The borough of Kings Lynn
Charters, letters patent, etc.

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Institute of Historical Research

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Historical Manuscripts Commission

Year published

1887

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Pages

185-209

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'The borough of Kings Lynn: Charters, letters patent, etc.', The Manuscripts of the Corporations of Southampton and Kings Lynn: Eleventh report, Appendix; part III (1887), pp. 185-209. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=67105 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Charters, letters patent, etc.

(b) Charters, Letters Patent, and Privy Seal Writs.

11th century.—Charter (Latin and Saxon) of privileges, granted by King Cnut to the monks of St. Edmund's Bury; the Saxon part of the instrument having been translated into the following English by the late Mr. C. W. Goodwin,—"In the name of the Almighty Lord, I. Cnut, king, make known to all men concerning the counsel which I have taken with my counsellors, for my soul's need and for the benefit of all my people, that is to say:—That I grant eternal freedom to the holy king Saint Edmund in such wise henceforth as he had it heretofore in the place where he rests, and I will that this freedom stand in his dominion unchanged, from the power of every bishop of the shire whatsoever eternally free. And so often as men pay army-money or shipmoney let the township pay, according as other men do, to the behoof of the monks, who shall therein serve [God] in our behalf. And we have chosen that no man shall ever convert the place to the use of men of another order, unless he would be cut off from the communion of God and all his saints. And I grant to the monks for their nourishment all the fishery which Ulfkytel owned at Wylla, and my toll of fish which arises to me along the sea-coast. And my queen Ælgyfu grants to the saints four thousand eels with their services which pertain to them, at Lakinge hithe. And I grant to them jurisdiction over all their townships in all their land, which they now have, and may hereafter acquire by God's grace." Regarded with suspicion by Kemble, and pronounced a forgery by Hickes, this interesting document may be said to have recovered the confidence of Saxon scholars through the critical judgment and ingenuity of the late Mr. C. W. Goodwin, who offered cogent reasons for thinking it a genuine performance, in a paper to be found in the Fourth Volume of "Norfolk Archæology."—Also, resting amongst the Lynn Muniments, a Latin Charter, purporting to be a confirmation of King Cnut's charter, by his son Hardecnut. Forbearing to pronounce this second charter an altogether spurious fabrication, on account of its penmanship, which, in the absence of strong reasons for declaring the document a piece of pure imposture, might be assigned to the hand of the same twelfth-century copyist of a genuine writing, Mr. Goodwin produced internal evidence that the document is nothing more than one of the ingenious forgeries, of which the monastic scriptoria were fruitful. How these two writings came into the possession of the burgesses of Lynn is a matter of conjecture; but as the endorsements of both parchments demonstrate them to have been at Bury so late as 1536, it has been reasonably assumed that the genuine charter and the later fabrication came to the Mayor and burgesses of King's Lynn, together with the title-deeds of a property (formerly pertaining to Bury Abbey), which they bought at Brandon co. Norfolk, and have since sold. For further particulars of these interesting MSS. readers are referred to Mr. Goodwin's masterly essay (Norfolk Archœology vol. IV.) "On two Ancient Charters, In the Possession of the Corporation of King's Lynn."

14 September, 6 John.—Charter of concessions by King John to the Burgesses of Lenn, with clause granting to them "quietanciam murdri infra burgum de Lenna et quod nullus eorum faciat duellum," and a clause saving the rights of the Bishop of Norwich and his successors, and of the Earl of Arundel and his heirs. Dated at Lutgershall.—Also, duplicate of the same charter, with a different arrangement of the names of the witnesses, amongst whom appears Alan Basset, a name that is not placed in the testamentary clause of the other writing.

6 February, 17 Henry III.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter of concessions, dated at Lutgershall by King John on 14th September in the 6th year of his reign to the Burgesses of Lenn. Dated at Westminster.

14 April, 39 Henry III.—Charter, entitled "Ne quis pro alio distringatur," to the Burgesses of Lenn. Dated at Windsor.—Also, duplicate of the same charter.

26 March, 52 Henry III.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter of concessions, dated at Lutgershall by King John on 14th September in the 6th year of his reign to the burgesses of Lenn; With further Grant to the same burgesses of power to elect their mayors, in accordance with a charter granted to them in former time by the Bishop of Norwich and his Chapter:—"Cumque quondam Norwic' Episcopus et Capitulum suum Norwic' concesserint et carta sua confirmaverint prefatis burgensibus quod ipsi per suam eleccionem creare possint sibi aliquem de suis in maiorem et maiorem ab eis creatum cidem Episcopo et successoribus suis presentare sicut per cartam eorundem quam inspeximus nobis constat evidenter, Nos pro . . . . . concessimus pro . . . . . prefatis Burgensibus et heredibus suis quod loco prepositi sui predicti decetero eligant maiorem et maiorem suum sic electum teneant sine impedimento nostri vel heredum nostrorum imperpetuum qui quidem Maior namium illorum qui thelonium vel consuetudinem a Burgensibus predictis ceperint excepta civitate London' ut superius inde apud Lenn capiat &c." Dated at Westminster.

29 November, 9 Edward I.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter of concessions, dated at Lutgershall by King John on the 14th September of the 6th year of his reign to the burgesses of Lenn; With Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Westminster by Henry the Third on the 26th March in the 52nd year of his reign to the same burgesses. Dated at Westminster.

17 February, 18 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor bailiffs and good people at Lenne; For the equipment and setting forth of the ships of the town, so that they may be ready at Portesmouth by mid-lent next ensuing, in accordance with orders given them by the King's Admiral towards the north. Dated from Westminster.

30 September, 19 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor, steward and bailiffs of Lenne; Enjoining them, if they would escape heavy loss and their sovereign's indignation, to do what they shall be told by the King's Admiral towards the north and John de Harsick, or by either of them, who have been despatched to the parts of Lenne on certain of the writer's necessities. Dated at Mersefeld.

20 July, 29 Edward I.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Westminster by Henry the Third, on the 16th February of the 13th year of his reign to the burgesses of Oxford: With Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter of concessions, dated at Westminster by the same King Henry the Third, on the 26th of March in the 41st year of his reign, to the burgesses of Oxford. Dated at Caldstrem per manum nostram.

5 April, 33 Edward I.—Charter of concessions to the burgesses of Lenn:—Granting that they may have their Gild Merchant, together with all lands and buildings pertaining to the same gild: that the same burgesses shall not be impleaded out of the borough by foreigners, in respect to contracts, demands, or other matters made or done within the borough; and that the Mayor for the time being of Lenn may make reasonable distresses for talliages and other reasonable aids, assessed and to be levied on the community of the borough, for the use of the same community. Dated at Westminster.

7 April, 33 Edward I.—Letters Patent of Pardon and Release to the burgesses of Lenn, in respect to all trespasses, &c. said to have been done by them in assessing divers talliages on the community of the said town, without the unanimous assent of the same community, and in levying the same talliages from the poor and but moderately endowed men of the same community, and other great sums of money under colour of certain common fines, heretofore made by them for divers causes, beyond the sums to which the same fines extended themselves, and in converting to their own use, and not to the advantage of the said community, nor to the reparation (emendacionem) of the same town, a great part of the same talliages and other different sums of money formerly levied in the same town, as well by occasion of the aforesaid fines as by occasion of murage granted unto them by us, and also in committing divers "forestalla et prisas" of merchantable things coming to the same town, of their own peculiar authority, against the law of our kingdom, and in establishing and using in the same town certain corruptions, contrary as well to common law as to law-merchant. Dated at Westminster.

26 May, 35 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor and bailiffs of Lenne. For their prompt and zealous compliance with a recent ordinance that all chattels and moveable things, forfeited to the King in the ports of his realm by offenders against "le statut de la monoie," be no longer delayed, but immediately on the very days of their becoming forfeit be seized into the King's hand by his servants in those places, and without delay remitted to the Chamberlains at the receipt of his Exchequer. It being ordered that no one, high or low, of what condition so ever, be spared in this matter. Don' a Kardoyl.

16 May, 6 Edward II.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Westminster by Edward the First, on the 29th of November in the 9th year of his reign, to the burgesses of Lenn, and also of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Westminster by the same King Edward the First, on the 5th of April in the 33rd year of his reign, to the same burgesses; with grant to the same burgesses of freedom throughout the kingdom, "de panagio muragio, kanagio; Salvo jure Episcopi Norwycen' domini dicti burgi et successorum suorum." Dated at Westminster.—Also a duplicate of the same charter.

28 September, 11 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ to the Bailiffs and good people of the town of Lenne. For that news has come to us that our enemies of Scotland have laid siege to our town of Berewyk-onTwede with a great number of people, wherefore we have need to send thither men and ships for the rescue of our said town and the safety of our people who are there, We pray and charge you as especially as we are able that you will aid us sufficiently and with good will with your navy well equipt with men and victuals in aid, for the rescue of our aforesaid town.—Promise being given of reasonable repayment of the costs to which the bailiffs and good people shall put themselves in the matter; order being given for their ships and men to be at Scardeburgh on the 12th of next October, to proceed thence in the company of Simon de Driby who has been appointed "cheveteyn de la navic" about to be sent for the rescue of the aforesaid town. Dated at Eu'Wykes.

28 March, 12 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor, bailiffs, and good people of the town of Lenne; Enjoining them to comply with the requirements of the Bishop of Norwich, Monsr Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke and Monsr Walter of Norwich, or two of the three, touching aid of ships and men for the king's navy, to be for a time at the charges of the town and afterwards to remain in the king's service and also in his pay, for the despatch of his war with Scotland. Dated at Euer Wyk'. Though it remains at Lynn, this writ is no longer in the hands of the Corporation.

