The corporation of Coventry
Charters, letters patent, etc.

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Historical Manuscripts Commission

Year published

1899

Supporting documents

Pages

109-127

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'The corporation of Coventry: Charters, letters patent, etc.', The Manuscripts of Shrewsbury and Coventry Corporations [etc]: Fourth report, Appendix: Part X (1899), pp. 109-127. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=67087 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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Contents

Charters, letters patent, etc.
Earl Ranulph's Charter. Confirmation of the Earl's Charter. Licence to give Land to the Prior and Convent of Coventre. Inspeximus of Henry the Third's Charter. Foundation of a Chantry in the Churches of the Holy Trinity and of St. Michael. Licence for a Merchants' Guild. Inspeximus of divers Charters. Another Confirmation of the Earl of Chester's Charter. Foundation of the Guild of St. John the Baptist in the Churches of the H. Trinity and St. Michael. Foundation of St. Katherine's Guild. Grant to the Guild of St. John the Baptist of Land for a Chapel. Queen Isabella and the Manor of Cheylesmore. Privilege of Electing a Bailiff, granted by Queen Isabella to her People of Coventre. Charter of Privileges. Confirmation to Queen Isabella and the Prince of Wales of Liberties and Privileges, &c. in the Manor of Chelesmore. Confirmation of Privileges. Confirmation of three Charters of Edward the Third. Acquittance of Coventre in respect to the Charges of Fifteen Armed Men. Grant by Queen Isabella of Land in Her Park of Cheylesmore. Foundation of the Corpus Christi Guild. Confirmation of Privileges granted by the Queen-Mother. Precept Touching the King's Pardon of Coventre. Foundation of the Guild of the Holy Trinity. Confirmation by Richard II. of divers Charters. Confirmation of the Licence to Found the Guild of Corpus Christi. Ratification of a Grant of Land in Coventry. Licence to give Messuages, Land, and Rents to the Corpus Christi Guild. Incorporation of Two Several Guilds into One Guild. Licence to give Six Messuages to the Mayor, Bailiffs, and Community. Licence in Mortmain to the United Guilds. Commission for an Inquisition touching certain Gates, Bridges, and Profits. Licence in Mortmain to the Guild of the Holy Trinity, &c. Petition touching the Underground Aqueduct of the Prior and Convent of Coventre. No more Guilds to be created in Coventre. Licence in Mortmain to the Guild of the Holy Trinity. Grant to Thomas Porter, Valet of the Prince of Wales's Bedchamber. Confirmation of the Inhibition of more Guilds. Licence in Mortmain for the Mayor and Community of Coventre. Order for suppressing the unlicensed Guild of St. Anne. Further Mandate touching the same Unlicensed Guild. Licence in Mortmain for the Mayor and Community in Relief of Taxes. Order for suppressing the Unlicensed Guild of St. George of Coventre. Pardon to the Guild of the Holy Trinity, &c. Further Licence in Mortmain for the Mayor and Community. Licence in Mortmain for the Guild of Corpus Christ. Confirmation of Letters Patent forbidding the Creation of more Guilds. Grant of an Eight Days' Market to Coventre. Pardon to the Guild of the Holy Trinity. Pardon to the Mayor and Community of Coventre. Injunction forbidding Citizens to be retanied by any Man unless in Necessary Service. Licence for Endowment of a Hospital in Bablake. Groats and Double Placks. Pardon to the Mayor and Community. Pardon to the Guild of the Holy Trinity, &c. Grant to Ralpe Swillyngton, Esquire. Promise of Rekpayment of Loans for the King's Wars against France and Scotland. Another Promise To Repay Loans. A Third "Privy Seal" to the same Effect. Letters under the Great Seal to Levy Money. For Punishment of Riotous Persons and Prevention of Riotous Assemblies. Licence to the Guild of the Nativity of Jesus Christ to hold Land in Mortmain. Grant of the Reversion of certain Offices to John Hygford, Dapifer. Lease of Orchards and Pools, late Belonging to the Priory or Cathedral Church of Coventre. Lease of Tenements and Lands to Hugh Wyatt of London, "Mynsterell." Order for Payment of a Crown Rent. Pardon to the City. Contribution in Aid of the King. Requisition for Payment of the Fee-Farm of Coventry and for Arrears of the Same. Complaint by William Coke against Richard Marlowe. Lease of the Little Park of Cheilsmore. Grant of Bablacke Church to the Mayor and Community of Coventry. Lease to William Enderby. Grant in fee Farm to the Mayor and Community of Messuages and Lands &c., formerly belonging to Guilds and Chantries. Inspeximus of the Letters of Licence granted to the Guild of the Nativity of Jesus Christ. Manufacture and Monopoly of "Ulterfynes" and "Cromple Lysts." Commission of Enquiry respecting Offences against the Laws for maintaining Horses, &c., and for taking Muster of able Men. Grant for the Reparation and Maintenance of Babllake Hospital. Commission of Array for Mustering the Men of Arms of Coventry. Inquisition "Post-mortem" of John Nethermyll. Commission of Array, &c. Licence to Richard Butler to alienate a Messuage, &c. Grant of the Almshouse in Bablacke to Trustees. Commission for raising a Loan. Commission for levying a Proportion of the Money voted by Parliament. Letters Patent for the Re-constitution of the Corporation, and for the Confirmation of the Ancient Charters. Ordinances for the City's better Government.

Charters, letters patent, etc.

II.—Charters, Letters Patent; Letters under the Privy Seal or the Signet, with or without the Sign Manual; and Indentures of Leases granted by Sovereigns.

Earl Ranulph's Charter.

[1153.]—Charter dated at Covintre (sic) by Ranulph, Earl of Chester: Granting, with other concessions, to his burgesses of Covintre and their heirs, that they may hold in free burgage of him and his heirs as firmly and freely as they held in the time of the Earl's father and other ancestors; with grant to them of all the liberties and good laws enjoyed by the burgesses of Lincoln, and that they shall not be drawn in any matter to the Earl's Castle to plead, but shall have their own Portmote, in which all pleas touching the Earl and them may be dealt with.

Confirmation of the Earl's Charter.

[c. 1177?].—Charter by Henry II. dated "apud Merlebergam," of confirmation to the burgesses of Covintre (sic) of the charter granted to them by Ranulph, Earl of Chester; With further concessions, for the greater security of the liberties granted by the Earl's charter.

Licence to give Land to the Prior and Convent of Coventre.

31 Edward I., November 6th [1303].—Letters Patent of Licence to Peter de Blockesley to give and assign for ever to the Prior and Convent of Coventre a messuage and two virgates of land with their appurtenances in Sowe, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.

