Charities

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Victoria County History

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K. J. Allison (editor)

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1969

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335-347

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'Charities', A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 1: The City of Kingston upon Hull (1969), pp. 335-347. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66782 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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CHARITIES (fn. 1)

The charities described in this section are, with a few minor exceptions, those established for the benefit of the poor, including almshouses and homes. Charity schools are considered elsewhere. Certain charitable trusts, such as those for churches and nonconformist chapels, are also dealt with where necessary in other sections.

The 'parish charities' include those for Drypool, Marfleet, Sculcoates, and Sutton, as well as Holy Trinity and St. Mary's, Hull; 'general charities' are those for a wider area. 'Nonconformist and Roman Catholic charities' exclude one which appears under 'almshouses', and two of the latter are for Jews. Many of the charities are administered by private trustees, but others have at one time or another been the responsibility of the corporation.

Little is known of many of the smaller charities whose administration was entrusted to the corporation. Some of them may have been lost, but others were merged in 1701 in an annual payment of £100 which the corporation agreed to make to the Corporation of the Poor, established three years before. This sum was to be 'in full [recompence] of all manner of payments for the poor at the mayor's house or at the town's hall at the courts there, except coals distributed at Christmas'. (fn. 2) Some of the constituent payments are listed under 'lost and merged charities' below. The £100 was paid until 1760, (fn. 3) when it was withheld for three years until a loan made to the Corporation of the Poor had been repaid. From 1763 until 1799, when payment ceased, the £100 was said to be for the benefit of the various hospitals or almshouses controlled by the town corporation; consequently certain payments to inmates were made by the Corporation of the Poor out of this money. The Corporation of the Poor had made similar payments to several of the hospitals since 1728 but the money had previously come from the poor-rate. (fn. 4)

Several charities were established specifically for the benefit of the Corporation of the Poor, and these are listed separately below. Some were for its general purposes, others for the inmates of Charity Hall, the town workhouse. (fn. 5) The names of numerous other benefactors are recorded, but it is not clear whether they provided endowments; these gifts were presumably merged in a common fund. (fn. 6) All the charities established for the Corporation of the Poor, and enjoyed after 1824 by its successor, the Guardians of the Poor, had been similarly merged by 1929, with the exception of Bell's Fund and Lindall's Gift. (fn. 7) In 1930 the guardians' functions were assumed by the Corporation of Hull.

The more substantial charities administered by the town corporation included a number of almshouses and one or two falling within the category of 'general charities'. Several of the town's medieval hospitals were in the corporation's charge and at least two of these, Gregg's and Riplingham's, continued after the Reformation. (fn. 8) To these other almshouses were added during the 16th and 17th centuries, and by the time of the Charity Commissioners' inquiry of 1823 the corporation was administering eight hospitals. The general charities were those of Thomas Bury, Thomas Ferries, and William Cogan.

Shortly before municipal reform, allegations were made of extensive abuses in the corporation's conduct of charity affairs. Not only had some of the smaller charities been entirely lost, but much other charity property had been sold, exchanged, or lost, and places in the hospitals were frequently given to ineligible applicants. Aldermen, it was alleged, were increasingly living in the country and placing country people in the hospitals. (fn. 9) Whatever the truth of these charges, the corporation lost its control of charities after the passing of the Municipal Reform Act, and in 1836 the Hull Charity Trustees were established to take its place. In 1840, however, apparently because charity properties could not all be identified and separated from other corporation property, the corporation agreed to continue paying the stipends of the inmates in Crowle's, Ellis's, Gee's, Gregg's, Harrison's, Bishop Watson's, and Weaver's Hospitals. These seven became known as the 'minor hospitals'. The Charity Trustees retained the patronage of the minor hospitals, and they had full control over the remaining municipal charities, that is Bury's and Ferries's for exhibitions and the poor, Ferries's for apprenticing, Cogan's for a school and marriage portions, and Lister's Hospital. (fn. 10) In the case of the Grammar School control was divided between the corporation, who had the patronage, and the trustees. (fn. 11)

An inquiry by the Charity Commissioners in 1871 led to the formulation in 1875 of Schemes for several of the municipal charities. The proposal to appropriate £10,000 from Ferries's apprenticing charity for the benefit of the Grammar School met with strong local opposition, however, and nothing more was done until 1879. Further allegations of mismanagement began to be made in 1878, (fn. 12) and in the same year the Charity Trustees protested against the corporation's ownership of charity property. Another Charity Commission inquiry resulted in 1879. (fn. 13) The outcome was that in 1881 the corporation surrendered the management of the minor hospitals to the trustees, (fn. 14) and agreed to pay them £1,000 a year for stipends and other hospital expenses. The charity properties remained in the corporation's ownership. By a Scheme of 1887 all the minor hospitals, together with Lister's, were consolidated as the Hull Municipal Hospitals. A single large set of almshouses was built to take their places, and most of the old buildings have since been demolished. The municipal hospitals and the various charities of Bury, Cogan, and Ferries were further consolidated, by a Scheme of 1913, as the United Charities of Kingston upon Hull. The hospitals then became known as the Almshouse Charities. Finally, a Scheme of 1955 brought Toft's Charity into the United Charities. (fn. 15)

The corporation, since the mid-16th century, has also enjoyed an interest in the administration of the Charterhouse (see 'almshouses'). The corporation was granted the patronage by the Crown in 1552, and subsequently at various times made orders for the regulation of the hospital too. In 1760, however, after a dispute with the master of the hospital, the Court of Chancery ruled that the corporation had no visitorial right, and a Scheme of 1764 provided that the corporation and the master should share certain administrative functions. The corporation retained the patronage after municipal reform, and in 1872 it was given the additional power of removing inmates. (fn. 16) Since 1901 the Charterhouse has been administered by trustees (fn. 17) and the corporation's only interest has been as patron. Several other charities are also administered by the corporation, among them the ancient parish charities of St. Mary's and Holy Trinity (over which the corporation assumed the powers of a parish council in 1909) (fn. 18) and one almshouse, the Pickering Homes.

In the accounts of charities below, sources of information used are for the most part cited by numbers which refer to the following list. In a few cases littleused sources are given in brackets in the text.

1. Charity Commission files.

2. Hull Corporation Records, Bench Books.

3. Ibid. Box 111.

4. Ibid. other MSS.

5. York Diocesan Registry, St. Anthony's Hall, Probate Registers.

6. Charity Commission, 9th Report (1823).

7. J. Cook, History of God's House of Hull (1884).

8. Hull Daily Mail, cuttings in Hull Public Library.

9. Hull Municipal Charities, Report up to the year 1935 (Hull, 1935).

10. [W. H. Kitching], 'Charities of Hull' (2 vols.) (scrapbook in Hull Public Library).

11. L. M. Stanewell, Cal. Hull Deeds.

12. J. Tickell, Hist. Hull.

13. V.C.H. Yorkshire, vol. iii.

14. T. White, Enquiry into the Origin of the . . Charities of Hull (1833).

Parish Charities

HOLY TRINITY PARISH. There were twelve charities for the poor in 1823: land at Hessle produced £1 10s. a year; William Skinner, by will dated 1680, gave £100; John Forcet, by will dated 1682, gave £2 12s. a year from property in Hull; Frances Smith, by will dated 1689, gave £3 18s. a year from property in Hull; John Horsman, by will dated 1704, gave £2 a year from property in Hull; Robert Trippet in 1707 gave money for bread (see St. Mary's parish); Mary Harrison, by will dated 1716, gave £20; Mary Porter, by will dated 1721, gave £2 a year from property in Hull, as directed by her late husband; Lawrence Robinson, by will dated 1724, gave £2 12s. a year from property in Hull; Jane Gault and Elizabeth Harris in 1728 gave property for bread (see St. Mary's parish); Thomas Hawkins, by will dated 1774, gave £50; Thomas Hewson in 1812 gave money (see St. Mary's parish). In 1823 the total income of these charities was £36, of which £27 was spent on bread distributed weekly; more was distributed on St. John's Day.(6)

Isabella Harbord, by will proved in 1918, left £100, the income to be distributed at Christmas.(1)

ST. MARY'S PARISH. There were eleven charities for the poor in 1823: William Popple, by will dated 1656, gave £3 a year from property at Sutton, to be distributed in bread; William Ramsden, by will dated 1675, gave £5 a year out of land at Cottingham, for bread; Robert Trippet, by will dated 1707, gave £5 4s. from property in Hull to be enjoyed equally by St. Mary's and Holy Trinity parishes, for bread; Robert Stephens, by will dated 1723, gave £1 4s. a year from property in Hull, for bread; Catherine Dunn, by will dated 1725, gave £2 12s. a year from property in Hull; Jane Gault and Elizabeth Harris, by indentures of 1728, gave property in Hull (producing £10 rent in 1821) to be enjoyed equally by St. Mary's and Holy Trinity parishes, for bread; Elizabeth Spacy, by will dated 1740, gave £10; Thomas Hawkins, by will dated 1774, gave £20; John Marshall, by codicil dated 1803, gave £200 (which was used to buy £180 stock in 1808); Joseph Rennard, by will dated 1807, gave £50; Thomas Hewson, by will proved in 1812, gave £100 to be enjoyed equally by St. Mary's and Holy Trinity parishes. In 1823 the total income of these charities was £35, of which £27 was spent on bread distributed four times a month; the rest was distributed in bread and money at Christmas.(6) In 1927 the Gault and Harris estate was sold for £425 and invested in £760 stock. The total income of the first six charities was about £10 in 1964, when the small remaining resident population in the parish made it impossible to distribute bread.(1)

Amelia Scott, by will proved in 1895, left £50 for the poor of St. Mary's.(I)

ST. JAMES'S PARISH. By will proved in 1924 David Islip left £500 to the vicar and churchwardens to be used, after his wife's death, to provide pensions of £1 to poor people in the parish.(1) The income in 1966 was about £30 (ex inf. the Vicar of Holy Trinity).