1 August, 16 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor and bailiffs of the town of Lenne (on information that many ships charged with victuals have come to the said town), Ordering and strictly charging that no such ships, that have or shall come thither, be permitted to discharge there, but be required to proceed with their victuals to the North parts for the sustenance of the king and 'hoste." Don' a Noef Chastel-sur-Tyne.

5 August, 16 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor and Bailiffs of the town of Lenne, on information that divers ships laden with wheat, rye and other victuals have entered the haven of the said town. Referring to previous letters on the same subject, and expressing astonishment that he has heard nothing in reply to them, the King orders the Mayor and bailiffs to permit no such vessels to discharge at Lenne, but on pain of forfeiture and his further displeasure to compel all of them to proceed promptly with their freight for the sustenance of himself and his host. Don' a Goseford.

1 April, 9 Edward III.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Westminster by Edward the Second, on the 16th of May in the 6th year of his reign, to the burgesses of Lenn: With further grant that (the burgesses of Lenn having been heretofore accustomed to bequeath by will their tenements in the said burgh according to custom) the wills touching tenements bequeathed in the said burgh may be proved and enrolled in the Guildhall before the Mayors and burgesses for the time being of the said borough; With further grant of freedom from arrest to the said burgesses and their successors in respect to their own persons, and also in respect to their ships, merchandise, goods and chattels, "pro debito aliquo unde principales debitores plegii seu manucaptores non existant aut pro delictis et transgressionibus aliorum infra regnum nostrum." Dated at Nottingham. —Also, a duplicate of the same charter.

24 February . . . . . Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor and the community of Bishop's Lenne. It having come to the King's knowledge that certain people of the said town are causing fear and trouble there, to his injury and to the prejudice and damage of his most dear and well-beloved William, Bishop of Norwyc and seigneur of the said town, the king bids the same Mayor and community, under pain of forfeiture, to alter their demeanour, and bear themselves otherwise if they would escape his most grievous anger. Dated at Westminster.

8 August, 10 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor and bailiffs of Lenne: Bidding them deliver for reasonable payment to Roger Daketon, the King's larderer, a sufficient ship for taking by sea five thousand fish between Lenne and Euerwykes for the use of the King's household.—Don' . . . a Nicole.

9 August, 10 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor and bailiffs of Lenne, bidding them to do what is right to Walter le Cotillor Deuer-Wyk' and his wife Isabel in respect to their requirements. Don' . . . a Nicole. Though it remains at Lynn this writing has passed from the hands of the Corporation.

5 November, 11 Edward.—Privy Seal Mandate addressed to the Mayor and community, for immediate payment to the King's larderer, Roger de Accon, of the fifty marks due from them for provision of fish for the King's household. Dated from Westminster.

17 April, 15 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ addressed to the Mayor of Lenne. A letter of credence for John Lambert, in which the Mayor is enjoined to put perfect trust in the said John Lambert, who has been enjoined to confer with the Mayor, and give him particular information, respecting certain of the king's most urgent needs. Dated at Westminster.

27 April, 1343.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation, dated by Brother William de Claxton Prior to the Church of the Holy Trinity of Norwyc and the Convent or Chapter of the same place, for the perpetual confirmation to the burgesses of Lenn of all liberties and things granted to them in former time by the charter of John by God's grace Bishop of Norwich. Dated at Norwyc, sealed with the seal of the chapter, and endorsed "Confirmacio libertatum ville Lenn concessarum per Capitulum Norwici juxta libertates Oxon.'"

20 May, 17 Edward III.—Letters Patent of a Mandate to the Mayor and honest men of Bishop's Lenn. For the strict observance of the Statute of Warranty provided for every person impleaded respecting lands in the city of London, who shall call a foreigner for Warranty, and also for the observance of the provision that, when a plea shall have been moved in London by brief respecting any tenement in the same city, it shall not be lawful for the tenant to make waste "de tenemento petito pendente placito predicto." Dated at Westminster.

24 December, 18 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ, addressed to the Mayor bailiffs and good people of Lenne, for the timely provision of one hundred of the most soldierlike and vigorous men of the said town, armed in accordance with the precise requirements of the present writing, and for their punctual appearance on the appointed day of mid-Lent next coming at Portesmouth, thence to proceed in the king's service, in the expedition for the rescue and defence of his Duchy of Gascoyn.

5 August, 23 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ, addressed to the Bailiffs and community of the town of Lenne; For their prompt and zealous action in drawing together all the ships galleys and other vessels of their port and coast, and in putting them upon the sea, to follow the King's fleet, in accordance with directions to be given by the bearer of the writ, Peter de Donewyz, the King's clerk. Dated at Westminster.

—1352 A.D.—Indenture of Agreement, whereby William by God's grace Bishop of Norwich, with the consent of his chapter, for the determination of all dispute and contention between him on the one part and the Burgesses and community of the town of Lenn on the other part, respecting the election of the Mayor of the said town, granted that henceforth the burgesses of the said town should be able to elect annually their Mayor, on condition that every Mayor of Lenne so elected and sworn in the said town be presented within three days of his election at Geywode by his comburgesses to the said bishop or to the same bishop's steward in case of the bishop's absence from his manor, and at his presentation promise to discharge his official duties faithfully, and preserve from injury the rights and liberties of the Church of Norwich within the said burgh. Dated at Norwich.

20 July, 30 Edward.—Lettters under the Privy Seal to the well beloved Bailiffs and good people of the town of Lenn; In acknowledgment of their manifestations of affectionate concern for the writer's honour and profit, and for the honour and advantage of all his people, and also for the good despatch "de n're guerre Descoce.", Don' . . . . a Euerwyk'.

2 July, 33 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ to the Bailiffs of Len, charging them "si marchanz ou autres gentz viegnent a la dite ville par mer, ou par terre, od nuls ostours qui soient a vendre, et vous puissez trover nul de eux qi soit plus graunt de corps qe autres ne soient communalment, qe ceu facez prendre a n're oeps, ia soit ce qil sit les pennes brisees." Don' a Smerden.

10 November, 34 Edward III.—Letters Patent of Special Pardon to the Mayor, burgesses and community of the town of Bishops Lenn co. Norfolk. Dated at Westminster.

20 November, 41 Edward.—Privy Seal Writ, addressed to the Mayor and bailiffs of Lenne: For their zealous compliance with the requirements and furtherance of the business of John de Swanlond the king's clerk, and William Getour the king's mariner, who have been appointed to take at Lenne suitable and sufficient ships for the king's service. Don' . . . . "en Park de Wyndesores."

4 May, 51 Edward III.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Walton on 10 July in the eleventh year of his reign by Edward II. to the Mayor and burgesses of the towne of Lenne, and granting during pleasure to the same Mayor and burgesses the custody of the same town, and its defence against the attacks of foreigners, and all others being the king's enemies. Dated at Westminster.

9 February, 1 Richard II.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Nottingham by Edward the Third on the 1st of April in the 9th year of his reign, to the Burgesses of Lenn. Dated at Westminster.

17 May, 9 Richard II.—Letters Patent of a Commission addressed to John Brunham, Mayor of the town of Lenn, and to John Waryn, Richard de Honton, Roger Paxman, Henry de Botele, and Thomas Curson, to array all the able-bodied men of Lenn and also of South Lenn between the ages of sixty and sixteen years, and to put the town together with South Lenn in a state of defense against the King's enemies of France and their adherents and all his other enemies; With power to the commissioners to levy moneys on the inhabitants of the burgh and of South Lenn for the execution of the commission, and to punish persons resisting their orders.—Dated at Westminster.

3 September, 16 Richard II.—Letters Patent of Licence of Alienation: granting to John de Brunham and Thomas de Conteshale of Lenn licence to give and assign to the Alderman and brethren of the Gild Merchant of The Holy Trinity of Bishop's Lenn five messuages, a quay, ten pounds six shillings and eight pence of rent, and the profit of the passage of a boat beyond the port of Bishop's Lenn. With Licence to the Alderman and brethren of the said gild to hold the same messuages, quay and rents and profit to themselves and their successors for ever, for religious uses, the Statute of the Mortmain notwithstanding. The grant being made from special favour and also in consideration of the sum of one hundred and twenty pounds, paid to the King by Henry de Betele the alderman and by the brethren of the said Gild.—Dated at Beverley.

20 September, 16 Richard II.—Letters Patent of Licence to John de Brunham mayor of the town of Bishop's Lenn, to give and assign to the Mayor and community of the said town a certain messuage and a certain rent of seventy-five shillings and seven pence half-penny in the said town, and also of licence to Richard Dun to give and assign to the same Mayor and community a certain rent of twelve pence and the profit of the passage of a boat out of the port of the same town, with their appurtenances in the same town: With licence to the same Mayor and community and their successors to hold the same, together with other things mentioned in the grant, to religious uses, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.—Dated at Wodestoke.

11 January, 2 Henry IV.—Letters Patent of Mandate to the Mayor and bailiffs and community of the town of Lenn: For their speedy preparation and complete equipment this side the quindene of Easter next coming, of a barge fully provided to serve as a vessel of war against the King's enemies.—Dated at Westminster.