Inspeximus of Henry the Third's Charter.

17 Edward II., July 10th [1323].—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of Charter of Inspeximus by Henry III. confirming the Charter given by Henry II. in confirmation of the Charter granted by Ranulph Earl of Chester.

Foundation of a Chantry in the Churches of the Holy Trinity and of St. Michael.

13 Edward III., January 17th [1340].—Letters Patent (in French), dated at Risyngs Castle by the Queen-Mother Isabella, of Licence to John de Holland, chaplain, John Lemman, John le Porter, Richard de Stoke, William de Welneburghe and others to acquire and hold lands, tenements and rents, &c., to the yearly value of twenty pounds in the Queen's lordship of Coventre, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, for the maintenance of a Chantry of six chaplains, to chant masses and other sacred services at the parochial churches of the Holy Trinity and St. Michael of Coventre, for the good estate in this life of the said Queen, and of her son the King, and of the Duke of Cornewaille, and for their souls when they shall have died, and also for the souls of the Queen Isabella's Lord Edward the late King of England, and the same Queen's dear son John late Earl of Cornewaille.

Licence for a Merchants' Guild.

14 Edward III., May 20th [1340].—Letters Patent of Licence to the men of Coventre and their successors to have a Merchants' Guild and a fraternity of brethren and sisters of the same Guild in the said town, and a Master or Keeper of the same Guild, &c.

Inspeximus of divers Charters.

15 Edward III., May 10th [1341].—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Charter of Inspeximus by Edward II. of the Charter by Henry III. of Inspeximus of the Charter whereby Henry II. confirmed the Charter granted to the burgesses of Coventre by Ranulf Earl of Chester: With Inspeximus of a previous Charter by the present King Edward III., granting to the Merchants of Coventre, and to their heirs and successors being merchants of the same town, that they should be exempt for ever from toll, pannage, pontage, murage &c., in respect to their goods and merchandize throughout the said King's realm and dominion; With further concession to the burgesses and honest men of Coventre, that all Inquisitions made in the said town, before the King, his heirs, justices or ministers, or the justices or ministers of his heirs, respecting contracts, agreements, or trespasses made or to be made in the said town, or respecting lands and tenements within the same town, should and ought to be made by burgesses and men of the said town, and not by foreigners, so long as the matters to be enquired into touch neither the King nor the community of the said town.

Another Confirmation of the Earl of Chester's Charter.

15 Edward III., May 10th [1341].—The Inspeximus contained in the preceding charter, by itself, without the additional grant of privileges from Edw. III.

Foundation of the Guild of St. John the Baptist in the Churches of the H. Trinity and St. Michael.

16 Edward III., October 6th [1342].—Letters Patent of Licence to John Holand chaplain, John Lemman and four other persons to found and establish a fraternity and Guild in honour of St. John the Baptist in Coventre, and to hold lands tenements and rents, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, for creating and maintaining chantries of six chaplains, to celebrate daily in the parish churches of the Holy Trinity and St. Michael divine rites and services for the souls of the said King's ancestors, and for the health of the said King, his mother Queen Isabella, his consort Queen Philippa and his children, and Walter de Chesthunt and William de Belgrave whilst they shall be living, and for their souls when they shall be taken from this life, and for the welfare of the brethren and benefactors of the said Guild whilst they shall be living, and for their souls when they shall have died, and for the soul of the King's brother John de Eltham late Earl of Cornewall, and for the souls of all who have died in the Faith.

Foundation of St. Katherine's Guild.

17 Edward III., November 12th [1343].—Letters Patent of Licence to Thomas de Ichynton, Nicholas Pake, William de Tuttebury, William de Overton clerk, Peter Percy, Richard le Darkere, Simon Wareyn, John Vincent and John de Pakynton, to found a fraternity and Guild of themselves and others, brethren and sisters, in honour of St. Katherine at Coventre, and to find three chaplains who shall daily celebrate divine rites for the souls of the said King's progenitors, and for the welfare of the same King, his mother Queen Isabella, and his consort Queen Philippa and the children of the same King and Queen Consort, and of Robert de Sadyngton, Master John de Thoresby, John de St. Paul, William de Thorp, Richard de Smetheton and William de Burgh during their lives, and for the souls of the same when they shall have died, and for the aforesaid grantees and the brethren and sisters of the said Guild and their benefactors during their lives, and for their souls when they shall have died, and for the souls of all who have died in the Faith, in the chapel of St. Katherine in the church of the hospital of St. John the Baptist in Coventre; with licence to the brethren and sisters of the Guild to assemble yearly, to elect a Master or Keeper of the same Guild and the aforesaid chaplains.

Grant to the Guild of St. John the Baptist of Land for a Chapel.

18 Edward III., May 7th (1344).—Letters Patent (in French) dated by the Queen Mother Isabella at Risyngs, granting to the good people of the Guild of St. John the Baptist in the town of Coventre a piece of land called Babbelak in the said town, in order that they may there build a chapel in honour of God and St. John the Baptist, and have there two chaplains daily chanting masses and other divine services for the good estate of the said Queen's dear son the King, and of the said Queen Isabella, and of her dear daughter the Queen Philippa and of the Prince of Wales during their lives, and for their souls when they shall have died, and for the soul of the said Queen Isabella's dear Lord the late King of England, and for the soul of her dear son John the late Earl of Cornewaille, and for the lives and souls of the brethren of the same Guild.

Queen Isabella and the Manor of Cheylesmore.

18 Edward III., August 23rd (1344).—Letters Patent of Precept to archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, sheriffs, and others: declaring the said King's will that his mother the Queen Isabella may have and enjoy for the whole of her life all the liberties and privileges in the Manor of Cheylesmore heretofore granted to the said Queen for life, and set forth in these Letters Patent.

Privilege of Electing a Bailiff, granted by Queen Isabella to her People of Coventre.

18 Edward III., October 18th (1344).—Letters Patent dated at Kenynghale by the Queen Mother Isabella, Queen of England, &c.; granting to her good people of the town of Coventre, during her pleasure and their good conduct, that they may elect from amongst themselves a Bailiff, who may yearly render loyal account of the issues and profits arising to her from the same town.

Charter of Privileges.

18 Edward III., January 20th (1345).—Charter of King Edward at the instance of his mother Isabella, to whom the Manor of Cheylesmore had been granted for life, and also in consideration of the King's firstborn son the Prince of Wales, to whose hands the said manor would pass after the said Queen's death, granting that the men of Coventre, tenants of the said manor, may elect annually from amongst themselves a Mayor and fit Bailiffs, and have cognizance of all pleas as well of trespasses, contracts and agreements as of other things arising within the town, and may have a seal for taking recognizance of debts, according to the form of the Statute for Merchants; and also that the said town may have a prison for the correction of malefactors, and that the Mayor and Bailiffs for the time being shall have the custody of the same prison and of the prisoners committed to it.