DRYPOOL PARISH. The Drypool Feast Charity derives from the gift by Sir Thomas Constable in 1836 of ground for the use of the inhabitants (see p. 460). Some time after 1931 the use of the land was relinquished in return for a payment of not less than £100 a year by the corporation. In 1961–2 £75 was distributed to the poor.(1)

Joshua Howerd (or Horwood), by will proved in 1901, left £50, the income to be distributed in bread to the poor of St. Peter's parish on Christmas Day. By a Scheme of 1951 the income was to be used to further the religious and charitable work of the Church in Drypool.(1)

Eleanor Scott in 1717 devised property for the poor of Southcoates (see Almshouses).

MARFLEET PARISH. The origin of the 'Poor Pound' is not known. In 1809 it was paid, as it had been 'from time immemorial', out of an estate in the parish (St. Giles's Ch. vestry, Register ii). It was added to the poor-rate in 1823.(6) In 1870 it was recovered after a lapse of 'many years' and was subsequently paid, at least intermittently (Register ii); the last payment was made in 1944 (ex inf. the Vicar, 1966).

Mary Barmby in 1867 left money for coal (see Sutton Parish).

SCULCOATES PARISH. Sarah and Elizabeth Glossop gave £150 in 1901 for the benefit of 30 widows of St. Paul's parish. The number of beneficiaries was in 1958 ordered to be at the trustees' discretion. The income was £5 in 1964 and was distributed at Christmas.(1)

SUTTON PARISH. Ann Watson, by will dated 1720, devised property to produce £1 a year for the poor of Sutton and Stoneferry. Benjamin Pead in 1784 and Ann Pead in 1799 each bequeathed £20, the interest payable out of land at Sutton; in 1823 it was distributed with the next charity. In 1823 land at Stoneferry produced £1 a year, distributed at Christmas;(6) this was later known as John Broadley's charity.(1) Mary Barmby, by will proved in 1867, left £100 to be distributed in coal to the poor of Sutton and Marfleet. Anne Turner, by will proved in 1902, left £500 to the 'various charities' of Sutton. In 1911 these five charities were designated the Sutton Consolidated Charities; the income was then £1 each from Broadley's, the Pead's, and Watson's, £5 from Barmby's, and £19 from Turner's. The total income was still £27 in 1962, when £17 was spent on grants and £10 was paid to the diocesan maternity home.(1)

In 1903 Miss E. Spence's charity was said to consist of £1,000, used for the poor of Sutton.(1)

Leonard Chamberlain, by will dated 1716, devised property in Sutton and Stoneferry for a sermon at Sutton (8s. a year), for a schoolmaster to teach reading in Sutton and Stoneferry (£5 a year), and for the poor of these places. In 1823 the sermon money was considered too trifling to pay, £10 was paid to a schoolmaster, £15–£25 was spent on coal, and there were two almshouses (q.v.).(6)

General Charities

Chamberlain's Charities: by will dated 1716 Leonard Chamberlain devised property in Hull and Fitling to provide 6d. a week to each of 12 poor people in Hull and other property to provide a similar stipend to each of 8 poor people. In 1823 payments to the 12 totalled £46 16s. a year, stipends having been increased to 1s. 6d., and to the 8 £31 4s., after a similar increase. The rents supporting all Chamberlain's charities (see also Nonconformist Charities; Charities for the Corporation of the Poor; Parish Charities, Sutton) amounted to £379 in 1823, and there was then also £300 stock.(6)

Chapman's Charities: by will dated 1816 Joseph Chapman left £1,500 for payments to the Vicar of Holy Trinity and for the purchase of bread for the poor, and £1,500 for poor aged men and women. In 1962 the total assets were £1,038 stock. The income in 1964 was £18 for each charity; from the first the vicar received £5 5s. and from the second each poor person got £1 1s.(1) Chapman is elsewhere said to have left £2,000 to the corporation, at the re-marriage or death of his wife, for the maintenance of a school for poor boys.(3) No more is known of it.

Cogan's Charity for Apprenticing: by codicil to his will dated 1772 William Cogan instructed his executors to use £60, the interest on £2,000 stock, to put out apprentices to ploughmen, seamen, joiners, bricklayers, smiths, shoemakers, and tailors. At the end of his term each boy was to get £4 and his master £2. On the death of two named persons a further £1,000 stock was to come to the executors, and Cogan's residuary estate was also to be used in the same manner. He died in 1777 but because of the conditions of the will no masters could be found, and in 1787, when the fund stood at £6,500 stock, it was decided to increase the sum offered to masters. By 1823 nearly 800 apprentices had been bound. The income was then £195; the £2 and £4 payments were made, and in addition masters were allowed £7 with each boy—or £3 in the case of seamen.(6) A Scheme of 1890 increased the number of eligible trades.(1)

Cogan's Charity for a School and Marriage Portions: by indentures of 1753 William Cogan conveyed 2 houses to trustees to whom he had also transferred £2,000; they were to clothe 20 poor girls and provide a mistress to teach them. Each girl was to have a Bible and to be fitted out for service. By an indenture of 1760 Cogan transferred £500 stock to the trustees; the interest on £100 of it was to be used to buy books, that on the other £400 was to be left until £120 was available and then divided as marriage portions among former pupils who had spent seven years in service.(6)

The school is described elsewhere (see p. 362). Marriage portions of £6 were paid irregularly in the early 19th century; the balance was divided among those who had already received portions. The income was £16 a year from £527 stock in 1889, and £27 from £872 in 1913 when this became one of the United Charities. The charity had been formally separated from the educational foundation in 1904. There was only one application to benefit in 1935, when the charity had £1,607 stock. The school closed in 1950, and in 1960 it was ordered that portions should be paid to poor brides who had been at the school; the assets were then £3,291. The net income in 1963 was £123.(1, 9)

Crabtree Trust Fund: by will proved in 1949 John Crabtree left £1,000 for poor women formerly employed by the F. Atkins & Co. (Hull) branch of the Metal Box Co. Ltd. In 1963 the income was £41. (1)

Etherington and La Marche Charity: by will proved in 1871 Jane Holden (née La Marche) left £6,616 stock for poor Church of England clergymen and merchants in Hull and Great Driffield. In 1964 the net income was £280, and grants totalling £315 were made.(1)

Ferries's Charity for Apprenticing: by will proved in 1631 Thomas Ferries devised to the corporation his property at North Ferriby, then let for £21, for the apprenticing of poor orphans of Hull. The income in 1823 comprised £137 rent and £10 interest on £328 stock. Gifts of £5 5s. were then given to boys and £3 3s. to girls bound apprentice for 5 years, less for shorter terms.(6)

In 1867 the income totalled £208; 5 orphans were given £2 2s. each and 54 got £1 1s. each.(3) The income was £605 in 1889, and £873 in 1913 when this became one of the United Charities. In 1935 the income comprised £90 rent and £1,115 interest on £35,121 stock; 99 children received premiums of £3 3s. each, 34 got £2 2s., and 23 £1 1s., and £240 was spent on apprentices; 34 apprentices were bound during the year. The total net income in 1963 was £676.(1, 9)

Ferries's and Bury's Charities for Exhibitions and for the Poor: by will proved in 1631 Thomas Ferries devised to the corporation property in Hull; from it £3 6s. 8d. a year was to be paid to the poor of Hull, £1 to the poor of Howden, and the remaining income was to help maintain a poor Hull boy at Oxford or Cambridge. By will proved in 1628 Thomas Bury gave the corporation property in Hull to maintain a boy of Hull or Beverley at school and then at Cambridge(5, 6) (see J. Lawson, A Town Grammar Sch. through Six Cents. passim).