27 May, 2 Henry (IV.)—Letters Patent of Licence to John Prentys, Thomas Throthe, John Berwyk, John Meye, and Robert Ferrour of Southlenn and John Wynteryngham, to found and make of themselves and other persons, as well men as women, in the Church of All Saints of Southlenn, a gild and fraternity to the praise and honour of the Holy Trinity; With power to the brethren and sisters of the same gild to elect yearly and as often as shall be needful from themselves a Master or Warden, and further licence (of alienation) to William Gaysle chaplain to give and assign to the Master or Warden the brethren and sisters aforesaid a certain messuage and a rent of twelve pence, for the support of the burdens of the said gild, and also to same Master or Warden brethren and sisters to take the same messuage and rent and hold them to themselves for ever, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding.—Dated at Leycestre.

16 March, 11 Henry IV.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Westminster by Richard the Second, on the 9th of February in the 1st year of his reign, to the Burgesses of Lenn. —Dated at Westminster.

10 April, 1 Henry V.—Letters Patent of Exemplication of Letters Patent, dated at Westminster by Henry IV. on the 25th of November in the 14th year of his reign, of Inspeximus of a certain memorandum touching certain decrees of the Venerable Thomas by God's grace Archbishop of Canterbury and Chancellor, upon certain discords and controversies between certain "de potentioribus" of the town of Bishop's Lenn of the one part, and the Mayor burgesses and community of the said town of the other part, respecting certain oppressions and extortions &c. committed by the said "potentiores" on the said Mayor burgesses and community, and upon certain articles &c. touching the same,—viz. A memorandum that, whereas certain strifes and controversies had arisen between Robert Botekesham late mayor of the said town and certain of the Potentiores of the same town of the one part and the Burgesses and community of the town of the other part concerning certain oppressions and extortions &c. alleged to have been done against the said Burgesses and Community by the said Mayor and Potentiores, and whereas afterwards Roger Galion Mayor of the aforesaid town and the Potentiores Mediocres and Inferiores and whole community of the same town in respect to the said alleged oppressions and extortions &c. submitted themselves to each and all the decrees and ordinances of certain eighteen persons set forth in a certain writing of Submission, and whereas for the greater security of the same Submission and of the fulfilment of the same decrees and ordinances, certain persons have become bound in certain sums of money to the said Mayor and community, as is set forth in the said Writing of Submission, running in these words 'To all Believers in Christ to whom &c. . .

. . . . Know that we as well the Mayor and potentiores as the mediocres and inferiores aforesaid in respect to all and each of the said discords and strifes &c. . . . . . and all the said oppressions and extortions &c. . . . . . by these presents firmly submit ourselves to the decrees and ordinances of the eighteen underwritten persons, namely, Thomas Waterden, Robert Brunham, John Spicer, James Brigge, John Thoresby, Bartholomew Sisterne, William Briceham, John Bilneye, Bartholomew Patypas, William Baret, Philip Franke, William Hereford comburgesses of Lenn aforesaid, William Halleyate, John Thilney, Robert Appelton, John Cokfeld, Thomas Middleton, and John Cressyngham inferiores not burgesses of the town of Lenn aforesaid, Which decrees and ordinances and every decree and ordinance to be pronounced by the same eighteen persons &c. . .

. . . We the Mayor and Potentiores for our part and We the Mediocres and the Inferiores not burgesses for our part and the whole community of the town of Lenn aforesaid by these presents promise to fulfil in all things; and further for the greater security of this present Submission and for the faithful fulfilment of the decrees and ordinances of the said eighteen persons, on the part of the Potentiores, Edmund Belleyetere, Thomas Waterden, John Wintworth, Thomas Brygge, Robert Brunham, John Brandon, Ralph Bedyngham, William Hounderpound, James Brygge, Richard Thorp, Richard Dendy, John Wesenham, Bartholomew Systerne, Andrew Swanton, John Bolt, John Spicer, John Home, John Lakynghithe, Robert Salesbury, William Briccham, John Thoresby and Thomas Hunt have each been bound by themselves by their obligatory writing in the sum of one hundred pounds to the Mayor and community of Lenn aforesaid and their successors, And on the part of the Mediocres and of the Inferiores not being burgesses William Baret, Robert Narburgh, Adam Whyte, William Hereford, Richard Waterden, Alexander Draper, Nicholas Dunton, Thomas Ploket, Richard Letthour, John Bilneye, John Masye, Philip Franke, John Muriell, John Butworth, William Style, Walter Todenham, William Colles, William Baldewyn, Richard Constable, Geoffery Gatleo, William Waterdon, John Alger, Henry Elmham, Nicholas Martyn, John Bentleo, John Frost, Ralph Topcrofte, Thomas Worsted, Thomas Walsyngham bocher, Robert Burgeys, John Brekerop, John Drewe, John Fylyppe, William Spire, James Nichasson, Hugh Cook, Bartholomew Toftes, John Cawod, Robert Randes, John Loueday sporyour, Richard Wyche, Peter Cambell, Philip Bylneye, Adam Candeler, Bartholomew Petypas, Henry Fouldon, John Berewyke, John Wynche, William Waldon, John Syleden, Richard Thewyck, John Parmenter, John Warner, John Hert, Thomas Skarlet, Henry Drewe, John Shermon, Henry Gil, William Norfolk, John Tydde, John Maupas, John Sisterne, Geoffrey Joynour, Richard Lyndeseye, Thomas Rudham, John Dytton, John Noble, Simon Rody, William Blakeneye, Edward Bonet, Thomas Paynot, John Beuerleo, Thomas Truyt, Reginald Castollacre, John Wythe, John Crosse, William Bedyngham, Thomas Langton, Robert Hadlee, Thomas Langton, John Brightyowe, Thomas Throthe, Adam Marcant, John Brunham senior, burgesses of Lenn aforesaid, have each been bound by themselves by their obligatory writing to the said Mayor and Community and their successors in the sum of fifty pounds of the money of England, And John Wyrham, William Hillyngton, John Perche, Richard Lyster, Nicholas Shermon, John Chesterton, Andrew Fourbour, Walter Baxter, Thomas Wyrmgeye skynner, John Wystede, Richard Gedney, John Kyng bocher, Nicholas Barbour, William Pye, John Franke, John Tamworthe, Stephen Lyster, Robert Gyle, William Wygenhale, John Broun taylour, Richard Pymond, Richard Caluebane, Robert Fourbour, John Candeler wolman, Thomas Lynmour, William Wolmon, John Wotton, Thomas Bonet, John Clerk barbour, John Melleford, Roger Fraunceys, John Crosse skynner, John Walpole bocher, Thomas Stalworth, William Wesenham cordwaner, John Worthyn, John Trunche, Roger Loksmythe, John Albot, John Hesell, William Peautrer, John Honton, John Swayn fletcher, William Pressour, John Barbour, Thomas Baryngton, John Gotthe, William Hanspe, John Wermegeys, John Walham, John Botthe draper, Thomas Gocche glover, Roger Broun barker, John Balder skynner, Robert Sadde, John Cambz, John Steynour, William Blome, William Luswyk, John Godyng, William Hallegate, John Tylneye, Robert Appelton, John Cokfeld, Thomas Midilton, and John Cressyngham, not being Burgesses of Lenne aforesaid, have each been bound by themselves by their obligatory writing in the sum of five pounds eleven shillings and two pence of the money of England to the aforesaid Mayor and community and their successors. . . . . . . . ." Sealed with the common seal of the town of Lenn, and dated 15 Dec., 13 Henry IV. It is next recorded in the memorandum that the said eighteen persons, appointed to make decrees for the settlement of the matters in controversy, being hindered in coming together and unable to do so, agreed and decreed that whatsoever (with the assent of the Mayor and community of the town) the greater part of them, so long as it was a greater part consisting of at least ten persons, determined respecting any of the said matters, should be firm and valid as though all eighteen had been present at their decision; this agreement being made by a writing, dated in the Gildhall of Lenn on 8 April, 13 Henry IV., and set forth in the memorandum, which goes on to record how, in accordance with powers given to them, the said eighteen persons (1) disallowed the claim made by John Belleyetere, one of the party of the Potentiores, on the Mayor and community for 36l. 13s. 8d. for expenses incurred by him when he was mayor of the town; (2) also declared unjust and disallowed the claim for 70l. 15s. 10d. made on the Mayor and community by Thomas Watirden, one of the party of the Potentiores, for expenses alleged to have been incurred by him, when he was Mayor of the town; (3) also declared unjust and disallowed the claim for 80l. 10s. 0d. made on the Mayor and community of the town by John Wyntworthe, one of the party of the Potentiores, in respect to expenses alleged to have been incurred by him when he was Mayor of the town; (4) also declared unjust and disallowed the claim for 69l. 2s. 4½d. made on the Mayor and community by Thomas Watirden, John Bitteryng, and Thomas Hunt, executors of the testament of Robert Botekesham, late Mayor of the town, in respect to expenses alleged to have been incurred by the said Robert Botekesham deceased during his said mayoralty; and (5) also declared unjust and disallowed the claim for 122l. 1s. 5d. made on the Mayor and community by Thomas Brigge, one of the party of the Potentiores in respect to expenses alleged to have been incurred by him for the town's benefit, in the times when he was Mayor of the town; and (7) granted a quit-claim to John Brunham, Edmund Belleyetere, Thomas Watirden, and to the aforesaid executors of Robert Botekesham, and to John Wynteworth, of the party of the Potentiores and formerly mayors in respect to a certain sum of 457l. 19s. 7d., which sum, in addition to very many other sums of money spent against Henry le Dispenser, late Bishop of Norwich, the aforesaid John Brunham, Edmund Belleyetere, Thomas Watirden, Robert Botekesham, and John Wynteworth, whilom Mayors of the town, from the first to the 13th year of Henry the Fourth, disbursed without the consent of the aforesaid community unjustly and inordinately, to the serious prejudice and extreme depoverishment of the same community; and (8) decreed that henceforth the Mayor of the said town should receive in accordance with ancient custom 10l. for his fee for the year of his mayoralty, and further for his reward whatsoever the Community of the said town (videlicet, potentiores mediocres et inferiores non burgenses) shall put aside for this purpose with regard to his merit or demerit, this being however observed with respect to rewards of this kind that the mayor do not exceed the same; and further (9) decreed that the Mayor answer to the Community for all arrears of all contributions coming up for the town's benefit during the year of his mayoralty; and further (10) decreed that yearly each mayor should choose and take to himself three persons of the Potentiores, and three persons of the Mediocres, and three persons of the Inferiores, not being burgesses of the aforesaid community, which nine persons together with the said mayor should, during the year of his said mayoralty, have full power to deal with the rents, &c. of the same community; and (11.) further decreed that the Inferiores not being burgesses of the same community, who hitherto against order of justice have been deprived of their certain privileges, should have and enjoy for ever all the privileges granted to them by a certain Composition, made between John formerly by God's grace Bishop of Norwich of the one part and the Mayor and Community of the town of Lenn of the other part: The aforesaid ordinances and decrees being embodied and set forth in certain writing dated at Lenn, by the majority of the aforesaid eighteen persons on 20 May, 13 Henry IV., and assented to by the Mayor and Community at the same place and time, and further confirmed by the several writings of assent, made by individuals of the aforesaid Potentiores, Mediocres, and Inferiores of the said town of Lenn, and dated respectively on 16 July, 18 July, and 21 July, 13 Henry IV. The remainder of the memorandum being the record of proceedings in the Court of Chancery for the confirmation of the aforesaid ordinances and decrees made by the aforesaid eighteen persons; the record closing with the aforesaid Chancellor's decree for the confirmation of the same ordinances and decrees, delivered on 17 November, 14 Henry IV. Dated at Westminster.—Also, a copy of the same Letters Patent of Exemplification, made on membranes stitched together in the form of a pamphlet.— Also, in connection with the foregoing Letters Patent of Exemplification, it may be observed that there remain amongst the Lynn Muniments the three obligatory writings set forth in the same Letters Patent and said therein to have been dated respectively at Lenn on the 20th of May, the 16th of July, and the 21st of July, in the 13th year of Henry the Fourth.

