Sessions Books
1690

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

W. J. Hardy (editor)

Year published

1905

Pages

1-26

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'Sessions Books: 1690', Middlesex county records. Calendar of Sessions Books 1689-1709 (1905), pp. 1-26. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66107 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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Sessions Book 471—January, 1690.

Jury panels with memorandum of the dates of Oyer and Terminer. (pp. 3, 4)

[Pages 5, 6 blank.]

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances, &c. (pp. 7–39)

Order that John Graves pay to Sara, the wife of Anthony Graves, his son, 2/- weekly for her maintenance until he produce the said Anthony, who, by the means of the said John, has absented himself from his wife (p. 41)

Upon the petition of Dame Phillippa Keelyng, widow, showing that she is an inhabitant of a tenement in Leather Lane, St. Andrew's, Holborn, which tenement is valued at £16 yearly, and that she is rated at 7/6 quarterly to the assessment for the poor, which is 6/- a quarter more than the late tenant paid, and praying that the assessment might be reduced, it is ordered that the rate be reduced to 3/- a quarter (ibid.)

Dispute between the churchwardens and overseers of Richmond Parish and those of Hampton Wick, in the parish of Hampton, concerning the legal settlement of Hannah Turner, an impotent person; the said Hannah being last legally settled as the hired servant of one — Armstrong in Hampton Wick, it is ordered that the churchwardens and overseers there do provide for the said Hannah (p. 42)

Dispute between the churchwardens of the town of Hampton and those of the poor of Hampton Wick in the parish of Hampton, concerning the legal settlement of Joseph Dixon with his wife and child, now chargeable to Hampton Town: the said Joseph being last legally settled in Hampton Wick, it is ordered that he and his family be removed to Hampton Wick aforesaid, the churchwardens and overseers of which parish, are required to receive and provide for them (p. 42)

Upon a hearing of the matters in difference between Daniel Atkins, of the parish of St. Paul's, Shadwell, ropemaker, and Daniel Hecktolls, his apprentice, it appears that the said Atkins has barbarously beaten and abused his said apprentice. It is ordered that Hecktolls be absolutely freed and discharged from his said master and from his indenture of apprenticehood, and that his parents have liberty to place him with any other master to be instructed in the said trade and serve the residue of his term. It is further ordered that the said Atkins pay the said Hecktolls 40/- towards "fitting him out to another master," and deliver up his apparel, and his indenture of apprenticehood to be cancelled (p. 43)

Upon a hearing of the matters in difference between Susanna Shippey, of Mile End, Stepney, widow, and Ann Taylor, daughter of John Taylor, of the said parish, her apprentice, touching the discharge of the said apprentice from her indenture of apprenticehood. It appears the said Ann has often defrauded her mistress of her goods and sold them for less than cost price. It is ordered that the said Susanna be "freed and discharged of and from her said apprentice," and the said John Taylor is required to receive and provide for the said Ann, his daughter (ibid.)

At the General Sessions of the Peace held, by adjournment, the 13th of December last [1689] it was ordered that all former orders made for the erecting of any watch-house upon the hill near Cowcross in St. Sepulchre's parish, and all proceedings thereupon should be discharged and vacated. This Court, being informed by the inhabitants of the said hill that the other inhabitants of the said parish thought themselves not obliged to obey the said order for vacating the former orders, the same not being made at a General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, orders that the said recited orders for vacating the said former orders be ratified and confirmed by the authority of this Court, and requires the parishioners and all others concerned therein to yield due obedience (p. 44)

Dispute between the churchwardens of the parish of St. Giles-in-theFields and those of St. Margaret's, Westminster, concerning the legal settlement of Katherine Manning, widow, and her three children, chargeable to the parish of St. Giles; the said Katherine being last settled in St. Margaret's parish, it is ordered that she and her children be conveyed to the said parish of St. Margaret's, and left with the churchwardens of the poor there (p. 45)

Upon the petition of Joseph Flower showing that he continued and served the office of headborough of Holborn End division in the parish of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields for the year 1688, during which time he disbursed 18/1, which sum remains unpaid, it is ordered that the present constables, headboroughs, and beadles of the said parish, with those who served for the year last past, do attend the next Petty Sessions to be held for Holborn Division, and there produce their books of rates and disbursements; and the Justices are desired to make such order for reimbursing the said Joseph the sum of 18/1 as to them shall seem most meet (p. 46)

The Court being informed by Thomas Hariott, J.P., that, as the maimed soldiers in this county are decreased to a small number, there is sufficient in the treasurers' hands to pay them their full pensions, it is ordered that William Turner, treasurer, within the hundreds of Ossulston, Edmonton, and Gore, do, out of such moneys collected by and remaining in his hands for the relief of the maimed soldiers, pay to those named in a schedule annexed the several sums therein mentioned, for the quarter ending at Christmas last; the said sums to be paid quarterly as they grow due, until further order therein (p. 47)

(List of 25 names, with the amounts, follow.)

A similar order issued to Richard Rice, gentleman, treasurer for the maimed soldiers within the hundreds of Elthorn, Spelthorn, and Isleworth. Names of pensioners given (p. 48)

Order for the appearance of Mr. Robert Hardisty, one of the attorneys at the Court of King's Bench, for the inhabitants of Ossulton Hundred at the suit of William Bird, for a robbery committed upon him in the said hundred (ibid.)

The petition of John Rowell, showing that Thomas Cordell, his nephew, was, by indenture dated "on or about" the 18th of March, 1688, bound as an apprentice to Edward Nutt, of St. Ann's, Westminster, baker, for seven years, and that £3 10s. 0d. was paid to the said Nutt, and bond given for £3 more, payable in March then following; the said Nutt, six months after he had taken the said Cordell, left his trade and has taken no care to instruct his said apprentice. The petitioner praying the said apprentice might be discharged from his apprenticeship, it was ordered that Nutt should attend the Court to show cause why the said Cordell should not be discharged. The said Nutt not appearing, it was ordered that the said apprentice be absolutely freed and discharged from his said master, the said John Rowell being at liberty to place the said Cordell with any other person to learn the trade of a baker. It is further ordered that the said Nutt deliver up the said apprentice's apparel and his indenture of apprenticehood, to be cancelled (p. 49)

The petition of Samuel Tatty, senior, of Whitechapel, husbandman, showing that his son Samuel Tatty became an apprentice to George Lovejoy, of Whitechapel, smith, for seven years, and that the said apprentice upon the complaint of his master, was committed to Bridewell last December, where he received correction; upon his discharge from prison he returned to his master and offered to serve the residue of his apprenticehood, which offer the said master refused. The petitioner prays that the said apprentice be discharged. It was ordered that the said George Lovejoy should attend the Court this day, the 18th of January, to show cause why the said apprentice should not be discharged of his apprenticehood. Upon the non-attendance of the said Lovejoy it is ordered that the said apprentice be discharged from his master, and that Samuel Tatty, senior, be at liberty to place his son elsewhere to be instructed in the trade of smith. The said Lovejoy is ordered to deliver up the said apprentice's apparel and the indentures of apprenticehood (p. 51)

The Court, taking into consideration that the salary for the maintenance of the governor and matron of the House of Correction, Clerkenwell, has of late years arisen out of the rent received for the New Prison, erected at the charge of the county, and that such employment of the rent was to ease the inhabitants in the said county who were formerly charged with a tax for the said salary, and that the perquisites belonging to the keeper of the New Prison, out of which the said rent ought to arise, have been lately much impaired by reason of the commitments of night walkers and other disorderly persons to prisons in the said county, proper only for detention of debtors, particularly Finsbury, Whitechapel, and St. Katherine's Prisons, that belonging to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's and the Roundhouse of the Bailiff's place, and that commitments for misdemeanours or breach of the peace to any prison proper only for debtors are unwarrantable and illegal: it is ordered that the respective keepers of the said prisons proper only for debtors, or any agent under them, shall not hereafter detain any person or persons brought to any of the said prisons for misdemeanour or breach of the peace. It is further ordered that none of the said keepers or agents shall by colour of any such commitment as aforesaid, liberate or discharge, or by any other ways or means, directly or indirectly, take any money or reward from any such person or persons, as aforesaid, brought to any of their said prisons. It is further ordered that these instructions be printed and made public (p. 52)