Confirmation to Queen Isabella and the Prince of Wales of Liberties and Privileges, &c. in the Manor of Chelesmore.

19 Edward III., June 16th (1345).—Charter of Edw. III. dated at the Tower of London; confirming to his mother the Queen Isabella and to the King's first-born son the Prince of Wales the King's previous concessions touching the Manor of Cheilesmore, to wit, that she during her life and the Prince of Wales after her death may, either by their own stewards or by the Mayor and bailiffs for the time being of Coventre, have cognizance of all pleas arising within the liberty of the said town, as well as those respecting lands, tenements, and rents as those respecting trespasses, agreements, contracts, &c., together with all other privileges and powers heretofore granted to the same Queen and Prince within the liberty of the said manor, in which Coventre is situated.

Confirmation of Privileges.

19 Edward III., December 3rd (1345).—Letters Patent in confirmation of the grant heretofore made by the King, at the instance and request of the Queen Mother Isabella, granting to the men of Coventre, being tenants of the Manor of Cheillesmore, that they may have and yearly elect from amongst themselves a fit Mayor and bailiffs for the said town, and in confirmation of divers other powers and privileges heretofore granted by the same King to the men of Coventre and their successors.

Confirmation of three Charters of Edward the Third.

19 Edward III., December 3rd (1345).—Letters Patent issued by the King, at the instance of the Queen Mother Isabella, to whom the Manor of Cheillesmore pertains for her life, in confirmation of previous charters granted by him to the said Queen and the men of Coventre, tenants of the said Manor, to wit, (1) a charter granting, with other things, that the men of Coventre may have a Mayor and bailiffs (as under date of 20 Jan. 1345, supra), (2) a charter granting to the said Queen View of Frankpledge of the said Manor and town, with forfeitures of felons and fugitives within the said Manor, &c., and (3) a charter granting to the said Queen and all the men of her said Manor freedom from pannage, passage, stallage, tollage, &c., throughout the said King's whole realm, together with other concessions to the same Queen and the men of her said manor of Cheillesmore.

Acquittance of Coventre in respect to the Charges of Fifteen Armed Men.

20 Edward III., August 16th (1346).—Letters Patent of Acquittance in consideration of a sum of £5 paid by the town of Coventre into the Exchequer, for the charges of fifteen armed men about to cross to parts beyond sea in the King's service.

Grant by Queen Isabella of Land in Her Park of Cheylesmore.

21 Edward III., June 14th (1347).—Grant by the Queen Isabella, dated at Risyngs Castle, for the term of her life, of a rood of land with appurtenances in Coventre in her park of Cheylesmore, to Peter de Stoke, merchant of Coventre, at a yearly rent of five silver pence.

Foundation of the Corpus Christi Guild.

22 Edward III., May 26th (1348).—Letters Patent of the King granting licence to Robert Chandos, John de Wynwyck, clerk, and seventeen other grantees, to found a guild to the honour of the precious Body and Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ, with a chaplain to celebrate daily divine rites and services for the good estate of the said King and of the grantees, and of the brethren and sisters of the same Guild, during their lives, and for their souls when they shall have died. With License to the brethren and sisters to assemble yearly, in order to elect a Master and Chaplain for their said Guild.

Confirmation of Privileges granted by the Queen-Mother.

22 Edward III., July 17th (1348).—Inspeximus by the King, confirming the Letters Patent dated by the Prince of Wales on 12th March in the said year, of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent dated by the Queen Mother Isabella at the Castle of Rysyng on 12th February in the same year, whereby the said Queen approved the Charter of liberties and privileges, by which her son Edward III. granted at her instance, to the men of Coventre, being tenants of the Manor of Cheilesmore, together, with other powers, that they might elect yearly a Mayor and bailiffs from amongst themselves and whereby the said Queen granted for her life to the same men all the liberties, &c., which the same King conceded they should enjoy after her death; and also whereby the same Queen granted to the same that they might have during her life a market, a fair, and view of frankpledge in the said town: it being stipulated in the last-mentioned Letters Patent that, in consideration of the concessions made to them in the same Letters by the said Queen, the men of Coventre should pay to her yearly during her life, the sum of £50, in two equal portions at the feasts of Easter and St. Michael in each year.

Precept Touching the King's Pardon of Coventre.

36 Edward III., October 18th (1362).—Letters Patent (in French) of Precept addressed to all justices, sheriffs, bailiffs, &c., enjoining that the commons of the town of Coventre be in no way molested contrary to the Pardon granted to them by the King.

Foundation of the Guild of the Holy Trinity.

38 Edward III., March 23rd (1364).—Letters Patent of Licence to Henry Kele and Thomas Orme, to found a fraternity and Guild to the honour of the Holy Trinity, and to acquire and hold lands, tenements, and rents to the yearly value of ten marks within the liberty and lordship of Coventre, and to hold the same to themselves and the brethren and sisters of the said fraternity and Guild and their successors for ever, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, for the maintenance of two chaplains to celebrate divine rites daily in the church of the Holy Trinity of Coventre, for the good estate of the said King and his consort Philippa Queen of England and their children so long as they shall live, and for their souls when they shall have died, and for the souls of all the brethren and sisters of the said Guild and their benefactors and of all who have died in the Faith.

Confirmation by Richard II. of divers Charters.

1 Richard II., March 4 (1378).—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Charter whereby Edward III. granted to the Merchants of Coventre and their successors to be free of toll, pannage, pontage, and murage, &c. With Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Charter granted by Edward III. (10 May 1341, supra) in confirmation of the Charter of Edward II., in confirmation of the Charter whereby Henry III. confirmed the Charter granted by Henry II., confirming the Charter given by Ranulph Earl of Chester to his burgesses of Coventre: With Inspeximus and Confirmation of other Charters of Edward III., conceding liberties, privileges, and powers to the burgesses of Coventre.

Confirmation of the Licence to Found the Guild of Corpus Christi.

4 Richard II., April 4th (1381).—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent whereby Edward III., 26 May an. 22, granted Licence to Robert Chaundos, John de Wynwyk, clerk, and seventeen other persons to found a fraternity and Guild of themselves and other brethren and sisters, in honour of the precious Body and Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ at Coventre, &c. (ut supra).

Ratification of a Grant of Land in Coventry.