20 May, 2 Henry V.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, dated at Westminster by Henry the Fourth, on the 16th of March, in the 11th year of his reign, to the burgesses of Lenn. Dated at Leicester.

2 June, 4 Henry V.—Letters Patent of Exemplification of the Tenor of a certain instrument for the Revocation of divers new ordinances and constitutions and for the reestablishment of the ancient constitutions and customs for the election of officers in the town of Bishops Lenn. "Henricus &c. . . . . salutem: We have inspected the tenor of a certain revocation of certain new ordinances, made in the town of Bishop's Lenn by certain late burgesses, made by the Mayor jurats and community of the said town, sent to us into our Chancery in these words.

To all sons of the holy mother the Church who shall see these presents. We the Mayor jurats and the rest of the comburgesses of the town of Bishop's Lenn and the whole community of the same town greeting in the Saviour of all men, Whereas our progenitors and predecessors of happy memory formerly burgesses of the aforesaid town from time in which memory does not stand for the better and healthier government of the same town were accustomed to make twenty and four jurats of the more discreet honest and worthy and more sufficient burgesses of that town and a certain election of a Mayor chamberlains common clerk common serjeant-at-mace, and other officers and ministers in the same town yearly by virtue and authority of certain liberties and privileges granted to our said progenitors and predecessors and their heirs and successors by the charters of the noble progenitors of our most excellent prince and lord in Christ the lord Henry by the grace of God King of England and France and lord of Ireland with the assent and at the special requisition of the then Bishop of Norwich of memory to be honoured and lord of the said Town and confirmed by our same most dread lord the King, under certain manner and form following, That is to say That all the burgesses of the aforesaid town yearly in the vigil of the Feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist be summoned and warned by the common serjeant-at-mace, in the name and by the authority of the Mayor for the time being of the said town to assemble on the following morrow with the Mayor and jurats for the time being of the said Town at the Guildhall of that town as well for electing the Mayor as for electing the aforesaid officers and ministers, who being thus assembled the Alderman for the time being of the Gild of the holy Trinity of Lenn or any other person appointed in his place by him if he shall not be able to attend respecting the election of this kind choose and nominate four of the more worthy and more sufficient burgesses of the same town not being of the state and degree of the aforesaid jurats, and then being there present, to elect to themselves eight other of their comburgesses likewise not being of the said state or degree of the twenty-four Jurats for making choice of the Mayor and the rest of the officers and ministers of the said town for the year then next following, which twelve burgesses thus elected, a certain accustomed oath having been first taken of the common clerk of the aforesaid town, should proceed at once [cum effectu] to making election of one of the aforesaid twenty and four jurats and of no other to the office of Mayor of that town and of others of their comburgesses and others not burgesses to the offices of chamberlains, common clerk, common serjeant-at-mace and janitors and also to the offices of belleman and wayte in that town for the year next following; Who being thus then elected to the aforesaid offices should on the next following Michaelmas-day and not before in the aforesaid Gildehall receive without delay of the common clerk of the aforesaid town the oaths pertaining and customary to their offices, which having been thus done they should continue in do and exercise their offices of this kind throughout one entire year. Respecting the election indeed of the aforesaid twenty and four jurats, this was the ancient custom that as often as it should happen that one or more of the said twenty and four jurats should die or voluntarily relinquish his state and degree or otherwise his demerits compelling him to be reasonably removed and expelled from the same, then the Mayor for the time being of the same town and the rest of the remaining jurats in the presence of all and each of the rest of the burgesses of that town wishing to be present at warning made to them on the part of the aforesaid Mayor by the aforesaid sergeant-at-mace in the aforesaid Gildhall should so often and when there be need elect admit and ordain another or others of the more worthy honest discreet and more sufficient of the aforesaid burgesses in the place of him or them thus dying retiring or being removed to do and exercise the state and degree of this kind, who being thus elected admitted and ordained the customary oath having been taken should continue for life in the state and degree of this kind, unless it should happen from the causes aforesaid that they or any one of them should voluntarily retire or be removed therefrom, And moreover if it should happen that any one or more of the coroners or constables should die or on account of old age or any other reasonable cause should retire or be removed, then the said Mayor for the time being should cause the burgesses of that town to be warned by the common serjeant aforesaid to be in the aforesaid Guildhall for electing the deficient officer or officers of this kind and on the appearance of all his comburgesses wishing to be present there, the aforesaid Mayor should nominate four of the same comburgesses, who should in like manner nominate eight others of the comburgesses then being there present, which having being done the twelve thus nominated, the customary oath having been first taken, should elect and ordain another person or persons in place of him or them of the coroners or constables aforesaid either wanting or removed, Which ordinances elections and ancient customs being held enduring and being observed in the aforesaid manner our aforesaid progenitors and predecessors the Mayor jurats burgesses and community of that town rested happily under the sweetness of peace and quiet throughout the days of prosperous times, But now greviously discords strifes controversies riots dissensions and quarrels have for long sprung up and increased amongst the comburgesses and others of the same town, by reason of certain new ordinances and constitutions concerning and about the elections of the Mayor and the rest of the jurats officers and ministers aforesaid, made by certain late burgesses of the aforesaid town and others adhering to them and more than wont which is to be deplored increase and grow in these days, the tenor of which new ordinances and constitutions in the form ensuing follows, Be it remembered that whereas lately divers dissensions discords and controversies have been moved and have arisen between the Mayor of the town of Bishop's Lenn and the more part of the burgesses of the aforesaid town on the one part, and certain others of the burgesses of the aforesaid town on the other part, about and concerning the yearly election and the manner and form of the election as well of the Mayor in the aforesaid town as of the chamberlains prelocutor common clerk common serjeant-atmace janitors and other ministers and officers wont to be yearly elected in the same town, and also about and concerning the election and the manner and form of the election of comburgesses of the aforesaid town whenever it may happen that they should be elected as well to the state and degree of the twenty and four jurats as often and whenever it may happen for any one or more of the said state and degree to die or voluntarily retire or for his or their demerits to be removed by the same as to the offices of coroners constables or others in the same town, The King our present dread Lord to whose ears through the suit of certain persons have resounded the aforesaid dissensions discords and controversies observing that the dissensions discords and controversies of this kind arising not only from the aforesaid causes but also from ancient discords not fully and cordially put to rest, between the aforesaid parties lying hid have broken forth anew between the same parties, and that by this the more quickly very many disturbances and commotions may easily result between the same parties and the rest of the burgesses of the said town and the community of the same, And wishing not only to take precaution against dangers of this kind, but to put an end to strifes, and more quietly and securely to reform and the more firmly to establish peace and tranquillity between the same parties, caused it by his royal power to be declared, that certain of the aforesaid parties should come before him, and caused his will respecting the premises to be declared to them, the aforesaid declaration being also thus made, he of his royal benignity urged the aforesaid parties for making concord renewing peace and altogether putting an end to strifes amongst themselves, that the same parties at the gracious instance of the same King by his royal authority and also with the unanimous consent and mere free and unforced will of the same parties made a final concord between them, concerning and about the aforesaid dissensions discords and controversies and in the following form respecting the elections and day of election of the Mayor jurats prelocutor and other officers following, and also in respect to the time of the Mayor's coming into the aforesaid mayoralty and the manner and form of the taking and receiving of his oath with the needful articles following being agreed unanimously for themselves and their successors that it should be held in the aforesaid town, That is to say, That henceforth the election of the Mayor in the aforesaid town should for ever be made yearly in the same town, in the manner and form in which it was used in the City of London, or at least to the greatest possible conformity with them of London, for so much that in the aforesaid town there are not had aldermen wards recorder nor divers other things as in the City of London but by statutes in the said town are twenty-four jurats, and that henceforth yearly that election take place on the day of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist, and he who had then been elected on Michaelmas day then next following and not before in the Gildhall of the aforesaid town, to the same town it was the custom that he should take the oath, the common clerk of the same town giving that oath to the same elected person, and that having been done he should take upon himself the state and degree and should continue in them, as the highest disposed, throughout an entire year, and as to the form and manner of the election, it was agreed that all burgesses of the aforesaid town who should be able and willing to assemble at the Guildhall of the same town in the aforesaid day of Decollation, for electing a Mayor of this kind, might come there freely, and the congregation of this kind having being made there should be public proclamation that no one under penalty of imprisonment presume to give voice to take part in making the said election unless he should be a comburgess or minister of the aforesaid town, And immediately afterwards it should be enjoined by the prelocutor and common clerk of the aforesaid town on all the burgesses thus assembled, That the same burgesses with good deliberation should then and there severally [divisim] elect and nominate two of the twenty-four jurats or of others who were formerly of the number of the twenty-four jurats, of the degree and state of the twentyfour jurats of this kind, notoriously not discharged on account of dishonesty or public causes or their demerits, which two thus to be chosen and nominated the same burgesses believed the more discreet more sufficient and