Whereas by an Act entitled "An Act for punishing officers and soldiers who shall mutiny or desert their Majesties' service, and for punishing false musters," their Majesties' Justices in their several counties are required at their Quarter Sessions to set reasonable prices which the soldiers shall pay to owners of inns, livery stables, alehouses, &c., for their diet and the baiting of their horses, for one or more nights in their march, and also for the first night only where they are appointed for residence or quartering; a list of these prices follows. It is ordered that the chief constables of every hundred within the county issue warrants to every petty constable within their said hundreds, to appear at the next Sessions, and to bring an account of the names of all inn-keepers, &c., who sell by retail, and who, by virtue of the said Act, are liable to quarter soldiers, together with an account of the number of soldiers, both horse and foot, which each house is capable of receiving. And that the officers, who are obliged to provide soldiers' quarters, do, in the first place, assign their quarters in the best houses fit for their reception, in proportion "with other of less receipt, having a consideration of those persons who keep houses liable by the said Act to quarter soldiers, who are poor and not able to find beds for their accommodation" (p. 54)

Order that Sir James Rowe, knight; Sir Charles Umfrevile, knight; together with five other Justices (named), do, at some convenient time, view the New Prison and the House of Correction at Clerkenwell, and report to the Court at the next Sessions what repairs they consider are necessary (p. 56)

Recital of the petition of Dorcas Trevor, exhibited at the December Sessions last against Elizabeth Mosey and Jasper Gifford, her son-in-law, showing that she was "retained a servant by them" at £4 per annum, and that after she had served them about six weeks, they accused the said Dorcas of a trivial matter and committed her to Bridewell, where she remained six weeks and had the correction of the house; after which the said Dorcas convened the said Mosey and Gifford, before Robert Feilding, J.P. for her wages and apparel, which were ordered to be paid and returned to her. Coming from the said Justice's house, Gifford caused the said Dorcas to be arrested upon a sham action, extorted a discharge from her and forced her to expend all her wages for bailiff's fees; they detained her trunk containing 6/- and her clothes; the petitioner prayed that Gifford and Mosey might be ordered to deliver the said petitioner her clothes, or make satisfaction for them.

It was ordered upon that petition that all matters contained therein should be referred to Andrew Lawrence and Robert Feilding, esquires, who, by a writing dated 23 December last, ordered that the said Mosey and Gifford should pay the said Trevor £4 10s. 0d. for the loss of her goods, and £3 for her charges, £7 10s. 0d. in all, as appears by the award then produced in Court. Upon the refusal of Gifford and Mosey to pay the money, it was prayed that the said award might be ratified and confirmed by the authority of this Court, which is now ratified and confirmed accordingly (p. 57)

Order of the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace held for the county of Surrey, at Croydon, on Tuesday, the 14th of January last, setting forth that Frances Flye, widow of John Flye, late of New Brentford, labourer, together with her two children, were conveyed from New Brentford to Putney under a warrant dated the 29th of October last. There was dispute concerning the legal settlement of the said Frances, and it was ordered that she and her children be conveyed from Putney to New Brentford; upon a motion made on behalf of the churchwardens of Putney, and by the consent of the churchwardens of Brentford, it is ordered that the settlement of the said Frances and her children shall be finally determined on "Thursday morning in the next Quarter Sessions of the Peace," the said Frances in the meantime to be provided for by the churchwardens of Brentford (p. 59)

An alphabetical list of names (pp. 62, 63)

Indenture of apprenticeship of Reginald Bucknall, son of Reginald Bucknall, formerly of Lambeth, citizen and merchant tailor of London, to William Page, of Wapping, county Middlesex, writer. Dated 13 January, 1690: to serve for seven years (p. 64)

The like of Margaret Reynolds, daughter of Robert Reynolds, to William Harris of the parish of St. Buttolph without, Aldgate, "sivemaker," and Anne, his wife. Dated 6 January, 1690: to serve in the art of "hair sive bottom maker" for seven years (ibid.)

Theophilus Beaujen, convicted for spreading false news and for seditious words against the Government, is fined 100 marks and ordered to stand in and upon the pillory at Charing Cross on "Monday next," and on Tuesday following in Covent Garden, for one hour between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon of each day. The said Beaujen to find sufficient sureties for his good behaviour for one year; in the meantime he is committed to Newgate until he pay the fine, undergo the punishment, and find security as aforesaid, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 17/6 (p. 65)

Peter Rowman, convicted for seditious words against the King and Government, is fined 20 marks and ordered to stand in and upon the pillory at Charing Cross on "Monday next," and on Wednesday following in St. James's Street, for an hour each day between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon. The said Rowman to find sufficient sureties for his good behaviour for one year; in the meantime he is remanded to Newgate until he pay the fine, undergo the punishment, and find security as aforesaid, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 15/- (ibid.)

Alphabetical list of names (pp. 68, 69)

Memoranda:—"Mr. Samuel Ely, in Dutchy Lane, in the Savoy, up one pair of stairs in the dark entry: to be summoned to take the oaths, &c.

"Notice to Mr. John Stephen's messenger, or Mr. Henry Sheldon, in Crown Court, Charles Street, Westminster, before the Armes delivered" (pp. 71, 72)

Sessions Book 472—February, 1690.

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, &c. (pp. 1–3, 9–21, and 33–35)

Jury panels and names of Justices (pp. 5, 6)

Names of those in the House of Correction. Several are to be whipped and then discharged (p. 25)

Order for Francis Redding, keeper of the House of Correction, Westminster, to liberate Ellen Salisbury for all matters in which she stands committed upon the complaint of John Williams; but if she is detained for any other cause the said keeper is ordered to certify the same to the Court before she is discharged (p. 39)

A like order for the discharge of Robert Stratton for all matters in which he stands committed by warrant from John Ward, esquire, J.P., upon the complaint of Mary Rosewell, if he be detained for no other cause (ibid.)

A like order to the keeper of Newgate Gaol for the discharge of Charles Busby, upon his giving security to prosecute his traverse to an indictment against him for a trespass whereto he has pleaded not guilty (ibid.)

Upon the petition of John Leyton, an inhabitant of Wapping Hamlet, Whitechapel, setting forth his poverty, the distracted condition of his wife, and the threat of the present churchwardens of Wapping to remove him and his family out of the said hamlet, and to send them to the place of their former residence, and praying that they might not be removed, but that they might have some relief from the said hamlet; it is ordered that the said Leyton be continued as a parishioner in the said hamlet and receive such relief as the necessity of his circumstances shall require (p. 40)

Order upon the petition of Katherine Auker, a black. Shows she was servant to one Robert Rich, a planter in Barbadoes, and that about six years since she came to England with her master and mistress; she was baptized in the parish Church of St. Katherine's, near the Tower, after which her said master and mistress tortured and turned her out: her said master refusing to give her a discharge, she could not be "entertained in service elsewhere." The said Rich caused her to be arrested and imprisoned in the "Pulletry Cempter," London. Prays to be discharged from her said master, he being in Barbadoes. Ordered that the said Katherine shall be at liberty to serve any person until such time as the said Rich shall return from Barbadoes (p. 41)

Order on the petition of the churchwardens and overseers of St. Andrew's, Holborn, "for the liberty above the Bars." Shows that the "pension poor" of the said liberty have so increased that the year's assessment will not pay their pensions, and that the petitioners have disbursed nearly £50 each more than they have received, and have yet two months more to pay, which will in all amount to above £100; the petitioners pray that an additional rate for three months might be assessed on the said liberty to reimburse the money by them expended. It is ordered that certain Justices of the Peace (named) shall enquire into the truth of the complaint and inspect the books of receipts and disbursements, and if it shall appear that the present assessment is insufficient, the said Justices are hereby desired to order such further assessment to be made, as to them shall seem meet for the relief of the poor and the repayment of the petitioners (p. 42)

Order on the petition of Grace Elliott, widow, setting forth that in 1687 she placed her son, Robert Elliott, as an apprentice to John Mascomb, of Ratcliffe, mariner, for five years, at the same time paying the said Mascomb £15. The said Mascomb having most inhumanly beaten and ill-treated the said Robert, the petitioner prays her son may be discharged from his master: the Court hereby discharges the said Robert of his apprenticeship with his said master, and orders the said Mascomb to deliver to the said apprentice his apparel and his indenture of apprenticehood (p. 47)

