Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1684

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

230-259

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1684', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 230-259. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66091 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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1684

10 January, 35 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster on the said day, Samuel Byrt late of the said parish shoemaker in the presence and hearing of divers of the King's lieges and subjects spoke these malicious and seditious words, to wit, "I think the King is most governed by papists, and the most of the King's court are papists and bastards." No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. West. R., 26 June, 36 Charles II.

18 January, 35 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, John Barker late of the said parish yeoman, a person of bad reputation and a common receiver of stolen goods, unlawfully received for his own unjust profit and had in his possession a watch with gold cases marked with C D. and a Coronett, worth twenty pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Right Honourable Conyers Lord Darcy and Conyers, the said watch having been some time before secretly stolen and carried away from the said lord by some felon. Found 'Guilty' by a jury, John Barker was fined in the sum of 13£., and was committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine. S. P. R., 25 Feb., 36 Charles II.

20 January, 35 Charles II. and 29 January, 36 (?) Charles II.— Six several certificates, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Safer West of St. Margaret's Westminster cheesemonger, of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his dwellinghouse in the said parish on six several occasions, to wit, in the forenoon and afternoon of nth, 18th and 25th of November last past: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed six several fines of 20£. on the said Safer West for his said six offences, to wit, a fine of 20£. for each offence. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

31 January, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken on the said day, for the appearance of Jonathan Fuller of Whitechappell victualler, George Paperill of Whitechappell butcher, Thomas Giles of Whitechappell cooper, and Richard Hudson of the same parish horner, at the S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for refusing to obey Mathias Houltrop headborough in executing a warrant against Edward Stephens of Whitechappell butcher, for levying 20£. according to the Act to prevent and suppress seditious conventicles . . . . he being convicted of wittingly and willingly suffering an unlawfull Assembly Meeting or Conventicle to be holden in his dwelling-house." S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

2 February, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborne on the said day, Philip Lewis late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Robert Payne by striking him on the head with a candlestick, and so giving him a wound one inch long and half-an-inch deep, of which wound the said Robert Payne has languished from the said 2nd day of February even to the day of the taking of this inquisition. Philip Lewis confessed the indictment, and was fined 3s. 4d., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 25 Feb., 36 Charles II.

7 March, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances of Rowland Betty of Little Russell Street in St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, in the sum of forty pounds, and Simon Bagley victualler and Thomas Moffett draper, both of Vine Street, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Rowland Betty at the next General Session of the Peace for Westminster, "to answer the cryinge of Scotch cloth about the streets, and for sayinge dangerous and seditious words against the Government." —Also two similar sets of Recognizances, for the appearance of William Erwin and Robert Moffet, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, petty-chapmen, at the same next G. S. P. for Westminster, to "answer the cryinge Scotch cloth about the Streets." S. P. West. R., 2 April, 36 Charles II.

7 March, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields, co. Midd. on the said day, and divers other days and occasions before and afterwards, William Erwing, Robert Murfort and Rowland Betty, all three late of the said parish laborers, wandered abroad under the name and style of Petty Chapmen, craftily and deceitfully using the art of buying and selling Scotch cloth and Holland cloth and wares pertaining to the art and faculty of linen-drapers. Each petty-chapman pleaded 'Not Guilty,' but on 14 May, 36 Charles II., they were all declared 'Guilty' by a jury and sentenced to be stript naked from the middle upwards, and to be whipt till their bodies should be bloody, "at the whipping-post prope Charing Crosse." S. P. R., 7 April, 36 Charles II.

16 March, 36 Charles II.—True bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Rebecca Coltman the wife of John Coltman sailor, Mary Alford the wife of Robert Alford sailor, Mary Hill the wife of Robert Hill sailor, Elizabeth Johns the wife of Peirce Johns sailor, Mary Basse the wife of Robert Basse yeoman, Robert Medford yeoman, his wife Mary Medford, Francis Bullard chandler, Rebecca Andrews the wife of Benjamin Andrews yeoman,—the men named in the indictment being all described as late of Stepney co. Midd.— Rebecca Coltman, Mary Hill, Elizabeth Johns, Robert Medford and Rebecca Andrews were all discharged of the indictment, on satisfying the Court of their conformity. No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case against the other indicted persons. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 36 Charles II.

17 March, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Bridgman late of the said parish yeoman assaulted a certain Robert Weston of the age of seventeen years, the son of one John Weston and the apprentice of a certain William Adams of Wansworth co. Surrey fisherman, and afterwards on the same 17th of March, 36 Charles II., carried the same Robert Weston by force and against his will on board a certain ship called The Margarett and Dorothy then lying in the river Thames, and subsequently did convey him against his will to parts beyond sea called Antego, and there in Antego for his own gain and profit sold the said Robert Weston. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. R., 8 Dec, 36 Charles II.

23 March, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Charles Osborne esq. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John Waterson of Whitechappell co. Midd. yeoman, of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his dwellinghouse in the said parish, on the said 23rd March: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said John Waterson for his said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

27 March, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborn co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Walsh late of the said parish laborer stole and carried off a haire portmanteau worth five shillings, two muslin cravatts worth six shillings, a point-lace cravatt worth three pounds and five shillings, a tortoise-shell comb worth two shillings, "a Beverett hat" worth fifteen shillings, and two ounces of the Balm of Gilead, worth sixteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Walsh. No clerical note on the face of the indictment. G. D. R., 26 August, 1 James II.

8 April, 36 Charles II.—Record of the appeal of Mary Baxter of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate co. Midd. widow to G. Q. S. P., from the conviction, whereby she stood convicted before Thomas Rowe esq. J.P. for Middlesex of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in her house in the aforesaid parish on 25th November, 35 Charles II. and was fined 20£. for the said offence:—With record that on the said appeal the said Mary Baxter was found by a jury ' Not Guilty' of the said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

8 April, 36 Charles II.—Record of the appeal of John Cooke senr. of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate co. Midd. . . . ., to G. Q. S. P. from the conviction whereby he stood convicted, before Sir Thomas Jenner Knt. and Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of having wittingly and willingly permitted a conventicle, at which some forty persons were present, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house or shed in the same parish on 9th Dec., 35 Charles II., and was fined 20£. for the said offence: With record that on the said appeal the aforesaid John Cooke was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

8 April, 36 Charles II.—Record of the appeal of Thomas Hollis of St. Trinity's Minorites the Elder cutler to G. Q. S. P. from the conviction whereby he stood convicted, before Sir George Treby knt. and J.P. for Middlesex, of having permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in the said parish, and was fined 20£. for the said offence, on 7th Nov., 35 Charles II.: With record that on the said appeal the same Thomas Hollis was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

8 April, 36 Charles II.—Record of the appeal of Samuel Boulton of Lumbert (sic) Street in London goldsmith to G. Q. S. P., from the conviction, whereby he stood convicted before Sir Clement Armiger knt. and J.P. for Middlesex, of being present at a certain unlawful conventicle, and of taking upon himself to preach to and teach the persons, assembled at the same unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in St. Margaret's Westminster in the afternoon of 26th August, 35 Charles II. for which offences a fine of 20£. was imposed upon him by the J.P.; With record that on his said appeal the said Samuel Boulton was found 'Not Guilty' by a Jury. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

17 April, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-le-Savoy co. Midd. on the said day, John Lord Berkeley and John Berkeley gentleman, both late of the said parish, assaulted Ralph Tonycliffe gentleman, and that the said John Lord Berkeley slew and murdered the said Ralph Tonycliffe by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in and upon his belly near the navel, of which wound he languished in the said parish from the said 17th day of April to the 26th day of the same month, on which last-named day he died of the said wound; And that John Berkeley gentleman was present at the said felony, and aided and encouraged John Lord Berkeley to perpetrate it. No clerical annotations on the face of this indictment. G. D. R., 8 Oct., 36 Charles II.