more useful to the community of the twenty-four jurats and others aforesaid to take and hold the office of the Mayoralty to God's praise and the aforesaid towne's good fame advantage and honor, and thus under this form should be named the aforesaid two thus to be nominated, that it be first be enquired by the prelocutor and common clerk of the aforesaid burgesses, to whom in the first place and to whom in the second place they would wish to give their voices and this with due intervening pause, so that one of them may be named clearly, and those appointed to this work may be able to have full report of him before inquisition be made respecting the other, and it being well and carefully seen by the prelocutor and clerk aforesaid who in the first place and who in the second place in this matter have the larger number of voices amongst the aforesaid burgesses, For the true reporting of which and presenting it to the Mayor and jurats the prelocutor and clerk should be themselves amongst the burgesses aforesaid and the same prelocutor and clerk be firmly sworn forthwith to report publicly the names of those two persons, that is to say of him who had the greater number of voices for first, and of him who had the greater number of voices for second, faithfully and without fraud to the same twenty-four jurats in the chamber appointed for their session and state, and this being done, the Mayor of the aforesaid town first and then each of the aforesaid jurats should in series and secretly declare and each of them should declare his wish to the aforesaid prelocutor and clerk respecting the one or the other of those two persons whose names were thus presented to them the Mayor and jurats for to be then elected to be Mayor, And the same common clerk under the observation of the same prelocutor should write down severally and secretly the wishes in this respect of each of the aforesaid Mayor and jurats, and he of the aforesaid two thus presented on whom the greater part of the same Mayor and jurats may agree should be chosen and made Mayor for the year then next to come, and the election thus made faithfully should be announced immediately to the same burgesses, so that if the aforesaid two thus presented have an equal number of voices amongst the aforesaid Mayor and jurats, then the voice of the Mayor should be counted for two voices, so that in a case of this kind he who shall have the Mayor's aforesaid voice should be agreeably named chosen and had for Mayor of that town for the year then following. Also in respect to the election of four chamberlains in the aforesaid town it was agreed that every year, the aforesaid mayor having been elected and it having been agreed respecting him among the jurats and burgesses, forthwith two of the burgesses of the aforesaid town on which two the Mayor and jurats for the time being in the aforesaid [manner] shall have agreed for taking the state or office of a chamberlain or at least the greater part of the same twentyfour jurats shall have agreed, the voice of the Mayor being computed as is aforesaid for two voices in case that amongst the same Mayor and jurats both parties be equal in voices and a greater party be not found, should be elected in the aforesaid form to be two of the aforesaid chamberlains by the same Mayor and jurats, And for the election of two other chamberlains in every year aforesaid two other burgesses should be named and chosen for the two other chamberlains by the burgesses themselves being present, as for the election of a mayor, or by the greater part of the same, the testimony and record of the aforesaid prelocutor and clerk sworn in form aforesaid being always taken, as to which two of the burgesses of the aforesaid town the greater part of the burgesses taking part in the election shall agree [to elect] as is aforesaid, the intention of either party being that neither the said chamberlains nor either of them be in any year chosen out of the twenty-four jurats and that no one of the same jurats be in any manner taken to the office of those chamberlains. Also it was agreed that when anyone of the aforesaid twenty-four jurats shall die or it shall happen that any one of them shall voluntarily retire or be removed from the grade and state of the twenty-four jurats, either by withdrawal deposition or exoneration either on account of old age or infirmity of body or any other cause whatsoever, then immediately the Mayor for the time being should appoint a day for this matter and by the common sergeant-at-mace give notice to the twenty-four jurats and all the other burgesses aforesaid of the said day and warn them to be then in the Chamber and Gildhall aforesaid, and all the burgesses aforesaid not being of the number of the twenty-four jurats who may wish to come together, then and there should with good deliberation amongst themselves elect and name from amongst themselves two persons whom likewise they believe more discreet faithful and more sufficient men to take the state and degree of jurats to God's praise and the aforesaid town's advantage and honor, and that the aforesaid prelocutor and clerk to this in like manner sworn should be in this matter present amongst the same burgesses, who should in the chamber aforesaid of the twenty-four jurats in this respect faithfully and without fraud in accordance with their oath thus taken forthwith present publicly to the same jurats the names of those two of the aforesaid burgesses on whom all the aforesaid burgesses shall have agreed, or at least the greater part shall have agreed, which names being thus presented, if it may appear to the same twenty-four jurats or at least to the greater part of the same twenty-four jurats that the two aforesaid burgesses thus presented to take the state and degree of this kind are sufficiently discreet and sufficient or that either of them is sufficiently discreet and sufficient, then immediately he of the aforesaid two thus presented, on whom the greater part of the aforesaid twenty-four jurats shall agree for being the more discreet and more sufficient, should be taken and advanced to the degree and state of this kind by the same jurats, the oath customary in this respect having been first taken by him, and should forthwith be numbered with them and rated for one of them, Otherwise if it appear to the greater part of the same twenty-four jurats that neither of the aforesaid two is for any reasons in this respect sufficiently discreet and competent, then those persons being omitted the aforesaid burgesses should come together again immediately in the Gildhall, and in the places of the omitted persons should elect two others from themselves the same burgesses, and that as well the choice as the assumption to the aforesaid state and degree as well for that time as henceforth, when there be need for any persons to be chosen and assumed to the same, should be of the more discreet more faithful and more sufficient burgesses of the aforesaid town as is aforesaid in the aforesaid form. And it was agreed that no one henceforth should be elected to the aforesaid degree of the twenty-four jurats nor be established in that degree unless he be of free condition and have at least a hundred solidates of rent, And that if henceforth at an election of this kind there be elected a common victualler selling by retail, he should put aside this kind of selling of victuals and till he do so should not be taken to the same degree, and that after being assumed into the aforesaid degree, and during his continuance in the same degree, he should not be a common victualler as is aforesaid under penalty of removal from the aforesaid degree. And in like manner in all things as the twenty-four jurats are elected, that the coroners and constables should be elected whenever such officers need to be elected, this nevertheless being added that coroners of this kind and constables should be chosen indifferently from the twenty jurats or all other burgesses at the discretion of the electors. Also it was agreed and ordained that if anyone henceforth sue for the exoneration of anyone being of the state and degree of the twenty-four jurats, or the removal of the same person from the aforesaid degree and state for any cause whatsoever, or any one of the twenty-four jurats wish to sue for his own proper exoneration on account of old age sickness or infirmity of body or for any other cause whatsoever, the Mayor for the time being should on this appoint a certain day and give notice of the same day to all the jurats and burgesses aforesaid by warning them by the common serjeant-at-mace to be present in the aforesaid Chamber and Gildehall, and that on the coming together at the said day in their Chamber of the aforesaid jurats with the aforesaid Mayor, and of those of the burgesses who wish to be present in the Gildhall, and on mature deliberation had separately by them upon the reasons against thus removing and discharging anyone by any persons in this respect put forward, or upon the reasons for exonerating the same person alleged for his discharge by himself or by any other person in his name, if the reasons thus proposed and alleged appear effectual and reasonable to the greater part of the same Mayor and jurats, and also to a part of all the other burgesses being in the Gildhall, then the same jurat against whom the same reasons for his removal have been set forth, or by whom the same reasons have been alleged for his discharge, should be discharged from the aforesaid degree and state and another person to be elected in his place and in form hereabove specified, the customary oath being first taken, should be demanded and charged, Otherwise the aforesaid person should not be removed from the aforesaid degree and state nor at his own suit nor the suit of any one else be discharged from the same degree and state for that time in any way, And that in this respect the Mayor's voice be computed for two voices in case that in the discussion of the aforesaid reasons there be not found a greater party amongst the Mayor and jurats aforesaid, and as to how the greater part of the burgesses had itself in the aforesaid discussion, full credence be had in the prelocutor and clerk to this matter sworn and in the report to be made in this respect by the same in accordance with that which is contained more fully in the form set forth in respect to the election of the Mayor. And it was agreed that yearly at the Feast of St. Bartholomew, due warning having been made by the common serjeant-at-mace as well to all the twenty-four jurats as to all the other burgesses of the aforesaid town for assembling in the aforesaid Chamber and Gildhall, in the form aforesaid with the assent of all the burgesses not being of the grade of the twenty-four jurats or at the least of the greater part of the same there should be elected one of the burgesses not being of the state of the twenty-four jurats to be prelocutor of the aforesaid town for the year then next coming and that, immediately after election, the person thus elected should take his oath before the Mayor jurats and all the burgesses, and henceforth for the aforesaid year continue and exercise his abovesaid office, And that there should be a report and presentation in this case by the common clerk to this matter sworn, as to the burgess upon whom the greater part aforesaid of the burgesses should agree for the aforesaid prelocutor. Also in respect to the offices of common clerk common serjeant-at-mace janitor at the east gate janitor at the west gate and janitor at the gate of St. Anne in the aforesaid town and the office of belman and the office of the wayte for the same town it was agreed and ordained that every year there should be a nomination of men for the aforesaid offices by the Mayor and jurats for the time being, and this as well of the Burgesses as of all persons whatsoever according to the advice and discretion of the aforesaid Mayor and jurats, on the aforesaid day of the Decollation immediately after the making choice of the aforesaid chamberlains.

