' in Cur'" = Titus Oates and William Bedloe,—sworn in court. G. D. R., 11 Dec, 30 Charles II.

28 April, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Coventgarden co. Midd. on the said day, Charles Pamplin late of the said parish laborer assaulted Charles Dallyson, and slew and murdered him by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the left side of his breast, of which wound he then and there instantly died. Found 'Guilty,' Charles Pamplin was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., . . . . May, 30 Charles II.

8 May, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Rogers late of the said parish mariner unlawfully conveyed his duly bound apprentice named Richard Angell, son of Henry Angell of London cabinetmaker, on board a certain ship called The Jarsey then lying in the Thames, and in the said ship for gain and profit transported him to Jamaica, and sold his said apprentice or caused him to be there sold to a certain man to the jurors unknown &c. Henry Rogers put himself 'Not Guilty,' and on 13 Jan. 1679, a jury declared him 'Not Guilty.'—Also, on the same file, a True Bill that, on 12 August, 29 Charles II., Michael Russell, late of St. Katherines co. Midd. yeoman assaulted a certain Joseph Williams at St. Katherines aforesaid, and afterwards on the same day without the consent and against the will of the said Joseph Williams did unlawfully carry him on board a ship called The Hopewell, then lying in the river Thames, and in the said ship transported the same Joseph Williams to an island call Mevis in parts beyond sea, and there sold him for gain and profit. On 8 Sept., 1680, Michael Russell put himself 'Not Guilty,' and on 7 Oct., 1680, a jury found him 'Not Guilty.'—Also, on the same file, a True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields on the said day, Katherine Farrendyne widow and Charles Lattinoe yeoman, both of the said parish assaulted a certain Susan Gunn spinster, and afterwards on the same day unlawfully conveyed her without her consent and against her will on board a ship called The Hopewell then lying in the river Thames, and for their own advantage and against her will transported her in the said ship to an island (sic) called Virginia (in quandam insulam vocatam Virginia), and there for their own gain and advantage sold her. On 13 Jan., 1679, Katherine Farrendyne and Charles Lattinoe put themselves on a jury, who immediately by agreement (immediate per consensum) found them 'Not Guilty.' S. P. R., 8 Dec., 31 Charles II.

10 May, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Hanwell co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Hands late of the said parish yeoman assaulted Deborah Wilcox, and afterwards on the said day unlawfully conveyed her from the said parish to a certain ship lying in the river Thames, with the intention of transporting her to parts beyond the sea without her consent and against her will, and selling her for the gain and profit of the same Thomas Hands and to the grievous injury of the same Deborah Wilcox. On 26 Aug., 1678, Thomas Hands put himself 'Not Guilty,' and on 10 Oct., 1678, he was declared 'Not Guilty' by a jury. S. P. R., 1 July, 30 Charles II.

21 June, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Robinson knt. and bart. and J.P. on the same day, of Hugh Garett citizen and box-maker and Henry Lincolne citizen and baker, both of London, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Hugh Qeyton citizen and box-maker of London, in the sum of twenty pounds: For the said Hugh Clayton's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "then and there to answeare his raising a tumult neere the Tower, and abusing and affronting the centinells and souldiers belonging to the Tower Garrison."—Also, on the same file, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of Thomas Betson citizen and taylor of London at the same next Session of the Peace, to answer to the same charge. S. P. R., 1 July, 30 Charles II.

18 July, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., Edward Rumfeild late of the said parish "a common innholder," on the said day and afterwards from the same day continually until the day of the taking of this inquisition, kept a common stable for horses, and that afterwards on the said 18 July, 30 Charles II., James West, Tobias Mason, Thomas Legoe, and Bartholomew Clarke, horsegranadeers retained to serve the king as horse-soldiers in his wars, were quartered with their horses in Edward Rumfeild's inn, And That the said Edward Rumfeild, with the intention of cheating the afore-named horsegranadeers and also of hindering the service of the said Lord the King, on the said 18 July, 30 Charles II., put a trusse of sweet and wholesome hay, in the presence of the same aforenamed horse-granadeers, in the rack of the stalls before their horses, and afterwards in the night of the said day, to wit, between eleven and twelve p.m., secretly and craftily removed the same sweet and wholesome hay, and put foul and unwholesome hay in its place, so that the horses of the said James West, Tobias Mason, Thomas Legoe and Bartholomew Clarke became weak and unfit for the king's service. Edward Rumfeild confessed the indictment, and was fined in the sum of six shillings and eight pence, which he paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 26 August, 30 Charles II.

21 July, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Hillingdon co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Wroth gentleman, Thomas Blaney gentleman, Henry Archer alias Henry Archett gentleman, Thomas Garlicke gentleman, Peter Burne gentleman, Charles Yorke gentleman, Andrew Howell gentleman, John Sinclare gentleman, John Steward gentleman, Goodricke Sibbett gentleman and Thomas Newsham gentleman, all late of the said parish, assaulted Bridget Hyde, daughter of Sir Thomas Hyde deceased, in the highway, and there robbed her of three silk hoods worth thirty shillings, a silke scarfe worth thirty shillings, a laced pocket-handkerchief worth thirty shillings, and an amber necklace worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Bridget Hyde.—Also, another True Bill against the same eleven culprits for assaulting one Ursula Hobson and maltreating her on the highway, at Hillingdon aforesaid on the said 21 July, 30 Charles II.—Also, another True Bill against the same eleven culprits, for assembling riotously at Hillingdon co. Midd. on the said day, and for then and there assaulting, beating and wounding Sir Robert Vyner knt. and bart.—Also, another True Bill against the same eleven culprits, for assembling riotously on the aforesaid day at Hillingdon co. Midd. aforesaid, and then and there assaulting Bridget, the daughter and heiress of the late Sir Thomas Hyde bart. deceased, an infant of the age of sixteen years, and robbing her of, and stealing from her person, the articles set forth and appraised in the first of the four indictments. Arraigned on the indictment for highway robbery from Bridget Hyde's person, Henry Wroth, Thomas Blaney, Henry Archer, Thomas Garlicke, Peter Burne, Charles Yorke, John Sinclare put themselves 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country. Thomas Blaney was found 'Not Guilty' and acquitted. Found 'Guilty,' Henry Archer alias Archett, Thomas Garlicke and Peter Burne were all three sentenced to be hanged. 'Po se' (= he puts himself on jury of the country) is the only clerical note over the names of Henry Wroth, Charles Yorke and John Sinclare; no information being given respecting subsequent proceedings in the case against them. No clerical notes whatever over the names of Andrew Howell, John Steward, Goodricke Sibbett, and Thomas Newsham. G. D. R., 28 August, 30 Charles II.

12 August, 30 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Henry Reynell esq. J.P. on the said day, of Hugh Irland of St. Mary's Savoy co. Midd. citizen and merchant-taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds: For the appearance of the said Hugh Irland at the next General Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to prefer &c. an indictment against William Philips, "for that the said William, being a listed souldyer under the command of Captaine Anthony Clifford in His Highness's Prince Rupert's regiment of dragoons and in His Majesties Service, did runne away from his said captain, flying and withdrawing from his said captain and His Majesties service without licence." S. P. R., 26 August, 30 Charles II.