8 Richard II., October 20th (1384).—Letters Patent in ratification of an indenture, whereby the Mayor, bailiffs, and chamberlains of Coventre on 26th December, 2 Rich. II. (1378) granted in fee-farm a piece of land in Coventre to Geoffrey Skartheburgh (sic) of Coventry and his wife Agnes, at a yearly rent of (—) shillings.

Licence to give Messuages, Land, and Rents to the Corpus Christi Guild.

16 Richard II., June 28th (1392).—Letters Patent, giving licence, in consideration of £50 paid to the King by the Guild of the precious Body and Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ in Coventre, to John Scardeburgh (sic), John de Wedon, Richard Marshall, Adam Deyster, and Nicholas Dudley, of Coventre, to give to the Master, brethren, and sisters of the aforesaid Guild twenty-nine messuages, eight acres of land, eighteen denariates of rent and one half of a messuage in Coventre, to hold to the said Master brethren and sisters of the said Guild, and to their successors for ever, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, in order to find a chaplain to celebrate divine rites daily, and for doing certain other works of piety, at the ordinance of the said Master brethren and sisters.

Incorporation of Two Several Guilds into One Guild.

16 Richard II., June 30th (1392).—Letters Patent reciting the particulars of the foundation, &c. of the Guild of St. John the Baptist founded temp. Edward III., and of the Guild of the Holy Trinity founded in the same reign, and granting that the said two Guilds may be united in one Guild, under the name of "The Fraternity and Guild of the Holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and St. John the Baptist of Coventre," and further granting that the same Guild may have power to hold within Coventre and elsewhere lands, tenements, and rents, &c. to the yearly value of £86 13s. 4d., the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.

Licence to give Six Messuages to the Mayor, Bailiffs, and Community.

16 Richard II., August 4th (1392).—Letters Patent granting, in consideration of £20 paid to the King by the Mayor bailiffs and community of Coventre, licence to William de Okham, John de Martondeyster, William Palmer and Thomas de Sutton, to give, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, six messuages with their appurtenances in Coventre to the aforesaid Mayor bailiffs and community for ever, and licence to the Mayor, bailiffs and community to hold the same for ever, in order to do and support certain works of piety at the ordinance of the said grantors.

Licence in Mortmain to the United Guilds.

16 Richard II, August 5th (1392).—Letters Patent of licence to Peter Percy, William Wolfe, Rolland Damet, Richard Verdon, Henry Kele, Adam Keresley, John Wedon and others and their heirs, or the Master brethren and sisters of the Guild of the Holy Trinity, St. Mary the Virgin and St. John the Baptist and their successors, to hold certain lands, tenements and rents, &c. for ever, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding; the said licence being granted to give effect to the King's previous licence to the Guild to acquire and hold lands and tenements &c., to the yearly value of £86 13s. 4d.

Commission for an Inquisition touching certain Gates, Bridges, and Profits.

22 Richard II., November 13th (1398).—Commission "ad quod damnum" to William Bage, steward of the King's manor of Cheylesmore, and to Guy Spyne the escheator of Warwick, to enquire whether it would be prejudicial to the King's interest or the interests of other persons, should he grant to the Mayor bailiffs and community of the town of Coventre and their successors all gates, bridges, and profits thereof, within the following bounds; to wit, from Jabotsasshe to the mill called Nassyngton Mill to the corner of the stone wall of the park of Cheilesmore, and thence by the same wall and the palings of the same park to Baronneswell, and thence to the house of John Yats of Dudemanneswell, and thence to the church and cemetery of St. Nicholas of Coventre, and thence to Bottecrosse, and thence to Harnehale Qwarele, and thence to Gosford Green.

Licence in Mortmain to the Guild of the Holy Trinity, &c.

6 Henry IV., November 12th (1404) —Letters Patent granted by Henry Prince of Wales in consideration of £10 paid to him by the Master brethren and sisters of the Guild of the Holy Trinity the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist in Coventre, of licence to John Preston and William Whitchurch, both of Coventre, merchants, to grant four messuages, one toft, one garden and eleven acres of land in Coventre, and also the remainder of a messuage in Coventre which Agnes, formerly the wife of Thomas Brone late of Coventre, holds for the term of her life, to the Master brethren and sisters of the aforesaid Guild, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, in aid of their livelihood and for the performance of certain works of piety according to the ordinance of the aforesaid John and William; with licence to the Guild to hold the aforesaid messuages.

Petition touching the Underground Aqueduct of the Prior and Convent of Coventre.

6 Henry IV., November 24th (1404).—Inspeximus and Exemplification of a Petition (in French), exhibited to the King in his parliament held at Coventre by the Prior and Convent of the Cathedral Church of Coventre, setting forth the pains and charges with which the petitioners and their predecessors have brought water by an underground aqueduct to their priory, complaining of injuries done to their said aqueduct by malicious persons, who also hinder the petitioners when they would survey and repair the same conduit, and corrupt the water of the Shirburn that runs to the petitioners' mills; and praying that henceforth no one shall be suffered to injure the said conduit, or to hinder the petitioners from surveying and repairing it, or to corrupt the water of the Shirburn by throwing entrails of beasts, garbage or other filth into it, under a penalty of £10 to the King and treble damages for injury done in those respects to the petitioners.

No more Guilds to be created in Coventre.

8 Henry IV., November 18th (1406).—Letters Patent of the King to the mayor bailiffs and community of Coventre, granting that no more or other Guilds than those at present existing in Coventre shall ever exist within the said city.

Licence in Mortmain to the Guild of the Holy Trinity.

10 Henry IV., February 16th (1409).—Letters Patent, in consideration of fifty shillings paid to the King by the Guild of the Holy Trinity the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist in Coventre, of licence to William Broke parson of the church of Ladbroke and his brother John Broke, and John Barbour of Bishopychynton, to give a messuage with appurtenances in Coventre to the Master brethren and sisters of the said Guild; with licence to the same Master, &c., to hold the said messuage, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.

Grant to Thomas Porter, Valet of the Prince of Wales's Bedchamber.

13 Henry IV., December 1st (1411).—Letters Patent (in French) by Henry Prince of Wales, granting for life to Thomas Porter, valet of the said Prince's bedchamber, in consideration of his good service, a messuage of a hundred acres of arable land, twenty acres of meadow and an acre of wood, with the appurtenances, in Wodende called Ernesplace, which are held of the Prince, and have been seized into his hands because the Prior of Coventre purchased them and appropriated them without the said Prince's licence.

Confirmation of the Inhibition of more Guilds.

1 Henry V., March 8th (1414).—Inspeximus and confirmation of the Letters Patent whereby Henry IV. in his 8th year ordained that henceforth there should be no more or other Guilds within Coventre than those already existing.