So that always if controversy respecting elections of this kind or anyone of them should in any way whatever be had amongst the aforesaid Mayor and jurats, those persons to be elected on whom the greater part of the aforesaid Mayor and jurats agree be appointed to the abovesaid offices, and be placed severally in the same according to the nomination thus had, contradiction or choice of the smaller part notwithstanding. Provided always that if a greater party cannot be found, but both parties be equal, that then the Mayor's voice be taken for two voices as has been said very often in order to make a greater part. Provided also that the aforesaid officers having been nominated in the aforesaid form their names be immediately made known to the burgesses being in the Gildhall, and that for a nomination of this kind at least the greater part of the same burgesses be content, And that if the greater part of the burgesses being in the Gildhall be not content respecting a nomination of this kind or any one of the persons of this kind nominated, for repeating a choice of this kind the major part and the aforesaid jurats may pass without delay to another nomination, and that in the places of the persons thus refused there be named in the aforesaid form such persons as those to whom to the greater part of the burgesses be willing to give agreement and contentment, and that the prelocutor and common clerk for the time being to this matter sworn see and on their oath faithfully report every year to what officers in this respect the greater part of the burgesses have given their voices, and with respect to whom they may be willing to be contented and with regard to whom not to be contented. But if the greater part of the burgesses be not able to be contented with the persons thus nominated at the first turn, or with those nominated at a second time, that then the same persons or person, on whom the greater part as well of the twenty-four jurats as of all the other aforesaid burgesses agree for holding the aforesaid offices or any of them, should be elected to those offices or that office and hold them or it according to the election thus made a third time. Also it was agreed that in the preferment of the prelocutor and common clerk of the aforesaid town to their aforesaid offices either of them should take his customary oath for doing and exercising faithfully and without fraud his office and all things pertaining to the same, before the Mayor and jurats for the time being in the Chamber of the Gildhall, And that the common clerk's oath should be in these words "Thou shalt swear that thou wilt be faithful to the Mayor jurats and all the rest of the burgesses of the town of Bishop's Lenn in whatever pertains to the office of common clerk in the aforesaid town in all times whatsoever and that without influence or motive of hatred or favour whatsoever between the Mayor and jurats and the rest of the comburgesses of all the town aforesaid thou wilt not make report unfaithful coloured or mixed with falsehood in any matter of those things that concern thy office, but without fraud to anyone to be done thou wilt according to thy knowledge make faithful report and not other between all degrees whatsoever of the same town as to thy office belongs, also in all cases thou wilt render and have thyself indifferent aswell as in writing examining and reporting as in doing whatsoever pertains to thy office towards the Mayor jurats burgesses every and all degrees and the community of the aforesaid town and that thou wilt reveal to no one the counsel of the same to the aforesaid town's injury or dishonour and if thou shalt learn or know anything by which to your knowledge injury or disgrace shall be able to happen to the aforesaid town thou wilt warn the Mayor for the time being or some one of the twenty-four jurats who shall be willing and able in thy estimation to amend this between thee and him and in what better way thou shalt know, and thou shalt not procure discords and dissensions between the aforsaid Mayor jurats degrees of the burgh and community or any of them secretly or openly, nor shalt thou know of any discords of this kind and dissensions but thou shalt hinder them, or as far as thou shalt be able thou shalt for allaying discords of this kind and not for justifying them reveal it to those of the aforesaid town who shall be able to hinder it so as God and the holy evangelists may help you." And that the prelocutor in his preferment take the same oath (things to be changed being changed), and nevertheless as well in the election of the Mayor as of all the other aforesaid degrees and officers and at every and all times when it shall happen that the same prelocutor and clerk or either of them shall do any of the affairs of their offices that their aforesaid oath be renewed, that is that it be taken again as it shall seem to be expedient to Mayor jurats and burgesses, and that if any prelocutor or common clerk be found unfaithful against his oath and be duly convicted of infidelity of this kind he lose as well his aforesaid office as his franchise of the aforesaid town and from then in no manner be restored to the same office and franchise nor do exercise or occupy henceforth any other office in the aforesaid town.

We therefore observing how certain immense expenses charges losses and intolerable damage by reason of the aforesaid discords strifes controversies riots and dissensions from the time of the first establishment and completion of the said new ordinances and constitutions in the aforesaid town have happened, and by process of time much greater will happen and are feared to happen, unless they be restrained, lest they redound to the final destruction and depauperization but also the desolation and probable overthrowing of all that town, which may it be far distant, and wishing to take precaution against losses and burdensome injuries of this kind, and according to our power to pluck up by the roots and extirpate the aforesaid strifes quarrels and dissensions from the said town and from the persons inhabiting the same and to bring back and reform peace quiet and true concord between us and our heirs and successors with the lords favour and help, and thus being reformed to establish it for ever, by the tenor of these presents revoke make void render vain and annul all and each of the aforesaid new ordinances and constitutions made for and about the election of the aforesaid Mayor jurats officers and ministers and contained and specified in the said memorandum, which have furnished as is premised the fuel of grief and hatred, and every particle of the same, by our common consent will and authority for ourselves our heirs and our successors, Being unwilling that the same new ordinances and constitutions be henceforth any further used in the aforesaid town by ourselves or our said heirs or successors or be drawn in any manner whatsoever into consequence use or exercise, But that henceforth for ever they be wanting of all their power and virtue. And Further for the better healthier and more discreet government of the aforesaid town of our aforesaid common counsel consent assent will and authority We Will grant ordain give and declare for ourselves our heirs and successors aforesaid that the aforesaid ancient customs ordinances and constitutions and all other laudable and prescribed customs in all and each of their articles "connexis et dependiciis" whatsoever from now and even for ever be held kept and firmly observed, and that if it happen that the Mayor for the time being of the aforesaid town within his year before he shall have executed the office of his mayoralty throughout one year should die, the Alderman for the time being of the aforesaid Gild be able to accomplish occupy and exercise the office of the Mayor of this kind thus dying until the end of that year as in the same Town in like case from ancient time the custom was, the said new ordinances and constitutions in any way notwithstanding.

We are unwilling nevertheless nor is it of our intention that by colour of the premises there be in any respect any derogation from the right of the Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity of Norwich or of our Venerable Father and Bishop of the same place Lord of the said Town of Lenn. In testimony of which thing we have caused to be put to these presents the new common seal of the said town of Lenn. Dated at Lenn aforesaid on the first day of June in the fourth year of the Reign of Henry the Fifth after the conquest of England. We moreover at the request of the aforesaid Mayor jurats and the rest of the comburgesses and community of the aforesaid town have thought right by the tenor of these presents to exemplify the tenor aforesaid, In testimony of which thing we have caused these our letters patent to be made. Teste me ipso apud Westmonasterium on the second day of June in the fourth year of our reign.

3 July, 1 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Leicester by Henry the Fifth, on the 20th of May in the 2nd year of his reign, to the burgesses of Lenn. Dated at Westminster.

12 July, 1 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of a Pardon and Release to William Trewe alderman of the Gild Merchant of the Holy Trinity of Bishop's Lenn, and to the wardens or scabins and to the brethren and their predecessors of the same Gild. Dated at Westminster.

13 December, 3 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of Exemplification of certain letters, made under the Privy Seal, and addressed by the same King to all Proconsuls, consuls, judges, &c. of Eric by God's grace King of Dacia, Norwegia and Swecia, touching the affairs of certain of the said King of England's subjects of his town of Lenne and certain merchants "de Hansa" using mercatorially the parts of Northberne; and for determining all discord between them in respect to the same matters. Dated at Westminster.

20 June, 6 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated on 6 June in the 5th year of his reign by Henry the Fourth, empowering English merchants "in partibus Prucie Dacie Norweie Hanse et Swethie commorantes," to assemble at their pleasure in a sufficient place, and to elect governors to themselves and make ordinances for their self-government in mercantile matters and for the furtherance and better execution of their affairs of commerce; power being accorded to the governors so elected to mete out reasonable punishment to any of the aforesaid English merchants, disobeying the governors so elected and the ordinances so made. Dated at Westminster.

