Sessions Books
1691

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

W. J. Hardy (editor)

Year published

1905

Pages

26-61

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'Sessions Books: 1691', Middlesex county records. Calendar of Sessions Books 1689-1709 (1905), pp. 26-61. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66108 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Sessions Book 480—January, 1691.

Jury panel (p. 1)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances, &c. (pp. 2–12)

Receipt for 40/- for the poor of St. Anne's, Westminster, paid by John Reynolds "in court, last sessions," for refusing to take the oaths of fidelity and allegiance to their Majesties. Signed, Robert Harrison, churchwarden. Dated 24 January, 1690 (p. 15)

Robert Dart, otherwise Dafte, convicted for seditious words against the Government, is to "be set in and upon the pillory in the New Palace Yard, Westminster," on Wednesday "next," the 14th instant January, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon, with a paper fixed on his head showing his offence; he is to return to the Gatehouse Gaol for six months, and further, until he find good bail for his appearance at the next Sessions (p. 18)

[Pages 19–31 blank.]

Miscellaneous memoranda as to commitments to the House of Correction; a meeting of Protestant dissenters in "le New Way" in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster, certified by Vincent Alsop, preacher; recognizances, &c. (pp. 32, 33)

Ah alphabetical list of names as to indictments (p. 35)

Memoranda as to acquittals, appearances and committals (p. 37)

Sessions Book 481—January, 1691.

Jury list (p. 7)

Recognizances, and memoranda relating thereto (pp. 9–45)

Order that Samuel Freebody, gentleman, treasurer "for the maimed soldiers" in the hundred of Ossulton, shall pay James Vance, a maimed soldier, £4, for his present relief (p. 49)

Order to the churchwarden of St. James', Clerkenwell, to pay to James Petworth, late constable of the Upper Liberty of St. John Street, £1 14s. 7d., and to Edward Weeks, late constable for Islington Liberty, £2 4s. 7d., being money expended by them in passing cripples and vagabonds through their several liberties (ibid.)

Ordered that constables and headboroughs of parishes within the weekly bills of mortality do forthwith give notice to every householder "whose house adjoyns unto or is near the street," that henceforth until Lady Day next, each night they set or hang out candles or lights in lanthorns on the outside of their houses next the street, "as it shall grow dark," till twelve o'clock at night. Further they are to give notice to all scavengers that every day in the week, except Sunday and other holidays, "they bring, or cause to be brought, carts, dung pots, and other fitting carriages into all the said parishes," where they can pass, and give notice to the inhabitants, and "abide there a convenient time," and carry away the dirt and soyle brought to them, according to the directions of an Act of Parliament made in the 1st year of William and Mary (p. 50)

Confirmation of William Binns as constable of the Duchy Liberty in the Strand, in the place of Thomas Aubrey, gone out of the liberty. [Vide Sessions Book 479, p. 59] (p. 51)

Ordered—as several houses and shops have been lately robbed "in the evening before the watches are set"—that the constables of the Duchy Liberty in the Strand, as soon as candles are lit, are to place four able and sufficient warders "at convenient stands in the High Street" between Temple Bar and Salisbury House. These wardens are to remain until the constables have set the watch at 10 o'clock (ibid.)

Ordered that the high constables of every hundred issue warrants to the petty constables to make a list of all the mariners and sea-faring men in their respective districts, together with their ages, places of abode, and whether they are at home or abroad; these lists are to be sent to the Commissioners of their Majesties' Customs "for the more speedy and sufficient supply and furnishing of their Majesties' Fleet with able and sufficient seamen and mariners" (p. 52)

Order naming six Justices who are to enquire into the expenses incurred by Mr. John Reynolds in promoting the Act of Parliament passed for the cleansing and paving the streets in the out parishes, comprised in the weekly bills of mortality. Further ordered that Mr. Reynolds shall procure "thirty thousand abstracts or breviats to the said Acts," to be printed, to the end the same may be given and disposed of to the churchwardens of every parish and place, for them to cause the same to be distributed to the respective householders . . . to prevent them from incurring the penalties imposed by the Act. Mr. Reynolds' costs incurred in procuring the passing of the Act, and of the printing to be raised by the parishes affected (p. 54)

Ordered that two of the Justices shall examine what moneys the overseers of the Liberty of Hatton Garden, Saffron Hill, and Ely Rents have expended on the relief of the poor, and to make such assessment for reimbursing the overseers as they shall deem fit (ibid.)

Dispute as to the repair of the great bridge of Colnbrook between the inhabitants of that part of the said town which lies in Bucks and those of that part which lies in Middlesex. The bridge was in great decay for want of reparation, to the hazard of travellers. The Court of Quarter Sessions for Bucks had ordered the inhabitants of so much of Colnbrook as lay in the parishes of Langley Marsh and Horton to repair their portion of the bridge, and these persons prayed that the inhabitants of such part of the said town as was in the parish of Stanwell and county of Middlesex should repair their part. These replied that there were certain tolls and profits of fairs granted to the Corporation of Colnbrook for the repairs of the bridge. The Court found that these profits ought to be employed as alleged, but that they were not sufficient, and ordered the inhabitants of Colnbrook in the parish of Stanwell to contribute their share towards the repair of the bridge (p. 55)

Ordered that Mr. Robert Hardisty appear for the inhabitants of Ossulston Hundred in the suit of John Hatton for a robbery committed on him in the hundred (p. 56)

The Court found that Captain Thomas Jones, keeper of the New Prison and governor of Bridewell at Clerkenwell, had disbursed for the use of the county, over and above £70 8s. 10d. reported due to him in 1680, a further sum of £94 16s. 6d., making a total of £165 5s. 4d. Captain Jones owed the county one year's rent of the New Prison £25 over and above £15 which he has paid to the Matron of the House of Correction. Captain Jones is ordered to detain the £25, and the Clerk of the Peace is ordered to pay him the residue of the £165 5s. 4d. Certain Justices are appointed to see what abatement, if any, could be made in the rent of New Prison, and to report their opinion to the next Court of Quarter Sessions. [Vide Sessions Book 487, p. 92] (p. 57)

Thomas Johnson and John Robins, two of the Justices, report upon the accounts of Francis Hooper, chapelwarden of the "Hamblett of Wapping, Whitechappll.," for the year 1685, and other preceding officers of the said hamblett: they find that there is due to Francis Hooper the sum of £10, and to Mr. John Seller the sum of £15 8s. 4d., that the said hamlet is in the whole indebted £150, which they consider ought to be raised by an "over rate." The present chapelwarden attended the present Court stating that the over rate is already made. They find that Robert Davis, late chapelwarden, is indebted to the hamlet in the sum of £50, and Charles Mitchell, another late chapelwarden, indebted to the sum of £5. The Court orders Robert Davis to pay the present churchwarden the £50, and Charles Mitchell to pay the £5, which sums are to be applied to the present relief of the poor: the present chapelwarden after paying the necessary expenses for the relief of the poor, out of the moneys that shall remain due to the said hamlet, shall pay to Francis Hooper the said sum of £10, and to the said John Sellers the said sum of £15 8s. 4d., "and unto such other of the parish officers who are in disburse for the reliefe of the poor of the said hamblett" (p. 59)

John Fauteleroy, gentleman, churchwarden, of Isleworth, appealed against an order made at the previous Quarter Sessions directing him to remove Ann Lawrence from the parish of Heston to Isleworth, to which place she had been before conveyed by the order of John Phelps and Nicholas Grice, two of the Justices. The churchwarden of Isleworth insists that Ann Lawrence has no legal settlement in that parish, and prays that a day may be appointed for hearing the appeal. By consent of the parties interested the Court ordered the appeal to stand over to the next Quarter Sessions. Sir William Hill, knight, and Henry Hawley, esquire, two of the Justices inhabiting near the said parishes, are requested to examine the case, and report at the next Quarter Sessions (p. 60)

The constables, headboroughs, &c., of St. Sepulchre's, petition the Court for leave to erect a watch-house in their parish. They allege that they have "noe watch-house . . . wherein to shelter them from the extremity of the weather when on their watch," and that the want of a roof has already occasioned the death of several of the inhabitants, and that they are no longer able to execute their offices without "hazard of their lives."

The Court ordered that they should forthwith set up a watch-house near the whipping post at Cowcross, at the charge of the parish, and that the same be "erected with a flatt roofe and doe not exceed five feet in height above the surface of the street there" (p. 61)

Dispute between the overseers, &c., of the hamlet of Mile End New Town, in the parish of Stepney, and the churchwardens, &c., of Stratford, in the parish of West Ham (Essex), respecting the last legal settlement of Thomas Woodall, who has three children, Mary, John, and Hannah, chargeable to Mile End. Upon the oath of Gerrard Dewart, and several other witnesses, that Thomas Woodall was last legally settled in Mile End New Town, the Court ordered that the churchwardens, &c., of Mile End should maintain and provide for the said children (p. 62)

Dispute between Samuel Wheeler and the widow of Richard Dowse, late overseer of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, in 1687, and the churchwardens, &c., of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, concerning the payment of £11 3s. 0d. disbursed by Dowse during his term of office. The present churchwardens insist that the accounts of Richard Dowse were not audited by the inhabitants, nor approved by two of the Justices. The Court nominated a committee of the inhabitants to audit the accounts, and requested two of the Justices, William Withers and William Underhill, esquires, living near to Shoreditch, to make the necessary orders for paying whatever should be shown to be due on Dowse's accounts. (ibid.)

Appeal of Christopher Harrison, of Ladd Lane, against a bastardy order made by Sir James Butler, knight, and John Robins, esquire, at the instance of Sarah Webb, widow. The Court is fully satisfied that the said Sarah Webb is "a lewd and common woman and that Christopher Harrison is not the father of the said bastard child," and the order of the two Justices is discharged (p. 63)

Edward Clarke, of Hendon, victualler, whose license had been suppressed "for that he kept an ill-governed and disorderly house," appeals against the suppression, alleging that the said order was obtained by "surprize"; that no disorders were committed in his house, and that it was more fitting for the entertainment and accommodation of travellers than any other in the parish. The Court ordered that the petitioner be heard at the next Court of Quarter Sessions. John Blott, gentleman, one of the high constables of the hundred of Gore, who attended to support the continued suppression of the license, was also ordered to appear (p. 64)

Dispute between the churchwardens, &c., of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields and St. Martin's-in-the-Fields as to the legal settlement of Mary Pickering, "a distracted" person. The former complain that Mary Pickering had been passed into their parish by an order of Walter Brydall and Robert Feilding, two of the Justices, in the previous November. The Court ordered the churchwardens of St. Giles to convey her into St. Martin's Parish, which parish was to receive and maintain her, and further pay 40/- to St. Giles, which had been expended on her relief in that parish (p. 65)

Mr. Upton, counsel for the inhabitants of the hill at Cowcross, in St. Sepulchre's Parish, alleges that the order which the constables and headboroughs of St. Sepulchre's had obtained for the erection of a watchhouse, near the whipping post at Cowcross, was obtained by surprize; and that the erecting of the watch-house upon the hill, would be prejudicial to them in their trades, and prays that a day may be appointed for the hearing, and that, in the meantime, the execution of the order be stayed. The Court ordered that the inhabitants of the hill be heard at the next Quarter Sessions; the erection of the watch-house in the meantime to be stayed. [Vide ante, p. 61] (p. 67)

David Davis convicted for falsely imprisoning William Rogers, and extorting from him £15 under pretence that he was guilty of high treason, was fined £6 13s. 4d., and ordered to stand for an hour in the pillory at Hammersmith, near the Maypole; in the meantime he is remanded to Newgate, until he pay the fine, undergo the punishment, and pay the fees, £1 4s. 8d. (p. 69)