Licence in Mortmain for the Mayor and Community of Coventre.

6 Henry V., June 10th (1418).—Letters Patent (in consideration of 40l. paid to the King by the Mayor and community of Coventre) of licence to John Leder, John Esterton, John Preston, Richard Southam, Lawrence Cook and William Dilcok, to give and grant for ever divers lands, tenements, and rents to the said mayor and community, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.

Order for suppressing the unlicensed Guild of St. Anne.

8 Henry V. (?), November 22nd (1420).—Mandate addressed to the Mayor and bailiffs of Coventre, upon information that a number of young men, being "journemen" servants of divers tailors and other artificers of the said city, have assembled and held and continue to assemble and hold meetings within the Priory of the said city and the houses of the brothers there under the name of St. Anne, which action on their part may work to injury of the Fraternities of the Holy Trinity and Corpus Christi within the same city; Requiring the said Mayor and bailiffs to make proclamations against the aforesaid unlawful assemblies, and to arrest all persons who shall disregard such proclamations, and to hold the same offenders in safe custody, until the King shall make further orders in the matter, and to make return of the principal persons who have brought about the said unlawful assemblies.

N.B.—It deserves attention that the "Guild of the Holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. John Baptist" is spoken of in this writ as simply the "fraternity of the Holy Trinity," the shortened form of description beginning now to come into general use.

Further Mandate touching the same Unlicensed Guild.

1 Henry VI. (?), March 8th (1423).—Mandate, addressed to the Mayor and bailiffs of Coventre, upon information that a number of young men, being journeymen tailors and other artificers of the said city have held and continue to hold assemblies within the Priory of Coventre, and in the houses of the brothers there, in order to maintain a guild under the name of St. Anne, to the prejudice of the Fraternities of the Holy Trinity and Corpus Christi, and to the injury of the whole community: Requiring thereupon the aforesaid Mayor and Bailiffs to make proclamations prohibiting the said unlawful assemblies, and to arrest all persons disregarding the same, and to hold them in custody till the King shall have ordered their enlargement.

Licence in Mortmain for the Mayor and Community in Relief of Taxes.

2 Henry VI. November 16th (1423).—Letters Patent of licence to William Babyngton and William Botener to give and assign for ever, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanting, to the Mayor and community of Coventre a messuage with appurtenances in Coventre, yielding thirteen shillings and four pence, to be held by the said Mayor and community in part satisfaction of a grant, made by the present King's father to the same Mayor and community, of licence to acquire lands and tenements, &c. to the yearly value of 40l., within the said city and the precinct thereof, towards the support of the burdens of the same city: The aforementioned grant by Henry V. having been made in consideration of the heavy burdens sustained by the Mayor and community in respect to the murage of their city, and of the fact that they neither possess nor ever have possessed any means for sustaining the murage and other burdens, apart from collections imposed upon the poor folk of the same city to their manifest injury.

Order for suppressing the Unlicensed Guild of St. George of Coventre.

3 Henry VI., February 14th (1425).—Mandate, addressed to the Mayor, Keepers of the Peace and bailiffs of the city of Coventre, upon information that a number of youths and men, being servants of divers tailors and other artificers, working by the day and called "journeymen," of the said city, have combined and held meetings in the Chapel of St. George and elsewhere within the said city, and have presumed without the King's licence to make themselves into a Guild or fraternity named the Fraternity of St. George of Coventre, and intend to maintain the same fraternity with collections amongst themselves, and have elected and do maintain Masters, clerks and other officers, to the injury of the Guilds of the Holy Trinity and Corpus Christi, and of the whole community of the same city: Requiring thereupon the aforesaid Mayor, Keepers of the Peace, and bailiffs to make proclamations ordering the offenders to desist from holding such meetings, and from maintaining the same unauthorized Guild of St. George or any like fraternities, and to arrest all persons who disregard the said proclamations, and to return the names of the principal offenders into the King's Chancery, in order that they may be punished according to their demerits.

Pardon to the Guild of the Holy Trinity, &c.

3 Henry VI., September 12th (1424).—Pardon to William Dilcok the Master and the brethren and sisters of the Guild of the Holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist of Coventre, of all offences committed by them before the 8th day of December last past.

Further Licence in Mortmain for the Mayor and Community.

5 Henry VI., May 11th (1427).—Licence to the Mayor and Community of Coventry in consideration of the heavy burdens sustained by them in maintaining of the murage of their city, to hold lands, tenements and rents &c. to the yearly value of £40, in aid of the support of the said city, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.

Licence in Mortmain for the Guild of Corpus Christ.

18 Henry VI. (1439–40).—Licence to William Donyngton, John Michell and John Whiting chaplain, to grant to the Master and brethren of the Guild of our Lord Jesus Christ the reversion of four messuages, a mill and a piece of land whereon stands a chapel built in honour of St. George, of the yearly value of forty shillings, which Lawrence Cook and his wife Alice hold for their lives in survivorship; with licence to the Master and brethren of the said Guild to enter upon and hold the said messuages to themselves and their successors, on the death of the aforesaid Lawrence and Alice, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding; the said licence being granted to the said Guild in part satisfaction of the grant, whereby K. Richard II. gave licence to the Master and brethren of the Guild to acquire lands to the yearly value of eight marks, for finding a chaplain to celebrate divine rites daily.

Confirmation of Letters Patent forbidding the Creation of more Guilds.

19 Henry VI., January 25th (1441).—Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated by Henry V. in the first year of his reign, in confirmation of the Letters Patent, whereby Henry IV. in his 8th year granted to the Mayor, bailiffs and community of Coventre and their successors for ever, that no more or other Guilds than those at present existing in Coventre should ever be established or ordained within the said city.

Grant of an Eight Days' Market to Coventre.

20 Henry VI., July 7th (1442).—Inspeximus and Confirmation of Henry the Second's charter to the Burgesses of Coventre: with further grant by Henry VI. to the Mayor bailiffs and community of licence to hold yearly a fair for eight days, beginning on the Friday next following the Feast of Corpus Christi, as freely as they have hitherto from ancient time held a yearly fair for one day, on the morrow of the Feast of Corpus Christi.

Pardon to the Guild of the Holy Trinity.

25 Henry VI., October 21st (1446).—General Pardon to the Master brethren and sisters of the Guild of the Holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Katherine the Virgin of Coventre, of all offences committed by them before the 9th day of April last past.

Pardon to the Mayor and Community of Coventre.

12 Edward IV., June 20th (1472).—Pardon to the Mayor, bailiffs and community of the City of Coventre of all offences committed by them before the last day of September last past.

Injunction forbidding Citizens to be retanied by any Man unless in Necessary Service.