30 August, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Sir George Wakeman baronet, William Marshall gentleman and William Rumley gentleman, all three late of the said parish, maliciously and traitorously proposed compassed and designed to raise and bring about rebellion in this kingdom of England, and to work slaughter amongst the subjects of the Lord the King, and to depose the said king from his royal style and authority, and to bring the same Lord the King to death and final destruction, and to subvert and destroy the government of the same kingdom and the pure religion established within the same kingdom by its laws, and to levy war within this kingdom of England against the said Lord the King; And That on the aforesaid day, in the aforesaid parish the said George Wakeman, William Marshall and William Rumley, together with other false traitors to the jurors unknown, maliciously and traitorously assembled themselves together, and agreed to put the said Lord the King to death and final destruction, and to change the lawfully established religion of this country.to the superstition of the Roman Church; And That to move and persuade the said William Marshall and William Rumley to fulfil and accomplish their said agreement to overthrow the government and change the religion of the kingdom, the aforesaid George Wakeman on the aforesaid day and at the said parish treacherously and traitorously undertook to slay and murder (subdole et proditorie suscepit ad dictum dominum Regem proditorie interficiendum et murdrandum); And moreover that the aforesaid George Wakeman traitorously received a commission of Physician-General of the army, about to be raised against the Lord the King, from an unknown person pretending he was the Provincial of the Society commonly called the Society of Jesus, and claiming authority from the See of Rome to grant a commission in that respect (persona ignot' pretenden' se fore Provincial' Societat' angce vulgariter vocat' Society of Jesus . . . . et claman' authoritat' concedend' Commission' in ea parte a sede Romana) &c.—On the dorse of the bill appears this clerical note, "Titus Oates, Will'ms Bedlow, Steph'us Dugdale— . . . . Jur'" = Titus Oates, William Bedlow, Stephen Dugdale . . . . Sworn.—Putting themselves on a jury on 16th July, Sir George Wakeman and William Marshall were both found 'Not Guilty.' Putting himself on a jury on 15 July, William Rumley was found 'Not Guilty.' The parchment has suffered so much from exposure and friction, that the indictment is illegible in places. G. D. R., 5 June, 31 Charles II.

30 September, 30 Charles II.—The Newgate Kallender of 16 October, 1678 exhibits the following note touching persons, committed to the prison for High Treason, to wit, 'Dr William Fogarty, Wm Ireland, John Fenwick, Thomas Pickering, John Grove, John Smith and Thomas Jennison: Committed by the Rt. Honoble the Lords of his Majties Privy Councill for High Treason in conspireing to take away the King at Whitehall, 30° September 1678.' G. D. R., 16 Oct., 30 Charles II.

16 October, 30 Charles II.—The Newgate Calendar of the aforesaid date contains the following entries touching persons committed to the prison.—(1) John Nelleville (?) Committed by Lords of the Privy Council for speaking contemptuously of . . . ., and for having also assaulted Mr Williams in his Majesties presence. Dated 30th Sept 1678.—(2) John Crump, Committed by Lords of the Privy Council for having in his Majesties presence confessed that he was formerly a Protestant, but by the perswasion of his father-in-law Mr Ja . . . . left his religion to embrace the Romish, and was reconciled to the Church of Rome . . . . Dated . . . . September, 1678.—(3) Richard Langhorne esq., Committed by Lords of the Privy Council for High Treason in compassing and imagining the death of his sacred Majestic Dated 7° October, 167 . . . .—(4) Edward Cole . . . ., Committed by Lords of the Privy Council for High Treason in holding correspondence with forreigners, for the destruction of the King and subversion of the Government. G. D. R., 16 Oct., 30 Charles II.

24 October, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, James Corker late of the said parish clerk, born within the dominions of the Lord now King, and made and ordained a priest by authority derived from the See of Rome after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist in 1 Eliz. and before the said 24 Oct., 30 Charles II., weighing little the laws and statutes of this kingdom of England, and in no degree fearing the penalties contained in them, traitorously and as a false traitor of the Lord now King was and remained. Endorsed "Test Titus Oates, Wm Bedlow, Miles Prance—jur'." On the bill's face appears the clerical record that James Corker put himself on a jury, was found 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be executed in the manner, prescribed for the execution of culprits convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 31 Charles II.

9 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Botolph'swithout-Algate co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Woodfeild wife of William Woodfeild late of the said parish laborer, alias Alice Woodfeild late of the said parish spinster, a woman diabolically affected towards the said most serene king, in the the presence and hearing of divers of the King's lieges spoke these seditious words, to wit, 'I doe know them and will bring out, and will make Mr Hubbard' (Mr Hubbard being one of the constables of the said parish) 'bring them out, that would wash their hands in his Majesties heart-blood.' Alice Woodfeild was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 11 Dec, 30 Charles II.

11 November, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before James Dewy esq. J.P. on the said day, of Henry Capell of St. Martin's-in-theFields yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of John Peasley of the same parish gentleman in the sum of ten pounds: For the said Henry Capell's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to receive that which by the Court shall be then and there injoyned him, for saying that Mr. Bedlow could make nothing out of what he had spoken concerning the murther of Sir Edmundbury Godfrey, after he had been examined by both Houses to that effect." S. P. R., 9 Dec, 30 Charles II.

15 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Daniel Keymish late of the said parish clerk, born within the dominions of the said Lord now King, and made and ordained a priest by authority derived from the See of Rome after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist in 1 Eliz. and before the aforesaid 15th of November, 30 Charles II., weighing little the laws and statutes of this kingdom, and in no degree fearing the penalties contained in the same, traitorously and as a false traitor of the said Lord now King was and remained. Endorsed "Test Titus Oates, Will'us Bedlow, Tho: Dangerfield, Jur." = Witnesses, Titus Oates, William Bedlow, Thomas Dangerfield—Sworn. No clerical notes touching subsequent proceedings in the case.—Also, on the same file, another True Bill to the same effect, against David Joseph Keymish late of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields co. Midd. for traitorously being and remaining in the said parish on 15 Nov., 30 Charles II. Bearing on its face over David Joseph Keymish's name the clerical note "Po se" = he puts himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury, this bill resembles the other indictment in being endorsed 'Test' Titus Oates, Wm. Bedlow, Thomas Dangerfield, Jur.'" G. D. R., 15 Jan., 31 Charles II.

23 November, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken on the said day before John Phelips esq. and Peter Sabbs esq. Justices of the Peace, of Thomas Smith surgeon and Henry Graves wheelwright, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of James Worsley of the said parish tobacco-seller, in the sum of two hundred pounds: For the said James Worsley's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answere to and abide the lawe for refusing to take the Oathes of Allegiance and Supremacie, being brought before us by the officers of the parish of St. Giles-in-theFields as a popish recusante and acknowledging himselfe to be soe." S. P. R., 9 Dec, 30 Charles II.