The petition of Francis Rogers, setting forth that about three years since he became an apprentice to Robert Rolph of Wapping, Stepney, a labouring sawyer, for seven years, and that, in his apprenticeship, he has received ill-usage from the said Rolph and his wife. Considering he will not derive any benefit from his hard service, he prays to be discharged. The said Rolph offers to discharge the said Rogers if Ellianor Collins, widow, mother-in-law to the said Rogers, will give him, the said Rolph, a release for all money due to her for diet, &c., by her provided for the said apprentice, and the said Rogers, his bond for the payment of £5 more at the end of two years next ensuing. By the consent of the said parties it is ordered, upon these terms, that the said apprentice shall be discharged (p. 48)

Upon the petition of Arthur Burford, showing that in 1687 he served the office of scavenger in the lower hamlet of Wapping, Whitechapel, and disbursed £5 18s. 6d. more than he received of the inhabitants there for cleansing the said hamlet, and praying that he might be repaid, it is ordered that Robert Davis, chapelwarden of the said hamlet, shall pay the said Burford the said sum, unless, upon examination of the accounts of the said Burford, Davis shall make it appear to John Caine, esquire, J.P., that there is not so much due; and what money the said Davis shall pay to the said Burford, he is to be allowed out of the money collected by rate from the inhabitants of the said hamlet (p. 49)

Upon the petition of John Seller, late chapelwarden, of Wapping Hamlet, showing he was chapelwarden of the said hamlet for 1688 when he disbursed £25 8s. 2d. more than he received, and praying for an order upon the present chapelwarden for reimbursement: it is ordered that Robert Davis, churchwarden of the said hamlet, pay the petitioner the said sum. Davis affirming that the money assessed for relief of the poor is insufficient and that he has already disbursed more than he has received and therefore cannot pay the petititioner the money, it is ordered that the said Seller and Davis shall attend at the next General Quarter Sessions and produce their books of receipts and disbursements, when the Justices will make such order for payment as to them shall seem meet (p. 50)

Henry Elliott, convicted for seditious and scandalous words against the King and Government, is fined five marks, and is to stand in and upon the pillory, on Monday "seaven night," the 10th of March next, near the end of Bow Street, in Covent Garden, and on Tuesday, the nth of the said month, in the Strand, near the New Exchange, and on Wednesday following near the Maypole, in the Strand, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon. He is to find sureties for his good behaviour for a year, and is recommitted to Newgate until he undergo the punishment and find such security; then to be delivered, paying his fees, 17/6 (p. 63)

John Clancey, convicted for seditious and scandalous words against the King and Queen, is fined £100 and committed to Newgate for three months without bail or mainprise. He is to find sureties for his appearance at the next Sessions after the end of the said three months, and for his good behaviour for a year. The said Clancey, after the said three months' imprisonment, is to remain in Newgate until he pay the said fine and find such security; then to be delivered, paying his fees, 10/4 (ibid.)

Alphabetical list of names (pp. 67, 68)

Memoranda:—"Thomas Savile, sent to Essex for felony att Westham; Robert Fletcher bound before Mr. Johnson for wages, &c." (p. 70)

Sessions Book 473—April, 1690.

Jury panels (p. 3)

Memorandum of the appointment of Samuel Freebody, of St. John Street, gentleman, as treasurer for the maimed soldiers within the hundreds of Ossulston, Edmonton, and Gore, for the year 1690. The said Freebody is appointed to take the account of William Turner, late treasurer for the said hundreds during the years 1688 and 1689.

A similar appointment for Thomas Thorowgood, of New "Braintford," gentleman, within the hundreds of Elthorne, Spelthorne, and Isleworth, for the year 1690. Thorowgood to take the account of Richard Rice, late treasurer during the years 1688 and 1689.

James Mawd is chosen treasurer for the Marshalsea, King's Bench, and Hospitals, within the hundreds of Ossulston, Edmonton, and Gore, for the year 1690.

A similar appointment for Edward Low for the hundreds of Elthorne, Spelthorne, and Isleworth (p. 4)

Order of the Justices that the prices and rates of strong beer and ale shall be 10/- the barrel, and those of small beer and ale, 6/-; all greater or lesser measures being according to the proportion of those rates. The assize of bread shall be observed according to the printed book of assize, set forth by William Pinkethman, while the rates of wages for servants, labourers, and artificers, upon the statute of 5 Elizabeth, shall stand as they were at the Sessions held at the close of Easter, 1688 (ibid.)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances, &c. (pp. 7–40)

List of names of those in the New Prison (pp. 41, 42)

Difference between the churchwardens and overseers of Norwood in the parish of Hayes, and those of the poor of Heston in this county, concerning the last legal settlement of Richard Byrings and Hannah, his wife, who are likely to become chargeable to the said parish of Hayes. Upon the oath of the said Byrings that he was a servant in Heston, where he was last legally settled, for six months, it is ordered that the churchwardens of Norwood aforesaid do remove the said Byrings and his wife to Heston, and deliver them to the churchwardens there, who are required to receive and provide for the said Richard and Hannah (p. 43)

Upon information that one of the overseers of the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, is a Roman Catholic, and another is an officer in the Tower Hamlets' militia, and consequently unfit to serve in the said offices; it is ordered to be referred to certain Justices (named), who are to enquire into the truth of the said information, and to remove and replace such overseers (ibid.)

Upon the petition of Francis Merrick, gentleman, showing that he was elected constable for Hayes, at the court leet held on Monday, the 28th of April, instant, and that John Emblin and Francis Coertly are more fit to serve in the said office; and the petitioner praying to be discharged, he is hereby discharged, and the said Coertly is appointed constable for this present year, 1690. Instructions for Coertly concerning the administration of his oath (p. 44)

Order that the churchwardens and overseers of Finchley Parish pay James Feild, a poor inhabitant of the said parish, 1/6 weekly towards his maintenance (p. 44)

Upon the complaint of Thomas Challoner, churchwarden of Wapping, Stepney Hamlet, that Richard Davis, late overseer of the poor of the said hamlet, had neglected to collect several sums of money assessed for the relief of the poor of the said hamlet, and had refused to make up his accounts, and to pay the remainder due thereupon to the said Challoner; it is ordered that the said Davis shall attend certain Justices (named), who are desired to inspect his accounts in the presence of the said Challoner, and to report the result of such inspection at the next General Sessions (p. 45)

Order that the churchwardens and overseers of Ratcliffe Hamlet, in the parish of Stepney, pay Bridget Harman, widow, 7/- due to her last Christmas for arrears of pension (ibid.)

At the General Sessions held on the 27th of February last, it was ordered that Robert Elliott, an apprentice to John Mascomb, of Ratcliffe, mariner; should be discharged. [Vide Sessions Book, No. 472, p. 47.] Now upon the request of Grace Elliott, mother of the said Robert, that the said order might be ratified and confirmed by the authority of this Court, the same not being made at a Quarter Sessions, it is hereby ratified and confirmed accordingly (p. 46)

Upon the petition of the ancient inhabitants of the New Town, within Mile End Hamlet, in the parish of Stepney, showing that they elected Robert Phipps, constable, and Joseph Boreman, Richard Gooding, Richard Taylor and Gerrard Dilward, headboroughs, for the said New Town, for this present year, and that they presented them to the Steward of the Court Leet, held at Whitechapel, who refused to administer to them their respective oaths; it is ordered that the said Phipps, Boreman, Gooding, Taylor and Dilward attend certain Justices (named) to take the oaths for the due execution of their several offices (p. 46)

Upon the petition of John Wilmer, one of the overseers of Hackney Parish for 1678, showing he had disbursed a considerable sum for the relief of the poor of the said parish, and the churchwardens of the same being now dead, the inhabitants refuse to repay him, praying that he might be reimbursed; it is referred to certain Justices (named), to inspect the accounts of the said Wilmer. The said Justices are desired to give notice to the churchwardens, some of the ancient inhabitants of the said parish, and also to the petitioner, of the time and place of their meeting, and to report a true state of the said accounts at the next General Sessions (p. 47)

Order that Samuel Freebody, gentleman, treasurer for the maimed soldiers of Ossulston Hundred, pay Elizabeth Ransome, widow of Robert Ransome (a poor maimed soldier), 10/- due last Christmas to her said husband for arrears of his pension (ibid.)