Upon information by the Right Honourable Henry Pollexfen, knight, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, Sir Thomas Byde, baronet, Sir Robert Sawyer, knight, Sir Edward Lutwitch, knight, "and other inhabitants of the Great Square," in the parish of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields, that many "robberys" have been lately committed in the square, &c., by the negligence of the constables of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields, in not providing a sufficient watch, and requesting that they might have liberty to provide and maintain, at their own cost, a watch in the square. The Court ordered that the inhabitants might place and maintain a sufficient watch and convenient stand for the watchmen at their charge in such convenient place in the said square as they shall think fit; the watch to be under the command of the constables of the said division, but not to be removed from the square except on "emergent occasions" (p. 71)

Upon information given by Sir Ambrose Phillips, knight, Thomas Strode, sergeant-at-law, Edward Jennings, John Cooke, Thomas Vernon, esquire, and Other inhabitants of Little Lincoln's Inn Fields, Sheire Lane, and Bell Yard, in the parishes of St. Clement Danes and St. Dunstan's in the West, that many robberies, &c., have occurred for want of a sufficient watch, the Court grants liberty to the inhabitants, at their own cost, to furnish a sufficient watch in convenient spots in the said places "to be under the command of the constables of the respective divisions in this county" (p. 72)

Order for respiting the recognizances of all persons indicted for recusancy, 46 names. They were indicted at the previous October Sessions for not coming to Church by the space of one month (p. 73)

Order for respiting five recognizances (p. 74)

Calendar of indictments (p. 78)

Calendar of recognizances (pp. 80, 81)

Memoranda relating to various matters before the Court:—

"Thomas Deane, Thomas Kirby, of the parish of St. Giles Without, Criplegate, Teachers of Congregation of Anabaptists in Glasshouse yard in the said parish."

"John Scott, of Twittenham, teacher of a congregacõn of dissenting protestants in a house there in which Mr. Jenkins lately lived" (p. 82)

Sessions Book 482—February, 1691.

Jury panels (pp. 5, 6)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to indictments, recognizances, &c. (pp. 7–24)

Caleb Clarke committed to Newgate, he "being vehemently suspected" to be one of the persons who broke into the house of Robert Rogers, clerk, of Braxted, county Essex (p. 25)

Order for vacating a former order of the 20th of January last, for suspending the erection of a watch-house at Cowcross, in the parish of St. Sepulchre's, in this county. [Vide Sessions Book 481, pp. 61 and 67] (ibid.)

Order for the churchwarden of St. James's, Clerkenwell, to pay John Page, constable of the said parish during the years 1688 and 1689, 10/-, and William Pakeman, headborough for the same years, £3 3s. 4d., being money expended by them for passing cripples and vagabonds through the said parish (p. 26)

Order in a dispute between Thomas Dickenson, late of St. Giles'-in-theFields, glazier, and Samuel Rowell, his apprentice, concerning the discharge of the said apprentice. Upon proof that the said Dickenson lives in a cellar in Whitefriars, and follows the trade of a cook, and that he had neglected to provide wholesome food and lodging for the said apprentice, it is ordered that the said Rowell be discharged from his indenture of apprenticehood, and that Dickenson deliver up the said indenture together with the apparel of the apprentice (ibid.)

Proceedings upon the petition of Edward Clark of Hendon, victualler, against an order of Sessions for suppressing his license. It being proved that the said Clark keeps a well governed alehouse, and that it is the most fitting house in the neighbourhood for the accommodation of travellers, it is ordered that the said order for suppression should be discharged. [Vide Sessions Book 481, p. 64] (p. 27)

Proceedings upon the petition of Captain Thomas Jones, keeper of the New Prison and the House of Correction at Clerkenwell, setting forth his expenses in aiding the sick prisoners, and praying reimbursement. Referred to certain Justices (named) to examine into the truth of the complaint . . . to reimburse the petitioner, and to report how the like charges may be prevented in future (p. 28)

Upon a hearing of the dispute between Eve Salmon and Richard Atkinson, of Hackney, yeoman, and Judith, his wife, touching the discharge of the said Eve from her indenture of apprenticehood to the said Judith, to whom she was bound for eight years to learn "the art of housewifery," it appearing that the said apprentice had been neglected by her employers, it is ordered she be discharged from her said indenture, and that she be at liberty to place herself in service elsewhere (ibid.)

Order that the several recognizances entered into by John Price, Frederick Sadier, Elizabeth Emmerson, Kath Morris and Thomas Lushington, and their sureties, for their appearance, be respited until further notice (p. 29)

David King, Luke Braisby, and John Morris, are all convicted for attempting to enter the house of Thomas Marsh, of Hendon; King and Morris are each fined five marks, and Braisby 20 marks. The said King, Braisby and Morris are severally ordered to be stripped naked from the middle upwards, and whipped at a cart's tail until their bodies be bloody, on Tuesday, the 24th of February instant, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon, from Holborn Bars to St. Giles's Pound, and back again. The said prisoners are committed to Newgate until they undergo the punishment; then to be delivered, paying their fees severally, 17/6 (p. 31)

Frances Hinton, otherwise West, is convicted for conveying Elizabeth, wife of William Tarply, on board a ship, on the Thames, with the intent of transporting her beyond seas: she is fined 13/4 and ordered to stand in and upon the pillory, on Thursday, the 26th of February instant, at the end of Hollowell Street, in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon; in the meantime she is committed to New Prison until she pay the fine and undergo the punishment; then to be delivered, paying her fees, 17/6 (ibid.)

John Burch and John Meere are convicted for unlawfully imprisoning Thomas Fitzwater for two hours, upon the pretence that they were pressmasters; they are each fined five marks, and are ordered to stand in and upon the pillory on Saturday, the 28th of February instant, near Great Turnstile, in the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon: they are committed to New Prison until they undergo the punishment; then to be delivered, each paying his fee, 17/6 (p. 32)

John Maddox and William Jones are convicted, with others, for rioting, and for assaulting and wounding the Earl of Danby, John Vandenanda, and William Champion: they are each fined one mark, and are ordered to stand in and upon the pillory on Monday, the 2nd of March next, near the Maypole in the Strand, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon; they are committed to New Prison until they undergo the punishment; then to be delivered, each paying his fee, 17/6 (p. 32)

Alphabetical list of names headed indictments and recognizances (pp. 33, 34)

Memorandum as to the appearance of John Wood, John Richmond (?), James Peirce and John Fowler (p. 36)

Sessions Book 483—April, 1691.

Panels, memoranda of recognizances, &c. (pp. 2–16)

Writ for discharging Peter Marshall, imprisoned for debt "in the Goale of St. Martin's-le-Grand," addressed to Henry Wyatt, keeper of the goal (p. 17)

Order that Robert Batson, one of the constables of St. Martin's-in-theFields, do attend the Court on Friday next, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, and bring with him the money and melted silver in his custody, sealed up and delivered to him by Walter Brydall, esquire, one of the Justices, with the clippings, "sheers, files, and other things then alsoe in his custody," that this Court may make such further order as may be convenient (p. 19)

The churchwardens, &c., of Thames Ditton, Surrey, under the authority of —— Bridges and —— Nuthall, esquires, Justices, conveyed Martha Frater from their parish of Thames Ditton to St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, asserting that the said Martha Frater had, within 40 days before, come to settle within their parish in a tenement under the yearly value of £10, and was likely to become chargeable to the said parish if she fell ill, and suggesting that she was last a servant to one —— Hall, of the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields. The churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's appeal to the Court, and the Court finds that she was not last legally settled in St. Martin's Parish, that she had been conveyed into the parish on insufficient proof from the house of Edward Avelyn, a porter in Thames Ditton. Ordered that the churchwardens of St. Martin's send her back to Thames Ditton (ibid.)

The churchwardens, &c., of St. Margaret's, Westminster, complain that "their poore are abundantly encreased within these few years, particularly by reason of the Dutch poore women and children," and petition that they may be allowed to make the next assessment for the relief of the poor "one halfe more than the same now is, and soe yearly" until the parish can lessen the same. The Court ordered that such an assessment and rate should be made for the year next ensuing, and appointed Sir John Cutler, knight and baronet, Sir Roger Langley, baronet, Richard Newman, esquire, Simon Smith, esquire, and Nehemiah Arnold, esquire, Justices, to do what "shall be most necessary and convenient" in the matter (p. 20)

Order that in future, to avoid the complaints which had been made to the Justices, of the inequality and uncertainty of the rates and charges, made in the various parishes of the liberty for the relief of the poor, and for the repairing of the highways, all rates and assessments be made according to an equal pound rate of the yearly value of all the houses, &c., in the respective parishes; "and that upon the top of the leafes of any such books of assessment," it be expressly stated "what and how much in the pound the rate is"; further, that it be also written "in a faire column" after each person's name, the estimated yearly value of each person's holding (p. 21)

The churchwardens, overseers, and surveyors of the highways of the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields ordered to attend the Court, to be heard upon several appeals of persons who complain that they are over-rated (p. 22)

Dispute between the churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields and St. Clement Danes, concerning the legal settlement of Lucy Needham, "a poor, crazed woman." The Court found that she was last legally settled in the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields "as a lodger in the house of one Richard Bye, a joiner there in Drury Lane against Brownlow Street," in the month of May, 1685, and for a year and a half before and after that date. Ordered that she be conveyed by the churchwardens, &c., of St. Clement Danes to the custody of the churchwardens, &c., of St. Giles (ibid.)

Order for the churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields to pay to George Silke, constable, of Hyde Park Ward, the sum of £6 11s. 7d., due to him since 23 April, 1690, for passing and relieving vagrants and cripples, with an additional 5/- for the order (ibid.)

Order for the churchwardens, &c., of the parish of St. James to pay 5/on the 1st of May next to Margaret Gibbs, "a very poor ancient widdow," for the relief of her grandson, John Gibbs, and an allowance of 5/- monthly till the Court make further order (p. 23)

Petition of the churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields setting forth that they are "obliged by articles" to pay £250 to Robert Meades for repairing and mending the highways, and asking permission to assess and collect the same. Order granted (p. 24)

Duplicate order to Henry Wyatt, keeper of the gaol at St. Martin'sle-Grand, to discharge Henry Dyer, a prisoner for debt, from custody. 21 April, 1691. Creditors mentioned—John Goodall, of Christchurch, London, butcher; Robert Taylor, of St. Anne's and St. Agnes; William Ewer, of St. Alban's Street, Westminster, "victualer"; —— Duke, "in the Pellmell"; Walter Clarke, "of St. Tooleys," scalemaker (p. 25)

A similar duplicate order relating to Ezekiel Browne, to the same keeper of the same goal, 21 April, 1691. Creditors mentioned—George Pagit, of Whitechapel, baker; Jeremy Boonman, in Whitechapel, brewer; William Heatly, of Goodman's Fields, bricklayer; John Higgs, of "Spittlefeilds," cheesemonger: Joseph Taylor, of Stepney, threadman; John Eldrick, "yorneman"; William Beeke, of the same, "victualer"; Adam Mason, of Old Bedlam, reedmaker; Mr. Stringer, of Bishopsgate Street, apothecary; Francis Gibbs, of Bishopsgate Street, porter, Richard Wild, of Shadwell, coal merchant; Jeremiah Bates, in Blow Court Fields, Stepney, surgeon; Jeremy Gun; John Alebone; William Close, of Bishopsgate Street; Peter Everett, of Bishopsgate Street; Samuel Thresher; Robert Garret, of "Fryday" Street; Edmund Turner; Timothy Safield; Francis Ford, of Whitefriars; Joseph Fishpoole; Richard Boner, Cheapside (p. 27)