By 1823 the two charities had for long been administered together. The income was then £52. The stipulated payments were made to the poor and £40 was given for an exhibition.(6) In 1866 the exhibition was £50 and the total income £81.(3) A division into three separate charities was made in 1904, and in 1913 they became part of the Hull United Charities.

The charity for the poor of Hull, which had been discontinued before 1904, had an income of £3 in 1913, and that for exhibitions £102 in 1914. The three charities had a joint income in 1935 of £97 rent and £85 interest on £2,400 stock; the exhibition was then £50 a year, and the £3 6s. 8d. for the poor of Hull was paid to the Hospital Sunday Fund. The net income in 1963 was £232 for exhibitions and £5 for the poor of Hull; the latter went to the Hull Seamen's and General Orphanage.(1, 9) Since 1960 the exhibition has been tenable at any United Kingdom university.(8)

Hull Corn Trade Guild: in 1898 a fund was established to relieve needy members of the trade. In 1963 the income was £1,471, mainly interest on investments, and pensions totalling £2,087 were paid.(1)

Hull Great War Trust: in 1918 a fund was established to help those disabled in the First World War, and the dependents of those killed. It was the only local charity registered under the War Charities Act of 1916 to continue in operation for long after the end of the war. In 1926 the income was £5,516, mostly interest from investments, and £9,444 was distributed. In 1964 the income was £870 and weekly allowances totalling £990 were paid.(1) By 1964 a total of £275,000 had been paid out since the inception of the fund.(8)

Hull Seed, Oil, and Cake Association Benevolent Fund: in 1941 a fund was established to relieve poor present and former members of the trade. In 1964 the assets included £2,125 stock and the income was about £430.(1)

Hull Wholesale Fruit Trade Benevolent Society: in 1920 a society was founded for the relief of needy present and former members of the trade and their dependents. The income in 1964 was about £450, much of it interest on investments. Grants totalling £560 were made in 1963.(1)

Jackson's Appeal Trust Fund: Alderman Herbert Jackson, while Mayor of Hull in 1954, opened a fund for needy citizens to which £9,403 had been subscribed by 1956; of this sum, £2,333 had already been given in flood relief allowances and the remainder was then invested. In 1961–2 £1,107 was given towards flood relief. The income in 1964 was £417.(1)

Jubilee Holiday Fund: in 1935 Archibald Stark, then mayor, established a fund to provide holiday camps for poor children, in commemoration of King George V's jubilee. By a trust deed of 1939, when £2,202 remained in the fund, £835 was authorized to be used to buy land at Mappleton. The income in 1963 was £195.(1)

Lindall's Charity: by will dated 1781 Hannah Lindall left £150 to pay weekly sums to three named persons; after their deaths the remainder was to go to the poor, as was the residue of her estate. The three named persons received £121 before the last one died in 1810; £16 was subsequently given to the poor and £5 added to the residue. The residue amounted to £1,044. It was distributed from 1786 onwards in annual pensions of £1 to 40 poor women. By 1823 the number of recipients had been increased to 50, and £1,840 had been paid out.(6)

Metcalf's Charity: by will dated 1680 Alexander Metcalf left to Clare College, Cambridge, £130 for exhibitions to be awarded to his own kin, or failing that to poor boys of Hull Grammar School. His brother-in-law Thomas Langley (d. 1694) added £30. An award was first made in 1725 and boys were allowed 5s. a week. By 1858 the weekly allowance was 12s. (see J. Lawson, A Town Grammar Sch. through Six Cents. passim).

Mother Humber Memorial Fund: the Mother Humber Coal and Distress Fund was established in 1908.(8) Its assets in 1933 included £2,747 stock.(1) Relief for air-raid distress was given during the Second World War. A small proportion of the income of the Memorial Fund was used for the Mother Humber Home from its opening in 1947 until 1953, when it was taken over by the corporation.(1, 8) Most of the income after the war came from donations. In 1946 it was £2,990, distributed to 7,487 people, and in the ten years up to 1958 about 5,000 people a year benefited.(8) By will dated 1949 Edwin F. Breaker left a reversionary interest in a house and the residue of his estate to the fund. The fund's income was about £2,500 in 1963.(1)

Pettenger's Charity: by will proved in 1828 William Pettenger is said to have founded a charity for the education of poor children of Hull or Hessle in navigation, at his trustees' discretion.(3)

Rank Benevolent Fund: in 1934 Joseph Rank settled £150,000 stock on trustees for grants to local charities and for pensions to poor people in, and within two miles of, Hull. The maximum pension payable was raised in 1946 from 15s. to £1 6s. a week. In 1962 £700 was paid to charities and £26,032 to 1,424 pensioners. The total income in 1963 was £29,800.(1) Up to 1960 a total of £370,000 had been paid out.(8)

Sir James Reckitt Charity: Sir James Reckitt in 1921 provided £33,333 stock to endow a charity whose main object was to carry on subscriptions which the founder had made during his lifetime. Additional endowments have included £2,560 stock devised by Dame Kathleen Reckitt in 1923.(1) The total income is now £25,000 and in 1965 subscriptions amounting to over £15,000 were made for a variety of religious, medical, educational, and social objects; over £5,800 of this went to the Society of Friends (ex inf. S. H. Priestman, Secy. 1965).

Townend's Charity: by will proved in 1956 Ethel Townend left all her real and the residue of her personal estates for poor and needy professional people and their widows. In 1961–2 the charity had £102,654 stock and a net income of £2,583. Grants totalling £2,676 were made in 1962–3.(1)

Trinity House Charities: in addition to supporting almshouses (see pp. 345–6), Trinity House has long provided both regular pensions and temporary relief for its members and others connected with the sea. Out-relief probably began to be given in the late 15th century, and from the first the rates were highly variable (see p. 403).

The House's chief source of revenue, from 1456 until 1872, was primage, a duty collected from the masters of ships (see p. 398); this averaged nearly £3,400 a year in 1813–22. Outstanding among its property was the site of the Carmelite Friary in Hull, acquired in 1621; this produced nearly £1,900 a year in 1813–22. Other rents and an annuity brought in another £600 a year. In 1823 this income supported a marine school (see p. 369), as well as 99 rooms in the almshouses, and out-relief; there were then 510 out-pensioners, each receiving from 2s. to £2 10s. a week and an extra payment in winter —a total of £1,184 a year; temporary relief amounted to £298.(6) In 1876, when assets included nearly £73,000 stock, the total income was over £12,000 a year, of which £11,500 was spent on almshouses and out-relief. In 1874 there were 696 outpensioners.(1)

By 1935–6 the income was £32,000, of which £5,100 was spent on the almshouses and £6,600 on out-pensions; the latter were still highly variable. In 1958 461 people received out-pensions, some getting £1 5s. to £1 10s. a week, others £4 to £6 a quarter, with various extra allowances. By 1961 the total income was £62,000: £50,200 from rent and the rest interest on over £232,000 stock. Of this income £6,300 was spent on the almshouses and £11,900 on out-pensions.(1)

Dr. Watson's Charity: in 1711 Thomas Watson, Bishop of St. David's, gave the rectory of Brandesburton to St. John's College, Cambridge, reserving the advowson to the Corporation of Hull in certain circumstances. In 1908 the corporation was authorized to sell this and two Cambridgeshire advowsons to the college for not less than £250. The money was to be invested and the income used for outfits or exhibitions, at a school or institute, for poor boys of Hull. The annual income in 1950–2 was £9 interest on £245 stock; none of it was spent.(1)

Watson's Charity: by will proved in 1938 Arthur Watson left about £2,500 to found a travel scholarship for young men and women of Hull with only an elementary-school education.(1) The charity came under the control of Hull Corporation in 1961, and between then and 1966 6 scholarships were granted (ex inf. Hull Educ. Dept.).