The Right Honourable John, Earl of Clare, keeper of the rolls of this county, having recommended Haughford Wainwright, gentleman, to be housekeeper of the Sessions House of Hickshall, and crier of the General and Quarter Sessions, in the room of William Hart, the present housekeeper and crier, he is hereby appointed to the said position. Particulars concerning his residence at Hickshall, and of the payment of rent and taxes (p. 51)

Order that two Justices (named) shall take an inventory of all the goods which belong to this county at Hickshall, and which shall be delivered by Mr. Hart into Mr. Wainwright's custody, upon his appointment as housekeeper. The said inventory is to remain in the hands of the Clerk of the Peace (p. 52)

Order for Peter Shute, of Isleworth, to be admitted as a pensioner; the Court being satisfied that he is a person well fitted to be relieved as an indigent and maimed soldier of this county, he is to receive 40/- yearly (ibid.)

At the General Quarter Sessions held on the 20th of February last, on behalf of the churchwardens and overseers of Putney parish, concerning the last legal settlement of Frances Flye, widow, and her two children, now chargeable to the parish of New Brentford, it was ordered that the settlement of the said Frances should be finally determined "on this day." [Vide Sessions Book No. 471, page 59.] Upon examination it appears that [John] Flye was last legally settled in Putney Parish, and that he afterwards married the said Frances at New Brentford and died there, but that he never gave notice in writing of his abode there and the number of his family to the churchwardens, as by law required; it is therefore ordered that the said Frances and her two children be conveyed to Putney and left in the care of the churchwardens of the poor of that parish (p. 53)

James Cardrow, J.P., reports that Robert Snelling owes William Long £15 1s. 6d. for wages; the Court, having regard to the said Snelling's incapacity to make present payment of the full amount, orders an instalment of £5 to be paid on the 19th of May next, the same sum on the 2nd of June, and the residue upon the 1st of July (p. 54)

Edmund Poore, convicted upon his own confession, for seditious words against the Government, is fined five marks, and ordered to stand in and upon the pillory on Monday the 5th instant, before Hickshall in St. John Street, for one hour, between 10 am. and 12 o'clock noon; he is committed to the New Prison until he undergo the punishment, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 4/8 (p. 55)

William Ball, convicted for publishing a foryed and counterfeit warrant, supposed to be under the hand and seal of John Mawgridge, esquire, their Majesties' drum-major-general, and pressing Giles Brockwell by colour thereof, is fined £6 13s. 4d., and ordered to stand in and upon the pillory on Tuesday, the 6th instant, at the end of Fuller's Rents, in Holborn, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon; he is committed to the New Prison until he undergo the punishment, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 17/6 (p. 55)

Miscellaneous memoranda, alphabetical lists of names, &c. (pp. 56–63)

"A meeting for Religious Worshipp is certified to this Sessions to be in the house of Mary Everet, in Hendon Parish, in this county, widow" (p. 66)

Sessions Book 474—June, 1690.

Jury panels (p. 3)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, indictments, &c. (pp. 5–34)

[Pages 35–40 blank.]

Names of those in, or ordered to, the New Prison and House of Correction (p. 41)

Order that the keeper of the Gatehouse Prison at Westminster discharge William Benson, there being no prosecution against him for the offence for which he stands committed under a warrant from John Ward, J.P., dated the 27th of May, 1690 (p. 43)

Order that Samuel Freebody, gentleman, one of the treasurers of this county, pay Robert Smyth, late of the Isle of Thanet, merchant, 10/- out of the public money of the county (ibid.)

Order for Mr. Robert Hardisty, one of the attorneys at the Court of King's Bench, to appear for the inhabitants of Ossulston Hundred, at the suit of William Brooks, for a robbery committed upon him in the said hundred (ibid.)

Upon the report of three Justices of the Peace (named), who were requested to inspect the accounts of John Wilmer, one of the overseers of the poor of Hackney Parish, for the year 1678, it is found there remains due to the said Wilmer £65 which was disbursed by him for the relief of the said poor. [Vide Sessions Book 473, p. 47.] The present churchwardens, desiring an order might be granted for the making of a rate upon the inhabitants of the said parish to defray the debt, it is therefore ordered that an equal and indifferent assessment be made upon the inhabitants for reimbursing the said Wilmer and for the further relief of the poor of the said parish. Instructions concerning such assessment (p. 45)

Dispute between George Colleson, of St. Katherine's Precincts, victualler, and William Chandler, his apprentice, touching the discharge of the said apprentice. Upon the confession of the said Chandler that he was bound an apprentice to one Henry Moore, of Leeds, county York, clothier, for seven years, and that he deserted the said Moore's service, and is therefore now his apprentice, it is ordered that the indenture of apprenticehood between Chandler and Colleson be cancelled, and it is further ordered that the said Chandler shall return to the said Moore, his master, and serve him for the residue of his apprenticeship (p. 46)

Order that the churchwardens and overseers of St. Andrew's, Holborn, receive Elizabeth Forrest, former servant to Roger Wilson, of the said parish, and convey her to New Bethlehem, she being now in a distracted condition (p. 47)

Order that the petty constables of the parish of St. James', Westminster, in the presence of some of the inhabitants there, do make search in all boxes and trunks of Robert and Thomas Cooper, in the house of the said Thomas, and secure all money, gold, jewels, plate, papers, writings, and other goods, belonging to the late King James or Queen Mary, or either of them (p. 47)

A similar order to the constables of Hammersmith, in Fulham Parish, to make a like search in the house, and kitchen garden, belonging to the house of Charles Taylor, at North End, called "Noe Man's Land," in the said parish of Fulham (ibid.)

Order on the petition of Robert More. Shows he is an inhabitant and shopkeeper in Cheapside, where he has borne all parish offices; but his wife requiring country air, his brother, Dr. Thomas More, allowed the said wife, and other members of the family, to have, at certain times, the use of a house in Hornsey parish, which the said doctor continues to hold. He prays to be discharged from the office of overseer of the poor of Hornsey parish, to which post he has been elected. Ordered that the said Robert be discharged, and two Justices (named) are instructed to appoint some other fit person in his place (p. 48)

Order for confirming an order made by two Justices (named), on the 1st of May, 1690, adjudging Nicholas Burrett, of Hampstead, brewer's servant, to be the father of Sarah Hare's child, Samuel (p. 49)

Upon a complaint that the watches in the several parishes, hamlets, precincts and liberties in this county are "set too late," and that the petty constables and head boroughs discharge their watches too early in the morning and keep no ward in the daytime, to the great detriment of the peace, it is ordered that the said petty constables and headboroughs set and place in their respective parishes, hamlets, precincts and liberties a watch, double to that usually appointed, and that the said watch be set kept and continued from 9 p.m. until 5 a.m., and that the said wards be set and kept from 5 a.m. until 9 p.m. Further orders concerning the due execution of these instructions (p. 51)

Order on the petition of William Hallum and Archelaus Stratford, overseers of the poor for the liberty of East Smithfield, in the parish of St. Buttolph's Without Aldgate, for the year 1688. Shows that they had executed the office faithfully, and that owing to a fire which happened in the said liberty, and through other losses, they were £6 16s. 0d. out of pocket, the present churchwardens refusing to pay them. The petitioners pray they may be reimbursed; and it is ordered that certain Justices (named), examine into the truth of the complaint and see what is justly due to the petitioners, and give them such relief as they, the said Justices, shall consider fair (p. 53)

Information of Sir Thomas Rowe, knight, J.P., that he held, of the trustees for the estates of this county, part of the Corporation Workhouse at Clerkenwell for a long term of years yet to come, at the annual rent of £30; that he had paid all rent due for the same at Michaelmas, 1687; and that he had converted the said workhouse into a college for the education of poor infants in the protestant religion. He asks that he may have orders to the churchwardens and overseers of the several parishes in this county, to send to the said college such numbers of poor children upon the same terms as formerly. It is ordered that certain Justices (named) be appointed a committee to consider the said request, and to enquire into Sir Thomas Rowe's title to the said workhouse. Instructions concerning the enquiry, the result of which is to be reported at the next General Quarter Sessions (p. 55)