23 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Mathew Momford late of the said parish a footegranadeer, in the company of John Price esq. Captain of a company now in the King's service, in conversation with a certain Thomas Tapping and James Saunders, concerning the religion established by law in this kingdom, said he (Mathew Momford) had for the seven years last past been of the religion of the Roman Church, to wit, a papist; and that, when James Saunders declared him no fit person to serve the King as a soldier, the said Mathew Momford, in the presence and hearing of divers of the king's lieges spoke these words, to wit, 'I hope to see you all burnt, and to be att the burning of you.' Found 'Guilty,' Mathew Momford was sentenced to pay a fine of twenty shillings, and to remain in prison till he should have paid it. G. D. R., 11 Dec., .30 Charles II.

27 November, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Peter Sabbs J.P. on the said day, of Richard Wheeler currier, Henry Duncombe tobacco-seller and Christopher Hurt glassier, all three of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, co. Midd. in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Richard Wheeler, Henry Duncombe, and Christopher Hurt and of Martha Duncombe, wife of the aforesaid Henry Duncombe, at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to give evidence against John Worsley a papist and Charles de la Rue Du Feu a reputed priest, both being apprehended in Weld Streete since the vii of this instant November. S. P. R., 9 Dec., 30 Charles II.

30 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer during one month beginning on the said day against Richard Pierson yeoman, George Evans yeoman, Dorothy Pound wife of Edward Pound esq., Leonard Wivill writing-master, John Christian painter, Robert Baudin cabinet-maker, John Provost picture-drawer, George Prockett fan-maker, John Morris surgeon, William Bayly barber, William Heath gentleman, Henry Tayler joyner, George Hall carpenter, Joseph Bennett printer, Thomas Walker patten-maker, John Blundell milliner, Benedict Prosser silversmith, Thomas Cammall taylor, Ralph Smith schoolmaster, James Richardson taylor, John Ridley surgeon, Mary Worsley wife of John Worseley tobacconist, and John Worsely tobacconist, all twenty-three late of St. Giles-in-the-Fields co. Midd. S. P. R., 13 Jan. 30 Charles II.

30 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other place of common prayer during one month, beginning on the said day, against Hugh Flannegar victualler, Margaret Duncombe widow, John Collard clothdrawer, Elizabeth Moore wife of Richard Moore yeoman, Robert Penn cook, Jane Terrier widow, Lewis Ferr carver, John Tayler carver, Lewis Duvoy carver, Peter Lennee cordwayner, Eleanor Newgent wife of Richard Newgent laborer and John Turpin varnisher, all twelve late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said said day, against Andrew Ashton surgeon, Charles Cattoway painter, Sampson Jeroe painter, Henry Yorke tayler, Roger Colchester porter, Jeremiah Swellivent victualler, and Dorothy Wild wife of Lawrence Wild tobacconist, all seven late of St. Giles's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during a month beginning on the said day, against Charles Bartyne fan-maker, Anthony Ballard yeoman, James Delaroach merchant, James Le Duke fan-maker, Charles Sharfe weaver, his wife Susan Sharfe, James Woodcock laborer, his wife Isabella Woodcocke, and Thomas Eyres gardener, all nine late of Nortonfoalgate co. Midd. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer during one month beginning on the said day, against Paul Turpinny weaver, Anthony Squire weaver, Mary Lermee wife of Anthony Lermee weaver and Nicholas Gannowe weaver, all four late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Antony Pogmore chandler, Jane Poore widow, George Keene yeoman, Thomas Yates gentleman, John Gerrald yeoman, Thomas Howlett tayler, James Anderson tayler, Percivall Sutton soldier, Geoffrey Rowse tayler, William Byerley tayler, Thomas Everson tayler, Thomas Blacker cordwayner, Susan Webb widow, all thirteen late of St. Giles-in-the-fields co. Midd. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 November, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during a month beginning on the said day, against Gloud Lantes frindge-maker, Frances Rosimor fan-maker, Nicholas Depelee fan-maker, and John Tetter fan-maker, all four late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

1 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that John Morris late of Stepney co. Midd. yeoman, a person greedy of gain and seeking his own private advantage by injury to others, on the said day at the said parish assaulted a certain Thomas Russells, and afterwards on the said day unlawfully and by force conveyed him on board a certain ship called The Cambridge then lying in the river Thames, and afterwards in the said ship transported the same Thomas Russells, without the consent of the same Thomas, to a place called Virginea in parts beyond sea, with the intention of there selling him for the gain and profit of himself the said John Morris. Found 'Guilty' by a jury, John Morris was sentenceed to pay a fine of forty marks, and was committed to the New Prison, there to remain until he should have paid the fine. S. P. R., 7 Oct., 32 Charles II.

4 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, John Nayler alias John Carpenter late of the said parish clerk, born in this kingdom of England, and made and ordained a priest by authority derived from the See of Rome after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist in 1 Eliz. and before the said 4 Dec., 30 Charles II., weighing little the laws and statutes of this kingdom of England, and in no degree fearing the penalties contained in them, traitorously and as a false traitor of the said Lord now King was and remained. Endorsed "Henry Smith, Sam Barrow, Joh'es Spratt—Jur." Putting himself on a jury, John Nayler alias Carpenter was fonnd 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 26 Feb., 32 Charles II.

10 December, 30 Charles II—Recognizances, for the appearance of Henry Richards merchant, Francis Richards gentleman, Mary Richards widow and Frances Warner spinster, all four of St. Bride's London, at the next G. Q. Sessions of the Peace for Middlesex. At the same next Session of the Peace, the matter in respect to Henry Richards was deferred, as Mr. Wyrley junior took oath that he believed the said Henry had gone to parts beyond sea. It appearing that Frank Richards, Mary Richards and Frances Warner were too sick and weak to appear, the matter was also deferred in respect to them. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

11 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Marquis of Winchester J.P., of John Langley vintner and George Richardson haberdasher, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of William Bromley of the same parish baker, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said William Bromley's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. William Bromley failed to appear at the said Session. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