1 Henry VII., January 31st (1486).—Privy Seal Letters to the Mayor and Justices of the Peace of Coventre enjoining them to permit no citizen nor inhabitant of their city to be retained by any man except as "dwellyng servant or [in] his necessary office accordyng to our lawes and statutes therfore made and ordered."

Licence for Endowment of a Hospital in Bablake.

23 Henry VII., March 3rd [1508].—Letter Patent of licence to the Master brethren and sisters of the Guild of the Holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. John the Baptist and St. Katherine the Virgin of Coventre, to acquire and hold lands, tenements and rents, &c. in mortmain to the yearly value of £50, for the support of a chaplain to perform sacred services and obsequies, and the maintenance of twelve poor men and one woman, to offer prayers for the King's health while living, and for his soul when he shall have died, and for the good estate of the brethren and sisters of the aforesaid Guild while living and for their souls when they shall have died, and especially for the soul of Thomas Bonde, late of the city of Coventry, and for the souls of all who have died in the Faith, in a certain chapel and house in a p'ace called Bablake in the aforesaid city, now newly built to the honour of the Holy Trinity.

Groats and Double Placks.

23 Henry VII., May 27th [1508].—Letters Patent addressed to the Sheriffs of the City of Coventre, embodying a Proclamation to be published at divers places of the said city and county thereof, to inform the people of the differences between English "grotes and double plackes" which are so clipt, worn, and diminished as not to be rated as good coin, and those "grotes and double plackes" which, although they be in some degree worn, defaced and diminished, are to be rated and accepted by the King's subjects as good and lawful English money.

Pardon to the Mayor and Community.

1 Henry VIII. [1509].—Letter Patent of a General Pardon granted to the Mayor, bailiffs and community of the city of Coventre, of all offences committed by them before the 23rd day of April last past.

Pardon to the Guild of the Holy Trinity, &c.

1 Henry VIII., May 21st [1509].—Similar Pardon to the Master brethren and sisters of the Guild of the Holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. John the Baptist and St. Katherine the Virgin of Coventre, of all offences committed before the 23rd of April last past.

Grant to Ralpe Swillyngton, Esquire.

14 Henry VIII., July 11th [1522].—Letters Patent of a grant for life to the King's well-beloved and faithful Ralph Swillyngton, Esquire, of the office of Steward of the King's lordship and manor of Cheilesmore in the county of the city of Coventre, and of all the King's manors, lands and tenements, &c., within the same county of the same city, and also of the office or offices of Master of the King's Park of Cheilesmore and of the venery of the same park, and Keeper of the King's woods within the same lordships, &c.

Promise of Rekpayment of Loans for the King's Wars against France and Scotland.

14 Henry VIII. October 3rd [1522].—Letters under the Privy Seal in which the King promises to repay to the lenders all the sums of money advanced by way of loan, for the maintenance of his wars against France and Scotland, by persons of the city of Coventre whose names are set forth in an indented schedule, and whose contributions of money amount in the whole to "oone thousand and nyne poundes thrytten shillinges four penys."

Another Promise To Repay Loans.

14 Henry VIII., November 17th (1522).—Privy Seal Letters promising to repay divers sums, amounting in the whole to £36 6s. 8d., advanced by divers persons of Coventre (whose names are recorded in an annexed schedule) for the maintenance of the same wars.

A Third "Privy Seal" to the same Effect.

15 Henry VIII., May 19th (1523).—Privy Seal letters promising to repay numerous sums amounting in all to £150 11s. 0d. advanced by 194 persons of the city of Coventre and its precincts, to wit, persons "haveyng landes and tenementes from the value of xxl. to the yearly value of xxs., and also that have moveable goodes frome the value of xxl. to the value of fyve poundes," whose names and sums are set forth in an annexed schedule.

This writ indicates that the poorer folk of Coventre were pressed for loans at this crisis towards the relief of the King's necessities.

Letters under the Great Seal to Levy Money.

16 Henry VIII., April 25th (1524).—Blank Letters of Commission under the Great Seal, appointing some person or persons to levy and gather the moneys granted by the King's loving subjects in Coventre "towards the recovery of" the King's "crown and realme of Fraunce and dyvers other domynyons and possessions . . . . rygtefully apperteigning within the same" to the said King.

For Punishment of Riotous Persons and Prevention of Riotous Assemblies.

17 Henry VIII., November 6th (1525).—Letters Patent of mandate addressed to the Mayor and Sheriffs and all right-minded persons of every degree and condition in Coventre, to take measures for arresting and bringing to punishment perverse and ill-disposed persons, who are set on renewing the riotous assemblies and disorderly routs in Coventre against the Mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the said city, that were recently suppressed by the punishment of divers persons, guilty of taking part in the disturbances.

Licence to the Guild of the Nativity of Jesus Christ to hold Land in Mortmain.

28 Henry VIII., May 10th (1536).—Inspeximus and confirmation of a Charter [stated in the present Letters Patent to have been dated by Henry V. in his seventeenth regnal year, by a curious mistake for Hen. VI.], granting licence to the Cutters and Fullers of the Guild founded to the honour of the Nativity of Jesus Christ in Coventre, to acquire lands, tenements and rents to the yearly value of ten marks, to find a chaplain to celebrate divine rites daily for the souls of the founders of the said Guild and for the souls of all who have died in the Faith; it being stated in the said Charter that the King Henry, who granted the Letters of licence, did so on the understanding that his progenitor Richard II. had in his time granted licence to the same Guild, to acquire and hold lands, &c. to the yearly value of eight marks.

N.B.—The curious error as to the date of the original Grant of Licence reappears in the Inspeximus of June 1st, 8 Elizabeth (as noticed in a later page of this catalogue) and seems also from that Inspeximus to have been found in Letters Patent of Edward VI. confirming the faulty charter.

Grant of the Reversion of certain Offices to John Hygford, Dapifer.

29 Henry VIII., March 11th [1538].—Letters Patent granting to John Hygford, one of the dapifers of the King's chamber, the office of Bailiff of the manor of Chellysmore in the county of the city of Coventre, and the Keepership of the same manor, and the place of Keeper of the park of Chellysmore, for the term of his life, from the time when the same offices shall become vacant by the death, retirement, or forfeiture of John Dyngley, one of the dapifers of the aforesaid chamber, to whom the same offices were granted for life by Letters Patent, dated 6th of February in the 15th year of the King's reign.

Lease of Orchards and Pools, late Belonging to the Priory or Cathedral Church of Coventre.