Upon the complaint of Anthony Ward, on behalf of Sir James Chamberlain, baronet, that William Holden, constable of Hammersmith, in Fulham Parish, by order of the Court, searched the house and gardens of one Charles Taylor, at North End, called "Noe Man's Land" [vide p. 47], and had taken "an iron chest which did not belong to their late Majesties, but which was subject to the said Sir James Chamberlain's distress as landlord, for arrears of rent due to him," the said Holden refusing to restore the same, it is prayed the chest might be returned to the place whence it was taken. Holden having stated he knew not the owner of the chest, which contained nothing belonging to their said late Majesties, it is ordered that he return the chest to its original place (p. 56)

Upon the complaint of several of the inhabitants of Wapping Hamlet, Whitechapel, in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, that Robert Davis, formerly chapelwarden of the said hamlet, has refused to give to certain Justices (named) a true account of all money received by him, and also of such stock, &c., concerning his said office, it is ordered that the said Davis deliver to the present chapelwarden such money remaining in his hands, failing which he is to be sent to the common gaol, there to remain without bail or mainprise, until he shall make a true account concerning his said office (p. 57)

Upon the complaint of Mary, wife of Joseph Staples, of Limehouse Hamlet, Stepney, butcher, that her said husband "beat and abused her by manacling her with irons, and had utterly crippled her, and that he threatened to cut of her legs"; it is ordered that the said Joseph pay his said wife 2/- weekly, and that he behave peaceably and quietly towards her in future (p. 59)

Peter Vivion to be delivered to the churchwardens of Aldgate, from the House of Correction (p. 60)

Indenture of apprenticeship of John Hall, of Finchley, to Thomas Baker, of Hampstead, liquor maker, to serve seven years from the 7th of May, 1690 (ibid.)

The like of William Wayman, son of William Wayman, bricklayer, to Thomas Harrison, of Holborn, armour-maker and gunsmith, to serve for a term of seven years. Dated 6 June, 1690 (ibid.)

The like of Philip Briggs, son of Philip Briggs, citizen and bookseller of London, to Thomas Austin, of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, saddletree maker, to serve seven years. Dated 12 August, 1686 (ibid.)

The said Philip Briggs states that the said Austin is dead, and that he, with the consent of his friends, has become apprenticed to John Swift, of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, "saddletree" maker, for seven years, as in the aforesaid indenture, and under the condition and agreement contained in the same (ibid.)

Miscellaneous memoranda (pp. 61–63)

"Conventicle in Shoreditch.—A meeting for religious worshipp is certified to this Sessions to be in the house of James Cave, in White Crosse Alley, in St. Leonards, Shoreditch, in this county" (p. 63)

Alphabetical list of recognizances (pp. 64–67)

At the General Quarter Sessions held on the 13th of January "last," divers arms were seized by John Steevens, a messenger, by virtue of Lord Shrewsbury's warrant, at Captain Samuel Ely's house, supposed to belong to Captain Pounds, a Roman Catholic, deceased; the said arms were left with the housekeeper at Hickshall, where they still remain. Upon an application made and upon oaths taken by Captain Ely, and upon the oath of his servant, John Hopkins, that all the arms (mentioned) are the property of the said Ely, it is ordered that the same be restored to the said Captain Ely. A list of the arms follows (p. 68)

Miscellaneous memoranda (p. 70)

"A meeting house att Michael Dorsett's house in Staines for dissenting protestants" (ibid.)

Sessions Book 475—July, 1690.

Jury panels (p. 5)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances &c. (pp. 7–36)

List of names under the headings "New Prison" and "House of Correction" (pp. 37, 38)

Proceedings upon the petition of Robert Taylor, minister, of Hadley. Shows that he has officiated as minister in the said parish for nearly 20 years; that he has always been excused from watching, warding, and repairing the highways in the said parish, and that his living is worth more than £40 yearly. Prays to be again excused. He is excused accordingly (p. 39)

Order for the churchwardens of Shoreditch to pay Richard Fierson £14 3s. 8d., he having expended that amount for the relief of the poor of the said parish during his term of office as upper churchwarden for the year 1687 (ibid.)

Order to "rerefer" the taking of the accounts of Robert Davis, late chapelwarden of the hamlet of Wapping, Whitechapel, to certain Justices named. [Vide Sessions Book No. 474, p. 57] (p. 40)

Order for excusing Mr. Robert More, citizen and linendraper, of Cheapside, from being overseer of the poor for Hornsey parish, he being only a lodger with his brother, Dr. Thomas More. [Vide Sessions Book No. 474, p. 48] (p. 41)

Order for excusing Robert Chambers, of Stepney, from watching, warding and payment of parish duties, the said Chambers in his petition showing that he served as master in the Royal Navy for 40 years, and is now old and indigent (p. 42)

Order for John Wray, junior, and John Bennett, junior, to attend and take the oaths as constables for Rislipp, for the year 1690 (p. 43)

Order for the conveyance of Judith Weaver and her child from Kensington to Ealing Parish, it having been proved that her husband, Charles Weaver, was last legally settled at Ealing aforesaid (ibid.)

Order for the churchwardens and overseers of the poor of Ratcliffe Hamlet, to pay Edward Parker £104 10s. 1d., due to him from the said hamlet upon his account, which sum is to be raised by assessment upon the inhabitants there (p. 44)

Address by the Middlesex Justices to the King and Queen expressing their zeal in preserving their Majesties "against the plots and contrivances of papists and all disaffected persons in this present invasion by the French" (p. 45)

Dispute between Henry Cleaver, of Hounslow, distiller, and John Tilley and —— Burbanck, constables, of Hounslow aforesaid, concerning the quartering of troopers, with their horses, upon the said Cleaver. Cleaver insisting that he is overcharged and ought not to quarter more than his proportion with others liable to quarter troops and their horses in the said town of Hounslow, it is ordered that enquiry be made by a Justice (named), and the said Cleaver eased of such quartering as shall be found meet (p. 46)

Order for a committee of Justices (named) to attend the Chancellor of the Exchequer concerning the allowance of the Justices' "wages" (p. 47)

Order for the churchwardens of St. Giles-in-the-Fields to pay Robert Cook, one of the overseers of the poor there, for the year 1688, the money due to him upon the auditing of his accounts (ibid.)

Order for Thomas Simonds to pay the money assessed upon him (1/6 per annum) for the relief of the poor of St. Pancras, for that part of the gatehouse at Highgate, which is in the said parish of St. Pancras, and in the possession of the said Simonds. He is to be discharged of so much of the assessment charged upon him (£3 10s. 0d. per annum) for the poor of Hornsey, the said gatehouse being situated in both parishes (p. 48)

Order for the inhabitants of Red Lion Square, in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn, to maintain a watch there at their own charge, and to place "stands" for the watchmen, at their own charge, at convenient places in the said square, and to have scavengers and rakers of their own. In consideration whereof they are exempted from payment for any other watching, cleansing, &c. (p. 50)

Thomas Hall ordered to pay William Beamont £3 for labour done by the said Beamont. Refusing to pay the same, he is committed to New Prison, there to remain until he pay the money or be delivered by due course of law; if delivered to pay for his fees, 2/ (p. 52)

By an order dated the 15th of July instant, it was directed that the license granted to William Brightfoot, of Tottenham, yeoman, for keeping a common victualling house, should be suppressed; but upon the said Brightfoot's petition, setting forth that he had purchased great quantities of liquors, and that he should be much "dampnified" thereby unless he were allowed to sell the same, it is ordered that the execution of the said order be suspended until the end of the next Quarter Sessions, and the said Brightfoot is hereby allowed to keep the victualling house and to sell the liquors already laid in, but to take in no fresh stock. He is to keep all the articles and conditions contained in the said license (ibid.)

Upon the matter in difference between Theodosius Lamphire and Thomas Flack, late overseers of the poor for the upper hamlet of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, and the present churchwardens of the poor there, concerning the payment of £23 14s. 6d. due to the said Lamphire and Flack for money disbursed by them, it is ordered that the accounts of the said Lamphire and Flack be audited by certain Justices (named), and that the present churchwardens and overseers of the said hamlet pay the money due upon the foot of the accounts (p. 54)

Joseph Chinnery, his wife and two children, were, by warrant dated the 5th August instant, passed from the parish of St. Buttolph's, Aldgate, to that of St. Clement Danes. The churchwardens of St. Clement Danes having now stated that the last legal settlement of the said Chinnery was in the parish of St. Katherine's, Colman Street, it is ordered that the matter be determined at the next General Quarter Sessions (p. 55)

By an order of the 19th of July last it was ordered that Judith Weaver and her child should be conveyed from Kensington to Ealing. The churchwardens of the latter parish having appealed against the said order, it is further ordered that the matter concerning the last legal settlement of Charles Weaver, husband of the said Judith, be determined at the next General Quarter Sessions. [Vide ante, p. 43] (p. 56)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances &c. (pp. 63–66)

Alphabetical list of names of those indicted for trespasses (p. 68)

Ditto, headed "presentment for recusancy" (pp. 69, 70)

Ditto, headed Calendar of Recognizances (pp. 71, 72)

Memoranda dated 17 July, '90.