Duplicate order to the same for the discharge of William Smart from prison. Creditors mentioned—Elizabeth Burdsey, Thomas Sanders, Abraham Carter, of Westminster, gentleman, Nicholas Griss, of Cowcrosse, cordwainer; Thomas Peirson, of Shirklane, cordwainer; William Turner, of St. Anne and St. Agnes; John Hubbard, of St. Martin's-le-Grand, cordwainer; Henry Jerman, of St. Sepulchre's, leather seller; Thomas Deacon, Quaker Street, Spitalfields, laceman; William Hayes, St. Botolph's, Aldersgate, cordwainer; John Alwood, Hatton Garden, doctor; William Gates, of Braintford, cordwainer; Robert Hind and partner, in Leather Lane, brewers; John Comes, Great St. Bartholomew; William Grant, St. Sepulchre's, innholder; Mr. Woodman, of St. Bride's, woodmonger; Robert Millard, Christchurch, pattenmaker; William King, of the same, painter; Marah Farrah, St. Michael Querne, spinster; Daniel Rolfe, St. Martin's-le-Grand, watchmaker; William Austin, Basinghall Street, "victualer." 21 April, 1691 (p. 31)

A similar duplicate discharge, relating to Thomas Sevet. Creditors mentioned—Ezekiel Browne; John Bawden, Bush Lane; Mr. William Butler; Henry Allen, of St. Mary Axe; Simon Francis, Great St. Helen's, merchant; "Seigineur Gomesers," Berry Street, merchant; Anthony Robleys, Berry Street, merchant; Deane Montays, London Wall; Andrew Rudkin, Fenchurch Street, pewterman; "Widdow Shore," of Bredstreet Hill; William Lecom, near St. Dunstan's Hill, merchant; Peter Renew, Abchurch Lane, merchant; Paul Burcoin, St. Martin's Lane, merchant; John Wilcox, Amen Corner, tailor; Mr. Willimott, of Blowbladder Street, leather seller; Joseph Draton, Thames Street, confectioner; Charles Hawkins; Joseph Bowles; St. Laurence Poulteney Hill, merchant; William Grosmenor, Richard Grosmenor, Canon Street, merchants; Richard Carter, Canon Street, cooper; Nattwood, St. Martin's Lane, cooper; Henry Stroud, Thames Street, merchant; John Gowse; John Marlowe, King's Street, apothecary; Mr. John Lovett, Temple, attorney-at-law; Francis Greene, Pickleherring, Southwark, vinegar merchant; Mr. James Reading, near St. George's, Southwark, brewer; Joseph Deakins, of the same, cheesemonger; Mr Miller, near "St. Barking Church," merchant; Margaret Keyne, Wild Street. 21 April, 1691 (p. 33)

Similar duplicate order for the discharge of Elizabeth Thompson from the Gatehouse Prison, Westminster, directed to the keeper, Anthony Church, gentleman. Creditors mentioned—Daniel Seymour, Mr. Hugh Champing, Mr. Richard Minefeild, Mr. Richard Smith. 21 April, 1691 (p. 36)

Duplicate discharge, directed as the last concerning Anne Overfield. Creditors mentioned—Nathaniel Bussint; Richard Hodgkins, Christ Church; Katherine Brian, St. Clements; Robert Willin, Covent Garden; Eleanor Raven, Covent Garden; Susanna Betts, St. James's. 21 April, 1691 (p. 39)

Order to the churchwardens. &c., of the parish of St. James' to levy a rate of £120 for the repair of the highways upon their petition that the highways are "now soe broken and in decay that they cannot be sufficiently repaired and amended for this present year" (p. 41)

Receipt from Mr. Smith, the sum of 40/- (paid by Edward Rigby "for refusing to take the oaths of obedience and allegiance to their Majesties the last Quarter Sessions") for the use of the poor of St. Paul's, Covent Garden (p. 42)

Memoranda relating to various persons concerning the oath of allegiance, recognizances, the enrolment of the apprenticeship of Charles Hartigan to Mathias Shore, sergeant trumpeter, &c. (pp. 43–45)

Alphabetical list of indictments (p. 46)

Sessions Book 484—April, 1691.

Commissions, jury panels, &c. (p. 5)

Robert Bird, of Islington, merchant, is appointed treasurer for the maimed soldiers in the hundreds of Ossulston, Edmonton, and Gore for the year 1691. The said Bird is to take the account of Samuel Freebody, the treasurer for the said hundreds, during the year 1690 (p. 7)

A like appointment for Thomas Arundell, of Northall, gentleman, in the hundreds of Elthorn, Spelthorn, and Isleworth. The said Arundell is to take the accounts of Thomas Thorowgood, the treasurer, during the past year (ibid.)

John Evans, of Whitecrosse Street, dyer, is chosen treasurer for the Marshalsea, King's Bench, and Hospitals, within the hundreds of Ossulston, Edmonton, and Gore for the year 1691 (ibid.)

A like appointment for —— Chandler, of Laleham, gentleman, within the hundreds of Elthorn, Spelthorn, and Isleworth (ibid.)

Order concerning the prices of beer, the assize of bread, &c. [Vide Sessions Book 473, p. 4] (p. 7)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances, &c. (pp. 9–43)

[Pages 44–58 blank.]

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, indictments, &c. (pp. 59–61)

[Pages 62–66 blank.]

Upon the information of William Rainburrough, that Robert Stanton, raker, of the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn, for the liberty above Bars, on the 14th of March last, did carry away soil in and from several paved streets within the said parish and liberty, being within the bills of mortality, in his cart, and did deliver the same on a certain laystall in St. Pancras Parish, without the bills of mortality in this county, where the streets are not paved, but less than half a mile beyond the paved streets within the said bills of mortality; and that the wheels of the said carts are not 6 inches in breadth in the felley, and are wrought about with iron work against the form of the statute of 2 William and Mary, whereby the said Stanton has forfeited 40/-; it is ordered that the said Stanton be convicted for the offence, and that a distress be levied upon his goods and chattels for the said sum, a moiety of which is for the relief of the poor of St. Andrew's, and the other moiety for the said Rainburrough, who discovered and prosecuted the said Stanton for the offence (p. 67)

Memorial from the Justices of the Peace for Middlesex to the Lords of the Treasury, setting forth that an allowance has hitherto been made to 18 Justices of the Peace, and that owing to the multiplicity of business, their Majesties have augmented the number. The petitioners pray that the usual allowance of 4/- a day may be made to six more Justices for the said county, to be paid to them, with the said 18 justices, out of the fines that are or shall be set in future. The names of 44 Justices follow (p. 69)

Treasury warrant, dated 18 March, 1691, granting the allowance above requested (p. 70)

Dispute between Walter Hone, of Limehouse Hamlet, Stepney, gardener, and William Masters, his apprentice, concerning the discharge of the said Masters. It appearing that the said Hone had neglected to provide for the said apprentice, it is ordered that he be discharged from his indentures, and that the said Hone deliver up the apparel of the said apprentice (p. 73)

For the better discovery of all persons disaffected to the Government, it is ordered that the chief constables of every division in this county give notice to all the Justices, constables, headburroughs, churchwardens, overseers, beadles, and all other offices whatsoever, to attend the Court on Friday "next" at 10 a.m., and to bring a list of the names of those disaffected or dangerous to the Government, to the intent that they may be summoned to take the oath of allegiance (p. 74)

Upon the report made by two Justices (named), to whom it was referred on the 15th of January last, to examine whether John Loveing, of Ealing, otherwise Little Yeeling, in this county, esquire, is over-rated for his estate, for parish duties, and it appearing he is overcharged to the amount of £15 yearly; it is ordered that the said Loveing be rated at £45 yearly, and no more (p. 75)

Upon the petition of James Bayley and James Pulman, mariners, and John Tyzacke, gentleman, all of the lower hamlet of "Wapping, Stepney," showing they were chosen scavengers of the said hamlet, contrary to the meaning of the late Act of Parliament, the appearance of the churchwardens and overseers is ordered on Tuesday, the 26th of May next, to show cause why the said petitioners should not be discharged (ibid.)

Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Long, of St. Margaret's, Westminster, a poor maimed soldier. Shows that he has been a pensioner about 30 years, and is very aged and infirm; the number of pensioners in this county being much decreased he prays an addition to his pension. Ordered that his pension be augmented by 40/- a year, the said pensioner to receive, for the future, £5 yearly out of the public money of this county (p. 76)

Upon the dispute between John Sellers, chapelwarden of Wapping Hamlet, Whitechapel, for 1688, and John Welby, present chapelwarden, concerning the payment of £15 8s. 4d. (sic) due to the said Sellers for money disbursed by him during his term of office, it is ordered that the said Welby pay the said Sellers £10 forthwith, and the remaining £5 8s. 10d. (sic) on or before the 1st of June next. [Vide Sessions Book, 481, p. 59] (p. 76)

Proceedings upon the petition of the churchwardens and ancient inhabitants of the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields. Shows that there are divers sums of money expended yearly for the repair of the highways in the said parish, for the raising of which money a rate has been yearly made by the general consent of the inhabitants, but that certain housekeepers refuse to pay the said rate, there being no law to compel them before the provision made for that purpose in the late Act for cleansing the streets; and that the common highways in the said parish cannot be sufficiently repaired without the help of the said Act. They pray an order for making an assessment on the inhabitants of the said parish for the repair of the said highways for this present year 1691. Ordered accordingly (p. 77)

Order of reference to two Justices (named), concerning a bastard child, whereof Thomas Holliers, of Kensington, is the reputed father (p. 78)

Dispute between Anthony Pinckney, of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, cooper, and Edward Markley, his apprentice, concerning the discharge of the said apprentice: upon proof that the said Pinckney is a prisoner for debt, and incapable of providing for or instructing the said apprentice, it is ordered that the said Markley be discharged (p. 79)

Proceedings upon the petition of John Read, of Goswell Street, victualler, and of Elizabeth, his wife. Shows that Peter Ayres, late of Wapping Hamlet, Whitechapel, mariner, died at sea last May on his voyage home from the Canaries, where he went about August, 1689, leaving a widow, Susanna (who shortly after died), and two children, and that at the request of the said Susanna, who was the sister of the said Elizabeth, the petitioner took care of the two children, one of whom was apprenticed and the other placed in Christ's Hospital; and that the chapelwarden has appropriated all the said Susanna's goods, together with £9 9s. 9d., being the wages of the said Peter. Prays that the said chapelwarden be compelled to make the petitioners satisfaction for the same. Ordered that John Welby, the chapelwarden, do attend the Justices at their next meeting at Mile End, and show how he has disposed of the said goods and money (p. 80)

Order for paving Kensington Square:—By their certificate, dated the 14th of January last, five Justices have certified that, pursuant to an Act for paving and cleansing the streets in the cities of London and Westminster, and suburbs and liberties thereof, &c.; they had viewed a new street in the town of Kensington, leading from the middle of the said town to the new street called the Square, and also the east, north, and south sides of the said square; and that they considered the said new street leading to the said square, that is to say, the common road or highway leading through Kensington aforesaid to the said new street, called the Square, fit to be paved with stone, and also the east, north, and south sides of the square, "from the place designed for freestone pavement before the several and respective houses there, to the rails in the said square." Ordered that the paving be carried out by the 24th of June next (p. 81)

Order for paving Beak Street:—Certificate, dated the 15th of April instant, of two Justices, that they have inspected the common highway called Beak Street, in the parish of St. James's, within the liberty of Westminster, and that they consider the said street fit to be paved with stone, from the corner of Major Ogar's house to Swallow Street, containing in length 45 yards, and in breadth "forty-five yards more or less." Ordered that the said street be paved by the 24th of June next (p. 82)