Wilson-Barkworth Charity: by will proved in 1932 Emily Wilson-Barkworth left £13,000 to provide for the education of the sons of members of the Royal College of Surgeons or of Church of England incumbents in Hull and the East Riding having 'strict evangelical views'. In 1942 such incumbents from any part of England were made eligible.(1, 8)

Nonconformist and Roman Catholic Charities

Chamberlain's Charity: by will dated 1716 Leonard Chamberlain devised property in Hull to enable £2 12s. a year to be distributed in bread to the poor of Bowlalley Lane Presbyterian chapel, and land at Sutton and Stoneferry for £12 a year to be paid to the minister at the chapel (and for another purpose). By 1823 the minister received a further £3 in the place of a defunct beneficiary.(6) By 1908 the charity was enjoyed by Park Street Unitarian church and the minister received £90 a year; bread worth £21 a year was distributed weekly, and £78 a year was used for fortnightly gifts to 20 poor members of the church.(1)

Coulson's Charity: by will proved in 1951 Florence M. Coulson devised to Newland Methodist church, Cottingham Road, a house to be used as a residence for a minister of the Hull North Circuit; and a house for a home for old people, together with £500 for its upkeep. This was named the Mumby Bequest in memory of her aunts.(1)

Fisher's Charity: by will proved in 1930 Richard P. Fisher left £100 to Campbell Street Methodist chapel, the income to be used to maintain his father's grave in the Spring Bank cemetery and for the benefit of the chapel. In 1953 the charity was transferred to Anlaby Road chapel, without any obligation to maintain the grave.(1)

Garbutt's Charity: by will proved in 1916 David P. Garbutt left the residue of his estate to the Hull City Mission, which he had earlier founded. In 1920 the estate's assets were £1,305 stock, £640 in loans, a house in Hull, and 345 a. of land.(1)

Garforth's Trust: by an indenture of 1732 William Garforth gave £400 to be invested in land; twothirds of the income was to be paid to the Presbyterian minister at York and one-third to that minister at Hull (i.e. at Bowlalley Lane). The money was never invested in land, and in 1873 was represented by £259 stock.(1)

Hawson's Charity: by will proved in 1744 William Hawson left £100, the interest to be paid to the minister at Dagger Lane Congregational chapel, and £20, the interest to go to the poor at the chapel. Up to 1816 the income was £5 and £1 respectively and about 10 poor people benefited.(6) By 1874 the endowment had increased to £150. The charity was then transferred to Spring Bank Presbyterian chapel. In 1931, with an endowment of £163, it was transferred to Chanterlands Avenue.(1)

Johnston's Charity: by will proved in 1934 George G. Johnston left £50 to Prince's Avenue Congregational church.(1)

Middleton's Charity: by will proved in 1950 Eliza Middleton founded a charity for grants or pensions to poor Roman Catholic women. In 1962 the total assets were £41,688 and the income £3,335; £3,152 was distributed in grants. In 1956 87 grantees had each received between £5 and £55.(1)

Pease's Charity: by a bond of 1779 Joseph Pease provided £63, the interest to be paid to 2 poor people at Bowlalley Lane Presbyterian chapel. In 1908 the income of £2 was enjoyed by Park Street Unitarian church.(1)

Shaw's Charity: by will proved in 1917 John Shaw left £400 to the Roman Catholic Bishop of Middlesbrough, half of the income to provide bread and coal for the Catholic poor of St. Charles's, Jarratt Street, at Christmas, and half to be paid to the orphanage of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. The net income was £15–£16 a year in 1929–31.(1)

Stratten's Charities: by will proved in 1904 Thomas Stratten left £100 to Prince's Avenue Congregational church and £50 to Cogan Street chapel.(1)

Joseph Wilkinson's Charity: by will proved in 1826 Joseph Wilkinson left £200 for the poor at Bowlalley Lane Presbyterian chapel. In 1908 the income of £4 was enjoyed by Park Street Unitarian church.(1)

William Wilkinson's Charity: by will proved in 1912 William Wilkinson left £500 to maintain Park Street Unitarian church.(1)

Almshouses

Brotherick's Hospital: by will dated 1579 Elizabeth Brotherick left a house in Hull to her son Robert, to pay £1 6s. 8d. a year to the inmates of her almshouse in Posterngate. If he failed to make the payment, the property was to go to the corporation on the same terms.(3) The building contained 12 rooms for poor widows.(12) A woman was placed there by the corporation in 1642,(2) and the hospital is said to have been used until 1659.(12) In that year, alleging that its foundations were unsafe, John Lilly, Henry Lambard, and Thomas Smith demolished it.(2, 12)

Chamberlain's Almshouses: part of Leonard Chamberlain's charities (see p. 338) consisted in 1823 of two almshouses in Sutton, described as built in 1800 and 1804 for 6 and 4 people respectively. They were occupied in 1823 by 10 poor women of Sutton and Stoneferry, with stipends of 3s.–5s. a week.(6) The houses in College Street, bearing the date 1804, had in 1964 recently been modernized and the accommodation reduced from 6 to 4 (local information). The houses in Church Street, also said to have been built in 1804, were replaced in 1954 when 12 new almshouses were built in Chamberlain Street (stone on building).

Charterhouse Hospital: almspeople were probably accommodated in the house, the maison dieu, which was replaced by the Carthusian Priory, founded by Michael de la Pole in 1378. The priory itself housed 13 poor men and 13 poor women. Priory and its hospital were separated in 1383 (see p. 333). Michael de la Pole's charter of 1384 directed that the master was to have a dwelling in or near the hospital and a salary of £10 a year; he was to pay the inmates £2 each a year (8d. a week and the rest in quarterly instalments). The lords of Myton were to have the patronage. The endowments consisted of extensive property in Hull, Cottingham, and Willerby.(6, 7, 13) Much more land, in Hessle, West Ella, Myton, Willerby, Tranby, and North Ferriby, was given in 1408 by Michael and Edmund de la Pole and Robert Bolton (Cal. Pat. 1408–13, 57). On Edmund de la Pole's attainder in 1504 his property passed to the Crown.(7) The manor of Myton, with the patronage of the hospital, was granted in 1514 to Sir William Sydney (L. & P. Hen. VIII, i (2), p. 1211). They were sold back to the Crown in 1538 (ibid. xiv (1), p. 421; xvi, p. 505) and granted to the Corporation of Hull in 1552 (Cal. Pat. 1550–3, 334). At the Dissolution there was accommodation for 16 people.(13) There were, in fact, 10 inmates in 1535, when the income was £33,(7) and 12 in 1547, when it was £46 (Sur. Soc. 92, pp. 338–9).

A separate residence for the master was built in 1554, and in 1558 a master was appointed on condition that he assisted with services at Holy Trinity Church; thereafter the office was long held by the lecturer at or the vicar of the church. Abuses by the master led to new regulations, drawn up in 1571 by the corporation at the Archbishop of York's direction. Since the income had never been enough to provide for the 26 inmates originally intended, the number was now formally fixed at 12 (6 of each sex), with the original stipends; and an additional £3 6s. 8d. was to be paid to the master whenever income permitted. These provisions were being observed in 1581. The income was still only £45 in 1599 but by 1625 it was £119; the stipends, after several increases, were then 1s. 2d., and in 1625–6 6 new rooms for women were built, carrying stipends of 1s. The inmates, then 19, sought shelter in the town during the sieges of 1642–3 and the hospital was demolished by the garrison in 1643. A house in Whitefriargate was used until the hospital was rebuilt, on the old site, in 1649–50.(2, 7)

In 1653 there were 11 women in the hospital, 6 getting 1s. 2d. a week and 5 1s., and 6 men, all getting 1s. 2d.; one out-pensioner got 1s. a week. Four out-pensioners were added in 1654 and stipends were ordered to be increased from 1s. 2d. to 1s. 4d. in 1657. The master's salary was increased to £20 in 1661, and in 1663 a new building was erected on the north side of Charterhouse Lane (the old buildings were on the south side). There were 31 inmates (only 2 of them men) in 1666, 10 getting 1s. 4d. a week, 20 1s. 2d., and one 1s. A new chapel was built in 1673 to replace that demolished in 1643, but it was still being furnished in 1677. By 1681 the income had reached £182 and in 1694 all inmates were ordered to have 1s. 4d. a week. Equality in numbers of men and women was ordered in 1696, but in 1711 there were a man and 10 women in 'the old house' and 2 men and 18 women in 'the new house'. In 1713 the income was £237 and in 1752 £422. The master's allowance for collecting the rents had been increased in 1746 from £2 to £5 5s. (2, 7) (For illustrations of the buildings in 1724 see Cook, Hist. God's House, Hull, between pp. 192 and 193).

In the course of a dispute with the corporation, beginning in 1752, the master took over the administration of the hospital and increased his salary to £60 and the inmates' stipends, by stages, to 2s. 6d. In 1755 the corporation took the dispute into Chancery where it was decided, in 1760, that the corporation had no visitorial right in the hospital and that the grant of 1552 involved only the patronage. By a Chancery Scheme of 1764 the master was to have a salary of £100, with £1 for his water supply, and the stipends of 15 men and 15 women were to be 3s. The income in 1775 was £680 and stipends were increased by 6d. in 1777. The hospital was rebuilt, with 44 rooms, in 1778–80: this was later called 'the Old House'. After a decrease in some of the stipends they were all increased again to 3s. 6d. in 1792. In 1789 it had again been necessary to order equal numbers of men and women. About 1800 the income was £1,173 and 42 inmates were receiving 4s. a week. Allowances were given to 14 outpensioners in 1803 and 'the Back House' was built for them in 1804. In 1805 the 57 inmates were given 5s. a week, and in 1813 the master's salary was increased to £200. In 1823 when the income was £1,397 (apart from quarry rent which averaged £100), stipends were 6s. A new block, of 12 rooms, called 'Dyke's Buildings' was built in 1844.(1, 2, 6, 7)