Edward Wildboar, sworn headborough, of Enfield, in the place of Edward Barney.

Cornelius Jones [and] George Howard: Fined 10/- for absence from Court 1 August, '90.

Richard Lee, of Finchley, victualler, sworn petty constable in the place of William Alder, now deceased.

The recognizances of Thomas Hawksworth continued to the 3rd of September to prosecute.

James Havering, "bayleffe" to attend next Sessions (p. 76)

Sessions Book 476—September, 1690.

Jury panels, &c. (pp. 3, 4)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances, &c. (pp. 7–40)

For the better preservation of peace, "daily endangered by the great resort of papists and reputed papists to the city of Westminster and other parts of this county within ten miles distance of the cities of London and Westminster, contrary to law, and for the speedier amoveing of such dangerous persons and seizing of their horses as the law directs," it is ordered that all householders, innkeepers, and "keepers of horse at livery" do, within 24 hours after this notice, deliver in writing to a Justice of the Peace in the parish, the full names and places of residence of every lodger or sojourner, and of the owner and keeper of every such horse as aforesaid, and of the time of harbouring the same. Further instructions concerning the printing and circulating of this order. [Vide Sessions Book 522, p 41.] (pp. 41, 42)

Upon the complaint of William Munden, high constable of Kensington Division, that the King's highway, before and near his house in Kensington aforesaid, is much overflowed by the stopping-up of a passage, or common sewer, which ought to be cleansed and repaired at the charge of the said parish, it is ordered that a Justice (named) shall enquire into the truth of the complaint, and give order for the cleansing of the said passage; he is further to report, at the next Sessions, who, in his opinion, ought to cleanse and repair such passage, as occasion requires (p. 43)

Proceedings upon the petition of the inhabitants of Mile End Hamlet, in the parish of Stepney. Shows that the hamlet has been lately divided into two parts, and named the old and new towns of Mile End, and recommends that Mr. Richard Goodwin and Mr. Henry May be overseers of the poor in the said new town. Ordered accordingly (ibid.)

Proceedings upon the petition of George West, gentleman, high constable of the Tower Hamlets, and of several petty constables, &c. Shows that, at the Sessions held on the 3rd of June last, it was then ordered that the petty constables and headboroughs in every parish, hamlet, &c., should double the number of watchmen nightly [vide Sessions Book No. 474, p. 51]; the inhabitants of the said hamlets being generally very poor, and unable to sustain the charge of double watches, the petitioners desire that they may be eased of keeping such watches. Ordered accordingly (p. 44)

Order for the churchwardens and overseers of St. Giles' Parish to pay Sarah Jones the arrears of her pension of 2/6 per month, and to continue the payment of the same until the next Quarter Sessions, when it shall be decided whether the said pension ought to be continued (p. 45)

Order for the churchwardens and overseers of Ratcliffe Hamlet, Stepney Parish, to pay John Dunsteere the arrears of his pension of 1/6 per week, and to continue the payment of the said pension until further order (ibid.)

Order for the constables and headboroughs of the liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden, and Ely Rents, in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn, with the overseers of the poor and some of the inhabitants of the said liberty, to make a rate for reimbursing William Price, constable of the said liberty, the money by him expended in receiving and conveying away, with passes, "cripples, vagabonds, and sturdy beggars through the said liberty." (p. 46)

Edward Maddox and George Harvey, of Edmonton, having, by order of the vestry of the said parish, dated 1 June, 1679, paid £16 as a fine, to be excused from serving in the said parish, and yet, having been appointed surveyors of the highways in the said parish for 1683, in which offices they served, it is ordered that the churchwardens refund Messrs. Maddox and Harvey the said sum of £16 (ibid.)

Upon the matter in difference between Francis Hooper, chapelwarden, of Wapping Hamlet, Whitechapel, in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, for 1685, and the present churchwardens of the said hamlet, concerning the payment of £21 0s. 8d. disbursed by the said Hooper, it is ordered that certain Justices (named) inspect the accounts of the said Hooper, and report the result at the next Sessions (p. 47)

Order that certain Justices (named) view Hickshall, and the pavements adjoining, and report what necessary repairs are required in and about the same, and what repairs have been lately done, &c., and upon what terms the late William Hart, housekeeper, held the said house, and at whose charge the New River water ought to be continued for the use thereof (p. 48)

Complaint of Thomas Davis, of the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, glazier, that Elizabeth Pennell, wife of Samuel Pennell, of the same parish, had stolen from him "two glazier's vices, with the screws and appurtenances," and had pawned them to one Ellianor Troughton, wife of Samuel Troughton, of the same parish, broker, and that by virtue of a warrant the said goods are now in the custody of —— Teague, constable of the said parish; the petitioner praying for the restoration of the said goods, it is ordered to be referred to certain Justices (named) who are to make such order for the relief of the said Davis as they shall consider meet (p. 49)

Order to certain Justices (named) to view the repairs done by Captain Thomas Jones, keeper of the New Prison and House of Correction, Clerkenwell, to report what further repairs are required, and to inspect the accounts of the workmen, who demand £25 7s. 2½d. The result of the enquiry to be submitted at the next General Sessions (p. 50)

Upon consideration of the matters in difference between Timothy Dalby, of Stepney, otherwise Stebunheath Parish, and Bridget, his wife, a semptress, and Margaret Blackman, Elizabeth Jackson, and Mary Clayton, their apprentices, concerning the discharge of the said apprentices; it appearing that the said Bridget "had given moderate correction" to the said apprentices, and had not provided wholesome and sufficient diet for them while in her service, it is ordered that the said apprentices be discharged from their indentures of apprenticehood. Jackson and Clayton are at liberty to serve any other mistress, but Blackman is to live at her father's house, and to serve her said mistress for a month, provided the said Bridget do not beat or abuse her; it is further ordered that the apparel of the said apprentices be restored to them, but the money paid with the said apprentices is to be retained by the said Timothy and Bridget (p. 51)

Upon the dispute between Abigail Wait, of the parish of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields, milliner and sempstress, and Elizabeth Sparling, her apprentice, concerning the discharge of the said apprentice, the Court, proving the indentures to be void, it is ordered that the said Sparling be discharged from her said mistress, who is to deliver up to the said apprentice all her apparel (p. 52)

Upon the dispute between James Halsey, of Whetston, Finchley Parish, and William Sleath (sic), constable of Fryern Barnett, in this county, concerning the passing of cripples and vagabonds through the said parish of Finchley, it appearing that the said Slate (sic) had frequently passed cripples, &c., from Fryern Barnett to the said Halsey, in Whetston (who is no constable), and who ought to have been passed to the constable of High Barnett, county Herts, whereby the north end of Finchley was twice charged with one pass, it is ordered that the said Slate do pass all such cripples, &c., passed to him as constable of Fryern Barnett aforesaid, from Edward Towerson, or any other constable of the north end of Finchley, to the constable of High Barnett aforesaid (p. 52)

Difference having arisen between the constable of the liberty of Upper Barnsbury, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington, and the headborough of the said liberty, and the constable of the liberty of St. John of Jerusalem, concerning the passing of cripples and vagabonds, it appeared that the constable of Upper Barnsbury ought to pass all who are passed to him from the respective constables of Islington to the said constable of the liberty of St. John of Jerusalem, who ought "to pass them forward to Highgate," and that he ought to pass all that come to him from Highgate to the constable of Upper Barnsbury, who ought to pass them to the respective constables of Islington town, for the time being. Ordered accordingly. (p. 53)

Upon the petition of Matthew Allen, senior, of Spitalfields Hamlet, Stepney Parish, stating that he is 72 years of age, and unable to work, and that the churchwardens refuse him any further allowance "than twelve (sic) a week only," which is insufficient to maintain him, and praying for some addition to his pension, it is ordered that the said pension be increased by the sum of 6d. weekly (p. 54)

