Report on the Charities of the Skinners' Company

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

327-343

Citation Show another format:

'Report on the Charities of the Skinners' Company', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 327-343. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69720 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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SKINNERS' COMPANY.

TO THE CHARITY COMMISSIONERS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES.

In pursuance of a minute of the Board of the 2nd February 1863, I have inquired into the condition and circumstances of the following charities under the management of the Skinners' Company, of the City of London, and I have stated in the Report, under the head of each specific endowment, the result of my investigation:—

The Skinners' Company is composed of the master, four wardens, and court of assistants of about 30 members. The court of assistants are self chosen from the livery. The number of the livery are at present. It is impossible to ascertain the number of freemen.

The title of the Company is, "The Master, Wardens, and Commonalty of the Mystery of the Skinners of London, of the Body of Christ."

The Free Grammar School at Tonbridge.

Sir Andrew Judd, by his will of the 2nd September 1558, gave to the Company, for the maintenance of a free grammar school erected by him, several messuages and tenements in the county of Middlesex and the City of London: the said Company to retain for their pains 40s. yearly, and pay to the almspeople of St. Helen's 10l. 8s. yearly, and for coals to such almspeople 1l. 5s. 4d.; the residue of the rents to be employed in needful reparations of the messuages, and the overplus for the use of the Company at their wills and pleasures.

The grammar school referred to in the will was founded by letters patent of the 7th of Edward VI. (1553), whereby it was ordained that there should be one grammar school at Tonbridge, to be called the Free Grammar School of Sir Andrew Judd, for the education, institution, and instruction of boys and youths in grammar, to continue for ever under one master and one usher, and the said Company to be incorporated by the name of the Governors of the possessions, revenues, and goods of "the Free Grammar School of Sir Andrew Judd."

This institution became the subject of the suit which (after the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry, Vol. I., p. 149–156) was instituted by the Attorney General, at the relation of the Rev. Charles Hardinge and others, against the Skinners' Company, which has been reported in the 5th Maddock's Reports, p. 173, and on appeal in Jacob's Reports, p. 629. By the decree, as varied on appeal, it was declared that certain property, described as having been purchased of Gates and Thorogood, was vested in the defendants in their special corporate character as governors of the said grammar school, and not under the effect of the instrument mentioned as the will, but upon a trust previously and duly declared thereof by Sir A. Judd, and it was referred to the master to approve of a scheme for the establishment of the school, having regard to the then annual rents of the said estates.

The estate of the charity consists of the property in the City of London, herein-after mentioned, and the Sandhills estate, on the south side of the New Road in the parish of St. Pancras, extending from Tonbridge Street on the east, to Burton Street on the west, and Leigh Street on the south. It was given under the description of "a close of pasture with the appurtenances called the Sandhills, situate, lying, and being on the back side of Holborn, in the parish of St. Pancras, in the county of Middlesex, being of the yearly value of 13l. 6s. 8d." and it at present includes Burton Street, Crescent Place, Chapel Place, Crescent Mews, south and north, Burton Crescent, Mabledon Place, Leigh Street, Sandwich Street, Thanet Street, Judd Street, Hastings Street, Claremont Place, Bidborough Street, Tonbridge Street, and the houses on the south side of the New Road from Mabledon Place to Tonbridge Street.

The particulars of the property was found and set forth in the report of the master in the above-mentioned cause, dated 13th July 1825. The London property has since undergone considerable change, owing to exchanges with another charity, effected under the order of the court.

By an order in the cause, Attorney General v. the Skinners' Company, of the 4th December 1840, it was referred to the master to inquire whether it would be for the benefit of the school that the exchange of the premises in Leadenhall Market should be carried into effect, and as to raising a fund for re-building certain houses in the market. By the master's report of the 25th January 1841, after finding the respective portions of the property which belonged to the School Charity and to Alice Smith's Charity, and the necessity for the reasons therein mentioned to pull down part of the Herb Market and other buildings therein mentioned, and to dedicate a part of the centre of the said market to the use of the public, he found that the Skinners' Company proposed to give up a portion of income of Alice Smith's estate (therein described as the estate of the Skinners' Company) and he approved of the exchange as therein mentioned. By an order of the 5th February 1841 the report was confirmed, and it was ordered that the Skinners' Company should take for their own use and benefit the plot in the centre of the market therein mentioned, which belonged to the School Charity, and that they should give over to and convey to the School Charity land to the same extent.

This order, in which the Company is expressed to take the land for their own use and benefit, must of course be understood in their capacity of governors of Alice Smith's Charity. The exchange was carried into effect by a deed dated 1st April 1841, made between the Skinners' Company of the one part, and the governors of Tonbridge School of the other part, and which was enrolled in the Court of Chancery the 24th April 1841.

The following tables exhibit the present rental and, lettings of the Charity estates. The first part relates to the property in the parish of Allhallows, Lombard Street, in the City of London, which was apportioned to the Tonbridge School Charity under the decree and master's report referred to above and in my report on Sir A. Judd's Almshouses and Alice Smith's Gift, and the second part consists of the St. Pancras estate.