A like certificate, of the same date, concerning the inspection of the common highway called Swallow Street, St. James's Parish, Westminster. It is adjudged fit to be paved with stone, from the house of Adam Motte to the houses of Mr. Maidwell and Mr. Hinch, in the same street, containing in length 117 yards, and in breadth 8 yards "more or less." Ordered that the said street be paved by the 24th of June next (p. 80)

Order for Sara Drew to be passed from the Liberty of the Rolls, in the parish of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, to the parish of St. Mary, Aldermary, where she was last legally settled (p. 84)

Proceedings upon the petition of Deborah Peirson, on behalf of her son Henry. Shows that she apprenticed her said son for seven years to Thomas Davis, of Shadwell, mariner, and that the said Davis died on the 20th of January, 1688. His widow, Sarah, being incapable of instructing the said apprentice, petitioner prays that the said Henry may be discharged. Upon proof that the said Sarah had provided an able mariner to instruct the said apprentice, and that the said apprentice was in His Majesty's service, and in receipt of 32/- monthly, of which the said Sarah ought to have the benefit for the remainder of the term, it is ordered that the petition be discharged, and that the said apprentice do serve the said Sarah until the expiration of his apprenticehood (p. 85)

Proceedings upon the petition of John Jewks, Timothy Ware, and others, inhabitants within the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch. Shows that they are rated towards the scavengers rate in the said parish, and that the said Jewks is now chosen scavenger, notwithstanding that they dwell in Kingsland Road, and have nothing to do with the pavements, neither did they in time past ever pay towards cleansing the streets; they pray direction whether they who live on the highway and distant from the pavements should pay the said rate, or be chosen for the said office. The Court is of opinion that all inhabitants of the said parish who live distant from the pavements ought to contribute to the said rate in proportion with those who live in the streets, lanes, and alleys already paved; and that John Jewks is duly elected and ought to serve in the said office. Ordered accordingly (p. 86)

Petition of the churchwardens of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, St. Andrew's, Holborn, and St. Clement Danes. Shows that, in Hilary term last, George Howard, the Sheriff's bailiff, levied upon the churchwardens of the two firstnamed parishes £10 each, and upon those of the latter £9, by virtue of an execution obtained by William Brookes against the inhabitants of Ossulston Hundred, for a robbery committed in the said hundred; and prays that the said sum be assessed proportionably throughout the said hundred. It is referred to the Justices residing in or near St. Giles' Parish to consider, at their next meeting, to be held at the "Court House, in Bloomsbury in Holborn," what the said Howard has levied of the petitioners, and to assess it according to their discretions; after such assessment made, the constables, &c., are to tax and assess the inhabitants of the hundred according to their abilities to pay (p. 87)

Upon the petition of George Howard, showing that he was apprenticed to William Peirce, of St. Giles's Without, Cripplegate, weaver, for seven years, and that the said Peirce is now a prisoner in the King's Bench, and incapable of providing for him, and praying he may be discharged from his apprenticeship, it is ordered that the said apprentice be discharged from his apprenticeship (p. 88)

Certificate, dated the 14th of January last, of five Justices (named), and pursuant to the Act of 2 William and Mary, that they have viewed and inspected the north side of the highway in the town of Kensington, and that they consider it fit to be paved with stone from the east end of the house of Thomas Johnson, gentleman, then untenanted, there westward to the west end of that of John Watkins, blacksmith; and that they had inspected the south side of the said highway, which they considered fit to be paved, from the east side of Mr. Coleby's door, westward to the west side of a door entering the garden of John Simmons, a gardener, "over against the house of the aforesaid John Watkins." Ordered that the said highways be paved by the 24th day of June next (p. 89)

Order that Thomas Arundell, gentleman, and treasurer for the maimed soldiers for the hundreds of Elthorn, Spelthorn, and Isleworth, do pay Alice Bradford, widow of Henry Bradford, a poor maimed soldier, 17/6 for a quarter's pension, due last Lady Day (p. 90)

Petition of Richard Slater and John Whalett, scavengers for Norton Folgate Liberty, in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, for 1690. Shows that the money assessed and collected for cleansing the streets will not amount to the sum agreed upon to pay the rakers, and prays an order for a rate for payment of the money due. Ordered that an assessment according to a pound rate be imposed upon the inhabitants of the said liberty for the expense incurred in cleansing the streets. Instructions concerning the payment of the same (ibid.)

Order for determining the last legal settlement of William Bake at the next Sessions (p. 91)

Order to view a highway [in the parish of Kensington] on Thursday, the 21st of May next. William Feild and Edward Martin to be present on the part of the King and Queen, and Francis Gotobed and John Ilford on the part of the inhabitants. The result of such view to be exhibited at the Sessions to be held on Tuesday, the 26th of May next (p. 92)

Upon the account of Henry Hawley, treasurer of the money raised for repairing Chertsey and Brentford bridges, and it appearing by the certificate of certain Justices (named) that they had carefully examined the account (the balance of which is £90 4s. 10d.), and had found the same to be correct; it is ordered that the said account be ratified and confirmed (p. 93)

Order for passing William Hamby from Hampton Wick to the parish of Atherton, in Southampton, he being the child of Elizabeth Baker, wife of Bartholomew Baker, who was last legally settled in the said parish of Atherton, Isle of Wight (p. 94)

Order for John Turner and John Gravett to be headboroughs of Ickenham, in the place of William Gravett and John Marlow, yeomen, who have served in the aforesaid office for two years and upwards (p. 95)

Upon the petition of James Bayly and James Pulman, mariners, and John Tyzack, gentleman, inhabitants of Wapping Hamlet, Stepney, showing they were chosen scavengers, contrary to a certain Act, it is ordered that James Bayly and James Pulman be discharged from serving as scavengers, they being masters of ships and seldom at home, but that John Tyzack be duly elected to the said office [vide ante, p. 75] (p. 96)

Ann Eccleston, convicted for obtaining "twenty pieces, called shillings" of false money, with the intent of passing the same as good and lawful coin of the realm, is fined 10 marks, and is ordered "to be stripped naked from the middle upwards," and to be whipped at a cart's tail "until her body be bloody," on Saturday, the 25th of April instant, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon, from Holborn Bars to St. Giles's Pound. She is committed to New Prison until she undergo the punishment; then to be delivered, paying her fees, 17/6 (p. 97)

Alice Nayland, convicted for obtaining three ounces of silver clippings, knowing the same to have been clipped from the current coin of the realm, is fined 10 marks, and is ordered to stand upon the pillory near the Maypole in the Strand, on Monday, the 27th of April "instant," for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon; she is committed to New Prison until she undergo the punishment; then to be delivered, paying her fees, 17/6 (ibid.)

Jane, wife of Humphrey Burton, convicted for procuring three ounces of silver clippings, one file and two pairs of shears for clipping money, is fined 10 marks, and is ordered to stand upon the pillory, near the Maypole in the Strand, on Monday next, the 27th of April, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon. She is committed to New Prison until she pay the fine, and undergo the punishment; then to be delivered, paying her fees, 15/- (p. 98)

George Robinson, John Banfeild, and James Osborne, convicted for illegally impressing Evan Price, with the intent of extorting money from him, are severally fined 5 marks, and are ordered to stand in and upon the pillory on Saturday next, the 25th of April, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon, before the great gates of Hickshall, in St. John Street; they are committed to New Prison until they undergo the punishment, and then to be delivered, paying their fees, 17/6 each (ibid.)

William Hodges, convicted for profanely cursing His Majesty, is fined 20 nobles, and ordered to stand in and upon the pillory on Monday, the 27th of April, near the Maypole in the Strand, and on Tuesday, the 28th, against Gray's Inn Gate, in the High Street, in Holborn, for one hour, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon of each day, and to remain in prison for three months, without bail or mainprize. Afterwards the said Hodges is ordered to find sureties for his appearance at the next Sessions to be held at the end of the said three months, and to be of good behaviour for twelve months next ensuing; he is committed to New Prison until he pay the said fine, undergo the punishment, and find such surety as aforesaid, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 19/10 (p. 99)

John Newell convicted fur obtaining 100 pieces of false money for illegal purposes, is fined 10 marks, and is ordered to be stripped naked from the middle upwards and whipped at a cart's tail until his body be bloody, on Friday, the 8th of May next, between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon, from Holborn Bars to St. Giles's Pound; and he is further ordered to find sureties for his appearance at the next Sessions, and to be of good behaviour for one year next ensuing; he is committed to Newgate until he pay the fine, undergo the punishment, and find such security, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 19/4 (p. 99)

Sarah, the wife of the said John Newell, indicted for the like offence, and acquitted, is to be delivered out of Newgate, upon payment of her fee, 15/- (p. 100)

Robert Niccolls, indicted for defrauding Henry Lanyon, "of severa goods and clothes by a false token," is fined 40 marks, and is ordered to stand in and upon the pillory before the great gates of Hickshall, on Saturday, the 25th of April "instant," between 10 a.m. and 12 o'clock noon; he is committed to New Prison until he pay the said fine, and undergo the punishment, then to be delivered, paying his fees, 17/6 (ibid.)

Upon the information that Henry, Lord Viscount Sydney, has received some misinformation touching the proceedings of this Court against the Sheriff of Middlesex, for respiting the judgment given against John Burch and John Meere, upon his lordship's letter; it is ordered that certain Justices (named) do attend his lordship, on the 26th instant, at 5 p.m. to inform him of their proceedings in the matter, and that no reflections were made on his lordship touching his said letter (p. 101)

Order that Mr. Robert Hardisty, attorney of their Majesties' Court of King's Bench at Westminster, do appear for the inhabitants of Ossulston Hundred, at the suit of —— Lloyd, for a robbery committed upon him in the said hundred (ibid.)

Order for respiting the recognizances of all persons indicted for recusancy until the next Quarter Sessions (the names, and, in some instances, the trades, are given) (p. 102)

A like order for respiting the recognizances entered into by John Richmond, Francis Seale, and John Ranton (p. 103)

Memoranda headed New Prison (pp. 104, 105)

Indenture of apprenticeship of William, son of William Johnson, formerly of the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, patten maker, to Daniel Flewry, dated 20 April, 1691, to learn the art of a weaver, and to serve for seven years (p. 107.)

The like of John, son of John Tall, citizen and fishmonger of London, to Anthony Robinson, of St. Clement Danes, tailor, dated 21 April, 1691; to serve for eight years (p. 107)

The like of John, son of William Hartwell, of Holborn, blacksmith, to Gideon Ware, of the same, gunsmith, dated 21 April, 1691; to serve for seven years (ibid.)

[Pages 108, 109 blank.]

Alphabetical list of names, headed calendar of indictments, and recognizances (pp. 110–114)

Memoranda:—

"John Farr, of the parish of St. Sepulchre, —— order to appear by Mr. Hardisty att the county's charge to defend this suit, the trunk being taken in the night, when Farr was on his watch, on suspicion of being stolne.

"Christopher Meidell, preacher to a congregation of dissenting protestants in Nightingale Lane, att the house of John James, —— Wapping.

"Thomas Gibbons, of Ickenham, yeoman, sworn constable in the place of William Osmond, 26 May, '91" (p. 115)

Further memoranda as to the appointment of constables, headboroughs, &c. The following meeting-houses are recorded.

"Dr. Daniel Rolls, preacher to a congregation of dissenting protestants at the New Chappell in Charles Street in Long Acre, in the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields.

"Stephen Lobb, preacher to a congregation of dissenting protestants at his house in Hampstead.

"Robert Hopkins, preacher to a congregation of dissenting protestants at his house in St. Paul, Covent Garden, Parish, Shandes Street.