Proceeding upon the petition of Richard Carrington, of the parish of St. Giles' Without, Cripplegate, fringe maker; states that the churchwardens of the said parish had placed John Galliard with him, as an apprentice, and that the said apprentice had several times robbed and run away from him, and prays that Galliard may be discharged from his apprenticehood. The churchwardens state that Galliard had been placed with other masters to whom he had behaved badly, and that he is now in the House of Correction, and they desire that he may remain with the said Carrington, who had received 40/- with the said apprentice. The petitioner prays that he may be free of his said apprentice, and offers to repay 30/- of the said 40/- towards providing him with another master. To this the Court agrees (p. 55)

Dispute between James Clark, of the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, cordwainer, and Thomas Woolley, his apprentice, concerning the discharge of the said Woolley. Upon proof that the said Clarke and his wife had ill-treated the apprentice, it is ordered that he be discharged from his said master, who is to deliver to the said Woolley his apparel, but Clarke is to retain the £4 paid with the said apprentice (p. 56)

Henry Ward, convicted for seditious and scandalous words against the Government, is fined 20 nobles, and to stand in and upon the pillory on Tuesday next, the 9th instant, in St. James Street, and on Thursday, the 11th instant, in Covent Garden, within the liberty of Westminster, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock, noon, of each day; he is remanded to Newgate until he undergo the punishment, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 15/- (p. 58)

John Cragg, convicted for impressing Joseph Golding without a lawful warrant, is fined five marks, and to stand in and upon the pillory on Monday next, the 8th instant, near the Sun Tavern, Shadwell, Stepney parish, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon; he is remanded to New Prison until he undergo the said punishment, then to be delivered, paying his fees 17/6 (ibid.)

Memorandum—List of names headed "New Prison" (p. 59)

Indenture of apprenticeship of Samuel Shepheard, son of Richard Shepheard, formerly of Newthorpe, county Nottingham, deceased, to James Duwee, clothworker, to serve for a term of seven years from the 11th of August, 1690 (p. 60)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances. &c. (pp. 61–64)

Alphabetical list of names, headed indictments for trespass, and recognizances (pp 67–69)

[Pages 70–73 blank.]

Memorandum, "Giles Hock, of Little Stanmore, victualler, his license to be suppressed" (p. 74)

Sessions Book 477—October, 1690.

Jury panel (p. 2)

Names of Justices (p. 3)

Memoranda as to recognizances, &c. (pp. 3–35)

Order for the churchwardens, &c., of the parish of St. Martin's-in-theFields to receive Ann Martin, who has a legal settlement in that parish, from the churchwardens, &c., of St. Margaret's, Westminster, and to provide for her until they can rid themselves of the charge by due course of law (p. 35)

Order for three Justices of the Peace to examine into the complaint of Lionel Empes that he is over-rated for his premises at Charing Cross (ibid.)

Order to the churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields to pay £5 17s. 2d. to Richard Blackman, constable, for passing and relieving vagrants and cripples, with 5/- more for the order. Further that since the parish of St. James' had lately been relieved from "the antient trouble and charge of Passing Vagrants and Cripples," the churchwardens, &c., of St. James are to pay forthwith one-half of the above charge (p. 36)

Order that Humphrey Watson be put in the pillory in New Palace Yard on the 6th October for the space of one hour, he having been convicted of speaking seditious words against the King's Majesty and Government (p. 37)

Order respiting the recognizances, entered into before 16 May, 1690, of those who had failed to appear at the July Quarter Sessions, and whose offences had been pardoned (ibid.)

Order for the churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields to pay to George Sams £40, out of £60 which he claims to be due to him for work on the highways. Further ordered that four of the Justices of the Peace shall examine George Sams as to the £20 which he claims, and they shall take such action as shall seem to them to be most convenient (ibid.)

Order to the churchwardens, &c., of St. James's, in the liberty of Westminster, to pay to Francis Steene, a constable of that parish, 28s. 11d., by him expended in the necessary relief of vagrants and cripples; and 5/- more for the order (p. 38)

Order for the same churchwardens, &c., to pay to Robert Butler 34s. 3d., expended by him when constable for the relief of vagrants, &c.; and 5/- for the order (p. 39)

Order concerning William Landy, "formerly a madman and confined in the house of correccõn at Tuttle Fields to prevent his wandering abroad and doeing mischeife to the people, was there mainteyned about five yeares by order of the Quarter Sessions" in 1684 . . . . at the charge of the respective parishes in the liberty; later, William Landy had "listed himselfe a souldier in their Maties. service and went into Flanders for some time, but since disbanded, and at the said last Quarter Sessions remayned distempered and very poor and helpless." He had prayed the Court to be relieved again. His sisterin-law, the wife of Edward Landy, a shoemaker, of Gray's Inn Lane, offered to allow him lodgings, and to accept 2/6 a week for his maintenance. The last Court had ordered the parishes in the liberty to contribute as follows:— St. Margaret's, 8d.; St. Martin-in-the-Fields, 6d.; St. James', 4d.; St. Anne's, 3d.; St. Paul's, Covent Garden, 3d.; St. Clement Danes', 4d.; St. Mary, Savoy, 2d., so long as William Landy should be lodged in the house of Edward Landy. Since the last Court, Edward Landy died, and his widow was so poor that she could not maintain William "without an allowance of five shillings per week for the future." Complaint is made that some of the parishes refused to pay their quota, and it is ordered that the sums unpaid be collected by Francis Reading, governor of the House of Correction, from the various parishes; and further that the parishes pay, for the future, weekly to Mary Lundy for the maintenance of William, through Francis Reading, as follows:— St. Margaret's, 1s.; St. Martin's, 1s.; St. James', 8d.; St. Anne's, 6d.; St. Paul's, Covent Garden, 7d.; St. Clement Danes, 1s.; St. Mary, Savoy, 3d. (p. 39)

Memoranda relating to recognizances, &c. (pp. 41, 42)

Agreement between the Justices and Mr. Rampane and other proprietors of the waterworks at Mill Bank for "Thames water to wash wthall, for the use and service of the House of Correction at Tuttlefeild." The parishioners yearly at Michaelmas to pay to the proprietors 40s. The churchwardens, &c., to pay the money over to the Governor of the House of Correction, and the several parishes to contribute as follows:—

s.d.
St. Martin's-in-the-Fields80
St. James'54
St. Margaret's80
St. Clement Danes80
St. Paul's, Covent Garden48
St. Mary-le-Strand20
St. Anne's40

(p. 43)

List of indictments alphabetically arranged; most entries followed by a number intended for a key, others with the word "felon" (p. 44)

A List of Papists:—Edward Ellis, Edward Dawson, Edward Tompkins, Michael Boylott, George Harris, Dominick Gosheen, Thomas Markaris (?) Sherwood, locksmith—"noe Edward or George amongst all that made Default, & yet Dawson, Tomkins, nor Harris to bee found."

Sessions Book 478—October, 1690.

Jury list (p. 9)

Memoranda relating to recognizances (pp. 11–55)

Order for Mordica Fromanteel, of Whitechapel, to take the oath of a high constable of the Tower division, in the place of Mr. George West (p. 57)

Order for Robert Bent, of Bury Street, in Edmonton, to take the oath of a high constable for the Edmonton Division, in the place of Mr. Richard Bradley (p. 57)

Order that the "pension" of 2/6 per month, which had been paid to Sarah Jones, of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields, should be taken off and discharged (p. 58)

Order for determining the legal settlement of Charles Weaver, at the next Quarter Sessions, between Ealing and Kensington. [Vide Sessions Book 475, pp. 43 and 56] (ibid.)