20 April, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Wise, Richard Jones, Charles Tooley and Mortaugh Downy, all four late of the said parish laborers, assaulted Elizabeth Fairebancke, And that the said John Wise slew and murdered the said Elizabeth Fairebancke by seizing her with both his hands by her neck, and breaking and crushing her neck with his hands, so that she then and there instantly died: And that the said Richard Jones, Charles Tooley and Mortaugh Downy were present at the said murder, and aided and encouraged John Wise to perpetrate it. Found 'Guilty' John Wise was sentenced to be hanged. Mortaugh Downy was found 'Not Guilty.' Of Richard Jones the clerical annotator says only 'Po se' = he puts himself on a jury. No clerical note over Charles Tooley's name. G. D. R., 8 Oct., 36 Charles II.

20 April, 36 Charles II.—True Bills, on five several parchments, for being present at a conventicle held at Stepney co. Midd. between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. on the said day, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration, against Jonathan Joyner cloth-dyer, Thomas Powell milliner, Benjamin White yeoman, Benjamin Bennet tailor, Alexander Ayres taylor, Samuel Ogbourne weaver, Stephen Deyton taylor, Jasper Clarke silkeweaver, John Case glover, Marcus Keys throwster, John Varreny weaver, Hugh Light sawyer, William Atkins taylor, John Cliffe taylor, Benjamin Painter frame-worker, Moses Collins carpenter, Jaabesse Boston pewterer, Richard Lugg blacksmith, John Collyer carpenter, Henry Norris tobacco-cutter, John Wells tobacco-cutter, Paul Every weaver, Thomas Pearse weaver, Benjamin Wottle cordwinder, William Peale cabinett-maker, Peter Tadley thred-throwster, Edward Johnson taylor, Edward Sherley cordwinder, John Rimmington cordwinder, William Marshall frameworke-knitter, George Winckles porter, Joseph Tayler thredman, Daniel Pillimore silke-weaver, John Jeffryes dyer, John Moldyn cordwinder, Timothy Bisse woolcomer, Cuthbert Holloway laborer, and John Cordred lath-cleaver. Found 'Guilty' by a jury on 30 June, 1684, Jonathan Joyner was fined £26 13s. 4d.; found 'Guilty' on the same day, Thomas Powell was fined £40., and each of them was committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain, until he should have paid the fine put upon him. Benjamin White was fined 6s. 8d., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. Benjamin Bennett, Alexander Ayres, Samuel Ogbourne, Stephen Deyton, Jasper Clarke, Mark Keys, John Varreny, and Hugh Light all eight confessed the indictment, and were each fined £6 13s. 4d., each of the eight being committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain till his fine should have been paid. John Case pleaded 'Not Guilty.' William Atkins, Richard Lugg, John Collyer, Henry Norris, John Wells, all five confessed the indictment, and were each fined £6 13s. 4d., each of them being committed to the New. Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should pay his fine. John Cliffe confessed the indictment and was fined 3s. 4d., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. Moses Collins confessed the indictment, and was fined £6 13s. 4d., (?) and was committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the fine. Jaabesse Boston confessed the indictment, and was fined 6s. 8d., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case against Benjamin Painter. Paul Every, Thomas Pearse, Peter Tadley, Edward Johnson, Edward Sherley, and John Rimmington, all seven confessed the indictment, and were each fined £6 13s. 4d., and each of them was committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the fine put upon him. William Peale pleaded 'Not Guilty,' but on 30 June, 1684, he was found 'Guilty' by a jury, fined £13 6s. 8d., anc committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the fine. Of Benjamin Wottle the clerical annotatoi of the indictment tells nothing, save that he pleaded 'Not Guilty. William Marshall, George Winckles, Joseph Tayler, Daniel Pillimore, John Jeffryes, John Moldyn, Timothy Bisse, and John Cordred, all eight confessed the indictment and were each fined £6 13s. 4d., each of the eight being committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the fine put upon him. On his arraignment Cuthbert Holloway stood mute (dicit nihil), whereupon he was fined £6 13s. 4d., and committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain &c. S. P. R., 14 May, 36 Charles II.

4 May, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborne on the said day, Owen Lloyd late of the said parish gentleman assaulted a certain Isaac Clarke, and with a rapier gave him a wound on the left hand near the thumb, of which wound the said Isaac Clarke has languished from the said 4th May, 36 Charles II., even to the day of the taking of the present inquisition,, to wit, the 14th day of the said month. Owen Lloyd confessed the indictment, and was fined 3s. 4d., and was committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine. S. P. R., 14 May, 36 Charles II.

8 May, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's Islington co. Midd. on the said day, John Holtom alias Holthom and John Bennett, both late of the said parish laborers, stole and led away a gray mare worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of Joseph Sanders. Found 'Guilty,' both culprits were sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 2 July, 36 Charles II.

23 May, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances of Christopher Tremarn and William Shudall of St. Clement's Danes' tailors, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Christoper Tremarn and William Shudall at the next Session of the Peace to be holden at Hicks Hall, to "give evidence against John Smith upon a suspicion of robbing her Grace the Dutches of Portsmouth of goods value about five hundred pounds." S. P. R., 30 June, 36 Charles II.

26 May, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Skelton late of the said parish spinster stole and carried off one hundred pounds in numbered moneys, of the moneys of Sir Job Charlton knt. Mary Skelton confessed the indictment and was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 2 July, 36 Charles II.

27 May, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, in a certain public thoroughfare called Drury Lane in St. Giles's-in-the-Fields on the said day, Thomas Baynes late of the said parish yeoman opened the door of his cellar three feet long and two feet wide, lying and being in the said public way, and unlawfully and wittingly allowed it to remain open, to the serious injury and grave peril of all the subjects of the said Lord the King, passing along the same thoroughfare with their horses, carts and coaches. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. R., 30 June, 36 Charles II.

30 May, 36 Charles II.—True Bill against John Herrick late of St. Sepulchre's for uttering on the said day to a certain Thomas Knox a speech in defamation of Roger L'Estrange esq.: the defamatory utterance being the same speech which the said John Herrick on the following 2 Sept. declared to be a false speech in 'The Humble Petition and Submission of John Heyrick,' set forth in this volume under date 2 Sept., 36 Charles II. John Herrick alias Heyrick alias Errick confessed the indictment, and was fined three shillings and four pence. Taken at Session of Oyer and Terminer. S. P. R., 30 June, 36 Charles II.

7 June, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day between 11 and 12 p.m., Andrew Hill and . . . . Morgan broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Most Noble James the Duke of Ormond, with the intention of stealing and carrying off the goods and chattels of the said Duke being and found in the same house. Found 'Guilty,' both culprits were sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 2 July, 36 Charles II.