11 December, 30 Charles II.—The Newgate Calendar of this date contains the following notes touching prisoners, to wit,—(1) John Mullenoe, Committed by Josiah Ricroft esq., accused upon the oathes of two several persons for being at Piedmont in the Dukedom of Savoy, when 6,000 Protestants were there massacred, and further that he had there cut off the ears and hands of a little child, and kept it as a trophy of honor, and likewise that he is a Roman Catholic. Dat. 8° November, 1678.—(2) George Gould and Richard Kirkham, Committed by Philip Mathews esq., and taken by . . . . Wheeler, constable of Edmonton, having confessed themselves to be Popish Recusants, and . . . . lodged being within ten miles of the Cittye, and in contempt of his Majties Proclamation. Dat. 12 Nov. 1678. (3) John Gibbons, committed by several of the Privy Council for High Treason. Dat. 10 Oct. 1678.— (4) Joseph Lane, committed by warrant from Lords of the Privy Council, for imagining the death of his Majestie. Dated 23 October 1678.—(5) Mathew Medburne, committed by Sir William Scroggs knt., Lord Cheif Justice of England, being accused upon oath for High Treason, for attempting to levie warr against the King and his subjects.—(6) Sir Ellis Leighton knt., committed by warrant under the hand and seal of his most sacred Majestie, for holding forreigne correspondence for the . . . . of Poperie in this Realme. Dated, 26 Oct. 1678.—(7) William Bromwell, committed by his Grace the Duke of Buckingham the Rt. Hon. Charles Lord Marquess of Winchester for felonie about the murther of Sir Edmundbury Godfrey. Dat. . . . .—(8) Peter Gomley, committed by the Duke of Buckingham, the Marquess of Winchester, upon suspicion . . . . the murther of Sir Edmundbury Godfrey. Dated . . . .—(9) Samuell Atkins, committed by the Duke of Buckingham, the Marquess of Winchester, and Sir Phillip Howard knt. . . . .felonie in concealing the murder of Sir Edmundbury Godfrey. Date . . . . (10) Francis Corrall coachman, committed by the same for the same offence. Date . . . . November, 1678.—(11) Richard Langhorne junior, committed by the Rt. Honoble the Lords. . . . . for treason wherewith he is charged. Date . . . . November, 1678.—(12) Marke Preston, committed by the same for treason, wherewith he is charged, Date 1mo November, 1678.—(13) John Carrill, committed by the Rt. Hon. Sir Wm. Scroggs knt., Lord Cheife Justice of England, accused by the Honble House of Commons, . . . . to be guiltie of High Treason for attempting to destroy His Majestie and subvert the Government of this Kingdome. Date, 4 Nov. 1678.—(14) Thomas Waller esq., committed by severall of the Lords of the Privie Councell, for assaulting and challenging . . . . Neale esq., who is a prisoner committed to a Serjeant at Armes by order of the House of Commons. Date 26° November, 1678.—(15) Thomas White alias Whitbread, committed by the Lords Spiritual and Temporall in Parliament. (16) James Skinner, committed by the Rt. Honble Sir William Scroggs Knt., Lord Chief Justice of England, upon suspicion of being a Romish Priest, and the Oath of Supremacie being tendred to him and he refusing to take the same. Date 12° Dec. 1678.—(17) Edward Whitaker, committed by warrant from the Rt. Honble the Lords Spirituall and temporall. G.D.R., 11 Dec, 30 Charles II.

11 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of George Mosonovie of St. Clement's Danes' victualler, at the next General Quarter Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer &c. "for being a reputed Roman Catholic." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan. 30 Charles II.

12 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Charles Skinner of St. Paul's Covent Garden lynnen-draper at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Westminster, then and there to answer &c. "for being a reputed Roman Catholic." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan. 30 Charles II.

13 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Ellen Le Franck, wife of Alexander Franck of St. Martin's-in the-Fields co. Midd., at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Westminster, to answer &c. "for being a reputed Roman Catholic." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place for common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against eighty-four persons, late of St. Paul's Covent Garden within the Liberties &c. of Westminster, comprising John Conquest M.D., Edward Gifford apothecary, and Charles Gifford apothecary,—The other eighty-one persons charged by this indictment with religious misdemeanour are respectively described in the bill as yeomen, tradesmen, artificers, craftsmen, wives of men to whom no gentle quality is assigned, widows, spinsters. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 31 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against one hundred and sixty-one persons, late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, within the Liberties &c. of Westminster; the same 161 persons being respectively described as yeomen, tradesmen, artisans, craftsmen, laborers, wives of men to whom no gentle quality is assigned, widows, spinsters. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 31 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel, or any other place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against sixty-four persons late of St. Margaret's Westminster within the Liberties &c. of Westminster, comprising Archibald Douglas gentleman, Hannah Bayles the wife of Thomas Bayles esq., Elizabeth Joy the wife of John Joy gentleman, Thomas Duvall gentleman, Shelden Napper gentleman, Claude Fride picture-drawer, Cybil Rennee the wife of Charles Rennee gentleman, Elizabeth Dillon the wife of Charles Dillon gentleman, and Austin Vancove gentleman— nine persons. The other individuals charged by this indictment with religious misdemeanour are respectively described as yeomen, tradesmen, artisans, craftsmen, laborers, wives of men to whom no gentle quality is assigned, widows, spinsters. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 31 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against nineteen persons late of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields, within the Liberties &c. of Westminster, comprising William Napper gentleman, Adrian Vanneer gentleman, John Southwell gentleman, George Gregson gentleman, Elizabeth Bowteel the wife of Barnaby Bowteel gentleman, Richard Clayton gentleman, his wife Mary Clayton, Richard Fitzgerald gentleman, Cesar Pearce gentleman, and John Beach gentleman—ten persons. The other persons charged by this indictment are respectively described in the bill as yeomen, tradesmen, craftsmen, wives of men to whom no gentle quality is assigned, spinsters. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 31 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against one hundred and seventy two persons, late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields within the Liberties &c. of Westminster, comprising Charles Arnold esq., his wife Mary Arnold, Thomas Porter esq., the Lady Elizabeth Cannowle, Edward Frank gentleman, the Lady Margaret Purbeck, Gratian de Perinant gentleman—seven persons. The other persons charged by this indictment with religious misdemeanour are respectively described in the bill as yeomen, tradesmen, artisans, craftsmen, laborers, wives of men to whom no gentle quality is assigned, widows, spinsters. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings appear on the bill. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 31 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Ann Staveley wife of Christopher Staveley yeoman, Richard Leigh gentleman, and Thomas Whitbread victualler, all three late of St. Margaret's Westminster within the liberties &c. of Westminster. 3 April, 31 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel, or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against thirty-three persons, late of St Clement's Danes' within the Liberties &c. of Westminster co. Midd. comprising Lord Weldin. All the other persons charged by this bill with religious misdemeanour are respectively described in the indictment as yeomen, wives of men to whom no gentle quality is assigned, widows or spinsters. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 31 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against one hundred and seventeen persons, late of St. Margaret's Westminster, comprising the following individuals of gentle quality, to wit, John Cary gentleman, Edward Thorrall esq., Thomas Sandyes, esq., Edward Fitz-Harris gentleman, Francis Sturke gentleman, the Lady Elizabeth Slingsby, the Lady Mercy Oveby, George . . . . gentleman, John Joy gentleman, in all, nine persons to whom gentle quality is definitely assigned by the draughtsman of the bill. The men indicted by the bill, whose names are not mentioned in this note, were tradesmen, yeomen, craftsmen, artisans, laborers. . . . Some of the indicted widows and spinsters bear gentle surnames: but most of the indicted women are the wives or daughters of male misdemeanants, to whom no gentility is attributed. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 30 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against two hundred and forty-two persons, late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields within the Liberties of Westminster, comprising Sir George Wakeman knt., Thomas Awbrey clerk, George Ashley yeoman, Andrew Robinson distiller, Francis Larances apothecary, John Christian painter, the Lady Mary St. John, David Power surgeon, his wife Mary Power, the Lady Frances Green, Alexander Pryor laborer, John Devall esq., Henry Skelton yeoman, Grace Wharton spinster, the Lady Margaret Purbeck, Laurence Aurabilis yeoman, Sir . . . . Lancaster knt., his wife Mary Lady Lancaster, John Glassington yeoman, the Lady Dorothy Napper, Sir . . . . knt., George Haines gentleman, . . . . Burdet gentleman, George Rathbone gentleman, Philip Hamerton gentleman, . . . . Ragway gentleman, Thomas . . . . M.D., his wife Elizabeth . . . . With the exception of the few persons of gentle quality, mentioned amongst these twenty-eight selected persons, no one of the individuals charged by this bill with religious misdemeanour is credited with any sort of gentility. The male misdemeanants not already named in this note were tradesmen, yeomen, artificers or laborers, and most of the indicted women were the wives or daughters of the 'not gentle' misdemeanants. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 30 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said 15 Dec, 30 Charles II. against thirty-nine persons, late of the parish of St. Mary Le Savoy. The men indicted in this bill are tradesmen, artisans, craftsmen, yeomen or laborers, no one of them being described as of gentle quality; and no one of the indicted women appears to have been of gentle degree. S. P. West. R. 3 April, 30 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month begining on the said 15 Dec, 30 Charles II. against eighty-two persons late of St. Clement's Danes' &c. within the Liberties of the City of Westminster, co. Midd. comprising the following persons of gentle quality, to wit, John Richard gentleman, Edward Pedley gentleman, John Cummins gentleman, Henry Fenwick gentleman, his wife Elizabeth Fenwick, —five persons in all, to whom the draughtsmen of the indictment assigns gentility. The four gentlemen excepted, all the male persons charged with religious misdemeanor by this indictment are tradesmen, craftsmen, artisans, yeomen or laborers. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 30 Charles II.