"John Reeson, preacher to a congregation of dissenting protestants in the same parish, Hart Street.

"Henry Slade, preacher to a congregation of dissenting protestants in the parish of St. Clement Danes."

Meeting house for Quakers at Tottenham Highcrosse, recorded (p. 116)

Sessions Book 485—May, 1691.

Jury list (p. 7)

Memoranda as to recognizances (pp 8–35)

List of those in the New Prison and in the House of Correction (p. 39)

Order for the churchwardens, &c., of Harefield, to pay £4 8s. 6d. to Captain Thomas Jones, keeper of New Prison, for the charge of maintaining Mary Johnson, committed from that parish during her sickness and till her death (p. 43)

Order to Charles Pratten, late constable of the Strand, to pay £1 8s. 8d. each to John Smyth and Robert Circuit, their wages, by agreement during the time that he was constable of the Strand (p. 44)

Order for discharging Samuel Page from his apprenticeship with William Knott, plaisterer, of St. Andrew's, Holborn. Proved by Edward Tallant and others that Knott had neglected to provide his apprentice with wholesome diet, &c., and had not instructed him in his trade (p. 44)

Similar order discharging Francis Quarrell from his indentures with William Gatley, colourman, of St. Buttolph Without, Aldgate. Quarrell complained that his master had compelled him to carry great burthens and given him "imoderate correction," and, on 29 April, "had turned him out of doors." William Gatley did not appear, though on the oath of Thomas Swinnerton it was shewn he had had due notice (p. 45)

Order for "Madam" Jane Lukener to pay £8 6s. 0d. due to John Stayner as wages, which she had refused to pay. Mrs. Lukener insisted that Stayner had by his carelessness as coachman overturned her coach, and by his negligence had done her other considerable mischief. Mrs. Lukener confessed that she then lived, and for several years past had lived, apart from her husband and had an allowance of £150 for her separate maintenance.

Order for Thomas Bennett, chirurgeon, of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, to pay £20 to his apprentice, Thomas Hotchkin, out of £30 claimed by the said apprentice. Hotchkin alleged "that his master hath sent him to sea, and forced him to buy all his own medicines which cost above thirty pounds." Bennett insisted that he was entitled to their Majesties' pay for the service of the apprentice, and that he was willing to allow what was "reasonable for medicines," but that the medicines were too dear, and bought without his consent (p. 47)

An order respiting the recognizances of Richard Pritchett, Sir Roger Lestrange, knight, Leonard Scott, John Keel, Ann Golding, Jane Desoe, Margaret Nutbrowne, William Harden, Richard Hambleton, Vincent Renier, Charles Booth, Margaret Chapman, and Charles Coleman (p. 48)

[Pages 49–63 blank.]

Calendar of indictments (pp. 64, 65)

Calendar of recognizances (pp. 66, 67)

Sessions Book 486—July, 1691.

Jury panel (p. 2)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, appearances, &c (pp. 3–24)

Proceedings in a dispute between the churchwardens of St. Margaret's, Westminster, and those of St. James's, within the liberty of Westminster, concerning the last legal settlement of Anne Cooper and her child, Charles; it appearing that they were not last lawfully settled in St. Margaret's, where they now remain, it is ordered that they be conveyed to the said parish of St. James's (p. 25)

Proceedings upon the petition of the churchwardens of St. Anne's, within the liberty of Westminster, showing that about £50 has been necessarily expended in repairing the highways belonging to the said parish, and praying an order for an assessment to be made for the same; the Justices (according to the Act, 30 Charles II, for making part of the parish of St. Martin's-in-theFields, a new parish, to be called the parish of St. Anne's, within the Liberty of Westminster) allow the sum of £60 to be assessed for the reimbursement of the said £50, already expended (p. 25)

Petition of George Milson, showing that he was apprenticed to John Hawkins, of St. James's market, "within this liberty," butcher, for three years, and that he has been ill-treated, and insufficiently provided with clothing. Ordered that the said Milson be discharged from his master (p. 27)

Order that the matters in difference between Sir John Ashford, baronet, and his late servant, Robert Not, concerning wages, alleged by the latter to be due, be referred to certain Justices (ibid.)

Elizabeth Flyburne and her bastard child, sent from the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields to that of St. Bartholomew, London (ibid.)

Order to Henry Wyatt, keeper of the gaol at St. Martin's-le-Grand, for the discharge of James Hodgson (without payment of any fine or chamber rent) imprisoned in the said gaol for debt. Dated 6 July, 1691 (p. 29)

A like order to Anthony Church, gentleman, keeper of the Gatehouse Prison, to discharge Robert Burchmore (without payment of any fine, &c.), he being imprisoned for debt. Dated 6 July, 1691 (p. 31)

A like order to discharge Richard Blackborne, imprisoned for debt (p. 32)

Order to John Higgs, one of the constables in the parish of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields, to deliver to Edward Carey, high bailiff of this liberty, a hundredweight and a half of lead, "lately taken by certain soulder" (sic) within the said liberty (p. 34)

Upon the complaint that the parishes of St. Clement Danes and St. Mary-le-Savoy, within the Liberty of Westminster, are insufficiently protected for the want of watchmen and stands, it is ordered that the constables of the said parishes place a watchman to guard, from 9 p.m. until 6 a.m., at the lanes, streets, and places hereafter named:—

St. Clement Danes Parish:—

Little Lincoln's Inn Fields, near the sign of the Crown; at the upper end of Ship Yard; St. Clement's Inn Coffee house; near the Five Bells, in Witch Street; in Stanhopp Street, near Blackmore Street end; at the Bullhead, in Vere Street; at Gilbert's passage, in Clare Market; and near the sign of the Feathers at the end of Haughton Street, next Clare Market.

And in the parish of St. Mary, Savoy:—

At the Maypole in the Strand; and at Katherine Street end, in the Strand (p. 34)

Upon the certificate of two Justices (named), both dwelling in the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster, showing that there is a new street, called Tufton Street, in the said parish, leading from the Bowling Alley in Westminster, south, unto the highway, running from the horse ferry towards Tuttle Fields, all built on one side, and a great part also of the other side, and which is fit to be paved, it is ordered that the owners and inhabitants of the houses in the said street, shall pave the same, before the 25th of December next, or forfeit 40/- (p. 35)

Miscellaneous memoranda as to recognizances, &c. (pp. 39, 40)

Alphabetical list of names, headed Ind[ictments] (p. 42)

Memorandum as to appearances (p. 44)

Sessions Book 487—July, 1691.

Jury panel (p. 5)

Memoranda as to recognizances (p. 7–43)

[Pages 45–47 blank.]

Names of those in the New Prison and in the House of Correction (p. 42)

Memoranda, various (pp. 48–52)

William Gatley, of St. Buttolph Without, Aldgate, applied to have the order, cancelling the indentures of his apprentice, Francis Quarrill, discharged. Mr. Harcourt, his counsel, alleged that the order was obtained "by surprize." Mr. Darnall appeared for Quarrill, and urged that the Court had already executed their authority. The Court confirmed the order previously made (p. 54)

Order to the treasurer for the maimed soldiers in Elthorn, Spelthorn, and Isleworth Hundred to pay to William Bramsgrove, Thomas Lincorne, and Thomas Turner, poor maimed soldiers and pensioners, 20s. apiece over and above their former pensions: 10/- apiece to be paid for their present relief, and a total of £3 yearly apiece in the future (p. 55)

Order for the suppressing a disorderly alehouse kept by Thomas Saunders, of Hampton (p. 56)

Order for the paving of Bluegate Field and Canon Street, Stepney. The Justices appointed in June, 1691, to view the spot, report that "they did adjudge" Bluegate Street, near Ratcliffe Highway, Stepney, fitt to be paved with stone at the north end thereof, from the end of the pavement there to a certain place called the back lane there by the owners and inhabitants thereof"; and that they had also viewed and inspected "the new street called Cannon Street . . . and did adjudge itt fitt to be paved with stone at the south end thereof . . . upon a line ranging with the denter stones in the middle of the said street to the denter stone of the middle of the street there called Ratcliffe Highway, from the said line to the houses and ground on the east side thereof, and soe ranging with the said houses on a line to the said denter stone in Ratcliffe Highway, by Robert Hastings, esquire, . . . and from the said line to the houses on the west side . . . and soe ranging with the said houses on a line with the said denter stone in Ratcliffe Highway by Mr. Samuell Miller or his Tennants" (p. 57)

Order for paving Old Gravel Lane. Two of the Justices of the Tower Division, Charles Osborne and Thomas Johnson, had viewed the piece of the King's highway called Old Gravel Lane, Stepney, containing 170 feet in length, and adjudged it fit to be paved with stone on the east side to the middle or denter stone there, from the house of Thomas Johnson, called the Crooked Billet, to the house of Richard Poole, called the George; and on the west side thereof to the said middle or denter stone from the house of John Johnson, deal merchant, to the house of Christian Dodson, called the Cart and Horses (p. 59)

Order for discharging John Wray and John Bennett, constables of Ruislipp, from their office; and a direction to Thomas Francklyn, one of the Justices, to swear in Thomas Preston and Allen Higison, who had been duly elected by the parishioners (p. 60)

Order to the churchwardens, &c., of St. Mary's, Islington, to make a rate for the repair of the highways, complaint as to their condition having been made to the Court by Lord Lucas, governor of the Tower of London, and Sir Francis Smyth, knight (p. 61)

Order to the churchwardens, &c., of St. Mary-le-Savoy, to provide for Bridgett Badwell, who passed from St. Bride's parish to the Savoy (p. 62)

Order for Edward Steel to serve Elizabeth Apprice, widow, the remainder of his term of apprenticeship. Edward Steel stated that on 1 May, 1684, he had been bound apprentice to John Apprice, of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, painter-stainer, for nine years; he had served for seven years when his master died, and Elizabeth, his widow, refuses to instruct him, and so he prays his indentures may be discharged. Elizabeth insists that since her husband's death she has provided able workmen to instruct this apprentice, and that he was now capable of doing her good service (p. 63)

On the petition of the inhabitants of Kensington the Court allowed an extension of time for paving the common highway in the parish with stone, which had been ordered to be completed by the 20th June last past. The time was extended to 24 August, and six of the Justices were authorised to nominate and appoint overseers of the work, and to report to next Court of Quarter Sessions (p. 64)

Order for suppressing the alehouse licenses of William Eustage, "of Great Ealing, otherwise Zenling, and Alice Andrews of the same, widow" (p. 65)

Order for discharging William Brind, one of the constables of St. Giles'in-the-Fields, from his office. Thomas Owen, one of the Justices, made complaint that Brind had refused to execute a warrant duly made out "for the seizing of fruit exposed to sale," thereby neglecting the duty of his office. Mr. Owen to nominate a fit person to serve for the rest of the year (p. 65)

Order for reference to certain Justices to ascertain the ''proportions" of paving Kensington Square, to limit a further day, and to report thereon. At the April Court it had been ordered that the square should be paved from the "place designed for freestone pavement to the rails in the said square." It was reported to the Court that the time "limited" is past, and great part of the work not done, by reason the "proportions" of the said paving charge are not "ascertained" on the inhabitants and owners of the houses adjoining (p. 66)

Order to William Bird, treasurer for the maimed soldiers for the hundred of Ossulton, to pay to George Russell, a pensioner, 20/- for his present relief (ibid.)