The income in 1850 was £2,431. Property adjoining the hospital was bought to provide additional accommodation in 1855, and 12 more rooms were completed in 1867 ('Bromby's Rooms') on land bought near by. A Scheme of 1872 increased the master's salary to £300 and provided that 4 rooms in the recently-built 'Widows' House' should be reserved for the widows of brethren dying in the hospital. In 1882 the income was £3,680 (apart from the sale of chalk from the Hessle quarry), comprising £2,486 rents and interest on £30,313 stock; 82 inmates received 7s. a week. A block of 14 rooms ('Dibb's Buildings') was built in 1888, bringing the total accommodation to 100. (1, 7)

The master's salary was reduced to £250 in 1901, with allowances of £15 for light and fuel and £20 for taking services in the chapel. It was raised to £300 again in 1922, and the respective allowances to £30 in 1941 and £36 in 1922; a £5 allowance for the garden was granted in 1930. The stipends were ordered in 1937 to be between 5s. and 8s. for single people and between 8s. and £1 3s. for couples. During air raids in 1941 the master's house was partly destroyed and the rest of the hospital damaged. There were then 120 inmates. By 1950 the restored buildings accommodated 74 people and in 1960 there were 60: vacancies were being left unfilled to facilitate modernization, which was completed in 1963. In 1966 there was accommodation for 80 (ex inf. Master). The master's salary was increased to £450 in 1951, in view of the loss of his house; this had been restored by 1960, containing rooms for inmates and a flat for the master. The salary was raised to £600 in 1963. The income was £5,056 in 1902, and £8,852 in 1962 when £6,392 came from rents, £1,930 from interest on stock, and £530 from inmates' contributions to the cost of maintaining the hospital. The Charterhouse was then administered by trustees in co-operation with the master, brethren, and sisters.(1)

'The Old House' remains as it was completed in 1780 (fn. 19) (see plate facing p. 471). The design was probably by Joseph Hargrave (Hadley, Hist. Hull, plate signed by Hargrave as architect). It is a twostoried structure of red brick with a hipped slate roof and a modillion cornice. The central range of seven bays is flanked by two projecting wings which enclose a rectangular forecourt. The three central bays of the main block are set forward and surmounted by a pediment with the Pole arms in the tympanum. A semicircular domed porch supported on Roman Doric columns projects in front of the central entrance. On the roof is a circular cupola consisting of eight Ionic columns supporting an entablature and crowned with a dome. Internally the main block and the side wings have central corridors flanked by rows of small rooms both on the ground and first floors; the two stone staircases are placed at the junctions of the central and side corridors. The chapel occupies the middle of the north side of the building and projects from its north wall. The interior retains its original oak fittings and survives almost unaltered. It is lit by a tall roundheaded window in each of the east and west walls and by a central dome in the roof. There is a dentil cornice and the enriched plaster ceiling is divided into three panels by raised bands of guilloche ornament. The stone slabs paving the floor have small squares of slate at their intersections. At the east end of the chapel the altar, raised on three steps, is enclosed by original rails with heavy turned balusters. Five rows of box-pews are stepped up against the west wall and there are similar pews on the south side flanking the central entrance from the corridor. This entrance has a carved doorcase and a segmental pediment. In the middle of the north wall is an enclosed area with a panelled front, curved in the centre; spacious pews for the master and officers occupy the two sides of the area while in the middle a fine semicircular pulpit, the most striking feature of the chapel, projects from the north wall. It is surmounted by a sounding-board and supported on a bracket some distance from the ground. Access to it is from a door at the rear leading to the vestry. The drum of the pulpit and the frieze behind it are elaborately carved with swags of drapery and other ornament. A general restoration of the whole fabric of 'The Old House' was carried out after minor war damage.

The master's house, on the opposite side of Charterhouse Lane, is on the same central axis as the main building, its two-storied symmetrical front being set back behind a forecourt and flanked by quadrant-shaped screen walls. The front dates from the rebuilding of c. 1780 and is of five bays with a central pedimented doorcase. The house was partially destroyed by bombing during the Second World War and was restored in 1954–6, under the direction of Horth & Andrews, architects. The west wing, which was of late-17th-century date and had a curvilinear west gable, was rebuilt in its original form.

Crockhay's Hospital: the origin of this almshouse in Vicar Lane is unknown. It was ordered by the corporation to be repaired in 1645 and to be used as a house of correction in 1646.(2) There is no evidence that it was actually put to this use, and it is said to have accommodated soldiers in 1647.(12) It was let to a tenant before 1655 when the corporation granted a fresh lease.(2) No more is known of it.

Crowle's Hospital: George Crowle is said to have founded this hospital in Sewer Lane in 1661, when he was mayor.(12) By his will, dated 1682, he gave it to the corporation, and a house was devised to his son to provide £8 a year for its upkeep.(3, 6) In 1750 William Crowle, the son, gave further property from which 4d. a week might be paid to each of the 12 inmates, on condition that the Corporation of the Poor paid another 6d. to each.(6) The stipends were 1s. 6d. in 1799 and 2s. 6d. in 1801.(3) In 1821 Daniel Wilson, a representative of the Crowle family, gave £100 to the hospital; this had been invested in £103 stock by 1823, when £28 rents were received from the charity properties.(6) Accommodation for 2 more inmates was provided in 1830.(2) This was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887. The old building was sold by the Charity Trustees in 1902(9) and later demolished.

Ellis's Hospital: at his death in 1683, Joseph Ellis, then mayor, left to the corporation almshouses for 4 poor widows, standing in Salthouse Lane. In 1694 his widow gave £60 to provide fuel for the inmates.(2)

It has been suggested that these almshouses were those which 'lately stood' on ground in Salthouse Lane in 1808,(3) and that the name was transferred to the building belonging to Ratcliffe's foundation (q.v.).(14) In 1823 the Charity Commissioners were uncertain which hospital had survived; fuel was then supplied by the corporation to the 4 inmates.(6) In 1825 the corporation decided to pay weekly stipends of 2s. to the inmates of 'Ellis's Hospital' and in 1829 the hospital was rebuilt(2) with the name Ellis above the door.(14) This was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887. The old building was sold by the Charity Trustees in 1894(9) and later demolished. There is a drawing of it by Kitching.(10)

Ferens Havens of Rest: Thomas R. Ferens, by an indenture of 1912, granted the site of 12 almshouses, which he was building, to the corporation. He undertook to provide £2,000 stock for the upkeep of the houses, and the stipends were to be 9s. a week for a single person, 13s. for a couple.(1) The first 12 almshouses, on Holderness Road, bear the date 1911; 8 more were built near by in 1956. In addition, 12 flats were built in Staveley Road and 12 in Barham Road in 1953 (dates on buildings). In 1964 the income was £3,800.(1)

Ferens Home of Rest: By will proved in 1930 Ferens also left his private residence, Holderness House in Holderness Road, for a Home of Rest for 10 or more poor gentlewomen. He left as an endowment £50,000, the income from which was to be applied, in that order, to maintaining the property, paying rates, taxes, and wages, purchasing food, and, at the trustees' discretion, providing stipends for residents. Any balance, together with a ninth of the residue of his estate, was to be used to provide additional accommodation for both men and women, on land previously purchased by Ferens. In 1961–2 the income was about £10,300, and expenditure amounted to £7,939.(1) In 1966 there was accommodation for 19 women.

Finn Homes of Rest: by will proved in 1940 Frank P. Finn left the residue of his estate to be used for educational or other charitable institutions in Hull or the East Riding at his trustees' discretion; the uses might include the foundation of homes of rest for poor people of whom at least two-thirds were to be Roman Catholics. In 1951 the trustees vested £29,000 stock in the corporation; 12 houses were eventually built in Boulton Grove in 1955. In 1962 the total assets were £77,163, of which £35,643 was expended; the net income was £2,424. In 1961 £28,135 had been spent on the homes of rest and £6,858 on Roman Catholic schools and churches. In 1963 the income was about £380.(1)

Gee's Hospital: in 1595 William Gee was said to have spent £1,000 on the hospital and its inmates (Cal. S.P. Dom. 1595–7, 49–50). By will proved in 1603 he gave the hospital, together with other property in Chapel Lane yielding rents of £9, to the corporation; each of the 10 poor women there was to receive 4d. a week.(5) In 1604 his son William conveyed the property to trustees to make the payments.(2, 11) The stipends were 1s. 8d. in 1796 and 2s. in 1803.(3) The income in 1823 was £55.(6) This was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887. The old building was sold by the Charity Trustees the same year.(9) There is a drawing of it by Kitching.(10)

Gregg's Hospital: by will proved in 1438 Joan Gregg devised the reversion of certain property to the town council, from which £5 4s. a year was to be paid to the 13 inmates of the almshouse which she had built in Aldkirk Lane (i.e. Posterngate).(5) (There is no evidence that it was founded by John Gregg in 1415–16, as in Tickell, Hist. Hull, 756.) In 1445 William Saunderson, a feoffee in the property, conveyed it together with the almshouse to the corporation, and it was agreed that £3 0s. 8d. a year should be paid to the inmates.(4, 5) In 1596 George Davie conveyed a house to the corporation for the benefit of the hospital.(11) The number of inmates varied from 11 to 13. In 1724 the old building, with 11 rooms, was replaced by a new one, with twelve.(3, 4) The stipends were augmented in 1779 when John Buttery gave £346, so that Gregg's almspeople might receive from it 2d. each a week and the inmates of Bishop Watson's Hospital 4d.(2, 4) They were again increased in 1799, from 1s. 4d. to 2s. a week.(3) This was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887. There is a drawing of the old building by Kitching(10) and the shell of it still stood in 1965.