15 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during the month beginning on the said day, against sixty-four persons, late of St. Paul's Covent Garden, within the Liberties of the City of Westminster &c, comprising these persons of gentle quality, to wit, Charles Greene gentleman, Margaret Arrington spinster, Mathew Stilboy gentleman, George Birto gentleman, Felix Mountaine gentleman, Sebastian Bremont gentleman, Francis Best gentleman, Francis Groves gentleman, Edward Griffin gentleman—in all nine individuals. The other men charged in the indictment are tradesmen, artisans, craftsmen, yeomen, laborers,—the persons described as labourers far outnumbering the individuals of any other sort of workers. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 30 Charles II.

16 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Shadwell co. Midd. on the said day, in the course of conversation had between Bartholomew Taylor, a loyal subject of the Lord the King, and a certain William Shaw late of the said parish laborer, a perverse and seditious man, of and about the lawfully established religion of this kingdom of England, William Shaw then and there daringly said, that he still was and ever from the time of his nativity had been of the religion of the Roman Church, to wit, a papist, upon which the said Bartholomew Tayler, having a cup of ale in his right hand, then and there drank the said cup towards the same William Shaw, and then and there said "An health to our Lord Charles the Second now King of England!" whereupon the said William Shaw with malice aforethought, and in the presence and hearing of divers persons spoke and uttered this wicked, detestable and diabolical answer, malediction and deprecation against our most serene lord Charles the Second &c. to wit, "God dam him! I will not pledge him: "—On his arraignment for this extremely shocking speech, Will Shaw put himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country; but the jury by consent forthwith (per consensum immediate) declared him 'Guilty,' and he was fined six pounds and thirteen shillings, and was committed to Newgate, there to remain till he should have paid the fine. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

21 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of William Beomont of Cheeswick co. Midd. at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being suspected to be a popish recusant." He appeared, and was redelivered to his bail. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

22 December, 30 Charles II—Recognizances, for the appearance of Humphrey Painter of Fulham inholder at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being a reputed popish recusant." He appeared and was redelivered to his bail. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

22 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Peter Duff of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate victualler and a suspected "papist," and of two sureties: For the said Peter Duff's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

24 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Phillipp Le Feaver of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields cordwinder, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Zacharias Aglas of St. Paul's Covent Garden coffee-man, and Henry Slaughter of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields cooper, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the said Phillipp Le Feaver's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace, "he being a popish recusant." On 28 April, 1679, the matter was deferred, as Phillipp Le Feaver on that day pleaded 'Not Guilty,' and put himself on a jury. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

24 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Marquis of Winchester J.P. on the said day, of Ralph Johnson jeweller and John Dipsey tailor, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of two-hundred-and-fifty pounds each, and of Henry Pane alias Nevill of the City of London gentleman, in the sum of five hundred pounds: For the appearance of the said Henry Pane alias Nevill at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. The gentleman failed to appear at the Session. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

24 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Devorie of Quakers Street in Spittlefeilds broadweaver, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said John Devorie ("hee haveing confest himself to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. He appeared, when the matter was deferred and he was redelivered to his bail. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

24 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Hariot esq., J.P., of John Tyson of Islington victualler and Richard Frisby of Clerkenwell victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Lancelot Kirk of St. James's Clerkenwell gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds: For the appearance of the said Lancelot Kirk at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "then and there to answer the personating of Jeremiah Buckly alias Buckle on Wednesday the seventeenth of this instant month, and taking the Oath of Allegiance and Supremacie instead of and for him the said Buckly alias Buckle." Lancelot Kerk appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

24 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of James Hodgson of Old Staires in Wapping in Whitechappell gun-maker, and John Overing of the same place brewer, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the wife of the said James Hodgson ("shee haveing confessed herself to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. She did not appear. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

24 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Henry Richardson of Greene Banck in Wapping in Stepney victualler and William Alderson of Trinity Lane in the parish of Queenehive London haberdasher, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Elizabeth Robinson and Elizabeth Mennell ("they having confessed themselves to be papists") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. Both women appeared and were discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

24 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Charles the Marquis of Winchester J.P., of Ralph Johnson jeweller and John Dipsey tailor, both of St. Martin's-in the-Fields, in the sum of two hundred and fifty pounds each, and of Henry Pane alias Nevill of the City of London gentleman, in the sum of five hundred pounds: For the appearance of the said Henry Pane alias Nevill at the next G. Q. Session of Peace for the city of Westminster, then and there to answer to such matters, as shall be objected against him. S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

25 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of William Fitzgerald of Milend co. Midd. victualler, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said William Fitzgerald ("hee being suspected to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

26 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Richard Spicer of East Smithfield in Aldgate barber, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said Richard Spicer ("hee being suspected to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

27 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Muckleberry of York Street in Bethnall Greene frame-work-knitter, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said John Muckleberry ("hee being suspected to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. He appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

27 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Vincent Shirley near the Armitage in Wapping in Whitechappell potter, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said Vincent Shirley ("hee being suspected to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. He appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate that he had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

27 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of George Howard of Katherine Wheel Alley in Whitechappell laborer, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said George Howard ("hee being suspected to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He did not appear; and the matter was deferred till his return from sea, Mary Loadman, wife of Robert Loadman of Rosemary Lane in Whitechappell, having taken oath that the said George Howard was at sea in the King's service. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

27 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, on two several parchments, for the appearance of Henry Conyers barber and Henry Talbott musitianer, both of St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd., at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Westminster, to answer &c. for being "popish recusants." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