Order that John Whitehurst, of Tottenham High Cross, be discharged from serving the office of churchwarden for the parish of Edmonton, and that John Mulberry, of Edmonton, yeoman, be one of the overseers for Edmonton for the "churchward there" for the present year. It appears that John Whitehurst's house was partly in Edmonton, but the greater part in Tottenham; that he and others who had occupied the house had served several offices in Tottenham parish, but never in Edmonton, and that was the reason he had refused to serve as overseer for Edmonton (p. 67)

Order for paving Crowne Street, heretofore called Hogg Lane, the east side being in the parish of St. Giles'-in-the-Fields, and the west side in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster, on the representation of four of the Justices. The Court ordered that the portion of the street unpaved from the north end leading from Acton road against St. Giles's Pound; from the corner house on the east side—in the occupac[i]on of George Powell, called by the sign of the Crown—to the extent of the ground of Elizabeth Fawtry, and then from the corner house on the west side then in the occupac[i]on of John Mirde, carpenter, unto the house of —— Smyth, widd, be paved, as for the want of such pavement the street is almost impassable in the winter time (p. 68)

Order for Simon Penn, keeper of the prison of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, called Finsbury Prison, to attend the next Court of Quarter Sessions and show cause why he did not allow certain prisoners to appear at the last Court, that they might take advantage of the Acts for discharging poor prisoners for debt. He is further ordered to bring the following prisoners before the Justices—Francis Stringer, Edward Alexander, Benjamin Wells, Andrew Green, John Blake, Edward Stone, William Birkett, Samuel Blake, John Cole, John Cope, Richard Kingsman, Henry Seals, Richard Nash, Godfry Taylor, Andrew Paine, Samuel Hill, William Cutler, Isaac Adished, Anthony Pitts, and Charles Palmer (p. 69)

Order for paving with stone the highway "leading from the east side of Clerkenwell Green to St. John Street on both sides of the way" by the 18th of October next (p. 70)

Order for the making of a new scavengers' rate for the parish of Shoreditch. A complaint was made to the Court by "divers" of the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, that they had lately been assessed at 6d. in the pound to the scavengers' rate, which they considered excessive; that the rate was made without their knowledge; and that several inhabitants of "Haggerston, Morefeilds, and other parts there'' have been over-rated and some under rated. The inhabitants of "Church End Liberty" who had made the rate, and objected to, were called before the Court (p. 71)

Order made for making a new rate for the relief of the poor for the hamlet of Wapping [in the margin "Shadwell"] on the report of two of the Justices, Thomas Johnson and Robert Hastings. They reported that the former rate was irregularly and imperfectly made.

A petition from the inhabitants of the Liberty of Moorfields, showing that "watches are kept only every other night," so that felonies and burglaries are committed, to the great danger of the petitioners, who pray that they may have power to elect constables, and so have a watch and scavengers of their own. The Court directed certain of the Justices to call before them the parish officers and enquire into the matter, and to report to the Court on the nth of August, and in the meantime to order and direct that watches be duly set and kept in the liberty (p. 74)

Order for the paving of Whitehorse Street to the upper end of a new street called London Street, in the hamlet of Ratcliffe, in the parish of Stepney, on both sides of the way, upon the report of two of the Justices who had been appointed at the previous Court to view the road, Thomas Johnson and John Robins. The work to be done by 20 August (p. 75)

Order concerning the proportions of the paving charge of Kensington Square. Three of the Justices to whom the matter had been referred on the 24th of July made their report. The Court ordered that the rates mentioned in the report and annexed to the order be observed, "and that the pavements there undone be done and finished by Bartholomew Day next"; that "the charge of paving the angles of the said square doe lye upon the adjoyneing buildings to the said angles according to their dimensions abutting on any the said new streets, and that the owners of the void places there sett out for building for any building terme or any greater estate, doe levell the places of the said streets adioyneing to their void ground and make the same firme and serviceable . . . for carrying off sky water to the common sewer" (p. 76)

Order upon the Queen's letter for the better observance of the Lord's Day and putting the laws in execution against profane cursing and swearing, and "all prophanation of the Lord's Day, by people travelling, selling or exposing anything to sale by exercise of their ordinary callings thereon or by using any other vain imployments or sports, and especially by tipling thereon or on any part thereof, and neglecting the worship and service of God, and also against the odious and loathsome sin of drunkennesse, and against all houses of debauchery and evill fame." The Clerk of the Peace is to cause the order to be printed and affixed upon the great gates of Hickshall, the church doors and all other public places of each parish (p. 78)

Order for two of the Justices to examine the accounts of John Jarvis, late overseer of the parish of St. Paul's, Shadwell, and to report thereon at the next Court. In his petition John Jarvis complains that he was elected to the office "when he was two hundred miles distant from home, and notwithstanding when he came home undertook the trouble of that office with a verry contentious partner who left him to gather the greatest part of the money himselfe, in collecting whereof he was att extraordinary expence, haveing a headburrough and a beadle severall days to make distresses, and that he being illiterate was necessitated to make use of a scrivener to keep his account, and has disbursed att one time one hundred and forty pounds or thereabouts before he had received any of the parish money, whereof he borrowed fifty pounds and paid three pounds interest for the same, which interest and charge amounts to twelve pounds fifteene shillings and twopence." When adjusting his accounts the auditors refused to allow his disbursements, though the same allowance has been made to other overseers (p. 81)

Order concerning street lighting from Michaelmas to Lady Day. The Court, being informed that several persons do not hang out any lights, and that "the patentees whoo doe cause the lamps to be placed by agreement with the said householders doe place them at too great a distance," directs that the Justices inhabiting the several divisions are to give their attention to the matter, and take such action as may be necessary (p. 82)

Order for paving Old Soho, otherwise Wardour Street, the eastern side of which is in St. Anne's, Westminster, and the western side in the parish ot St. James's, Westminster, on the report of two of the Justices, who had been appointed to inspect the place. They recommended that the street be paved with stone on both sides of the way, viz., on "St. Ann's side from the house belonging to Mr. Bayly, of Great Queen Street, baker, to the house of Nicholas Speerman, known by the name of the 'Redd Cow,' and on St. James' side from the house of Mr. Peter Churchlow to the house of David Pew, known by the name of the 'Spotted Dogg.'" The work was ordered to be finished by 20 September (p. 84)

Order for the paving of Dane (sic) Street in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster, on the report of two of the Justices, who had been authorised to inspect the street. The Court ordered that the street be paved on both sides of the way, from "the back part of the house of the Lord Bullingbrooke and from the house of Mr. Samuell Commins over against itt, to the house of Edward Channell, wheelwright, and to the house of James Palmer, known by the name of the 'Coach and Horses,' att the north end of the said street, on or before" 20 September (p. 85)

Order on the report of the Right Honourable Robert Lord Lucas, Chief Governor of the Tower, and Thomas Johnson, two of the Justices, for paving Ayliffe Street in Goodman's Feilds, in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, leading from Mansell Street to Goodman's Gate; Redlyon Street, leading from High Street, Whitechapel, "to a certain street called Lemmon Street in Goodman's Feilds," and Lemmon Street leading from Redlyon Street into Rosemary Lane. The paving to be completed by 29 September (p. 86)

Order for the paving of both sides of Church Lane in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, leading from the end of the pavement in the High Street to Goodman's Feilds Gate, before 29 September, on the report of the two Justices mentioned in the last order (p. 87)

Order for paving, on both sides of the way, High Street, Whitechapel, from "the end of the pavement near the church to a certaine house called or known by the signe of the 'Artichoake,' near a certaine place called the Mount." The work to be done by 29 September. The same two Justices make the report (p. 88)

Order, on the report of Lord Lucas and John Robins, two of the Justices, that the street or way in the hamlet of Bow, in the parish of Stepney leading from Bowbridge to Bromley, be paved on both sides of the way by 29 September" (p. 89)

Order for Elizabeth Forster, "widdow," to be removed from the hamlet of Spittlefeilds to St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, and maintained there (p. 90)

Upon the report of four Justices, appointed for that purpose at the previous Quarter Sessions, the Court ordered that the constables, churchwardens, overseers, and surveyors of the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, shall elect "one constable more than is already elected" out of the inhabitants of the liberty of Moorfields; further that "the present scavengers and rakers . . . doe carry or cause to be carried away all the dust, ashes, filth, and soyle from the houses" within the liberty, till Easter; at the Easter Vestry an extra scavenger is to be elected for the liberty of Moorfields. (p. 90)

Order for the payment of money due to Captain Thomas Jones, keeper of the New Prison, and governor of the House of Correction at Clerkenwell. Three Justices were appointed at the January Quarter Sessions to examine and report on the claim. It was ordered by the Court that the report be filed with the Clerk of the Peace, and that the yearly sum of £25 formerly paid by the keeper of New Prison to the governor of the House of Correction "be allowed to . . . Thomas Jones out of his rent for New Prison for the government of the said House of Correction untill further order to the contrary;" further, the Clerk of the Peace is to pay Thomas Jones the sum of £115 5s. 4d. [Vide Sessions Book 481, p. 57] (p. 92)

Order for a watch to be kept in Long Alley "next adjoyneing to Morefeilds in the liberty of Norton Folgate in Finsbury division." Several of the inhabitants had complained to the Court that "they have had a standing watch kept between the signe of the Dolphin and Long Alley end next unto Morefeilds for att least fifty years past, as they could make appear, the said place haveing been well liked of by divers high constables, itt being much for the safety of the petitioners who dwell soe near Morefeilds, where frequent outrages and robberies are committed." They prayed the Court to grant an order for the continuance of the watch, so that no constable or other officer in the future should alter the same without leave from the Court (p. 93)

Order for the constables, headboroughs, &c., of New Town, in the hamlet of Mile End, in the parish of Stepney, to pay to Elizabeth, the widow of Robert Phipps, a former constable, the sum of £9 0s. 9d., which had been expended in passing cripples and vagabonds, and other charges. Elizabeth Phipps complains that though a rate had been properly made on the 3rd of April last for reimbursing the said Elizabeth, the present constables, &c., had refused to collect it (ibid.)

Order for respiting the recognizances to prosecute of all persons indicted for recusancy until the next General Quarter Sessions. The names are as follows:—William Baily, of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, barber; Thomas Goodwin, of the same, joiner; Alexander Oxton, of the same, Schoolmaster; William Whitfield, of the same, victualler; Thomas Prince, of the same, goldsmith; Ferdinando Albertus, of the same, victualler; John Burgis, of the same, clerk; Phillip Cook, of the same, victualler; Nicholas Body, of Gray's Inn Lane, cook; St. Roland Belles, knight; John Thimbleby, esquire; Edward Hobart, gentleman; George, Lord Abergavenny; Thomas Cook; George Howse; Henry Trapps; Thomas Culverly; Thomas Campion; William Gerrard; Mary Tichburne; Henrietta Roper; Faith, Lady Henneadge; Mary Maddison; George Messenger; James Bamber; John Rigmaden; Francis Duddle; Stephen Galloway; George Potter; William Peircy; Joseph Higgs; Thomas Higgens; Henry Yorke; Thomas Bromwharrwood; Elizabeth Bromwharrwood; Bazill Fitzherbert; George Hall; Thomas Coby; Benjamin Callow; Lewis Furshoone; Henry Oldham; John Phillips; Edward Goldsmith; Tohn Rogers; Hugh, Lord Clifford; Richard Butler; John Vanloon; Francis Codrington—"the said persons have behaved themselves quietly to their Majesties and their Government" (p. 95)

Order for respiting recognizances of the following persons till further order:—Thomas Pate; Joseph Acomb; Edward Shortell; William Browne; John Magnan; Alice Mobbey; William Spilman; Nicholas Glave; Susanna Harrison; Robert Presson; William Levins; John Kilby; Mary Rogers; Rachael Horton (p. 96)

Indenture of apprenticeship of Thomas Farrer, son-in-law of Christopher Heard, of Stepney, farrier, to Thomas Hill, of St. Paul's, Shadwell, rope-maker, for seven years. 5 January, 1690 (p. 103)

Calendar of indictments (p. 104)

Calendar of recognizances (p. 106)

Rough memoranda, relating to recognizances, &c.