14 February, 19 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of Letters Patent of concessions to the Gild of the Holy Trinity of Lenn, dated at Beverley by Richard II. on 3 September in the 16th year of his reign: With further concessions to the same Gild. Dated at Westminster.—In duplicate: one of the parchments being so decayed and injured by damp that it is legible only in places, whilst the other writing is in perfect preservation.

1 December, 20 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Leicester by Henry the Fifth, on the 20th of May in the 2nd year of his reign; With reference to the confirmation of the same last-named Letters Patent dated by Henry the Sixth on the 3rd of July in the 1st year of his reign, it being stated that the King confirmed them on this previous occasion, with the assent of Parliament.—The initial letter, beautifully drawn in pen-and-ink, of these Letters Patent is surmounted by the Sovereign's crown, with the legend "Dieu et Mon Droit" on the head-band. Below the floreated letter, the draughtsman has depicted in pen-and-ink an angel bearing the shield of the Arms of Lynn. Dated at Westminster.

1 February, 26 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of Licence to Marmaduke by God's grace Bishop of Carlisle, Sir Thomas Scales knt., and Imaine his wife to empower William Goderede to give and assign a certain mill called Scalesmylle to Henry Thoresby now alderman and to the wardens or scabins and the brethren of the Gild of the Holy Trinity of Bishop's Lenn, and of licence to Master Adam Gerard clerk and Henry Wryght chaplain, to give and assign to the same Gild two messuages and six acres of land with appurtenances in South Lenn: With licence to the said Gild Merchant to take the same mill, messuages and land and hold them to themselves and their successors for ever, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding. Dated at Westminster.

29 January, 34 Henry VI.—Letters Patent of Pardon and Release to the Alderman and wardens or scabins and the brethren of the Gild Merchant of the Holy Trinity of Bishop's Lenn. Dated at Westminster.

16 December, 1 Edward IV.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of Letters Patent, dated at Westminster 4 October, 8 Henry IV., granting licence to John Brandon, Bartholomew Cisterne, and John Snailwell of Bishop's Lenn, to found and establish in the church of St. Margaret of the said town a perpetual fraternity of brethren and sisters to the honour of God and of the glorious martyr, St. George, with permission to the brethren and sisters of the same gild to elect yearly and as often as may be necessary an alderman and four wardens of the same gild: With licence to the same alderman and wardens, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, to hold a certain tenement with an adjacent quay, and all the buildings pertaining to the same tenement and quay, &c., of the annual value of ten marks, for the maintenance of one or two chaplains, to celebrate divine rites in the said church for the healthful estate of the said King Henry the Fourth and his consort Joan, Queen of England, during life, and for their souls after death, and for the souls of the said King's father and mother, and for the healthful estate of the brethren and sisters of the aforesaid gild and of their successors during life, and for their souls after death, and also for the performance of other works of piety:—With further Licence, by the present grantor, to the alderman and wardens of the same fraternity, the Statute of Mortmain notwithstanding, to acquire and hold lands and rents, to the yearly value of ten pounds, over and beyond the said ten marks, for the better sustentation of the said one or two chaplains, to celebrate divine services for the healthful estate of the present King (Edward IV.) and of George duke of Clarence and Richard duke of Gloucester, and of George bishop of Exeter and Richard earl of Warwick, and of the brethren and sisters of the Gild during life, and for the souls of aforesaid King, &c. after death, and also for the souls of the King's father Richard late Duke of York, and Edmund late earl of Rutland, and Richard earl of Salisbury, and of all who have died in the faith. Dated at Westminster.

6 December, 13 Edward IV.—Letters Patent of Exemplification, of Letters Patent dated by Edward III. on 24 June in the 20th year of his reign at Porcestre, appointing William Basset, William de Thorp. Edmund de Grymesby clerk, Robert de Thorp, William de Notton and Roger Petygard, commissioners to enquire respecting allegations that John de Ely late Bishop of Norwich assumed to himself and his successors, bishops of Norwich, view of frank-pledge of the men and tenants of the town of Lenn "necnon hustengum eadem villa ac cogniciones de contractibus, convencionibus et transgressionibus ibidem emergentibus, &c.," with lands and tenements in former time had by the Mayor and community of the said town, and that by pretext of this acquisition the present bishop holds the same and other privileges and certain tenements pertaining to the said Mayor and community, together with the Inquisition taken and the Return made by the same Commissioners: With Inspeximus of a certain brief, dated at Windsor on 6 July, in the 20th year of his reign by Edward the Third, to the same Commissioners: With Inspeximus of a certain other brief, dated at Westminster by Edward III. on 20 August, in the 20th year of his reign (Teste Leonello filio nostro carissimo Custode Anglie) to William de Thorp, directing that the same view of frankpledge, husteng, liberties, lands and tenements be committed to the keeping of the Sheriff of Norfolk and to the King's Escheator there, until further order be taken in respect to them, by the advice of the King's council; with the said William de Thorp's reply, that in obedience to the aforesaid brief the same View of Frankpledge and Husteng, &c. have been taken into the King's hand and committed to William de Middelton, sheriff and escheator of Norfolk.

16 July, 14 Edward IV.—Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation, dated at Westminster by Richard the Second, on the 9th of February in the 1st year of his reign; With Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated to the Burgesses of Lenn by Edward the Third on the 4th of May in the 51st year of his reign, of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Walton by Edward the Second on the 10th of July in the 12th year of his reign, granting to the Mayor and burgesses of Lenn the custody of their said town against all hostile attacks by aliens, &c., and power of assessing subsidies on all persons of the same town for its defence, with the power of making distresses for levying the same; reservation being made of all rights pertaining to the Bishop of Norwich and his successors. Dated at Westminster.

21 February, 1 Richard III.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Charter of Inspeximus and Confirmation, dated at Westminster by Edward the Fourth, on the 16th of July in the 14th year of his reign, to the Mayor and burgesses of Lenn. Dated at Westminster.

10 May, 2 Henry VII.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation, dated at Westminster by Richard the Third on the 21st of February in the 1st year of his reign, to the Mayor and burgesses of Lenn.

6 August, 3 Henry VII.—Letters Patent of Pardon and Release to the Aldermen and wardens or scabins and to the brethren of the Gild of the Holy Trinity of Bishop's Lenn. Dated at Westminster.

24 November, 4 Henry VIII.—Letters Patent, dated to Richard the now Bishop of Norwich, of Inspeximus and Confirmation of a series of Charters and Letters Patent, dated by successive sovereigns of England to successive Bishops of Norwich, from the charter dated by William King of England to Herbert Bishop of Norwich and the monks of the church of the Holy Trinity at Norwich. ["W., &c. . . . . Salutem, Sciatis me dedisse Herberto Episcopo terras illas omnes quas viderunt et determinaverunt et circum iri fecerunt Walthelin Episcopus et R. Capellanus et Rogerus Bigotus ad ecclesiam suam faciendam et ad domos suas et monachorum suorum faciend' apud Norwicense Castrum et hoc cum soca et saca et aliis consuetudinibus omnibus Ita quidem quod Episcopus ibi constituat monachos qui ibidem serviant usque ad finem seculi perseverantes et vos Vnfr' et Rad' et Odb'te seisite Episcopum inde, &c."], to Letters Patent, dated at Westminster on 9 May, 3 Henry VII., in Confirmation of divers charters, closing with Letters Patent, dated at Westminster by Edward IV. on the 8th of December in the 1st year of his reign.

11 February, 16 Henry VIII.—Letters Patent of Exemplification and Confirmation of the rights pertaining to the Bishop of Norwich in Lynn; setting forth in detail the ancient tolls and customs of the port of Lynn, afterwards vested in the corporation of the borough.

27 June, 16 Henry VIII.—Letters Patent of a new charter, for the reconstitution of the burgh of Bishop's Lenn co. Norfolk, with a Mayor, twelve aldermen, eighteen common-councilmen, a recorder, a townclerk, nine constables, two coroners, four serjeants-at-mace, and a clerk of the market; with appointment of Thomas Miller to be the first Mayor under the charter; and with the appointment of John Grendell, John Burd, Richard Bewshere, Robert Amfles, Thomas Leighton, William Castell, Richard Brice, Cristofer Brodbank, John Water, Edward Newton, Richard Peper, and Robert Parmenter to be the first twelve aldermen under the new charter, each of them being appointed to the office of alderman for life, "dummodo se bene gesserit in officio"; power being granted to the same Mayor and aldermen and their successors to come together in the Guildhall and there elect whensoever and so often as they shall please eighteen burgesses from the burgesses of the borough, to be the common council of the same borough; power being given to the said common council of eighteen burgesses or the greater part of them at the Feast of the Decollation of John the Baptist in each year to choose one alderman from the existing aldermen, who has not held the Mayor's office for the last five years, and make him to be Mayor of the said burgh for a single year, to enter upon and hold the said office of Mayor from the Feast of Michaelmas next following his election thereto till the Feast of Michaelmas next following; power also being given to the same common council of eighteen burgesses or the greater part of them, on the death or removal from office of any one or more of the aldermen, to elect in the Gildhall another burgess or other burgesses in place of the burgess or burgesses so dying or being removed. to hold the office of alderman for life unless lawful cause for his removal shall arise or happen; power moreover being granted to the Mayor and aldermen for the time or the greater part of them to remove from the common council any member thereof whom they may think fit to remove and expel therefrom, and also, in case any member or members of the common council die or be removed, to elect at their discretion from the burgesses other burgesses or another burgess to hold office in the common council in place of the members or member thereof thus dying or being removed. It is granted that in all places within the borough the Mayor for the time being may have a sheathed sword borne before him by a sword-bearer, to be elected for that purpose by the Mayor and aldermen or the greater part of them. Directions are given for the election of the recorder and town clerk and for swearing them into office. Power is given to the Mayor, and aldermen and common council or the greater part of them for creating new burgesses within the burgh according to their discretion, so that no one be a burgess of the burgh or as a burgess enjoy any liberty therein, until he shall have been elected and made a burgess by the aforesaid Mayor aldermen and common council or the greater part of them for the time being. Provision is made for the election and swearing in &c. of the clerk of the market, coroners, nine constables and officers for the conservation of the river, from St. Edmund's Nesse to the sewer of the Staple Were. Together with other concessions for the advantage of the burgesses it is granted that no one foreign to and outside the freedom of the borough may henceforth buy aught of or sell aught "in gross" to any like foreigner within the limits of the burgh, except only at the time of the fair, under pain of forfeiture to the king, his heirs or successors, of the things so bought and sold. Full power is granted to the Mayor aldermen and common council to levy taxes on the inhabitants of the burgh, for the defence of the said burgh against the water-flow and for other necessary matters happening from time to time within the burgh, and to punish at their discretion all persons resisting the collection of such needful taxes. A clause for the preservation to the Bishop of Norwich and his successors of all rights pertaining to him and them within the burgh.