27 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, on two several parchments, of Edward Pedley of Vere Street in St. Clement's Danes victualler and Susanna Rose (wife of Marmaduke Rose) of the same parish at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace, each of them "being a reputed Roman Catholick." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

27 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, on twelve several parchments, for the appearance of (1) Mathew Dixon of St. Andrew's Holborn painter and his wife Mary Dixon, (2) Robert Whitfeild of St. Martin's-in-the-Feilds stationer, and his wife Elizabeth Whitfeild, (3) Timothy Peniston of St. Andrew's Holborne tailor, (4) Ursula Jones of St. Andrew's Holborn widow, (5) Elizabeth Biniard, wife of William Biniard of St. Andrew's Holborn vitler, (6) Dorothy Smithson, the wife of Bernard Smithson of . . . ., (7) Robert Corwin of St. Andrew's Holborn tailor, (8) Katherine Watkins of St. Andrew's Holborn widow, (9) James Bartlett of St. Andrew's Holborne surgeon and his wife Mary Bartlett, (10) Sarah Allman of St. Andrew's Holborn widow, (11) William Baldwin of . . . ., and (12) Ellianore Harwood of St. Andrew's Holborn spinster, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, each of the aforesaid persons being described as "a suspected papist" or "a suspected popish recusant."—Robert Whitfeild's case is more fully set forth in the words, which speak of him as bound to appear at the Session of the Peace, then and there to anwer &c. for "being a Popish Recusant, and for being in Towne contrary to his Majesties Proclamacion." S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Ridley of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields surgeon, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of his two sureties, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the said John Ridley's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. for being "a popish recusant." He appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Elizabeth Timber man of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate co. Midd. widow, in the sum of forty pounds, and of two sureties in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the said Elizabeth Timberman's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. She appeared and was discharged, on producing a certificate that she had taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken at Hicks Hall before three Justices of the Peace, of Elizabeth Wilson of Swan Alley in St. James's Clarkenwell widow, and of two sureties: For the said Elizabeth Wilson's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. She appeared on 5 Jan., 1678, and was discharged on producing a certificate that she had taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken at Hicks Hall before three Justices of the Peace, of John Wise gentleman and John Collyer wyer-drawer, both of Holborne co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Ellen Wise, wife of the said John Wise, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. She appeared on 28 April, 1679, when the matter was deferred as "Sir Wm. Smith knew her to bee a protestant." S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken at Hicks Hall before three Justices of the Peace, of Frances Bell of Golden Lane Plow-Court widow, in the sum of forty pounds, and of two sureties in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the said Frances Bell's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace &c. She appeared and was discharged on producing a certificate that she had taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Phillipp Nicholl the Elder of White Hart Court in White-chappell co. Midd. wood-hatmaker, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said Phillipp Niccoll the Elder, and also of Phillipp Nicholl the Younger, Leonard Leberk and John Buket ("they being suspected to bee papists") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. Phillipp the Elder appeared and was discharged; the others were re-delivered to their bail. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Vandercluse of St. Katherine's co. Midd. cordwainer, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said John Vandercluse ("hee being justly suspected to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. He appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Farskell of St. Katherine's co. Midd. victualler and of two sureties for the appearance of the said John Farskell ("hee being suspected to be a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He did not appear. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Margaret Abittely of Whitechappell widow, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said Margarett Abittely ("shee having confessed herself a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. She appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate that she had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Henry Corbisheere of Whitechappell co. Midd. wood-hat-maker and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said Henry Corbisheere and also of John Cullin, Bartholomew Raskin, Mathias Pott, Henry Vuckly and Reyner Bawdwynn ("they being suspected to bee papists") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. Henry Corbisheere appeared and was redelivered to his mainpernours; all the others appeared and were discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Harding barber and William Boxman weaver, both of Whitechappell, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the wife of the said John Hardman ("shee being suspected to bee a papist") at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace. She appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Susannah Palmer of Chequer Alley in St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate, widow and a suspected "papist," and of two sureties: For the said Susannah Palmer's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. She appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Thomas Shepard of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate pipe-maker and a suspected "papist," and of two sureties: For the said John Shepard's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate that he had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Timothy Price of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of one, hundred pounds, and of two sureties in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Timothy Price at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Westminster, "to the end that he may then and there be proceeded against according to the law, he being a suspected papist." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

28 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Christian Brampton, daughter of John Brampton of St. Mary's-leSavoy gentleman, and Mary Brampton, wife of the aforesaid John Brampton gentleman, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Westminster, to answer &c., the one woman being described as "a Roman Catholic" and the other as "a popish recusant." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of John Tavernour of Maydenhead Row in St. Giles's-in-the-Fields glover at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate that he had taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, on nine several parchments, for the appearance of (1) James Cotter of St. Clement's Danes' gentleman, (2) Charity Norris of St. Clement's Danes' widow, (3) John Richardson of the Ship Yard in St. Clement's Danes' gentleman, (4) John Brookes of St. Clement's Danes' victualler, (5) George Brett of St. Clement's Danes' taylor, (6) Anne Brookes, the wife of the aforesaid John Brookes, (7) Stephen Mason of the King's Head in Drury Lane taylor, (8) William Turbeck of St. Paul's Covent-garden perriwigmaker, and (9) Cecily Webster of Duke Street in St. Clement's Danes' spinster, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Westminster to answer &c., each of them being described as "a reputed Roman Catholic" or "a suspected popish recusant." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Charles Munds of Hammersmith co. Midd. gentleman at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answer for being suspected of recusancy." He appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Anne Baldwin of St. Andrew's Holborn spinster, and Edward Pepper of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West gentleman, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. for being suspected "popish recusants." S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Henry Fervid of Shoe Lane in St. Bride's London taylor, and William Roscoe of St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. taylor, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Ellen, the wife of John Phillipps of St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. taylor, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer &c. "for being a reputed popish recusant." She did not appear. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Phillipps of St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. tayler, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said John Phillipps at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer "for being a reputed popish recusant." He did not appear. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Joseph Bowes of St. Clement's Danes' taylor, and of two sureties: For the appearance of the said Joseph Bowes at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer &c. "for being a reputed popish recusant." He did not appear. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of William Kempson, of St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. victualler, and of two sureties: For the said William Kempson's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer &c. "for being a reputed popish recusant."—He appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate, that he had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Lucas of Blew Anchor Alley in St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate laborer and "a suspected papist" and of his two sureties: For the said John Lucas's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared and was redelivered to bail. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Rudder of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. . . . . and of two sureties: For the said John Rudder's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate, that he had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper (comp et produc certif q'd rec Sacr'm' Cene D'nice exon). S. P. R., 13 Jan., Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Joan Simpson of Luteners' Lane in St. Giles's-in-the-Fields . . . ., and of two sureties: For the said Joan Simpson's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex. She appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate, that she had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Porter of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields . . . ., and of two sureties: For the said John Porter's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. He appeared 5 Jan., 1678, and was discharged on producing a certificate that he had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before three Justices of the Peace at "le vestri" in St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, of Jane Poore of . . . ., and of two sureties: For the said Jane Poore's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. She appeared and was discharged on producing a certificate, that she had taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Cutler, knt. and bart. J.P., of William Edwards silk-weaver and William Glover yeoman, both of St. Margaret's Westminster, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of Jane Edwards at the same parish at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Westminster, to answer to what "shall be objected against her for beinge a popish recusant, and refusinge to take oaths of Supremacy and Obedience." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, on three several parchments, for the appearance of John Dankers of Long Acre in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields picture-drawer, Henry Dankers of Long Acre aforesaid, and Charles Vivion of Clare Street in St. Clement's Danes' barber, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace, each of the three "being suspected to be a popish recusant." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