31 Henry VIII., February 20th [1540].—Lease of twenty-one years at a yearly rent of £4 14s. 4d., granted by the King to Henry Over, of an orchard called "le greate Orchard "containing eight acres, lying without the precinct of the late Priory or Cathedral Church in Coventre recently dissolved, and of another orchard called "la lytle orchard" containing two acres and a rood, late in the hands of the same Priory or Cathedral Church, and a piece of standing water called "the Swannss poole," containing an acre, and another piece of still water called "Newe Poole" containing an acre, which orchards and pools formerly belonged to the said late Priory or Cathedral Church.

Lease of Tenements and Lands to Hugh Wyatt of London, "Mynsterell."

33 Henry VIII., June 26th [1541].—Lease for twenty-one years, at a yearly rent of forty-one shillings and eight pence, granted by the King to Hugh Wyatt of London "mynsterell," of two tenements, two gardens, two orchards, two crofts of arable land and six acres of pasture in Stone, Wyken and Biggen in the county of the city of Coventre, called Biggencroft, &c. late belonging to the now dissolved Priory or Cathedral Church of Coventre.

Order for Payment of a Crown Rent.

34 Henry VIII., August 20th [1542].—Privy Seal, addressed to the "Chamberers" (i.e., the Chamberlains) of the City of Coventre: commanding them in peremptory terms to pay forthwith to the Receiver of the "Revenues of thaugmentacions of our Crowne in our Countie of Warwick" under a penalty of £100 in case of further remissness, the sum of twelve shillings of arrears of the rent issuing from a tenement in Wellestret in Coventre.

Pardon to the City.

36 Henry VIII., February 12th [1545].—General Pardon to the Mayor, sheriffs, bailiffs and community of the City of Coventre.

Contribution in Aid of the King.

38 Henry VIII., May 16th [1546].—Letters Patent of Commission to John Hertford mayor of the City of Coventre, Sir George Throgmarton (sic) knt., and Sir Fulke . . . . knt.; appointing them to be commissioners to take steps for raising in the city of Coventre a contribution towards the aid of the King, in his need to resist his enemy, the King of the French.

Requisition for Payment of the Fee-Farm of Coventry and for Arrears of the Same.

— Henry VIII.—Privy Seal letters to the Sheriffs of the City of Coventre: Requiring them, under a penalty of £500 in case of remissness on their part, to appear forthwith personally before Sir Robert Southwell, knt., and Bartholomew Westby, one of the Barons of the Exchequer to pay £200, due to the King for the fee-farm of the town of Coventre, and also to account for arrears.

Complaint by William Coke against Richard Marlowe.

— Henry VIII., July 9th.—Blank letters under the Privy Seal: Requiring certain persons (whose names are not filled in) to make enquiry touching the justice of the complaint of William Coke against one Richard Marlowe, set forth in accompanying Bill and Answer, and to certify the King and his Council of the truth of the matter.

Lease of the Little Park of Cheilsmore.

1 Edward VI., May 8th [1547].—Lease for twenty-one years, at a yearly rental of forty-four shillings, granted by the King to William Wightman, gentleman, of 'totum illud clausum terre nostrum vocatum the little Park . . . parcellam manerii de Chelismore . . . . quod quidem manerium est parcella terrarum et possessionum ducatus nostri Cornubie."

Grant of Bablacke Church to the Mayor and Community of Coventry.

2 Edward VI., December 13th (1548).—Letters Patent of the Grant made to the Mayor, bailiffs, and community of the City of Coventre, of the church of Bablacke in the said city, and of the campanile and cemetery of the said church, to have and to hold the same of the said King his heirs and successors for ever, by the service of one penny yearly, in free burgage: With further grant to the same of the issues, rents, revenues and profits of the same church, and of the bells, lead, iron, glass, jewels and ornaments belonging to it.

Lease to William Enderby.

6 Edward VI., March 10, [1552].—Lease for twenty-one years, from the King to William Enderby, at a yearly rent of fifty-three shillings and four pence, of a messuage and tenement in Earl Strete in the City of Coventre, late in the occupation of Alice Enderby and now in the tenure of William Enderby, and also of another messuage or tenement now in the tenure of William Herdy.

Grant in fee Farm to the Mayor and Community of Messuages and Lands &c., formerly belonging to Guilds and Chantries.

6 Edward VI., September 18th, [1552].—Letters Patent of a grant, made by the King in consideration of a payment of £1,315 1s. 8d., in fee-farm for ever to the Mayor, bailiffs and community of the City of Coventre and their successors, of a large number of messuages, lands, tenements, and rents, &c., formerly belonging to the late Guilds of Corpus Christi and Holy Trinity of Coventre, and of messuages, tenements and rents, &c., formerly pertaining to divers Chantries in the same City, and of divers rents and moneys heretofore held in trust for the celebration of yearly Obits in Coventre or elsewhere, for the souls of deceased persons: to be held by the aforesaid Mayor, bailiffs, and their successors of the said King his heirs and successors as of the manor of Greenwich, co. Kent, at a yearly rent of £90.

Inspeximus of the Letters of Licence granted to the Guild of the Nativity of Jesus Christ.

1 Elizabeth, June 1st (1559).—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of Edward the Sixth's Inspeximus of the Letters Patent, whereby Henry VIII. in his 28th regnal year confirmed a Charter, giving licence to the Cutters and Fullers of the Guild of the Nativity of Jesus Christ in Coventre, to hold lands and tenements and rents to the yearly value of ten marks, in order to find a chaplain to celebrate divine rites daily for the souls of the founders of the said Guild, and for the souls of all who have died in the Faith.

N.B.—In these Letters Patent reappears the error found in the Letters of 10th March, 28 Henry VIII., describing the original Charter of Licence as a Charter of 17 Hen. V., instead of Hen. VI.

Manufacture and Monopoly of "Ulterfynes" and "Cromple Lysts."

10 Elizabeth, March 22nd (1568).—Letters Patent for the regulation and encouragement in Coventre of the manufacture of two sorts of woollen cloths commonly called Ulterfynes and Cromple Lysts, now usually made at Armentiers in Flaunders: It being granted by the Letters Patent, during pleasure, that no other person or persons than the Mayor bailiffs and community of Coventre, and such other persons in Coventre as are appointed by virtue of the same Letters Patent shall be allowed in England, or in any other of the Queen's dominions, to make or cause to be made "any of the said sort of clothes called Ulterfynes or Cromple lystes or any other Wollen Clothes lyke thereunto."

In connection with these Letters Patent there is an Indenture, made on the same day between the Queen of the one part and the Mayor bailiffs and community of Coventre of the other part, for the more precise regulation of the manufacture of and trade in the Ulterfyne or Utterfyne cloths and Cromple Lysts: containing orders for the breadth, length, weight and quality of the several pieces of the same cloth, and settling the penalties and punishments to be inflicted on manufacturers and dealers who disobey the orders.