"John Maldon, of Faith Lane, London, a teacher of a congregation of Anabaptists in Joseph Francklyn's house in Goodman's Feilds in the parish of Whitechapel."

"A conventicle or assembly for religious worship is recorded . . . to be at William Shewen's house at Endfeild."

Sessions Book 488—September, 1691.

Jury panels (p. 5)

[Pages 6–8 blank.]

Miscellaneous memoranda as to indictments, recognizances, &c. (pp. 9–53)

[Page 54 blank.]

List of names under headings New Prison, and House of Correction. (pp. 55, 56)

[Pages 57–60 blank.]

Miscellaneous memoranda as to acquittals, commitments, &c. (pp. 61–64)

[Pages 65, 66 blank.]

Order for William Turner, of Ickenham Parish, yeoman, to be headborough of the said parish for this year (p. 67)

Upon the petition of Elizabeth Plowden against Thomas Preist, victualler, for wages due to her for nursing his daughter, Elizabeth, and also upon the petition of the said Thomas, praying a discharge from the maintenance of the said child, it is referred to certain Justices (named) to hear and determine the said matters in difference (ibid.)

Upon the petition of the churchwarden (sic) and inhabitants of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, showing that Joseph Buffington, Francis Double day, William Wood, and Robert Sherrington, surveyors of the highways of the said parish for the past year, have not yet accounted for the money received and disbursed by them, it is ordered that the said surveyors do yield up to the inhabitants a perfect account of the same, and that they return any overplus to the present surveyors (p. 68)

Whereas by an order of the 11th of August last, a certain street in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, "from the end of the pavement near the church there, to the house called the Artichoake, near a certain place called the Mount, in the said parish," was ordered to be paved on both sides of the way before the 29th of September following; now, upon the petition of the churchwardens and inhabitants, showing that if the said way should now be paved, the same would not endure, but would sink, owing to the winter being near, and that sufficiency of stones cannot now be had, and praying that the paving might be postponed until the spring, it is ordered accordingly. [Vide Sessions Book 487, p. 88] (p. 69)

Upon the petition of William Freshwater and Ralph Brockett, inhabitants of the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell, showing that "a certain book was made and rated on the inhabitants, amounting to about £27, and that the petitioners are nominated collectors, that they have a book sent them entitled, a rate for two several robberies, and not setting forth any particulars, and praying relief and direction in these particulars; it is ordered that the inhabitants do amend the title of their assessment and expressly mention the names of those upon whom the said robberies were committed, what sums such persons recovered against Ossulston Hundred, how much is assessed towards each robbery, what is expended for the passing of cripples and vagabonds through the parish, &c., and that the said William and Ralph collect and pay the money so assessed (p. 70)

Whereas by an order of the 11th of August last, it was directed that the scavengers and rakers of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, should carry away all dust, &c., from the houses of the inhabitants of the liberty of Morefields until Easter next; but upon application, made by the chief inhabitants of the said liberty, to have the clause omitted from the order as they have always carried away their own dust, and no scavenger can come into the said liberty, it is ordered accordingly. [Vide Sessions Book 487, p. 90] (p. 71)

Upon the matter in difference between Thomas Hearne, of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields, joiner, and William Odell, his apprentice, concerning the discharge of the said William; the Court seeing no cause for the discharge, orders the said William to serve the remainder of his apprenticehood with his master (p. 72)

Order for respiting several recognizances and their sureties; names of the former given (p. 73)

[Pages 74–83 blank.]

Alphabetical list of names as to indictments and recognizances. (pp. 84–87)

Memorandum of persons fined for non-appearance, &c. (p. 88)

Sessions Book 489—October, 1691.

Memoranda relating to recognizances (p. 3–27)

Order for Mark Fenton, convicted of trespass and unlawful possession of lock, keys, and brass bosses from the doors of an empty house, to be whipped "at the hinder part of the cart from the one end of Marsham Street to the other, in the parish of St. Margaret's." He is committed to the prison of the Gatehouse until he shall undergo the punishment on Monday next, and then to be delivered after paying his fees (p. 29)

Order for Giles Griffiths to stand upon the pillory near the Maypole in the Strand for one hour on Wednesday next, for speaking the following seditious words to one of the soldiers of "their now Majesties," viz., "you are all lobstring, faggotting doggs, rogues, rebells, and traytors to your lawful King, I wish the King's shipps were all on fire." He is committed to the prison of the Gatehouse until he shall undergo the said punishment, and then to be delivered after paying his fees (ibid.)

Order for the removal of Anne Stacey, a poor woman, "and very lately passed from the parish of St. Katherine Coleman" to St. Margaret's, Westminster, back to St. Katherine's. The Court finds that the said Anne Stacey had not resided in St. Margaret's Parish before the month of May, 1685, nor has she had any legal settlement since that time by her husband (Abraham). She had not given notice of coming to settle, according to the Statute, but both she and her husband had concealed themselves in several places. Before May, 1685, she was lawfully settled in the parish of St. Katherine Coleman (ibid.)

The Court orders two of the Justices living near to St. Clement Danes, to examine into the cause and circumstances whereby a female bastard child of Margaret Jemmett's, spinster, of that parish, has become chargeable to the parish. Ezekiel Cousins, of Clifford's Inn, gentleman, is said by Margaret Jemmetts to be the father. The Justices are to take such order as they think fit and convenient (p. 30)

Order to the churchwardens, &c., of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields to pay £5 4s. 8d., and 5/- more for the order, to Richard Price, constable of the Upper Ward, which sum was necessarily expended by him in passing and relieving vagrants, cripples, &c., during his term of office (p. 31)

Order for the churchwardens of the parish of St. James', Westminster, to pay to Thomas Phillips the sum of £6 9s. 2d. which had been expended by him during his term of office as constable in relieving, &c., vagrants, cripples, &c.; 5/- more is to be paid for the order (ibid.)

Order of the Court cancelling the indenture of apprenticeship of James Cooper to Matthew Cary. The mother of James Cooper, Hester Cooper, widow, states to the Court that her son James was apprenticed to Matthew Cary for five years on the 12th September, 1690, to learn the art of a barber, surgeon, and periwig maker, and to play on the violin and flute. She complains that Cary had left his trade and gone to sea for a time in another employment; that he had now been returned about three months, but "taketh no care to instruct and maintain" his apprentice, and absents himself from his house, and refuses to attend the Court (ibid.)

Order to Anthony Church, gentleman, keeper of the prison of the Gatehouse, Westminster, to discharge from custody Richard Galley, a prisoner for debt, 3 October, 1691. Creditors named—William Bushell; Michael Arnold, in Peter Street, Westminster, brewer; Lawrence Warwick, on the Mill Bank, woodmonger; Thomas Rawson, of Tuttle Street, mealman; Stephen Tay, of St. James's Market, gentleman; Samuel Chassey, of Charing Cross, victualler; John Galloway, of Jerman Street, mealman; John Bennett, of Bellyard, at Temple Bar, victualler; Lawrence Shelton, of Watford, in Hertfordshire, mealman; and James Gardner, of Covent Garden, gentleman (p. 32)

Additional order granted to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields for the arrears of the highway rate for the year 1690. The churchwardens complained that very many persons had refused to pay their respective rates. The Court appointed Richard Woodcraft, William Tame, Matthew Francklyn, Henry Phipps, John Hight, John Morris, James Crooke, George Pickett, William Reynolds, and Thomas Kerwood, surveyors of the highways in St. Martin's Parish for 1690, with the present surveyors, to collect unpaid rate.

[The five divisions of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields are named—Drury Lane or the East Division, St. Martin's Lane Division, the High Street or Strand Division, the Haymarket Division, and the Out Division] (p. 34)

A similar order for the same parish for the highway rate of 1691. The Court, amongst other things, orders that the collectors of the rate shall account for the whole sum which they have collected within four days after the election of the new surveyors; and that when the vestry has audited and examined the accounts they are to be submitted to the next ensuing Court of Quarter Sessions (p. 36)

Rough memoranda, chiefly relating to recognizances (p. 47)

Alphabetical list of indictments (pp. 50–52)

Sessions Book 490—October, 1691.

Jury panels (p. 5)

[Page 6 blank.]

Miscellaneous memoranda as to indictments, acquittances, recognizances, &c. (pp. 7–29)

[Pages 30–32 blank.]

List of names, headed New Prison, House of Correction, and Finsbury Prison (pp. 33–35)

List of names, under the heading, "Prisoners discharged for debt, &c.," with the sub-headings, Newgate, St. Katherine's Prison, Stepney (pp. 37, 38)

Memoranda as to recognizances, commitments, acquittals, &c. (pp. 39–43)

Upon a complaint that Richard Perry, of Stanwell, victualler, was suppressed from keeping an ale or victualling house, and from selling beer in the said parish, and, notwithstanding, the said Perry continues to carry on his trade there, in contempt of the warrant, it is ordered that he be suppressed, and that he receive notice of this his suppression (p. 44)

Upon the certificate (dated the 3rd of October instant) of two Justices (named), inhabitants within the Tower Division, that they have inspected a certain street or lane called Church Lane, part thereof in Stepney Parish, and a part in that of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, and that they consider it fit to be paved "on both sides the way, from the grate at the lower end of the said lane and so up as far as the houses of Thomas Sturt and Olliver Ashwish, with the kennell in the middle, being about thirty rods in length," it is ordered accordingly; the work to be completed on or before the 10th of November next. [Vide Sessions Book 487, p. 87] (p. 45)

Order that William Clarke, of St. Margaret's, Westminster, be admitted a pensioner as a maimed soldier of this county, and that he receive £3 a year, to be paid quarterly by the treasurer acting for the hundreds of Elthorn, Spelthorn, and Isleworth (p. 46)

Order for Christopher and Joseph, the two children of John Hoare, of St. Margaret's, Westminster, deceased, to be passed from the parish of St. Katherine's, near the Tower, to that of St. Margaret's aforesaid (ibid.)

Whereas it was ordered on the 11th of August last that a portion of Ayliffe Street, in Goodman's Fields, should be paved on both sides on or before the 29th of September; now, upon the application of Mathew Davis, of St. Olave's, Southwark, county Surrey, for an increase of time in which to pave in front of his houses in the said streets, it is ordered that two Justices (named) consider the petitioner's case, and grant him such an extension of time as they shall think meet. [Vide Sessions Book 487, p. 86] (p. 47)

Order that William Bird, gentleman, treasurer for the maimed soldiers within the hundreds of Ossulston, Edmonton, and Gore, do pay to George Russell, a pensioner, 20/- towards his present relief (ibid.)

Order for confirming an order made by two Justices (named), adjudging George Collison, of the precinct of St. Katherine's, near the Tower, victualler, to be the father of the male bastard child of Dorothy Dorton, of the said hamlet, widow (p. 48)

Order for John Philpott, keeper of the prison for the liberty and manor of Hackney, to attend the first day of the next Sessions, and to bring certain prisoners (named), with the causes of their imprisonment, that they may receive the benefit of the several Acts for discharging poor prisoners for debt (ibid.)