30 December, 30 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Daniel Maccarty late of the said parish clerk, born in the kingdom of Ireland within the dominions of the Lord now King, and made and ordained a priest by authority derived from the See of Rome after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist in 1 Eliz. and before the said 30 Dec, 30 Charles II., weighing little the laws and statutes of this kingdom of England, and in no degree fearing the penalties contained in them, traitorously and as a false traitor of the Lord now King was and remained. Endorsed "Test Sebastian Jones, Thomas Stiffe, . . . . Rockhall . . . . Jur." On the face of the bill appears the clerical record, that Daniel Maccarty put himself on a jury, was found 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be executed in the manner, prescribed for the execution of culprits convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 26 Feb., 32 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, on three several parchments, for the appearance of Andrew Ashton surgeon, Anthony Tomlingson taylor and Lewis Savory coachman, all three of St. Giles'sin-the-Fields, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. All three appeared, and each of them was discharged on producing a certificate, that he had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—One hundred and thirty-two sets of recognizances (entered upon two long strips of parchment, closely written on both sides), taken before Sir Charles Harbord knt. the King's Surveyor General, Sir John Cutler knt. and bart., Sir William Waller, bart., Sir Thomas Orby bart., and Francis Wythens, Thomas Robinson, Humphry Wirly, William Bridgman, Thomas Bayles, Thomas Lewis, Thomas Povey, George Farwell, and Walter Lapp esquires, Justices of the Peace for the City and Liberties of Westminster:—Beginning with the Recognizances of Adrian Vanneer of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields brasier, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Matthew Rogerman cook and Robert Greenway . . . ., both of the aforesaid parish, in the sum of fifty pounds each; the condition of the said Recognizances being "that the above-named Adrian Vanneer and his wife Mary, who are suspected to bee papists, shall personally appear at the next Generall Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held for the said City and Liberties of Westminster, and in the meantime shall keep the peace and bee of good behaviour towards our Soveraigne Lord the King and all his liege people, and not departe the Court without licence &c."—Followed by recognizances under the same condition for the appearance &c. of the following persons, suspected to be papists, to wit, (1) Charles Vincent of Shandois Street in St. Paul's Covent Garden silk-dyer, (2) Mark Goodyeare of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields apothecary, (3) Elizabeth Sheldon of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (4) Katherine Sheldon of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (5) Daniel Guy of St. Paul's Covent Garden tayler, (6) Anne wife of the said Daniel Guy, (7) William Barroon of St. Paul's Covent Garden tayler, (8) Katherine Barroon, wife of the said William Barroon, (9) John Labar of St. Paul's Covent Garden tayler, (10) Lucy Labar, wife of the said John Labar, (11) William King of St. Clement's Danes tayler, (12) Elianor King, wife of the said William King, (13) John Le Roux of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (14) Katherine Le Roux, wife of the said John Le Roux, (15) Dennis Gannoe of St. Clement's Danes' gentleman, (16) Nicholas Casson of St. Clement's Danes' fringe-weaver, (17) Peter Duran of St. Martin's-in-theFields confectioner, (18) Nicholas Smyth of St. Martin's-in-theFields goldsmith, (19) Daniel Mair of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (20) Elizabeth Roach of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields widow, (21) Elizabeth Griffith of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (22) Anne Folliard the wife of Ralph Folliard of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields esq., (23) Dorothy Wood of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (24) Charles Cavener of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (25) Martha Cavener, wife of the said Charles Cavener, (26) John Grunnell of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields barber, (27) Christopher Birch of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (28) Robert Whitfeild of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields stationer, (29) James Pemberton of St. Martin's Ludgate painter-stainer, (30) Timothy Dwynn of St. Martin's Ludgate, chandler, (31) Mary De Summore, wife of Daniel De Summore of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields goldsmith, (32) Mary Wright, wife of Christopher Wright of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . . . ., (33) Claud Fride of St. Margaret's Westminster picture-drawer, (34) James Pollard of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields cook, (35) Remmoe Cerwell of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields merchant, (36) Lambert Miller of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (37) John Tallow of St. Martins-in-theFields cook, (38) Jane Rusham of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (39) Anne Pettyt of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (40) Arundle Bradshaw of St. Paul's Covent Garden . . . ., (41) Katherine Bradshawy wife the said Arundle Bradshaw, (42) Mark Roy alias King of St. Paul's Covent Garden merchant, (43) Peter Bushway of St. Paul's Covent Garden embroiderer, (44) Katherine Bolger of Covent Garden widow, (45) Mary Hodges, wife of Daniel Hodges of St. Paul's Covent Garden tayler, (45) Mary Hubart, wife of Richard Hubart of St. Mary's Savoy . . . ., (46) William Trevethell of St. Mary's Savoy engraver, (47) John Stacy of St. Paul's Covent Garden gentleman, (48) Mary Parker of St. Clement's Danes' widow, (49) Elizabeth Rawlins of St. Clement's Danes' widow, (50) Prudence Meachamp of St. Clement's Danes' widow, (51) Nicholas Delassall of St. Clement's Danes' cook, (52) William Sympson of St. Clement's Danes' barber, (53) Darby Langley of St. Margaret's Westminster victualler, (54) Nicholas Stubbs of St. Margaret's Westminster victualler, (55) Thomas Travers of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, (56) John Rigg of St. Martin's-in-theFields tayler, (57) John Cocus of St. Paul's Covent Garden, (58) Gartrude Cocus, wife of the said John Cocus, (59) William Keyzer of St. Paul's Covent Garden . . . ., (60) Cornelia Dorothy Keyzer, wife of the said William Keyzer, (61) Charles Blake of St. Paul's CoventGarden tayler, (62) Trecia Blake, wife of the said Charles Blake, (63) Richard Jones of St. Paul's Covent Garden tayler, (64) Anne Jones wife of the said Richard Jones, (65) Rice Price of St. Paul's Covent-Garden tayler, (66) May Price, wife of the said Rice Price, (67) Dominick Rouge of St. Paul's Covent-Garden tayler, (68) Dominick Dufour of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (69) Nicholas Poynts of St. Martin's-in-theFields tayler, (70) Margaret Dubren, wife of Maxene Dubren of St. Paul's Covent-Garden . . . ., (71) Francis Guiltier of St. Martin's-inthe-Fields merchant, (72) Mary Guiltier, wife of the said Francis Guiltier, (73) Nicholas Delansant of St. Paul's Covent Garden tayler, (74) Peter Alexander of St. Paul's Covent-Garden tayler, (75) John Savery of St. Paul's Covent-Garden tayler, (76) Nicola, the wife of Nicholas Delansant of St. Paul's Covent-Garden tayler, (77) Richard Harris of St. Mary's Savoy upholsterer, (78) William Clayton of St. Mary's Savoy uphosterer, (79) Richard Burton of St. Mary's Savoy joyner, (80) Thomas Holder of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields esq., (81) John Delantre, of St. Martin's-inthe-Fields . . . ., (82) Elizabeth Delantre, wife of the said John Delantre, (83) John Williams of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, (84) John Dupere St. Martin's-in-the-Fields peruque-maker, (85) Charles Daniel of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields strong-water-man, (86) Henry Milford of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields patterne-drawer, (87) Francis Suckley of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields inholder, (88) Margaret Storey of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields widow, (89) William Gillerton of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields upholsterer, (90) Thomas Fling of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (91) Peter Crosse of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, (92) Thomas Hickman of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tallow-chandler, (93) Abigail Shreeve, wife of John Shreeve