Commission of Enquiry respecting Offences against the Laws for maintaining Horses, &c., and for taking Muster of able Men.

11 Elizabeth, July 18th (1569).—Commission, addressed to Ambrose, Earl of Warwick, Robert, Earl of Leycester, Sir Robert Throckmorton knt., Sir William Wigston knt., Sir Thomas Lucie knt., Sir William Devereux knt., and Clement Throckmorton and John Fisher of Pakington esquires, directing them to associate the Mayor of the City of Coventre for the time being with themselves, for the execution of a commission to enquire respecting all offences, committed since the 5th day of April last past against the laws for maintaining of horses and the provision of armour and weapons, and to take muster of the able men of Warwickshire.

Grant for the Reparation and Maintenance of Babllake Hospital.

14 Elizabeth, July 12th (1572).—Letters Patent granted at the request of Robert, Earl of Leicestre, for the reparation and maintenance of the Hospital of Bablake within the City of Coventrie, licensing the Mayor bailiffs and community of the same city to acquire and hold for ever manors, messuages, lands and tenements to the yearly value of £100, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.

Commission of Array for Mustering the Men of Arms of Coventry.

15 Elizabeth, April 24th (1573).—Commission of Array, appointing Robert Earl of Leicester, the Mayor of the city of Coventre for the time being, Sir Fulke Grevill knt., Sir William Wigston knt., Edward Eglionby esq., Thomas Rylay, Edward Dampard, Thomas Dudley, Richard Smythe and Henry Kirden, aldermen of the said city, to be Commissioners of Array, to muster and drill all the men-at-arms above sixteen years and under sixty years of age in the city of Coventre, as well horse as foot, archers and "sclopetarii" [i.e., soldiers armed with arquebuses or carbines], and to instruct in military duty all the youths and men hitherto ignorant of military affairs in the said city.

Attached to this Latin commission appears in English, "a direccion for the Commissioners for the musters in the citie of Coventrie, how they shall proceed in the execution of the said Commission."

Inquisition "Post-mortem" of John Nethermyll.

17 Elizabeth, June 22nd (1575).—Inspeximus of certain Letters Patent, dated on 11th November 15th Elizabeth, of a commission to Edward Holte esq., Humfrey Ferrers esq., Edward Eglionby esq., and Arthur Gregory gentleman, the Queen's feodary in the county of Warwick, appointing them to enquire what lands and tenements John Nethermyll, late an alderman of the city of Coventre, held on the day of his death, and to return their inquisition into Chancery. With Inspeximus of the Inquisition, dated on 9th May, 17 Elizabeth, whereby the said commissioners certified that on the day of his death the said John Nethermyll was seized in his own demesne of the Manor of Eccleshale with its appurtenances in Eccleshale and Folleshill, co. Coventre, and also of four messuages, three hundred acres of arable land, one hundred acres of meadow, two hundred acres of pasture, four hundred of wood, and one hundred acres of scrub and briery, and of rents of £10 6s. in Eccleshale and Folleshull, now held, and which at the time of the said John Nethermylle's death were held of the Mayor bailiffs and community of the city of Coventre, as of the manor of Chellesmore, otherwise called their manor of Coventre, &c.

Commission of Array, &c.

19 Elizabeth, May 31st (1577).—Commission of Array addressed to Robert, Earl of Leicestre, the Mayor of Coventre for the time being, Sir Fulke Greville knt., Sir William Wigston baronet, Edward Egliambye (sic) esq., Thomas Ryley, Edward Damperd and Thomas Dudley, aldermen of the said city, to be Commissioners for mustering, arraying, inspecting and drilling, all the men at arms, horse and foot, archers and "sclopetarii" and all other able men within the city of Coventre.

Licence to Richard Butler to alienate a Messuage, &c.

40 Elizabeth, October 30th (1598).—Letters Patent of licence to Richard Butler, in consideration of thirty-three shillings and four pence paid by him, to sell to John Stapleton esq., a messuage with a dovecote, a garden, an orchard, . . ., acres of pasture, an acre of wood and two acres of arable land, &c. in the city and county of the city of Coventre.

Grant of the Almshouse in Bablacke to Trustees.

7 James I., July 15th (1609).—Letters Patent of a grant for ever by James the First (made in consideration of payment of £100) to Edward Stapleton esq., Henry Sewall of Coventrie, draper, and Humfrey Wightwick of the same city, grocer, and their heirs and assigns, of the Almshouse in Bablacke built by Thomas Bonde and the chapel and chamber adjoining the same Almshouse, and of a close of pasture called Hickfield in Coundon co. Warwick, and of lands, tenements and rents &c. in Old Fillonghley, New Fillonghley. Alspade and Merelbrookes co. Warwick, and of a messuage called the Moat House in Spoonestreete (sic) in Coventrie, and of divers other lands and tenements &c. in Coventrie and elsewhere.

Commission for raising a Loan.

2 Charles I., October 11th (1626).—Commission for raising a loan for the King in the city and county of Coventre: appointing William Earl of Northampton, Robert Earl of Monmouth, Foulke Lord Brooke, and the Mayor and aldermen of the said city to be Commissioners for the said purpose.

Commission for levying a Proportion of the Money voted by Parliament.

18 Charles I., April 4th (1642).—Commission appointing the Mayor of Coventre for the time being, and Henry Million, John Clarke, Thomas Ward, William Jeffyn and John Baker, aldermen of the said city, and John Hales and Richard Greene esquires, and Thomas Basnettt, to be commissioners for levying a proportion of the money voted by the present Parliament by an annexed Statute, entitled "An Act for the raiseing and levyinge of moneyes for the necessary defence and great affaires of the kingdomes of England and Ireland and for the payment of debt undertaken by the Parliament"; and further requiring the Sheriffs of the said city and county to aid the said Commissioners in executing their commission.

Letters Patent for the Re-constitution of the Corporation, and for the Confirmation of the Ancient Charters.

15 Charles II., July 6th (1663).—Letters Patent to the Mayor bailiffs and community of the city and county of Coventre, for the re-constitution of the Corporation; With Inspeximus and Confirmation of charters grauted by previous sovereigns, to wit, James I., Elizabeth, Mary, Edward VI., Henry VIII., Henry VII., Edward IV., Henry VI., Henry IV., Richard II., Edward III., Edward II., Henry III., and Henry II.

Ordinances for the City's better Government.

35 Charles II., October 31st (1683).—Letters Patent of concessions and ordinances made by King Charles the Second, for the better government of the Borough and City of Coventre.