Upon the information of two Justices (named), inhabitants in or near St. Andrew's Parish, Holborn, that John Averyhall, junior, of Gray's Inn Lane, in the said parish, victualler, keeps a very disorderly house, it is ordered that the said John be allowed one month for the sale of his ale, &c., stocked by virtue of his license, and that from the end of the said month he be suppressed from keeping a common ale or victualling house in the said parish (p. 49)

Upon the petition of Bartholomew Hart, late churchwarden of East Smithfield, in the parish of St. Buttolph Without, Aldgate, and upon the report of two Justices (named), showing there is due to the said Hart £40 for money disbursed by him during his term of office, a confirmation of the report is ordered; and it is further ordered that the present churchwarden (sic) do pay to the said Hart £20 on or before the 1st of November next, and the residue upon the 25th of March following (p. 50)

Order for vacating an excessive rate made for the relief of the poor of Hornsey, and for making a new rate (ibid.)

Order on the petition of Susan Matson (sic), widow of Anthony Mason (sic) late beadle of the Duchy Liberty in the Strand, and the report made thereupon by three Justices (named). Shows that Anthony served as beadle for a year and nine months, for which service he was paid by Mr. John Coggs, a burgess of the said liberty, £35, and by Mr. Charles Hellow £5, and that there is due to the said Susan £12 10s. 0d., and showing the amount due to the said Coggs, paid by him for watching and warding within the said liberty for 1687–89, to be £64 15s. 8d. and £36 14s. 6d. It is ordered that a collection be made upon the inhabitants for the payment of the said sums (p. 51)

Upon information that Sir Richard Bulkeley, baronet, has set up an office in Lincoln's Inn to superintend the actions of the Justices in this county, and has had several orders and warrants printed without lawful authority, and, aided by Ralph Hartley, J.P., has caused several unlawful convictions to be made, it is ordered that certain Justices (named) do examine into the truth of this information, and do certify their opinions on the subject, on Friday morning next; and it is further ordered that all constables do bring into Court on Thursday morning next all warrants for the levying any sums upon the inhabitants upon convictions for "tipling, exposing of fruit or goods upon the Lord's Day," &c. Instructions for the Justices concerning such offenders. [Vide post, p. 57] (p. 53)

Upon the report of two Justices (named), dated the 21st of September last [Vide Sessions Book No. 488, p. 67], concerning the wages for the nursing and maintenance of Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Preist, of St. Giles'-in-theFields, victualler, it is ordered that the said report be confirmed, and that the said Thomas do pay Elizabeth Plowen, in the said report named, £14 2s. 6d., due for the nursing of his said daughter. Further order for the maintenance of the said child (ibid.)

Order concerning the settlement of Alice Beane and her child, Richard. Edward Beane, husband of the said Alice, a soldier, having been quartered in the Savoy garrison, in the parish of St. Mary, Savoy, and now (if alive) in Ireland, it is ordered that the Justices do examine where the said Edward was last legally settled, and in the meantime the churchwardens and overseers of St. Mary aforesaid are ordered to maintain the said Alice and her child (p. 54)

Order that the several recognizances entered into by certain persons (named), and their sureties, be respited until further order (p. 55)

Order for respiting the recognizances of all persons indicted for recusancy. (Names of recusants given) (p. 56)

Sir Richard Grahame, baronet, Viscount Preston "in the Kingdom of Scotland," is committed to Newgate for contempt, in refusing to be sworn as evidence against Francis Turner, doctor of divinity, indicted for high treason (p. 57)

Order for confirming a report concerning the illegal convictions by warrant from Ralph Hartley, J.P. It appeared that Mr. Hartley had signed above 500 warrants of conviction, many of which were illegal, and that some persons convicted for suffering tippling in their houses had never sold any drink, or had died prior to their conviction. The report is confirmed, and the execution of any of these warrants is suspended. An inquiry is to be made as to any sums of money levied by virtue of them. [Vide ante, p. 53] (ibid.)

Recital of previous orders on the inhabitants of Kensington for paving the common highway in the said parish, and order that, on account of the difficulty of procuring workmen, gravel, and stones to pave the said highway, and the near approach of winter, when the newly-made road would sink and "be broke up by carts and coaches," the paving be again postponed until the 24th of June next (p. 58)

Alphabetical lists of names, headed Indictments for trespass, and Calendar of recognizances (pp. 60–63)

Miscellaneous memoranda:—Obadiah Marriots, teacher of a congregation of dissenting protestants at the house of Frazier, in Chiswick (p. 64)

Sessions Book 491—December, 1691.

Jury list (p. 5)

[Page 6 blank.]

Memoranda relating to recognizances (pp. 7–31, 39–42)

List of persons in the New Prison and in the House of Correction (p. 35)

Order to the high constables of Westminster Division, Holborn Division, Finsbury Division, Kensington Division and the Tower Division, to summon the petty constables of the several parishes to appear before the Justices at Hickshall on Wednesday, 9 December, to bring in all the warrants directed to them on the "account of swearing, cursing, prophaning the Lord's Day," &c., and also an account of what money they have received upon the said warrants, and to whom they have paid the money (p. 49)

Order for enlarging the time, limited by an order made at the last Sessions, for a committee of the Justices to examine the convictions which have been made upon any of the inhabitants of the county "for tippling, exposing fruit or any other goods to sale on the Lord's Day, or any other offence for prophanation thereof." The Justices report that all the convictions could not be discovered, many of them remaining in the hands of the respective constables. The Court ordered that the time for examination be enlarged to Saturday next, and the committee is to report to the Court "before the end of this present Sessions" (ibid.)

"The said committee appointed to examine the matters mentioned in this order on Friday morning next, and particularly to hear the complaints of such persons as are ordered to attend this Court concerning the said convictions against them, and direct that Mr. Hartley have notice thereof, and a copy of their names, and be desired to give notice to the informers against such offenders to attend this Court at the said time to justify the said convictions" (p. 50)

Opinion of the Court upon a warrant of conviction granted by Ralph Hartley, Justice, for exercising a trade and calling on the Lord's Day. Francis Askew, distiller, of the parish of St. James's, Westminster, complains that a silver spoon belonging to him was distrained under a warrant, granted by Ralph Hartley, for exercising his trade and calling on the Lord's Day, 27 September. He affirms that "he never sold strong waters or other liquors to any person whatsoever by retail, nor to any person on the Lord's Day, unless in cases of necessity." He calls special attention to the warrant in which he is described as "Francis Askew, strongwaterman, in St. Albans Street, in St James's Market, next door to the Red Lyon," and the fine of 5/was imposed. He pleads that the warrant of distress was illegal and irregular, "for that he never had opportunity of answering any complaints touching the matter." The Court adjudged the warrant of distress to be illegal and oppressive, because the nature of the crime was not specified, and Askew was convicted without being heard (ibid.)

Order concerning the removal of Thomas Marshall and his wife from the parish of Little Stanmore. The churchwardens of that parish complain that Thomas Marshall, a hired servant, living for some time in Hendon Parish, and his wife, had come into the parish of Little Stanmore. Fearing that they were about to become chargeable to the parish, the churchwardens had warned them to remove out of the parish. This they refused to do. The Court referred the matter to four of the Justices to deal with as they should think most fitting (p. 52)

Order to two of the Justices to view and report on a certain way leading from Hockley Hole to Leather Lane. John Edge, surveyor of the highways for the liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden, and Ely Rents, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, stated that "the street . . . leading from the north side of Hatton Garden to the farrier's shop towards Hockley Hole, and from thence upwards towards Leather Lane end, and also the way from the said farrier's shop leading up the hill on the north side to Leather Lane . . . is very much in decay for want of repair." The Court instructed the Justices who were to view the street to report to the Court on Saturday, and state whether the street "ought to be paved with stone, or amended with gravell." (ibid.)

Order for the churchwardens of Stoke Newington to pay £1 18s. 4d. to Thomas Hunt, and for making an additional rate for the relief of the poor. John Hunt complains that by the order of the churchwardens, &c., of Stoke Newington, he had disbursed £1 18s. 4d. for "coals and candles for several Irish and Dutch soldiers, who were lately quartered and kept guard in the said parish," and that they refused to repay him. The churchwardens in their reply state that the rate for the relief of the poor was not sufficient to defray this £1 18s. 4d. The Court ordered the payment of John Hunt out of the poor rate, and authorised the churchwardens, &c., to levy a further rate (p. 53)

George Steevens, one of the overseers of the poor for St. Mary-le-Savoy, complains that "the poor of the parish being lately much increased" the rate is very insufficient, and that he had spent above £20 more than he had received; yet the churchwardens to whom he had applied would give him no assistance. The churchwardens, Toby Sedgwick and Francis Taylor, alleged that Steevens had neglected to collect several sums of money which would be sufficient to reimburse him. The Court ordered three of the Justices living near the parish to look into the matter and make such order as may be necessary (p. 54)

Order discharging Francis Quarrill from his indenture of apprenticeship. Complaint had been made to Thomas Johnson, one of the Justices, by Francis Quarrill, apprenticed to William Gatley, colourman, of St. Buttolph's Without, Aldgate, that his master has misused him, given him immoderate correction, neglected to instruct him, and turned him out of his service. Thomas Johnson "did examine the said matter" between the master and his apprentice, but for want of "conformity in the said matters" referred the dispute to this Court. The Court ordered Francis Quarrill to be discharged from his indentures of apprenticehood (p. 55)

Order on the report of Andrew Lawrence and Thomas Smyth, two Justices instructed to view the way from Hockley Hole to Leather Lane. The Court directs that "the street leading from the north end of Hatton Garden to the farrier's shop towards Hockley in the Hole, and from thence upwards towards Leather Lane end, be well repaired and amended with gravel by the surveyor of the highways" of the parish at the cost of the inhabitants; and that the way from the farrier's shop leading up the hill on the north side to Leather Lane, containing 120 feet in length and 16 feet in breadth, be forthwith paved with stone by the inhabitants and owners of the houses next adjoining the street. [Vide ante, p. 52] (p. 56)

Order discharging Daniel Seale from his indenture of appenticehood. He complained that he had been apprenticed to William Wright, of St. Margaret's, Westminster, bricklayer, for seven years, and had served for three years, but had endured great hardship for want of sufficient food and necessaries, and hath been almost "starved for want of clothes," and that his master was altogether incapable of providing for him. William Wright did not appear (p. 57)

Certain of the Justices are nominated to draw up a petition to the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Great Seal of England, humbly representing . . . the great oppression of Ralph Hartley, essquire, one of the Justices who had committed irregularities "in issuing forth many hundred illegal warrants" for levying money, and in default distraining the goods of their Majesties' subjects for supposed offences against the statutes, i.e., "for suffering tippling in their houses," and for non-observance of the Lord's Day. "It being the unanimous request of the whole Court that the said Mr. Hartley," for the reasons given, "and for quieting the minds of the inhabitants of the county, should be put out of the Commission of the Peace; and that the Chairman and the whole Commission do attend their Lordships in a body with the said petition, together with the copy of the Report" (p. 58)

Order that John Lavy, one of the constables of the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel, deliver up to Benjamin Desimere, Henry Lee, John Leppar, and Francis Linsey, victuallers, of Whitechapel', several pieces of plate, which had been distrained from them, for suffering "tipling in their several houses on the Lord's Day," it having been decided by the Court that the warrants which had been issued by Ralph Hartley were illegal and arbitrary (p. 59)

Order for confirming a report made this present Sessions relating to Mr. Hartley (p. 60)

Order for respiting the recognizances of John Pennell, John Marmett, and Mary Preistman, till further order (p. 61)

Indenture of apprenticeship of Roger Sheldon, of St. Dunstan's-in-theWest, to John Weale, to learn the art of fencing, from 1 November, 1689, for eight years. The guardians of Roger Sheldon are Margaret Sheldon, widow, his mother, and John Penhalle, of Clifford's Inn, gentleman (p. 71)

Alphabetical list of indictments (p. 72)

Alphabetical list of recognizances (p. 74)

Rough memoranda.