10 June, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances of Joseph Martin of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields ballad-singer, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Richard Dennis labourer and James Deane stationer, both of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Joseph Martin and his wife Elizabeth Martin at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to "answer the being common ballad-singers wandering abroad." S. P. R., 30 June, 36 Charles II.

15 June, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of 2 men and 6 women at the next S. P. to be holden at Hicks Hall, "to answer for being present at a riotous and unlawfull Assembly or Conventicle held at East Smyth Feild on the Lords Day, commonly called Sunday;" nothing besides their obscure names being given in the way of personal description of the same men and women. S. P. R., 30 June, 36 Charles II.

19 June, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, on the said day at Portsmouth co. Southampton, John Richardson late of St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd., a soldier and not a captain, retained to serve the Lord the King as a soldier and receiving wages for that service from the same Lord the King, feloniously withdrew from the said service without the King's permission. A note at the foot of the indictment certifies that John Richardson was taken and arrested for the said felony at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields. Found 'Guilty,' John Richardson was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 2 July, 36 Charles II.

19 June, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' on the said day and on divers other days and occasions before and after the said day, Isaac Scriven late of the said parish fringe-maker opened in a certain public place and ancient thoroughfare called The Strand the door of his cellar, three feet long and two feet wide, and unlawfully and wittingly allowed it to remain open, to the grievous injury of the King's subjects passing along that way &c. Isaac Scriven confessed the indictment and was fined 13s. 4d., which he paid to the Sheriff in Court. S. P. R., 30 June, 36 Charles II.

21 June, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields on the said day, in a certain public place called Gerrard Streete, leading from a place called Pickadilly to a place called Sohoe, John Young carver and Thomas Streeter painter, both late of the said parish, dug a pit or vault ten yards broad and eleven feet deep, in the public high-way in which it is the wont and right of the King's lieges and subjects to pass and repass with their horses coaches and carriages, and unlawfully and wittingly left the same vault open, so that on the said 21st of June, between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. one Thomas Whitehead in journeying by the aforesaid way had the misfortune to fall into the aforesaid vault, in which fall his right arm "became broake," a consequence of the said fall and fracture being that Thomas Whitehead has languished and lived languidly from the said 21st of June even to the day of the taking of this inquisition, to wit, the 6th Oct. then next following. On 8 Dec., 1684, John Young and Thomas Streeter both confessed the indictment, and were each fined in the sum of three shillings and four pence, a fine which each of them paid at once to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 36 Charles II.

10 July, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Ralph Hawtrey, Lancilot Johnson and Christopher Clitherow esqs. and Justices of the Peace, of John Clapham of Gray's Inn esq., in the sum of one hundred pounds, and Henry Treddaway of Upton co. Bucks yeoman and Thomas Dance of Uxbridge inn-holder, in the sum of fifty pounds each; For the appearance of the said John Clapham at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. for "the assaulting and wounding of George Carter one of the gentlemen of the Life Guard." S. P. R., 6 Oct., 36 Charles II.

13 July, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir William Smyth bart. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Ann Bennett of Stepney co. Midd., of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some fifteen persons besides the members of her family to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. at her dwelling house in the said parish, in the forenoon of the said 13th July, and of the conviction of . . . . Phinnee late of Stepney co. Midd. clerk, of having preached to and taught the said assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said Ann Bennett for her said offence, and a fine of 20£. on . . . . Phinnee clerk for his said offence. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

20 July, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Charles Osborne esq. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Hugh Upton of St. Trinity's Minorites co. Midd. merchant, of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. at his house in the said parish, on the said 20th July: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said Hugh Upton for his said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

20 July, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir William Smyth bart. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Mathew Hollifeild of St. Paul's Shadwell co. Midd. of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some forty persons to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in the said parish on the said 20th July, 36 Charles II.: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said Matthew Hollifeild for the said offence. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

22 July, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster within the Liberties &c. of Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, James Barnardi late of the said parish painter, a pernicious and scandalous person, with the intention of debauching and corrupting as well the young persons as others of the lieges and subjects of the said Lord the king painted and caused to be painted " fasciculum pictarum cartarum anglice packe of cards per eundum fasciculum pictarum cartarum representans diversas . . . . obscenas posturas et figuras inter Christianos non exprimendas, Et cartas pictas illas adtunc et ibidem vi et armis &c. illicite nequiter maliciose et scandalose venditioni exposuit vendidit utteravit et publicavit &c." No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. West. R., 2 October, 36 Charles II.

22 July, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Sarah Bathow widow of Thomas Bathow late of St. Giles's Cripplegate clerk, of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle, of more than twenty persons besides the members of her family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in her house on 20th inst. July: Certifying also that the said J.P, imposed a fine of 20£., on the said Sarah Bathow for her said offence. On her appeal from this conviction to G. Q. S. P., Sarah Bathow of Cherry Tree Alley in St. Giles's Cripplegate (who by the way spelt her surname Bathoe) was acquitted by a jury.—C. C. C,, 35 and 36 Charles II.

30 July, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that (Whereas the inhabitants of the hamlet of Spittlefields in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. have been and are disaffected towards the Lord the King in his government of the Church of England, &c, and between 1 Feb., 35 Charles II., and 30 July, 36 Charles II., have often assembled themselves tumultuously, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than is permitted by the laws of this kingdom of England, and Whereas certain Justices of the Peace for Middlesex met together in private session at Spittlefeilds aforesaid on the said 30 July, 36 Charles II., to take order for the better preservation of the peace, and for the prevention and suppression of unlawful conventicles and for the discovery of the names of the aforesaid persons being as is aforesaid ill-affected to the authority of the Lord the King) Edward Kinns late of the same hamlet yeoman and constable of the same hamlet, John Chartwright late of the said hamlet and warden of Stepney church for the said hamlet, and Roland Trion, Christopher Tooley, David Waine, William Cowley and William Sumner (?) all five late of the said hamlet yeomen and supervisors of the poor in Stepney for the said hamlet, and John Newitt, John Miller, John Hilton, Richard Skingley, Laurence Culliford and Samuel Winnett, all six late of the said hamlet yeoman and headboroughs of the said hamlet, and John Child and George Henwood both of the said hamlet laborers and beadles of the said hamlet, on being required by the said Justices of the Peace to be duly sworn to give true evidence to the said Justices, and true answers to the questions of the said Justices so assembled at Private Session of the Peace on the said 30th July, 36 Charles II., each and all refused to take the oath for that purpose tendered to them &c. Declared 'Guilty' by verdict of a jury on 5 Sept. 36 Charles II., Edward Kinns was fined 100£., John Chartwright was fined £100., Roland Trion was fined 100£., Christopher Tooley was fined 100£., David Waine was fined . . . ., William Cowley was fined 50£., each of them being also committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid his respective fine, William Sumner (?), John Newitt and John Miller all confessed the indictment and were each fined in the sum of £3 6s. 8d., which sum was paid by each to the Sheriff in court. Declared 'Guilty' by a jury on the same 5th Sept., 36 Charles II., John Hilton, Richard Skingley, Laurence Culliford and Samuel Winnett were each fined in the sum of 50£., and each was committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell until he should have paid his fine. John Child and George Henwood each confessed the indictment, and each was fined in the sum of 13s. 4d., and was also sentenced to be put in and upon the pillory in the Spittlefeilds Market on the next Wednesday, and again at Ratcliffe Crosse on the next following Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 12 at noon of both days, with a paper showing his offence upon his head, and was committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain until he should have undergone the said punishment. An almost obliterated clerical minute still shows that this indictment was taken at Session of Oyer and Terminer. S. P. R., 1 Sept., 36 Charles II.