of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . . . ., (94) Nicholas Molleneux of St. Martins -in-the- Fields . . . ., (95) John Deane of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields bricklayer, (96) Giles Bignall of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields merchant, (97) Mary Cantrell, the wife of John Cantrell of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields baker, (98) Joan Slade of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (99) Joseph Brady of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields merchant, (100) Patrick Nash of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields merchant, (101) Robert Hand of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields smith, (102) Thomas Kelly of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields shoemaker, (103) Nicholas Clarke of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (104) Charles Gilford of Covent Garden apothecary, (105) Andrew Tompson of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (106) Robert Jennison of St. Andrew's Holborn gentleman, (107) Thomas Budding of St. Martin's-in-the Fields cook, (108) Mary Budding, wife of the said Thomas Budding, (109) Bryan Ryley of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, (110) Humphrey Prescott of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields baker, (111) Andrew Napper of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (112) Ursula Napper, wife of the said Andrew Napper, (113) Mark Holder of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . . . ., (114) Thomasine the wife of John Gill of St. Martin's-in-theFields, (115) Anne Holder of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, (116) Francis Deplissey of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields peruque-maker,' (117) Thomas Harris of St. Margaret's Westminster, petty-chapman, (118) David Lloyd of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields watchmaker, (119) Cybell Ranneer, the wife of Joseph Ranneer of Westminster gentleman, (120) Elizabeth Dillon, the wife of Charles Dillon of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, (121) Augustine Vancove of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, (122) Mary Vancove, wife of the said Augustine Vancove, (123) James Richardson of St. Margaret's Westminster victualler, (124) Lucas May of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (125) Laurence Martindale of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields blacksmith, (126) John Baptist Colperes of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, (127) Patrick Wood of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields gentleman, (128) Bridget Whistler, wife of Robert Whistler of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . . . ., (129) Margaret Dukes, wife John Dukes of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . . . ., (130) Elizabeth Odinet of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields widow, (131) Christopher Staveley of St. Margaret's Westminster glover, (132) Anne Staveley, wife of the said Christopher Stavely, (133) Robert Power of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (134) John Tent of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (135) Elizabeth Joy, the wife of John Joy . . . ., (136) Francis Collett of St. Paul's Covent-Garden gentleman, (137) Mary Collett, wife of the said Francis Collett, (138) Marian Collett of St. Paul's Covent-Garden spinster, (139) Dominick Hurrett . . . ., (140) Katharine Leneer . . . . spinster, (141) Mary Baker, wife of John Baker of St. Margaret's Westminster tayler, (142) Katherine Brown of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields widow, (143) Dorothy Brown of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spinster, (144) Darby Mulraine of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields barber, (145) Margaret Beresford of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields widow, (146) Richard Tufton of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (147) Grace Dudley, the wife of Francis Dudley of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, (148) Edward Weldon of St. Clement's Danes' victualler; Edward Higgs of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields brickmaker, (149) Jane Higgs, wife of the said Edward Higgs, (150) Elizabeth Fenwicke, wife of Henry Fenwicke . . . ., (151) George Harris of St. Margaret's Westminster joyner, (152) Christopher Ives of St. Margaret's Westminster plaisterer, (153) Edward Duvall of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tayler, (154) Mary Mazzantini wife of . . . . Mazzantini of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields chirurgeon, (155) Anthony Deligny of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields merchant, (156) Frances Pool, wife of Godfrey Pool of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields milliner, (157) Charles Shelley of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields goldsmith, (158) Edward Edwards of St. Margaret's Westminster tayler, (159) Frances Cox, wife of Nathaniel Cox . . . ., (160) Mary Nelson, wife of Robert Nelson of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, (161) Nicholas Desert of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields musician, (162) Robert Paddon of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, (163) Elizabeth Collins of St. Martin's-in-theFields spinster, (164) Henry Thunder of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields victualler, (165) Mathew Philboy of St. Paul's Covent-Garden gentleman, (166) Isaac Thorpe of St. Clement's Danes gentleman, and (167) Mathew Le Fountaine of Rose Street . . . . With the exception of two recognizances, in which the principal was bound in the sum of two hundred pounds, the principals in the 133 recognizances, for the appearance &c. of these aforenamed persons suspected to be Catholics, were all bound in the sum of one hundred pounds, the mainpernors being bound in the same sum when there was only one surety, and in the sum of fifty pounds each, when the principal was supported by two mainpernors. S. P. West, R., 7 Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Richard Tomson painter-stayner and John Norris joyner, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and John Hayles of the aforesaid parish gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds: For the appearance of the said John Hayles at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace, to answer &c. for "being a reputed papist." S. P. West. R., 7. Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Dorothy Wyld, wife of Lawrence Wyld of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields tobacconist, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex. She appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate, that she had recently taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Elizabeth Browne of St Andrew's Holborne widow, and John . . . . of the same parish cutler, and Anne Smith of the same parish spinster, at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being popish recusants." They appeared and were discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before John Underwood esq. J. P., of John Williams victualler and Daniel Gardiner blacksmith, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Thomas Wright of . . . . victualler, in the sum of one hundred pounds: For the said Thomas Wright's appearance at the next Session of the Peace. The matter was deferred on 28 April, 1679, when it appeared that Thomas Wright had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of George Tilley needlemaker and William Cattler carpenter, both of St. Giles's-withoutCripplegate in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Elianor Tilley, wife of the said George Tilley, at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, she being a suspected papist. She appeared and was discharged. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Thomas Maley of St. Botolph's-without-Aldgate apothecary and Robert Kighley of St. Leonard's Shoreditch chandler, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of Francis Moyne the wife of Simon Moyne and of Elizabeth Dermunde at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, both women being suspected "papists." They appeared and were discharged. S. P. R. 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.

31 December, 30 Charles II.—Recognizances of Mary Willard of Chequer Alley in St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate spinster, and a suspected "papist," and of two sureties: For the said Mary Willard's appearance at the next Session of the Peace. She appeared, and was discharged on producing a certificate, that she had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 30 Charles II.