7 July, 29 Henry VIII.—Letters patent to Mayor, burgesses and inhabitants of Lynn. Reciting briefly the Letters Patent, dated to the Mayor burgesses and inhabitants of Lynn Episcopi on 27th June in the 16th year of the king's reign, and confirming the concessions made by the same Letters, and also Reciting briefly the Act of Parliament (3 Nov. 21 Hen. VIII. to 4 Feb. of the 27th year of the same reign) vesting the Temporalities of the Bishop of Norwich in the Crown, the present Letters Patent ordain that henceforth the borough instead of being called Bishop's Lynn shall be styled King's Lynn, and with other concessions grant to the same Mayor burgesses and inhabitants two courts every week in the Gildhall for holding pleas and plaints before the Mayor and recorder or either of them, or the deputies or deputy of either of them, and another court to be called The Tolboth Court and to be held before the same Mayor and recorder or either of them or the deputies or deputy of both or either within the said burgh, or the limits of St. Edmondnesse and Staple Weyre, for hearing and determining plaints and pleas for transgressions done and debts arising by water within the same limits, and also a yearly Court Lete within the same burgh: It being further Granted that the Mayor and recorder of the burgh, and those aldermen of the burgh who shall have served in the Mayor's office shall be Justices of the Peace within the burgh, and that the same Mayor burgesses and inhabitants of King's Lenn may have within the burgh two yearly fairs, and two markets in each week, with a Court of Pied Poudre to be held for ever in the times of the fairs and markets.

6 December, 1 Edward VI.—Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the charter, for the reconstitution of the burgh of Bishop's Lenn co. Norfolk, dated at Westminster by Henry the Eighth on the 27th of June in the 16th year of his reign. Dated at Westminster.

21 May.—2 Edward VI. Letters Patent of the Grant in fee-farm to the Mayor and burgesses of the town of Lenn Regis of divers lands tenements and rents, late belonging to the Gild Merchant of the Holy Trinity, and of divers lands &c. late belonging to the Gild of St. George the Martyr, in the said town, at a yearly rent of 13l. 10s.; together with the grant to the same Mayor and burgesses of all the stock and store of mill-stones worth 40l., late a parcel of the goods and chattels of the aforesaid Gild Merchant of the Holy Trinity, and also of 30l. late a parcel of the goods chattels and moneys of the aforesaid Gild of St. George the Martyr. Dated at Wanstead.

27 February, 1 & 2 Philip and Mary. — Letters Patent for the annexation (during pleasure) of South Lynn to the borough of Lynn Regis. Dated at Westminster.

11 August, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Westminster by Edward the Sixth on the 6th of December in the first year of his reign, of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Westminster by Henry the Eighth on the 7th of July in the 29th year of his reign, to the Mayor, burgesses, and inhabitants of Lenne. Dated at Richmond.

2 October, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — Letters Patent to the Mayor and burgesses of King's Lynn. Reciting the substance of the Letters Patent of 27 Feb., 1 & 2 Phil. and Mary, which annexed South Lynn to King's Lynn during pleasure, the present Letters Patent give South Lynn to the Mayor and burgesses of King's Lynn in fee-farm at a yearly rent of ten shillings, and further grant to the same Mayor and burgesses in fee-farm the manor of King's Lynn, and the quit-rents in the borough, being in the hands of the said King and Queen by force of an arrangement made between the Bishop of Norwich and the late King Henry the Eighth, to hold the same as of the manor of Estgrenewiche of the said King and Queen and of their heirs and successors, at a yearly rent of 13l. 13s. 6d. Dated at Westminster.

6 July, 1 Elizabeth.—Letters Patent of Exemplification of a certain Act of the Parliament (begun at Westminster on the 23rd of January in the same year), respecting the renewal of a fair in the town of King's Lynn, to be held there yearly on the next . . . . after the Feast of the Purification of the Virgin, and to last for six days. The parchment being so defaced by damp as to be illegible in the most important passages of the original writing.

20 May, 18 Elizabeth.—Articles Indented made and agreed upon by Robert Bell esquire, recorder of the towne of Kinge's Lynne co. Norfolk, and Stephen Thumblebye esq. recorder of the towne of Bostone in the countie of Lincolne, touching a matter in varyaunce for toll between certeyne of the inhabitantes of Bostone aforesaide being tenauntes of the Duchye of Lancaster of thone partye, and the Mayor and burgesess of Kyngyes Lynne aforesaid of thother partye.

1 December, 19 Elizabeth. — Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Richmond by Philip and Mary on the 11th of August in the 4th and 5th year of their respective reigns, of Inspeximus and Confirmation of the Letters Patent, dated at Westminster by Edward the Sixth on the 6th of December in the 1st year of his reign, of Inspeximus and Confirmation of aforementioned Letters Patent, dated at Westminster by Henry the Eighth on the 7th of July in the 29th year of his reign. Dated at Westminster.

12 November, 2 James I.—Letters Patent of the grant of Admiralty Jurisdiction to the Mayor and burgesses of King's Lenn, on the death or resignation of the present Lord High Admiral, with confirmation in general terms of previous charters to the borough.—Dated at Westminster.

22 April, 9 James I. — Letters Patent for the reconstitution of the ancient hospital of St. Mary Magdalen in Gaywood, situated near the calcetum between King's Lynn and Gaywood co. Norfolk, with Governors, a warden or master, and ten, nine, eight, seven, six or five poor brethren and sisters. Dated at Westminster. — Also, Letters Patent of 27 January 15 James I., of a Commission, addressed to Sir Le Strange Mordant bart., and Sir Hamond Le Strange knt., and to John Richers, Owin Sheppard, John Founteyne and William Armiger esquires and appointing them commissioners to enquire and ascertain by the examination of witnesses the limits and bounds of a certain "faldecursus," in dispute between the Governors of the hospital of St. Mary Magdalen aforesaid plaintiffs and Henry Bastard and others defendants, and to return their finding into the Court of Chancery. Dated at Westminster.—Also, the Letters Patent (dated at Westminster, 4 June 5 James I.) of the grant, for life, of the "roome and place of Governor or Guyder of the Spitle Howse of Goworth" (sic) co. Norfolk, to Thomas Battie; the said grant being made in consideration of the said Thomas Battie's "service heretofore done in the warres," and of "his maymes sustained therein."

9 March, 17 Charles II. — Letters Patent of Inspeximus and Confirmation of charters dated by former sovereigns, beginning with King John's charter to the Burgesses of Lenn; granting to the borough a High Steward, and appointing a fine for refusal to serve in the office of an alderman. Dated at Westminster.

9 July, 36 Charles II. — Letters Patent for the reconstitution of the borough of King's Lynn, with a Chief Steward, Mayor, recorder, twelve aldermen, two coroners, a town clerk, and eighteen common councilmen. With appointment (for life) of Henry Duke of Norfolk to be first and present Chief Steward; of Benjamin Keene esq. to be first and present Mayor; with appointment of Henry Ferrour to be first and present recorder, "quam diu bene se gesserit;" with appointment of Sir Simon Taylor knt., Sir John Turner knt., and Benjamin Holley, Henry Bell, Thomas Robinson, Giles Bridgman, Edmund Tassett and Henry Chennery, esquires, and Edward Bodham, John Kidd, Edmund Hooke and Thomas Pepys gentlemen to be first and present aldermen, holding office for life, unless in the meantime the same aldermen or any one of them shall be removed from office for any reasonable cause; with appointment of Edward Bodham and John Kidd, gentlemen, to be first and present coroners; with appointment of Edmund Rolfe to be first and present town-clerk, holding office "quamdiu bene se gesserit;" and with appointment of Robert Sparrow, Osbert Backler, John Pulvertoft, William Hatfield, Robert Paine, Thomas Lemon, William Lynstead, Henry Bett junior, William Holley, Charles Turner, Henry Pope, Robert Few, John Taverner, Robert Awborne, Robert Allen, Timothy Preist, Robert Fuller, and William Stringer gentlemen to be the first and present eighteen members of the common council, holding office in accordance with the ancient usage of the borough: power being reserved to the King, his heirs and his successors, at their pleasure to remove, by order made in Privy Council and under the seal of the same Council, any Steward, Mayor, recorder, town clerk, justice of the peace, alderman, common councilman, or other officer of the said borough. Dated at Westminster.