2 August, 36 Charles II.—Three several certificates, under the hand and seal of Sir Clement Armiger knt. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Richard Bland alias Dod alias Whetwell late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd., of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some thirty or more persons besides the members of his family to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in the said parish, on three several occasions, to wit, in the morning of 25th May last past, and in the forenoon and afternoon of 8th June last past: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed three several fines of 20£. on the said offender for his said three offences, to wit, a fine of 20£. for each offence. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

21 August, 36 Charles II.—True Bill against nine yeomen, late of St. Mary's-le-Savoy, for being present at an unlawful conventicle, held on the said day at the said parish, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration, otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. R., 1 Sept., 36 Charles II.

21 August, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances of Isaac Jaques of St. Margaret's Westminster drawer and John Mason of Newgate-Market London poulterer, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Isaac Jaques at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer his being at a Conventicle in the Savoy."—Also, similar Recognizances for the appearance of 2 yeomen, 1 haberdasher, 1 glover, 1 poulterer, 1 salesman, 1 sugar-refiner, 2 tailors and 1 coachman, at the same next S. P., "to answer for being present at a conventicle in the Savoy." S. P. R., 1 Sept., 36 Charles II.

30 August, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, Whereas Sir William Smyth bart., Charles Osborne esq. and Abraham Bayly esq., three Justices of the Peace for Middlesex, residing within the Tower Division of Middlesex, came together at Whitechappell within the said division on the said 30 August, 36 Charles II., for the purpose of taking order for the better preservation of the King's peace, and for the prevention and suppression of conventicles, and the discovery of the names of divers persons living within the hamlet of Bethnall Greene in the parish of Stepney, and being ill-affected towards the said King's authority in his government of the Church of England in ecclesiastical causes &c, William Malin late of the said hamlet yeoman and constable of the same hamlet, James Pittman late of the said hamlet yeoman and supervisor of the poor in the parish of Stepney for the said hamlet, Richard Stradford late of the said hamlet yeoman and William Palmer also late of said hamlet yeoman, being headboroughs for the said hamlet, and Samuel Wheeler late of the said hamlet laborer, being beadle of the said hamlet, being required by the aforesaid Justices of the Peace to take oath to make true answer before the same Justices to questions put to them of and concerning the premisses, each and all by agreement and pre-arrangement (per confederacionem) severally refused to take the oath then and there tendered to them. William Malin confessed the indictment, and on 5 Sept., 36 Charles II., was fined in the sum of £3 6s. 8d., which fine he paid to the Sheriff in court. On his arraignment on the same day Jacob Pittman neither confessed nor pleaded, whereupon he was fined in the sum of 200£., and was committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine. Richard Stradford and William Palmer confessed the indictment, and on the said 5 Sept. each of them was fined £3 6s. 8d., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. Samuel Wheeler confessed the indictment, and on the same 5 th Sept. was sentenced to be put in and upon the pillory near the Almshouse in Whitechappell on the next Thursday from 11 a.m. to 12 at noon of the said day, with a paper on his head showing his offence, and was committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain until he should have undergone the said punishment. A clerical minute on the bill shows that this indictment was taken and tried at Session of Oyer and Terminer. S. P. R., 1 Sept., 36 Charles II.

31 August, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir William Smyth bart. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Robert Medford marriner of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. on the said 31st Aug. at his house in Wapping in Stepney, and of the conviction of . . . . Baxter of Stepney aforesaid of having preached to and taught the persons assembled at the same conventicle: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said Robert Medford for his offence and a fine of 20£. on the said . . . . Baxter for his offence. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

1 September, 36 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Edward Snelgrove shipwright, Richard Loaton yeoman, his wife Elizabeth Loaton, all three late of Whitechappell; Caleb May yeoman, his wife Anne May, both of Nortonfolgate; John Russell gentleman, and Francis Cohetherington strongwaterman, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields; Thomas Hart yeoman, . . . . Thompson yeoman, Joshua Wright yeoman, and Zachariah Greene yeoman, all four late of Endfeild; and John Mulberry late of Edmonton yeoman. Edward Snelgrove was discharged of the indictment, on satisfying the Court of his conformity. No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case against any of the other persons charged by the bill. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 36 Charles II.

1 September, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields within the Liberties &c. of Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, William Cadman late of the said parish bookseller, with the intention of debauching and corrupting as well the young persons as others of the lieges and the subjects of the Lord the King uttered, published, exposed for sale, and sold a certain wicked, scandalous and vicious book, entitled A Dialogue between A Married Lady and a Maid Tullia Octavia, and containing most pernicious and vicious passages. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. R., 2 Oct., 36 Charles II.

2 September, 36 Charles II.—The Humble Petition and Submission of John Herrick addressed to His Majesties Justices and Commissioners of Oier and Terminer for the County of Middlesex; the Submission running in these words,—"Whereas I John Heyrick Master of the Coffee House called the Protestant Coffee-House in the parish of St. Sepulchers in the county of Midd. was not long since indicted for and justly found guilty of an infamous Libell, which I had exposed in my said Coffee-house to the Scandall and Dishonour of my gracious Sovereign and his Government. And in particular a slanderous Reflexion upon Roger Lestrange Esq. a worthy Member of this Honorable Bench, For which said infamous Libell myselfe and my poor family had beene utterly ruined, if your Honors had not extended your compassion unto him (? them) upon the Intercession of the worthy . . . . abovesaid to this Honoble Bench. Now soe it is may it please Yor Honors that I the said John Heyrick have . . . . devillishly, ungratefully and maliciously (which I doe most sorrifully owne to my shame and confusion) invented and contrived a second scandall worse then the former against the same worthy person, saying in the wickedness of my heart unto one Mr. Thomas Knox in the Company of Mr. George upon the thirtieth day of May last past these following worde or words to the same effect, L'Estrange has done his worst and there will bee a time when Mr. L'Estrange shall bee called to an account for what hee has said, and the said Mr. Thomas Knox asking me what that was, I made answere, That I the said John Heyrick was at Mr. L'Estranges with the Churchwarden, and that Mr. L'Estrange asking me if I was a Protestant, I reply'd yes, whereuppon I told the said Mr. Knox, that Mr. L'Estrange said God dam me, I'le make all Protestants shake before I have done with them.—I doe acknowledge with shame and greife of heart, I did discharge these words upon the said Mr. L'Estrange. But I doe solemnly declare to this Honorable Court as in the presence of Almighty God, that the said Mr. L'Estrange said nothing at all to this purpose; But that on the contrary he demeaned himselfe towards me like a Gentleman and a Christian, which I shall thankfully acknowledge all the daies of my life.—Jno Heyrick." John Heyrick's signature is of excellent penmanship. S. P. R. 1 Sept., 36 Charles II.

4 September, 36 Charles II.—True Bill against three widows and three spinsters, late of St. Botolph's-without-Aldersgate co. Midd., for being present at an unlawful conventicle, held on the said day at the said parish, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration, otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. R., 1 Sept., 36 Charles II.