Harrison's and Fox's Hospital: by will proved in 1550 John Harrison devised property, including his almshouse in Chapel Lane, to his wife, and after her death to the corporation; 1s. 4d. a week was to be divided among the 10 inmates.(2) His widow released the property to the corporation in 1552.(11) A maison dieu in this position, next to St. Mary's Church, existed in 1518.(2) The hospital was rebuilt on the same site in 1723.(2) In 1795 Margaret Fox was authorized to build accommodation for 4 more poor women at the hospital; she paid £400 to the corporation, the interest of £20 a year to go to her for life and then to the inmates.(3) In 1823 all 14 inmates received weekly stipends of 2s. This was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887. The old building was sold by the Charity Trustees in 1898 (9) and later demolished. There is a drawing of it by Kitching.(10)

Hart Rest Homes: trusts declared in the will of Herbert W. Hart were regulated by a Scheme of 1952. Land formerly belonging to Hart, in Atwick Road, Hornsea, was to be used as the site of the homes and his residuary estate was to support them. The inmates were to be chosen from Hull or East Riding business people, from the middle classes but of straitened means.(1) The homes, for about 16 people, were opened in 1958.(8) The income in 1963 was £1,473.(1)

Hudson Memorial Homes: in 1947 £3,000 was given by several fishing companies to provide homes, in memory of Thomas Hudson, preferably for poor people connected with the fishing industry.(1) Three bungalows were built in 1954 in Coltman Street (stone on building).

Charles Jacobs Homes: by will proved in 1920 Charles M. Jacobs left £25,000 to be used for almshouses, for poor people of whom at least one-third were to be Jews. The bequest was to take effect after his wife's death; this occurred in 1929, and 5 houses had been built behind Askew Avenue by 1931. The weekly stipends were fixed at £1.(1) Four more houses were added in 1936 (date on building). In 1963 the income was £900. By will proved in 1948 Louise R. Jacobs left £5,000 for additional houses to be built on the site in memory of her parents, Benjamin and Isabel Jacobs.(1) Six were built in 1949.(8)

Esther Jacobs Homes: by will proved in 1956 Alfred K. Jacobs left the residue of his estate for a house for old Jews; it was to be named after his mother, Esther Jacobs. The bequest was to take effect 21 years after his death or that of his housekeeper, Alice Linford.(1, 8)

Lee's Rest Houses: by will proved in 1912 Charles A. Lee left the residue of his estate to build rest houses; 15 blocks, each containing 8 flats, were opened in 1915 in Anlaby Road. The maximum stipends paid were fixed in 1916 at 105. a week for a single person and 12s. 6d. for a couple; they were increased in 1920, 1926, 1931, and 1945, on the last occasion to £1 4s. and £1 18s. 6d. respectively. The total assets were £109,301 (book value) at the start of the trust, and £198,032 in 1962 when the income was £8,539.(1)

Linsley Almshouses: by will proved in 1937 John T. Linsley provided for almshouses, preferably for poor people connected with T. Linsley & Co. Ltd., to be built after the death of his son. This occurred in 1947, and 14 houses were subsequently built in Rosedale Grove. The original assets amounted to £88,407, and in 1961 the income was £2,062.(1)

Lister's Hospital: by will dated 1640 Sir John Lister devised property in the churchyard of Holy Trinity, together with £200, with instructions for almshouses for 6 poor men and 6 poor women to be built on the site; a house for the 'assistant preacher', or lecturer, of Holy Trinity was also to be provided, and he was to serve as curate at the hospital. Eight of the rooms were to be disposed of by the corporation, 4 by Lister's heirs. In addition Lister devised property at Thorngumbald and Paull, together with £400, for payments to the preacher and the inmates.(6) The hospital was built in 1642. (2) Lister's wife (d. 1656) left £20 to the hospital. (12)

The income was £30 a year in 1666 when stipends of 9d. a week were paid to the inmates.(2) The stipends were 1s. in 1713(3) and were steadily increased thereafter.(9) The total income was £350 in 1823, comprising £290 rents and £60 interest on £1,629 stock. Stipends were then 7s. (6) The hospital and preacher's house had been rebuilt on the same site in South Church Side in 1779.(9) The preacher's emoluments were at different times in dispute between the vicar, lecturer, and curate of the church. (2, 11, 12)

In 1869 the hospital was conveyed to Edwin Davis, the owner of some adjoining property; he agreed to build a new hospital of 24 rooms, together with a preacher's house. The new almshouses, in Park Street, were finished that year, and Davis also paid £957 as the excess value of the old hospital,(9) which was later demolished. There is a drawing of the old building by Kitching;(10) its plaque is now in the Wilberforce House museum. Lister's was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887; the Park Street building became Alderman Cogan's School in 1889. The main reason for the consolidation was a big increase in the income of Lister's Hospital following the sale of land to the Hull, Barnsley, and West Riding Junction Railway Co., in or soon after 1883.(9)

Municipal Hospitals: in 1887 Crowle's, Ellis's, Gee's, Gregg's, Harrison's and Fox's, Lister's, Watson's, and Weaver's Hospitals were consolidated as the Municipal Hospitals. New almshouses were completed that year in Northumberland Avenue, costing £15,000. There were to be 114 inmates taking their names from the old hospitals; 6 of the Watson's almspeople were still to be supported by Trinity House. A house for a preacher at Holy Trinity was also built, in accordance with Sir John Lister's will. The weekly stipends were fixed at 7s.–10s. for Lister's almspeople and 5s.–7s. 6d. for the rest. The income in 1889 comprised £456 rent, £131 interest on £7,434 stock, and £1,000 from the corporation. After 1896 the preacher's house was not so occupied but let for £18 a year; in 1913 it was used to accommodate 4 additional almspeople.

By a Scheme of 1913 out-pensions of 5s. to 7s. 6d. a week were also to be paid from the funds. The income was then £299 rent, £1,312 interest on £35,326 stock, and £1,000 from the corporation. In 1935 the total income was £3,495. The stipends were increased in 1918 and again in 1945 when Lister's almspeople were to receive 7s. to £1 3s. 6d. for a single person and 10s. to £1 16s. 6d. for a couple, and the rest the same except that the minimum for a single person was 5s.

In 1955 the funds of Toft's Charity (q.v.) were authorized to be used to improve the municipal almshouses and convert them from 118 single rooms into 68 sets of rooms, with more staff accommodation. Toft's almspeople took their places with the rest. The assets then included £48,748 stock. In 1963 the net income from all sources was £5,387.(1, 9)

Pexton's Almshouses: in 1865 William Pexton settled 4 houses in trust for this purpose, together with £2,000 stock; the weekly stipends were to be 5s. By will proved in 1903 Elizabeth Pexton bequeathed £100 to the almshouses. The houses, in Mariners' Court, Sykes Street, were sold to the corporation in 1934 and the benefits transferred to 4 pensioners, each to receive between 5s. and 10s. a week. The assets were £3,115 in 1935, and in 1961 the income was £116.(1)

Pickering Homes: in 1909 Christopher Pickering conveyed to the corporation a site for 12 almshouses, and in 1913 a site for 8 more; by will proved in 1921 he provided for 4 more houses. All stand in Hessle Road and were provided preferably for poor people connected with the fishing industry, or secondly for retail tradesmen. The total assets were £11,693 in 1915–16, and £25,538 in 1962 when the income was £840. The Hull Fishing Vessel Owners' Association contributed £360 a year from 1955 to 1961.(1)

Ratcliffe's Hospital: by will dated 1572 Robert Ratcliffe left 2 houses in Salthouse Lane, to be used as almshouses after his wife's death; he devised part of a beast-gate in Drypool to provide fuel for the inmates, and the mayor was to administer the hospital. In 1597, after the widow's death, the houses were repaired and let by the mayor for £2 6s. 8d. a year.(2) Rents were still being received in 1647(3) but the houses were apparently later used as the donor intended.

It has been suggested that these almshouses were given the name of Ellis's Hospital (q.v.) in the early 19th century.