Order to the churchwardens, &c., of St. Clement Danes, concerning the settlement of Joseph Chinnery in that parish; the dispute was between churchwardens, &c., of St. Katherine, Colman Street, St. Buttolph's, Aldgate, and St. Clement Danes (p. 59)

Order to James Ermindeger, of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, gunsmith, to pay to the churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, 4/- weekly, and upon every Saturday, for the relief and maintenance of his wife, Mary, whom he had "locked up many days and nights in dark places, allowing her no kind of sustenance, and endeavoured to burn her flesh by placing lighted candles round her" (p. 60)

Order suppressing the license of Edward Clark, victualler, of Hendon, on the complaint that he had kept a disorderly victualling house, frequently allowing persons "to remain tipling in his house" during the time of Divine Service on Sundays. He is to be forthwith brought before one or more of the Justices and proceeded against as an unlicensed victualler, if he disobeys the order (p. 62)

Order that Henry Jones, late treasurer for the Marshalsea, King's Bench and Hospitals within the hundreds of Ossulton, Edmonton, and Gore, shall pay the sum of £48 15s., collected by him in the years 1688 and 1689, to Thomas Harcourt, Clerk of the Peace of the county (ibid.)

Order for suppressing the license of William Brightfoot, of Tottenham. Complaint made by John Woodhouse, servant to the Right Honourable the Earl of Colraine, that Brightfoot had "by surprize" obtained a license for selling beer, &c., in the house which he rents of the Earl, contrary to his covenant; that he was a young man, and capable to maintain his family without keeping an alehouse; that the Court had already given him time in which to dispose of "his beer and ale laid in by virtue of his said license." Further order to bring the said Brightfoot before one or more of the Justices to be proceeded against as an unlicensed victualler if he presumes to sell beer after receiving notice of this order. [Vide Sessions Book 475, p. 52] (p. 63)

Order referring to two of the Justices, "inhabiting near that parish," a claim made by Samuel Pearson, "upper" churchwarden of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, for the payment of £114 14s. 1½d. to him from that parish, Samuel Pearson states that a rate had been made for reimbursing him, but that the present churchwardens refused to pay him, though he was willing to take £65 14s. 1½d. now, and "to stay twelve months for the other fifty pounds due to him . . . in respect of the pressing necessities of the poor" (p. 64)

Order to the churchwardens, &c., of St. Clement Danes to remove James Gardner to the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great, that being the place of his last legal settlement (p. 67)

Order that the dispute between the churchwardens, &c., of "the hamblett of Mile End New Towne in the parish of Stepney, otherwise Stebinheath" and the churchwardens, &c., of Stratford, concerning the settlement of Mary, John, and Susannah Woodhall, the children of Thomas Woodhall, should be dealt with at the next Quarter Sessions (p. 68)

Ordered that Mr. Robert Hardisty, Attorney of the Court of King's Bench, do appear for the inhabitants of the hundred of Ossulton at the suit of the Right Honourable John Lord Lovelace, and at the suit of John Christmas for "two small robberys committed upon them" in the hundred (p. 70)

Order for the removal of John Phillips at once, and for the removal of Mary, his wife, as soon as she "is in condition of health" from St. Buttolph's Without Aldgate, [to] St. Giles' Without, Cripplegate (p. 71)

Order to certain Justices to deal with a surplus arising from an assessment of the various parishes in the hundred of Ossulton, over and above the assessment sanctioned by the Justices (p. 73)

Indenture of apprenticeship of John Middleton, son of John Middleton, of St. Paul's, Shadwell, to John Lize (?), clothweaver. Dated 21 October, 1689 (p. 79)

Indenture of Joshua Marshall, son of John Marshall, clothworker, of St. Mary Matfellon, "otherwise Whitechappell," to Solomon Dupire, clothweaver. Dated 17 February, 1689 (ibid.)

Alphabetical list of indictments (p. 84)

Alphabetical list of recognizances (pp. 86, 87)

[Pages 88, 89 blank.]

Various notes, mostly relating to headboroughs and constables being sworn in, the suppression of ale-house licenses, &c.; and a memorandum that "John Walker keeps a meeting house of dissenting Protestants in Old Brentford," and that "Letitia Bawdell keeps a meeting house of dissenting Protestants att her house called Mount Pleasant in East Barnet" (p. 90)

Sessions Book 479—December, 1690.

Jury panels (pp. 5, 6)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances &c. (pp. 7–40)

[Pages 41–48 blank.]

Miscellaneous memoranda as above (pp. 49–54)

Upon the complaint of Joshua Iremonger, Andrew Branfield and others, inhabitants of Ratcliffe Hamlet, Stepney Parish, against Charles Cutting, con stable, for excusing several of the inhabitants from watching and warding, and thereby overburdening the complainants, who are put to great charges, it is ordered that certain Justices (named) do enquire into the matter and report their opinions at the next General Quarter Sessions, and in the meantime give the complainants such relief as they shall consider meet (p. 5 7)

Order for the churchwarden of Isleworth to remove Ann Lawrence from Heston to Isleworth, she having been last legally settled in the latter parish (p. 58)

Proceedings upon the petition of the inhabitants of Hornsey. They state that upon the 13th of October last, they were presented by William Bluck, J.P., "upon his view," because, on the 24th of August previous, they had not repaired a certain common ancient highway in their said parish, leading from a place called Newgate Lane, in the said parish, to a certain village called Highgate; 20 perches in length, and 2 perches in breadth, the same being in great decay. The petitioners state that the highway really lies in Finchley Parish, and they pray to be discharged from the said presentment. The matter is referred to certain Justices (named), who are to certify, in writing, at the next General Sessions, their opinions in which parish the said highway lies, and who ought to repair the same (p. 58)

Information of the burgesses and assistants of the Duchy Liberty in the Strand, that some of the inhabitants had obtained the nomination of Joseph Weeks as constable of the said liberty, in the room of Thomas Awbrey, pretending that the latter had gone from the said liberty. As it appears that the said Awbrey had not then removed, neither was Weeks the next to serve the said office, the nomination was void. Awbrey having since removed, and one William Bines, hosier, being next in course to serve the said office, the said Bines is appointed to act as constable until the next leet or Quarter Sessions (p. 59)

Dispute between Robert Cooke, one of the overseers of the parish of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields, for the year 1688, Richard Sheppard, upper churchwarden, and John Harris, late overseer of the said parish, concerning the payment of £18 disbursed by the said Cooke for the relief of the poor: it is ordered that Harris pay out of the public money of the parish the said sum of £18 to Robert Cooke; and it is referred to the Justices to examine into the charges expended by the petitioner in the auditing of his accounts, and to order the churchwardens to pay the same without further trouble (p. 63)

Upon the petition of the inhabitants of Norfolk Street, in the Duchy Liberty in the Strand, St. Clement Danes Parish, stating that, owing to an insufficient watch, some of their houses had lately been robbed and others were in danger, and praying that they might have liberty to maintain a watch in the said streets, it is ordered accordingly; the said inhabitants to bear the charge thereof (p. 64)

Upon the petition of Mary Guttridge, widow, on behalf of her daughter Clare, aged 14 years, setting forth that the said Clare, on the 24th of June, 1689, was apprenticed to Penelope Batchelor and Ann Ithall, spinsters, late of Pall Mall, to learn the trade of a milliner and embroiderer, for which the sum of £15 was paid; her mistresses having used the said apprentice badly, and the petitioner praying that the indentures of apprenticehood might be cancelled, it is ordered that the said apprentice be discharged, and it is recommended to certain Justices (named) to consider what part of the money paid with the said apprentice should be returned (p. 65)

Order for the respite of the recognizance, entered into by Thomas Lake, Charles Whitehead, and William Cooper, and their sureties, for their appearance at the General Quarter Sessions (p. 66)

List of names under the headings:—New Prison and House of Correction (pp. 67, 68)

The petition of Elizabeth Mellin, widow, mother of Frances Niccolls, aged 14 years. States that the said Frances was apprenticed to James Lambert, of St. Katherine's Precinct, and to Mary, his wife, to learn the trade of a cook, but the said James and Mary having neglected the said apprentice, the petitioner prays they may be compelled to provide for her, or that the said indenture be cancelled. Ordered, upon the non-appearance of the said James and Mary, that the apprentice be discharged from her indenture of apprenticehood, and it is further ordered that the said Lambert and his wife do deliver to the said apprentice her indenture, together with her apparel, &c. (p. 69)

Indenture of apprenticeship of William Davies, son of Robert Davies, of Allhallows, Barking, weaver, to Samuel Sheering, of St. Olave's, Southwark, Surrey, sailor. To serve for a term of seven years. Dated 1 December, 1690 (p. 71)

Alphabetical list of names, headed indictments for trespass (pp. 72, 73)

Ditto, headed calendar of recognizances (pp. 74, 75)



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