17 September, 36 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields on the said day, on view of the body of Walter Norborne there lying dead and slain: With verdict of jurors saying that, at the parish of St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on the 9th inst., Thomas Montgomery late of the last named parish esquire assaulted the said Walter Norborne, and slew and murdered him by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in and upon the left thigh, of which mortal wound he languished at St. Clement's Danes' and in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields from the said 9th of September till the 16th day of the same month, on which last-named day he died of the same wound. G. D. R., 8 Oct., 36 Charles II.

20 September, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Timothy Emerson of having been present at an unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion &c. at a meeting-house in St. Mary's-le-Savoy on 17th inst. Sept., at which conventicle three unknown persons preached and taught: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 5s. on the said Timothy Emerson for having been present at the said conventicle, and a further fine of £9 15s. on the same offender for the offence of three unknown and not to be discovered preachers. On his appeal from this conviction to G. Q. S. P., Timothy Emerson was acquitted by a jury. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

21 September, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances, on seventeen several parchments, taken on the said day: For the appearance of seventeen humble and obscure persons—to wit, 1 box-maker, 1 bricklayer, 1 perriwig-maker, 6 spinsters, 2 widows and 6 women whose position in respect to matrimony is not defined—at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for beinge at a riotous and seditious conventicle and assembly." S. P. R., 6 Oct., 36 Charles II.

25 September, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances of John Harris tailor and Mary Powers widow, both of St. Paul's Shad well co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each: For the appearance of William Power at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer to such matters as "shall be objected against him by Edward Kisset for encouraging his son to run away from his master and going along with him to Dunkirk in France, thereby causing him to misspend a considerable summe of money, which he had taken away from his said master." S. P. R., 6 Oct., 36 Charles II.

25 September, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborn co. Midd. on the said day, Jane Price wife of . . . . Price late of the said parish yeoman, alias Jane Price late of the said parish spinster, assaulted a certain Richard Jackson, and afterwards on the same day did unlawfully convey him against his will and without his consent on board a certain ship called The Jeofferey then lying in the river Thames, with the intention of unlawfully and forcibly transporting the said Richard Jackson against his will and without his consent to parts-beyond-sea called Virginea, and there selling him for her own gain and profit and to his grievous loss. On 22 Feb., 1685, abandoning a previous plea of 'Not Guilty,' Jane Price confessed the indictment, and was fined £1 6s. 8d., and was sent to the New Prison, there to remain until the said fine should have been paid. S. P. R., 7 Dec, 1 James II.

26 September, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that Mary Gwyn the wife of William Gwyn late of St. Botolph's-without-Aldgate co. Midd. yeoman, alias Mary Gwyn late of the said parish spinster, and Thomas Black late of the same parish yeoman assaulted a certain Alice Deakins spinster, of the age of sixteen years, the daughter of one Robert Deakins, on the said day and at the said parish, and afterwards on the same 26 Sept., 36 Charles II., against her will conveyed the same Alice on board a certain ship called The Concord, then lying in the river Thames, with the intention of transporting the same Alice Deakins to parts-beyond-sea called Virginea and there selling her for their own profit and gain, and to the utter ruin of the same Alice. Mary Gwyn and Thomas Black both confessed the indictment, whereupon each of them was fined in the sum of twelve pence (12d.) and was committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain until the fine should be paid. The smallness of the fine for so serious an offence is so astonishing, that students will be thankful for an assurance that the xiid. of the record is clearly written and twice written. S. P. R., 6 Oct., 36 Charles II.

30 September, 36 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, on view of the body of Maurice Fitzgerald gentleman there lying dead and slain: With Verdict of jurors saying that, on the 26th inst. at the said parish, Ogdoenus Keene late of the said parish assaulted the aforesaid Maurice Fitzgerald, and slew him, by giving him then and there with a sword a mortal wound in the right part of his body near the short-ribs, of which mortal wound he died in the said parish on the 30th day of the same month. G. D. R., 9 Oct., 36 Charles II.

30 September, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Anthony Wythers of St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of more than ten persons besides the members of his family to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in the said parish, on 24th Aug. last past: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said Anthony Wythers for his said offence. On appeal from this conviction to G. Q. S. P., Anthony Wythers was acquitted by a jury. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

30 September, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John King of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. mason, of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle, of some twelve persons besides the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in the said parish on 7th inst. Sept., and the conviction of Christopher Nesse of having preached to and taught the said assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on John King for his offence and a fine of 40£. on Christopher Nesse for his said and seventh offence.— Mary Fairer of St. Clement's Danes' spinster and Elizabeth Williams widow (two active common informers against conventiclers) were the witnesses, whose evidence resulted in this conviction of John King, who appealed from Sir Thomas Jenner's decision to G. Q. S. P. That he fared no better before a jury than he did before the single Justice of Peace appears from the following endorsement of Sir Thomas Jenner's certificate, to wit, "May 2d: 1685.—Received then of John Smith Esq. Clerke of the Peace for the County of Midd. the sum of six pounds and six shillings as being the Informers' third part of eighteene pounds and eighteene shillings paid into the Court of Quarter Sessions att the certifying the appeale of the within-named John King from the record within-mencioned, whereof he was by Jury taken by defalt against him convicted as in the record hereunto annexed more att large appeareth. We say received by us—Mary Fairey Elizabeth Williams." C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

1 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of James Ward of St. Saviour's co. Surrey ribbonweaver of having been present at an unlawful conventicle of some fifty persons, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in a house called a Meeting-House on 29th June last past, at which conventicle one Thomas Plant took upon himself to preach and teach: Certifying also that the same J.P. imposed a fine of 5s. on the said James Ward for his said offence, and also a fine of £9 15s. on the same James Ward for the preacher's offence, because Thomas Plant was not found. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

2 October, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances for the appearance of John Smith of Golding Lane in St. Giles's-in-the-Fields chandler, Frances Brunter . . . ., Elizabeth Grundee . . . ., Clement Halsey of St. Sepulchre's . . . ., George White of St. Botolph's-without-AldersgateStreet weaver, John Taylor of St. Sepulchre's tapestry-weaver, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer "for being taken at an unlawful Assembly or Meeting." S. P. R., 8 Dec., 36 Charles II.