Sir James Reckitt Village Haven: Sir James Reckitt in 1924 provided an endowment of £13,000 to provide almshouses, preferably for poor people connected with Reckitt & Sons, Ltd. (ex inf. S. H. Priestman, Secy., Sir James Reckitt Charity, 1965). Twelve houses were built in Garden Village Road. In 1952–3 the income was £238, and a further £200 was provided from the Sir James Reckitt Charity.(1)

Juliette Reckitt Haven of Rest: Juliette Reckitt subscribed in 1911 for shares in Reckitt & Sons, Ltd. nominally worth £1,000, to provide almshouses, preferably for poor people connected with the company. Eight houses were built in Laburnum Avenue.(1)

Frederic Reckitt Homes of Rest: Frederic Isaac Reckitt provided £2,000 stock in 1912 for almshouses for Hull residents or for poor people connected with the Reckitt family or company; the stipends were to be 5s. a week. Twelve houses were built in Laburnum Avenue.(1)

Riplingham's Hospital: John Riplingham is said to have founded an almshouse for 20 poor people in Vicar Lane, probably in 1518; he endowed it and a chantry in Holy Trinity Church with property in Hull and elsewhere.(13) Women were still being placed there by the corporation in 1646 and 1647, and in the latter year it was ordered to be viewed for repair.(2) No more is known of it.

Scott's Almshouses ('the Non-educational Charity of Eleanor Scott'): by will dated 1713 and codicil dated 1717 Eleanor Scott devised a house and 37 a. of land in Southcoates to the poor there. The income in 1743 was £15 15s. (Y.A.S. Rec. Ser. 71, 176–7). The rents, amounting to £100 in 1823, were applied with the poor-rate, and some extraordinary relief was also given.(6) A charity school was established in 1856 (see p. 368) and the residue of the income was assigned to the sick and the poor. The title of 'the Non-educational Charity' was assumed in 1907, when authority was given for 4 almshouses to be built; the stipends were to be 5s. to 10s. a week for a single person and 7s. 6d. to 12s. for a couple; other payments might be made to the poor generally. The assets were then the farm-house and land, £6,635 stock, and £2,794 cash; the total income was £406. Part of the land was sold in 1933 and 3 more almshouses built in Southcoates Lane in 1934. The sale of the remaining land was authorized in 1957. In 1963 the income was £420.(1)

Toft's Charity: by a deed of 1851 Mary Toft conveyed to trustees a house in Dock Street; in 1874 the 5 tenants paid rents totalling £16–£17 a year. She also gave £800 to the trustees in 1855 and £50 in 1863, which sums were invested. A Chancery Scheme of 1879 ordered that the house should be let to poor people, the rents to be at the trustees' discretion; the charity then had £2,129 stock. A Scheme of 1898 designated the building an almshouse, with 6 almswomen whose stipends should be 5s. to 8s. a week; the income was then £122 from £4,435 stock.

The house was damaged by bombing in 1941 and in 1955 the sale of the site was authorized, the charity funds to be used for the former Municipal Hospitals; the assets then included £5,285 stock.(1)

Trinity House Rest Homes: in 1940 and 1951 respectively, Trinity House completed 24 and 32 new flats in Anlaby Road to replace its existing, scattered buildings. Only 2 almshouse flats remained in Trinity House Lane. In 1958 the inmates received weekly stipends varying from 10s. to £1 a week. In 1937 the occupants of the various almshouses then still in use had received from 8s. 6d. to 18s. 6d. each. In 1887 they had received 6s. to 15s.(1) The House had at various times administered nine sets of almshouses (see below); further details concerning them will be found elsewhere (see pp. 398 sqq.). Since 1721 the House has also been responsible for 6 rooms in Bishop Watson's Hospital (see p. 346).

Trinity Almshouse was founded in 1457 for 13 poor brethren or dependants. It was rebuilt in 1753, with accommodation for 32 inmates, with its main front in Trinity House Lane (see plate facing p. oo). In 1823 there were 34 rooms and stipends were 7s. a week.(6) Additional almshouses in Posterngate were built in 1828, and these remained in use until replaced by the Rest Homes in 1951 (A. S. Harvey, Trin. Ho. of Hull, 26). The Posterngate building was damaged by bombing in 1941; in 1965 it was used as offices and was known as Carmelite House.

Ferries's Hospital was founded by Thomas Ferries, possibly in 1625 (Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 592). It was near Trinity House, probably in Trinity House Lane. Its management was subsequently entrusted to the House, perhaps at Ferries's death in 1631, when there were 10 inmates. It appears to have been known thereafter as the 'New Hospital'. The hospital was rebuilt in 1822 (date on building) in what is now Prince's Dock Street. In 1823 there were 21 rooms and stipends were 4s. 6d. to 10s. a week.(6) It was replaced by the Mariners' Almshouses in Carr Lane, and in 1965 the building was used as offices.

Robinson's Almshouse was founded in 1682(10) by William Robinson; in 1697 it was granted to Trinity House, and then housed 6 seamen's widows. In 1769 it was rebuilt, still housing 6 inmates.(1) The site was near the town walls, behind Posterngate, in what is now Prince's Dock Street. In 1823 the stipends were 10s. 6d. a week.(6) The House was authorized to move the inmates to 6 vacant rooms in the Mariners' Almshouses in Carr Lane in 1873.(1) The old building was later demolished; there is a drawing of it by Kitching.(10)

The Merchant Seamen's Hospital was built by the House behind Whitefriargate in 1781. There were 22 rooms in 1823 and stipends were 4s. 6d. to 7s. a week.(6) It was replaced by the Mariners' Almshouses in Carr Lane and is said to have been demolished in 1862; there is a drawing of it by Kitching.(10)

The Marine Hospital was built by the House in Trinity House Lane in 1786. In 1823 there were 9 rooms, with stipends of 4s. 6d. to 7s. a week.(6) It was replaced by the Mariners' Almshouses in Carr Lane and the building was later demolished; there is a drawing of it by Kitching.(10)

The Master Mariners' Almshouse was built by the House in Carr Lane in 1834 (see plate facing p. 387).(2) There were 44 inmates in 1937; it was replaced by the Rest Homes and destroyed by bombing in 1941.(1) There is a drawing of the building by Kitching.(10)

The Victoria Almshouse accommodated 12 inmates in the gateway to the House in Prince's Dock Street, built in 1842 (date on building). It was presumably replaced by the Mariners' Almshouses in Carr Lane, and in 1965 was used as offices.

The Mariners' Almshouses were built by the House in Carr Lane at various dates—in 1837, 1848, and 1857 (Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 597; 1; 10). There were 48 inmates in 1937; the houses were replaced by the Rest Homes and destroyed by bombing in 1941.(1) There is a drawing of them by Kitching.(10)

Kingston [Almshouse, in Beverley Road, was converted by the House from Kingston College (see p. 365) in 1851. There were 90 inmates in 1937; it was partly destroyed by bombing in 1941(1) and ceased to be used as an almshouse in 1950 (Harvey, loc. cit.). In 1965 the remaining part of the building was used by the corporation as a clinic.

Ann Watson's Hospital: by will dated 1720 Ann Watson devised property in Stoneferry, including the White House, to be a college or home for 4 widows or daughters of clergymen. The building was replaced in 1762 by new almshouses for 10 people. Relatives of the founder were admitted until 1817, but a Chancery decree had been made in 1801 in favour of her intended beneficiaries and new almshouses for 8 people were built in College Street, Sutton, in 1816. The inmates' stipend was £13 a year in the old almshouses but £25 in the new. Three of the 4 remaining 'relatives' were still at the old houses in 1823. The income was £423 in 1823, arising from 218 a. of land and £2,200 stock.(6) In 1889 it was £993 and stipends were then fixed at £25–£35.(1) In 1924–5 the income was £1,450, and stipends of £25 were still being paid in 1936 (papers in Hull Pub. Libr.).

Bishop Watson's Hospital: a ruinous almshouse (perhaps Ravenser's and Selby's Hospital, see p. 335) on North Church Side was rebuilt in the early 18th century as Watson's Hospital. In 1707 the corporation stated that Canon Row, as the houses were known, had always been used for the poor, though there was no fund for repairs. Subscriptions were invited towards its rebuilding.(2) The work was completed by 1708 and the cost met by Thomas Watson, Bishop of St. David's.(2, 3, 4) The building accommodated 10 men and 10 women, and 6 of those places were reserved to be disposed of by Watson and his trustees.(6)

After Watson's death the corporation asked William Watson to endow the hospital, as his brother had intended to do.(4) By will dated 1721 William gave £300 to Trinity House to maintain the inmates of the 6 reserved rooms.(6) In 1779 John Buttery gave £346 so that payments of 4d. a week might be made to each of the other 14 inmates, and 2d. to those in Gregg's Hospital.(4) In 1823 the 14 received 2s. each a week from the corporation and the 6 got 4s. 6d. each from Trinity House.