5 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Charles Osborne esq. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John Gammon of Stepney co. Midd. of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. on the said 5th Oct., in his house in the said parish: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said John Gammon for his said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate of the conviction, before Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of a certain Christopher Nesse of having taken upon himself to preach to and teach the persons assembled at an unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in the house of Justicia Phillis in Stepney co. Midd. on 24th August last past, and of the conviction of the said Justicia Phillis of having wittingly and willingly permitted the said conventicle, numbering more than ten persons over and above the members of the household, to be held in the said house: Certifying also the imposition of a fine of 20£. on Justicia Phillis for her said offence, and a fine of 40£. on the said Christopher Nesse for his said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John Nelson of having wittingly and willingly permitted a conventicle of more than twenty persons over and above the members of his family to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in St. Sepulchre's parish on three several days, to wit, the 2nd, 9th, and 16th Sept. last past, at each of which unlawful assemblies an unknown person preached and taught, and of the conviction of John Hedgin alias Edge of having been present at the said conventicles: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed three several fines of £20., in all 60£., on the said John Nelson for his said three offences, and imposed a fine of 25s. on John Hedgin alias Edge for his three offences in being present at the three unlawful assemblies, and imposed a further fine of £29 5s. on the same John Hedgin alias Edge for the three offences of the said preacher or preachers. On his appeal from this conviction to G. Q. S. P., John Hedgin alias Edge was acquitted by a jury. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John Nelson of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in St. Sepulchre's parish on 28th Sept. last past, at which assembly two unknown persons preached to and taught the assembled persons, and of the conviction of John Franks, George Gill, John Jadell, and Richard Winfeild of having been present at the said conventicle: Certifying also that the said J.P. fined John Nelson 20£. for so permitting the conventicle to be held in his house, and fined John Franks, George Gill, John Jadell and Richard Winfeild 5s. each for having been present at the said conventicle, and further imposed a fine of £9 15s. on each of the four last-named offenders for the offences of the unknown preachers. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John Mathews of St. John's Street co. Midd. of having been present at an unlawful conventicle of some twenty persons, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in a place called The Peele Meeting House in the said street on 16th Sept. last past, at which conventicle an unknown person preached to and taught the assembled persons: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 5s. on the said John Mathews for his said offence, and a further fine of £9 15s. on the same John Mathews for the offence of the preacher, who was unknown and not found. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Christopher Dodsworth of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle, of some twelve persons besides the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in Whitechappell co. Midd. on 17th Aug. last past, and the conviction of Christopher Nesse of having preached to and taught the said assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on Christopher Dodsworth for his offence, and a fine of 40£. on Christopher Nesse for his offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Edward Floyd of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle, of some ten persons besides the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in Whitechappell co. Midd. on 20th July last past: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said offender for his said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Justicia Phillis of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some eleven persons besides the members of her family to be held in her house in Stepney co. Midd. on 20th July last past, and of the conviction of Christopher Nesse of having preached to and taught the same unlawful assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on Justicia Phillis for her said offence and a fine of 20£. on Christopher Nesse for his said offence. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

6 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Thomas Dixon of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some eleven persons to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in Whitechappell co. Midd. on 3rd Aug. last past, and of the conviction of Christopher Nesse of having preached to and taught the same unlawful assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on Thomas Dixon for his offence, and a fine of 40£. on Christopher Nesse for his offence. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

7 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Edward Guise esq. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Elizabeth Cambridge of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. . . . ., of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some twenty persons, besides the members of her family to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in her house in King's Street in the said parish, on 7th Sept. last past, and of the conviction of a certain Benjamin Allsopp of having preached to and taught the said assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said Elizabeth Cambridge for her offence, and a fine of 20£. on Benjamin Allsopp for his offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

10 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Richard Bryers of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle, comprising more than ten persons over and above the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in the parish of . . . . in-the-Fields co. Midd. on 10th August last past, and of the conviction of Thomas Bryers of having taken upon himself to preach to and teach the persons present at the said conventicle: Certifying also the imposition of a fine of 20£. on Richard Bryers and another fine of 20£. on Thomas Bryers for their respective offences. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

10 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Elizabeth Cambridge of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. of having permitted an unlawful conventicle of some ten persons over and above the members of her family, to be held in her house in the said parish, under colour of exercising religion &c. on the said 10th Oct., and of the conviction of Christopher Nesse of having preached to and taught the persons assembled at the said conventicle: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on each of the said offenders for their said offences, and further imposed a fine of £9 15s. on (? Elizabeth Cambridge) for the offence of the said Christopher Nesse, because he was not found. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

10 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Christopher Dodsworth of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some twelve persons, over and above the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in Whitechappell co. Midd. on 27th July last past, and of the conviction of Christopher Nesse of having preached to and taught the said unlawful assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said Christopher Dodsworth for his said offence, and a fine of 40£. on Christopher Nesse for his offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

12 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. S.L. and Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of a certain John Langley of having preached to and taught the persons, assembled at a certain unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in the house of a certain Robert Fuller in Whitechappell co. Midd. on 2nd September, 36 Charles II., and of the conviction of the aforesaid Robert Fuller of having wittingly and willingly permitted the said unlawful conventicle, comprising more than ten persons over and above the members of his family, to be held in his said house: Certifying also the imposition of a fine of 20£. upon each of the two offenders for his respective offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

13 October, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances of William Shippy of Trinity Minoryes carpenter in the sum of two hundred pounds, and of Arthur Rowland apothecary, Hugh Botler looking-glass-maker, William Bevin packer and Samuel Hall cutler, all four of the said parish, in the sum of one hundred pounds each: For the appearance of the said William Shippy at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answer all such matters against him whereof he stands indicted, for speaking scandalous words of his Highness the Duke of York." S. P. R., 8 Dec, 36 Charles II.

14 October, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, James Watts, Peter Barnwell, George Baker and Bryan Ondwick, all four late of the said parish laborers, stole took and led away a bay gelding worth twelve pounds, of the goods and chattels of Richard Winlowe gentleman. Found 'Guilty,' James Watts, Peter Barnwell and George Baker were sentenced to be hanged. Bryan Ondwick was acquitted. G. D. R., 10 Dec., 36 Charles II.

15 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Elizabeth Cambridge widow, of having permitted an unlawful conventicle, numbering more than ten persons over and above the members of her family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in her house in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on 10th August last past, and of the conviction of a certain Christopher Nesse of having taken upon himself to preach to and teach the persons assembled at the same conventicle, and of the conviction of a certain John King and Owen Roberts of having been present at the same conventicle: Certifying also the imposition of a fine of 20£. on the said Elizabeth Cambridge for her said offence, and a fine of 20£. on Christopher Nesse for his said offence, a fine of 5s. each on the said John King and Owen Roberts for their said offence, and a further fine of £9 15s. 0d. on each of the two last-named offenders for a part of the fine imposed upon the aforesaid preacher "quia Christopherus Nesse non est inventus." C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

18 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Owen Haughton alias Halton of Stepney co. Midd. brewer and Thomas Gibbs of Cannon Street in St. Mary's Abchurch London . . . . of having been present at an unlawful conventicle of some fifty persons, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in St. John's Street Stepney co. Midd. on 31st Aug. last past, at which conventicle an unknown person preached and taught: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 5s. on each of the above-named offenders for his said offence, and a further fine of £9 15s. on each of them for the offence of the unknown preacher. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

20 October, 36 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during six months beginning on the said day, against Edward Hopton late of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. yeoman, and his wife Mary Hopton. Both were discharged of the indictment, on satisfying the Court of their conformity. S. P. R., 27 April, 1 James II.

22 October, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, George Clarke late of the said parish laborer, and his wife Mary Clarke, and George Clarke junior of the same parish, clipped, filed, cut and diminished six pieces of "King Charles the First his halfe Crownes," and twenty "King Charles the First his shillings." Found 'Guilty,' George Clarke was sentenced to be drawn on a hurdle to the gallows and there to be hanged. Found 'Guilty,' Mary Clarke was sentenced to be drawn to the place of execution and there to be burned. George Clarke junior was acquitted. G. D. R., 10 Dec, 36 Charles II.

25 October, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co Midd. on the said day, John Ward late of the said parish yeoman, a seditious and depraved and turbulent person, with the intention of disquieting this kingdom of England, and bringing the Most Serene Lord Charles now King and his brother James, Duke of York and Albany, into contempt and ignominy with the said king's lieges, said and declared these following words in the presence and hearing of divers of the said king's subjects, to wit, "God damn all Papists in England excepting one," and afterwards on the same day and at the same parish, and in the presence and hearing of divers of the said king's lieges, declared that the same Duke of York and Albany was a papist and the next heir to the crown of England saving one person. Found 'Guilty' John Ward was sentenced to pay a fine of twenty pounds, and was committed to prison, there to remain until he should have paid the fine, and found sureties for his good behaviour for an entire year. G. D. R., 10 Dec, 36 Charles II.

27 October, 36 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, on view of the body of Sir James Halkett knt. (sic) there lying dead and slain: With Verdict of jurors saying that, on the 11th day of October aforesaid, at St. Bride's within Farringdon Ward without London, George Porter late of the last-named parish esquire, assaulted the said Sir James Halkett, and slew and murdered him, by then and there giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the left thigh, of which wound he languished at St. Bride's aforesaid and at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields aforesaid, from said nth day of October to the 26th day of the same month, on which last-named day he died of the said wound; And that after doing and perpetraiting the said felony and murder in the aforesaid manner, the said George Porter "fugam fecit" = made flight. It is worthy of observation that in their verdict the jurors, after recording that the felon 'made flight,' do not add that he withdrew himself to a place unknown to the jurors.—Also, on the same file, two several True Bills against George Porter for slaying and murdering Sir James Halkett bart. (sic); one of the indictments charging the culprit with wounding the baronet before the latter had drawn his sword &c, whilst the other indictment forbears to make this particular charge in aggravation of the offence. On the graver indictment George Porter was acquitted by the jury. Tried on the other bill, he was found 'Not Guilty' of murder, but 'Guilty' of manslaughter. When he had pleaded his clergy in respect to the less serious felony, the Court decided to deliberate on the case. G. D. R., 10 Dec, 36 Charles II.

28 October, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co Midd. on the said day, Daniel Decoyson alias Walker late of the said parish laborer and his wife Katherine Decoyson alias Walker, late of the same parish, made and coined certain counterfeit money of copper, tin, and other metals, to wit, forty pieces of false money in the likeness of "King Charles the Second his Mild halfe Crownes," and seventeen other pieces of false money in the likeness of "King Charles the Second his twenty shilling pieces of guyney gold," and two other pieces of false money, in the likeness of "King Charles the Second his ten shilling pieces of guyney gold." Found 'Guilty,' Daniel Decoyson alias Walker was sentenced to be executed in the manner prescribed for the execution of culprits convicted of high treason. Katherine Decoyson alias Walker was acquitted. G. D. R., 10 Dec, 36 Charles II.

30 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John Jenkins of St. Leonard's Shoreditch cheesemonger and Thomas Mallot of Hare Street in Stepney victualler, of having been present at an unlawful conventicle of some fifty persons, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in Stepney aforesaid on 24th Aug. last past, at which conventicle a certain unknown person took upon himself to preach to and teach the persons assembled at the said conventicle: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 5s. on each of the aforenamed offenders for his said offence, and a further fine of £9 15s. upon each of them for the offence of the unknown preacher. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

31 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of William Ward of Hogg Lane in St. Leonard's Shoreditch of having wittingly and willingly permitted a conventicle of some two-and-twenty individuals over and above the members of his family to be held in his house in or near the aforesaid lane under colour of exercising religion &c. on 19th inst. Oct., and of the conviction of . . . . Gammon of having taken upon himself to preach to and teach the persons present at the said unlawful assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on each of the said offenders for his offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

31 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of William Cordwell stocken-weaver, of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle of some twenty persons, over and above the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in Rose Alley in St. Buttolph's Bishopsgate co. Midd. on 26th inst. Oct.: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said William Cordwell for his said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

31 October, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Thomas Plant . . . ., Samuel Quinton of St. Giles's Cripplegate razor-maker, and Abraham Suckman of the said parish cheesemonger, of having assembled unlawfully with some twenty other persons under colour of exercising religion &c. on 5 th inst. Oct. in the house of . . . . Slye in St. Buttolph's Bishopgate co. Midd., and of the conviction of Thomas Plant of having taken upon himself to preach to and teach the persons present at the said unlawful conventicle: Certifying also that the said J.P.' imposed a fine of 20£. on . . . Slye for having wittingly and willingly permitted the said conventicle to be held in his house, and a fine of 40£. on Thomas Plant for preaching &c., and a fine of 5s. each on Samuel Quinton and Abraham Suckman for having been present at the said conventicle, and a further fine of £9 15s. each on the same Samuel Quinton and Abraham Suckman for the offence of the aforesaid Thomas Plant, because the said preacher was not found. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

2 November, 36 Charles II.—True Bill for being present at a conventicle held at Nortonfolgate co. Midd. on the said day, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than in accordance with the laws of this kingdom of England, against Michael Dunwell yeoman, William Clarke yeoman, William Hayes yeoman, John Hilton yeoman, Henry King yeoman, and William Goffe yeoman. All six were found 'Not Guilty.' S. P. R., 8 Dec, 36 Charles II.

6 November, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Philip Wallis late of the said parish yeoman, a seditious depraved and turbulent person, with the intention of bringing the Most Serene Charles II. now King into odium and contempt with all his lieges and faithful subjects, in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects maliciously declared the Duke of Monmouth would be king of this kingdom of England, and that in the county of Cornwall there were forty thousand men, who would fight in order that the Duke of Monmouth should enjoy the crown; And Further that the said Philip Wallis, stretching forth his hand, declared that he would lose his right hand, if he would not fight to make the Duke of Monmouth king of this kingdom of England, and yet further that, when one Henry Williams in replying to the said Philip Wallis said that such words ought not to be spoken by him, the said Philip Wallis drew forth his knife against the same Henry Williams, and assaulted him.— Found 'Guilty,' Philip Wallis was sentenced to pay a fine of twenty pounds, and was committed to prison, there to remain until he should have paid the fine, and put in sureties for his good behaviour for an entire year. G. D. R., 10 Dec, 36 Charles II.

10 November, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Christopher Dodsworth of having permitted an unlawful conventicle, of some ten persons over and above the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in Whitechappell co. Midd., on 21st Sept., 36 Charles II., and of the conviction of Christopher Nesse of having preached to and taught the said conventicle, and of the conviction of a certain George Hudson of having been present at the said unlawful assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. fined George Hudson ten shillings, Christopher Dodsworth 20£., and Christopher Nesse 40£., for their respective offences. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

11 November, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of John Ferguson of Whitechappell, co. Midd. cheese monger of having been present at an unlawful conventicle of some twenty and more persons over and above the members of the family, held under colour of exercising religion in Westbury Street in Stepney co. Midd. on 9th inst. Nov., at which conventicle an unknown person preached to and taught the assembled conventiclers: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 5s. on the said John Ferguson for having been present at the said conventicle, and imposed a further fine of £9 15s. on the said John Ferguson for the offence of the unknown preacher. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

12 November, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of John Pery, esq. and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of William Peale of Glasse-house Yard in St. Botolph's-without-Aldersgate coachman, of having wittingly and willingly permitted an unlawful conventicle to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in the said yard on 12th Oct. last past: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 20£. on the said William Peale for the said offence. On his appeal from this conviction to G. Q. S. P., William Peale was acquitted. C. C. C, 35 and 36 Charles II.