This was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887. The old building was in 1898 let by the Charity Trustees to the corporation and became part of the market-hall site.(1) There is a drawing of it by Kitching.(10)

Weaver's Hospital: when first mentioned in 1693 the hospital is said to have been founded by a weaver, Peter Simpson.(2) In 1775 John Buttery assigned mortgages totalling £410 to the corporation in trust to pay weekly stipends of 1s. 4d. and to maintain the hospital.(4, 6) In 1796–1802 the 6 poor women received 2s.(3) and in 1823 2s. 6d.; the income in 1823 included £8 rent for part of the hospital yard.(6)

This was one of the Municipal Hospitals, consolidated in 1887. The old building, in Dagger Lane, was sold by the Charity Trustees in 1888(9) and later demolished.

Charities for the Corporation of the Poor

Bell Fund: in 1822 William Bell deposited £160 with trustees, apparently for the use of the Corporation of the Poor. In 1930, when it consisted of £169 stock, the fund was directed to be for the benefit of children in Hull workhouse or receiving treatment at any poor-law infirmary in the city. In 1961 it was ordered to be used for poor children receiving medical treatment. The income in 1964 was £22.(1)

Chamberlain's Charity: by will dated 1716 Leonard Chamberlain left £100 to the Corporation of the Poor.(6)

Duncalf's Benefaction: by will dated 1713 Edmund Duncalf devised to the Corporation of the Poor property to provide £3 a year for a clergyman to give religious instruction at Charity Hall. In 1823 the rent was £20; the payment had been increased to £10 and then went to the 'reader' at Holy Trinity.(6)

Ellis's, Mould's, and Perrott's Benefactions: in 1707 land in Preston was bought with £70 given to the Corporation of the Poor by George Ellis, William Mould, and Lady Perrott. In 1823 it yielded £13 rent. In 1711 land in Southcoates was bought largely with £50 given to that Corporation by George Ellis. In 1823 it yielded £23 rent.(6)

Lindall's Gift: by will dated 1781 Hannah Lindall left £400 to the Corporation of the Poor, to help poor people who neither received poor relief nor lived in Charity Hall. The money was put out at interest but in 1823 no separate account was kept.(6) When the alleged misappropriation of the income was investigated in 1879 it was found that payments had been made to the poor only in 1784–8, and for 10 months in 1832. After that various workhouse expenses were met from the fund.(3) Payments were presumably resumed after this inquiry. In 1930 the charity had £400 stock and in 1964 its income was £33. It was ordered in 1930 that outpayments should be made for goods or for temporary financial assistance.(1)

Robson's Benefaction: by will dated 1714 Ebenezer Robson devised a house in Hull, after the death of his widow, for the poor in Charity Hall; he gave also £40 and the residue of his estate.(3) The house produced £4 rent in 1823.(6)

Wallis's Benefaction: by will dated 1718 Tower Wallis devised a house to the Corporation of the Poor. In 1823 the rent was £15.(6)

Watson's Benefaction: by will dated 1720 Ann Watson devised property to provide £1 a year for Charity Hall.(6)

Lost or Merged Charities

Clare Baumbrough, by will dated 1684, devised a house to her daughter-in-law, and after her death to the corporation for the benefit of poor widows in the town, and two-thirds of another house to the corporation for the same purpose. The corporation was receiving rents from this property in 1708.(3)

Brian Bayles, by will of 1579, bequeathed £66 13s. 4d. to the corporation for £6 13s. 4d. a year to be given to the poor. That sum was available for distribution in 1595.(2)

James Chapman, by will proved in 1583, devised a house in Finkle Street to the corporation which was to allow a poor person to live there rent-free, and a stable to Alexander Chapman to pay 3s. 4d. a year to the poor person.(5) In 1602 it was agreed that this should be paid to the corporation for disbursement.(2)

John Dalton, at unknown date, bequeathed £5 to the corporation for the poor. In 1619 it was placed with the poor's money in the mayor's keeping, to be laid out with it.(2)

Thomas Ferries, by will dated 1630, gave £200 to the corporation for a stock to set the poor at Charity Hall to work. No account of the receipt or application of the money could be found in 1823.(6)

Robert Gayton, by will dated 1589, directed that £1 3s. 4d. a year from a house in Hull should be distributed to the poor in coals.(2) In 1635 William Foxley granted the house to the corporation, which agreed to make the distribution.(3)

William Gee, by will proved in 1603, left, amongst other gifts (see almshouses and parish charities), £150 to his executors, to provide £6 13s. 4d. a year for the poor, £160 to the corporation, to be used to make an annual provision of corn for the poor, and £20 as a 'remembrance' to the corporation.(5) The £160 was being let out in 1614 and 1616, and probably also in 1622.(2) No more is known of any of these bequests.

John Gregory, by will proved in 1596, devised to the corporation a house to support an annual payment of £3 to the poor.(5) In 1616 it was decided to distribute it ward by ward successively.(2)

Michael Haddlesey, by will of 1620, bequeathed £6 13s. 4d. to the corporation, to be lent out and the interest given to the poor.(2)

Henry Moxon in 1622 gave the corporation £30 in respect of £4 a year which his wife had left to the town. It was to be lent out for the use of the poor.(2)

Eleanor Perrott, by will dated 1566, devised the reversion of a house to the corporation, the income to be paid to the poor.(3) The will was recorded by the corporation in 1613.(2)

Steven Peterson, by will dated 1589, bequeathed a house in Hull to his wife, and after her death to his niece who was to pay 8s. a year to the poor and 2s. for highway repairs. After the niece's death the house was to pass to the corporation which was to pay 10s. to the poor.(2)

Widow Prattie, at unknown date, left money to the corporation; it was out on loan in 1615.(2)

Christopher Scales, by will proved in 1557, devised his house in Hull, after his wife's death, to the corporation, the rent to be annually distributed to the poor. In 1595 £6 10s. was available for distribution.(2)

Sir Edward Stanhope, at unknown date, bequeathed £200 to the corporation for the benefit of the poor. In 1609 it was decided to lend it out at interest, and it was out on loan in 1613 and 1615.(2)

Thomas Thackray, by codicil to his will of 1630, bequeathed to the corporation £100, to be lent to young merchants or poor artificers and the interest given to the poor.(2)

William Walthall, by will proved in 1608, bequeathed £100 to the corporation, to lend for terms of 5 years to 4 poor young men and to pay the interest to the poor of Hull.(3) The money was out on loan in 1615.(2)

Thomas Williamson (d. 1638) bequeathed to the corporation (a) £50, 2½ years after his death, to be lent to 5 newly-married couples without charge; (b) £50, 3 years after his death, the interest to be used to provide corn and coals for 6 poor widows or widowers; and (c) £13 6s. 8d., 3 years after his death, the interest to be used for the repair of bridges and highways about the town.(3)

An unknown donor, at unknown date, bequeathed 3s. 4d. a year for the poor from a house in the churchyard of Holy Trinity. Robert Genton owned the house in 1577. This may be the house in the churchyard from which the corporation paid 3s. 4d. to the poor in 1595.(2)

Other lost or merged charities included 10s., the rent of a garden, and £3, the rent of a house, both of which were being paid to the poor in 1595. The latter was described as given by award upon an agreement between Thomas Dalton and John Gregory.(2)

A list of 19 allegedly lost charities was compiled in 1833.(14) Thirteen of these have been already mentioned. The others are those of Lawrence Cave (who is said to have given a house and garden), John Lister (£100), Anthony Beddingfield (£50), a Mr. Brickdale (£30), Coniston Wrightson (£50), and William Peck (£13 6s. 8d.). There is no other evidence concerning these 6 charities.

Footnotes

1 This article was written in 1964, with some amendments to 1966.
2 Hull Corp. Rec., B.B. 8, p. 483; T. White, Enquiry into Origin of . . . Charities of Hull (1833), 60–61.
3 Hull Corp. Rec., B.B. 9, p. 302.
4 White, op. cit. 63–64.
5 See p. 439.
6 For a list see Tickell, Hist. Hull, 776–7.
7 Char. Com. files.
8 Harrison's Hospital may perhaps be added to these, together with another near Holy Trinity Church (see Bishop Watson's Hosp.).
9 White, op. cit., and Supplement (1835).
10 Hull Corp. Rec., Box 111, Bdle. 75a.
11 See p. 352.
12 J. Temple, Hull Mun. Chars.: their Hist. and Abuse (1878–82).
13 Rep. on Hull Mun. Chars. by F. Lowe & W. T. Huffam (1878) (copy in Hull Corp. Rec.); 'Charities Inquiry Commission, 1879, shorthand writer's rep.' (2 vols.) (in Hull Corp. Rec.).
14 Bishop Watson's Hosp. was omitted in error and transferred in 1882.
15 Hull Mun. Chars., Rep. up to 1935; Char. Com. files.
16 Cook, Hist. God's House, Hull.
17 Char. Com. files.
18 Ibid.
19 The following two paragraphs are by A. G. Chamberlain.


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