13 November, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Richard Martin of St. Olave's Southwark co. Surrey salesman and Edward Everet of the Minories London shoemaker, of having been present at an unlawful conventicle of some fifty persons, held under colour of exercising religion &c. on the 14th Sept. last past in a house in St. John's Street near Brick Lane in Stepney, at which conventicle an unknown person preached and taught: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of 5s. upon each of the aforenamed offenders for having been present at the said conventicle, and another fine of £9 15s. on each of the same two offenders for the unknown preacher's offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

14 November, 36 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, on view of the body of Bazonne Symonds gentleman; With verdict of jurors, saying that on the 12 th instant Alexander Mac-Danniell, late of the said parish gentleman, assaulted the said Bazonne Symonds, and slew and murdered him, by then and there giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in and upon the right part of his body near the short ribs, of which wound he then and there instantly died.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the said Alexander Mac-Danniell, for slaying and murdering the said Bazonne Symonds at the time and place &c. set forth in the coroner's inquisition. A clerical note on the indictment shows that Alexander Mac-Danniell was at large. G. D. R., 10 Dec., 36 Charles II.

18 November, 36 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against John Ireton yeoman, Robert Marshall yeoman, and William Panton yeoman, all three late of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate. They all surrendered in obedience to proclamation, and on 14 July, 1685, process against each of them was stayed; William Panton being the only one, of whom it is recorded that he gave proof of his conformity. S. P. R., 27 April, 1 James II.

24 November, 36 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken on the said day at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of James Belcher gentleman, there lying dead: With Verdict of jurors saying, that on the 22nd instant, Silvanus Morris late of the said parish gentleman assaulted the said James Belcher, and slew him by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the left part of his belly near the navel, of which wound he died in the said parish on the following day.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the said Silvanus Morris gentleman for slaying and murdering the said James Belcher gentleman. Acquitted of murder Silvanus Morris was found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, whereupon the Court determined to deliberate on the case. G. D. R., 10 December, 36 Charles II.

1 December, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. in a public street called Tuttlestreet, on the said 1 Dec., 36 Charles II., and on divers other days and occasions before and after the same day, Thomas Stephens late of the said parish yeoman and farrier placed horses and caused horses to be placed in the said public way, and then and there did bleed and drench them, whereby the said public way is greatly narrowed, straightened and obstructed, so that the lieges and subjects of the Lord the King have not been and are not able to pass along the same way so freely as they ought with their horses, coaches and carriages. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 36 Charles II.

9 December, 36 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. about 12 p.m. of the said 9 Dec., 36 Charles II., James Dore late of the said parish gentleman assaulted a certain Isaac Page one of the beadles of the same parish and then being upon the watch and in the execution of his said office, and then and there with a rapier gave the said Isaac Page a serious wound two inches wide and one inch deep upon his belly near the navel, and another serious wound half-an-inch wide and three inches deep in and upon his groin, of which wounds the aforesaid Isaac Page has languished from the said 9th Dec. even to the day of the taking of this inquisition. On 7 Dec., 1685, James Dore confessed the indictment and was fined three shillings and four pence. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 36 Charles II.

16 December, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of a certain Robert Dalimore of having been present, together with some forty and more other persons, at an unlawful assembly, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in the house of Edward Noble in Quakers Street in or near Spittlefields in Stepeney co. Midd. on 26 Oct., 36 Charles II., at which conventicle an unknown person took upon himself to preach to and teach the assembled persons, and of the conviction of Edward Noble of having wittingly permitted the said conventicle to be so held in his house: Certifying also that for their said offences Edward Noble and Robert Dalimore forfeited respectively 5s. and 20£., and that the said J.P. imposed a further fine of £9 5s. upon the said Robert Dalimore, quia predicator ignotus est et non est inventus = because the preacher was unknown and was not found. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

16 December, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas. Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of a certain Richard Price of having permitted an unlawful conventicle, comprising more than twenty persons over and above the members of his family, to be held under colour of exercising religion &c. in his house in Stepney co. Midd.; Certifying also the imposition of a fine of 20£. on the said Richard Price for his said offence. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

18 December, 36 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before two Justices of the Peace at a private Session of the Peace held in the Vestry of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, of William Bingley of St. Gregory's London wholesaleman and Richard Collett of Charing Cross vintner, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the appearance of the said William Bingley at the next Session of the Peace for Westminster, "to answer the being at a conventicle or unlawful Meeting in the parish of St. Margaret's Westminster on Sunday last." S. P. West. R., 7 Jan., 36 Charles II.

18 December, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Christopher Thomas of Tuttle Street Westminster of having been present, together with some forty and more other persons, at two several unlawful conventicles, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in a street called The Ambry in St. Margaret's Westminster on the 14th inst. Dec, at which conventicles two unknown persons successively preached to and taught the people so gathered: Certifying also that the said J.P. fined the said Christopher Thomas ten shillings for his own said offences, and further fined him £9 15s. 0d. for the offence of the first unknown and undiscovered preacher, and yet further imposed a fine of £9 15s. 0d. upon the same Christopher Thomas for the offence of the second preacher who was neither known nor discovered. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

21 December, 36 Charles II.—Certificate of the conviction of thirty-six individuals, whose names are set forth in the document without mention of their respective callings &c., of having come together in the house of one Edward Steevens in Whitechappell co. Midd. with some twenty other individuals, over and above the members of the family of the said Edward Stevens and of having been then and there present at an unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion &c. on the said 21st Dec., 36 Charles II., and of the conviction of the said Edward Steevens of having wittingly and willingly permitted the said conventicle to be so held in his said house: Certifying also the imposition of a fine of 5s. upon each of the aforementioned offenders for their common offence, and a fine of 20£. on the said Edward Steevens for his offence in allowing the meeting to be held in his house. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

28 December, 36 Charles II.—Certificate (long, closely-written; and so injured and defaced as to be illegible in many places) of the conviction of upwards of ninety persons, named in the document, of having come together with others to the number of one hundred individuals, and having been present at an unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion &c. at a certain place called The Quakers' MeetingHouse in Stepney co. Midd., on the said 28th Dec., 36 Charles II., and of the conviction of Thomas Wynne late of the said parish yeoman, of having then and there taken upon himself to preach to and teach the persons assembled at the same conventicle; Certifying also that a fine of 20£. was imposed on the said Thomas Wynne for his said offence, and a fine of five shillings on each of the other offenders. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.

31 December, 36 Charles II.—Certificate, under the hand and seal of Sir Thomas Jenner knt. Recorder of London and J.P. for Middlesex, of the conviction of Richard Butcher of the liberty of St. Martin's-leGrand London bodyesmaker, of having been present with some twenty other persons at an unlawful conventicle, held under colour of exercising religion &c. in St. John's Street in St. James's Clerkenwell, on 29th Dec., 36 Charles II., at which conventicle several unknown persons one after another preached to and taught the said assembly: Certifying also that the said J.P. imposed a fine of five shillings on the said Richard Butcher for having been present at the said conventicle, and further imposed upon him a fine of 9£. for the offences of the said unknown preachers. On appeal to G. Q. S. P. Richard Butcher was acquitted by a jury. C. C. C., 35 and 36 Charles II.