Part I.—City Property.

£
No. 1, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, now let to Mrs. Lambert on lease for 21 years, from Lady Day 184850
No. 2, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Lane for 21 years, from Christmas 186150
The above property, which was apportioned to Alice Smith's Charity, has been acquired by the Tonbridge School Charity under the order of the court of the 5th February 1841, and the deed of the 1st April 1841, herein-before mentioned.
No. 4, Bull's Head Passage, Leadenhall Market, "The Green Dragon," publichouse, let to — Harris for 21 years, from Christmas 1862200
No. 3, Bull's Head Passage, Leadenhall Market, let to — Kennett for 21 years, from Lady Day 186160
No. 2, Bull's Head Passage, Leadenhall Market, let to — Thornhill for 21 years, from Christmas 186150
No. 1, Bull's Head Passage, Leadenhall Market, let to — Hall for 14 years, from Christmas 186250
No. 80, Gracechurch Street, and warehouse behind, let to — Kirby for 21 years, from Lady Day 1853250
No. 81, Gracechurch Street, and warehouse behind, let to — Crawford, from Lady Day 1853230
No. 82, Gracechurch Street, and warehouse behind, let to — Ray, from Lady Day 1854 for 21 years210
£1,150

The property in hand at Tonbridge consists of a chapel recently built by subscription, of the school house, of the date of 1553, and the master's and under master's residences, with dormitories for the scholars. The house of the under master is a detached building, and is adapted for the reception of about 34 or 35 boarders. There are also 12 acres of land. The head master and under master have gardens, which occupy about 2 acres, and the whole of the remainder of the land is play ground. The land has a frontage on the high road to London, which, it is suggested, may hereafter be made advantageous for building purposes.

Part II.—St. Pancras Property.

The whole of the land on the south side of the New Road, part whereof has built upon and let to James Burton, Esq., under an agreement for 99 years, from Michaelmas 1807, at the annual rent of 2,500l., and of such part as hath been built upon, the following leases have been granted:—

Premises.Tenancy.Rental.
£s.d.
1808. May 31 Tonbridge PlaceThomas Lumley990
2 "
3 "
1808. May 304 "John Williamson2100
1808. Dec. 85 "Sophia Davis530
6 "
1809. Mar. 97 "Jane Catherine Venn1500
8 "
9 "
1810. Feb. 2710 "Basil Woodd1500
11 "
12 "
1811. July 913 "Thomas Chandless2000
14 "
15 "
16 "
1810. Oct. 11Tonbridge Chapel Tonbridge PlaceBunnell, Wilson and Stevens.4800
1811. June 2518 "John Body11110
1809. Mar. 919 "Zachariah Bunnell1500
20 "
21 "
1808. Dec. 822 "Francis Oxley12120
23 "
24 "
1809. Dec. 2025 "John Thorn2100
1810. Feb. 2726 "Thomas Williams23150
27 "
28 "
29 "
30 "
31 "
1808. Aug. 3032 "James Payne880
33 "
1808. Aug. 3034 "Peter Dawson2100
35 "Wm. Roberts3600
Carried forward
Brought forward£s.d.
1808. Aug. 3036 Tonbridge PlaceGeorge Payne5080
37 "
38 "
39 "
1 Tonbridge St.George Payne1800
2 "
3 "
1823. April 34 "Samuel Smith14140
5 "
1818. Sept. 76 "Thomas Allerton10100
1819.7 "Thomas Chandless700
8 "
1818. Jan. 159 "James Burton500
1819. Dec. 210 "James Burton700
11 "
12 "
13 "
14 "
15 "
16 "
17 "
18 "
19 "
20 "
1812. May 821 "James Burton1500
22 "
23 "
24 "
25 "
26 "
1812. May 827 "James Burton1500
28 "
29 "
30 "
31 "
32 "
1808. Dec. 833 "James Payne2430
34 "
35 "
1813. Dec. 21 Bidborough St.William Cade220
1818. Jan. 152 "William Cade440
1818. Sep. 73 "Thomas Swinbourne13130
4 "
1818. Jan. 155 "William Holman2210
6 "
1818. Sept. 77 "Alexander Greig880
1818. Sept. 78 "Moses Kenney880
1818. Sept. 79 "Charles Jones880
1819. Mar. 2010 "James Burton200
11 "
12 "
1818. Sept. 713 "Thomas Pantin880
See Nos. 10, 11, and 1214 "James Burton; included in the lease, of the 20th March 1819, of No. 10 in the same street.
15 "
1816. Dec. 516 "Henry Tovey2540
See Judd St., No. 4617 "Richard Parrott; included in the lease, dated 9th July 1811, of No. 46, Judd Street, after mentioned.
18 "
1810. Feb. 2719 "Thomas Mash2000
20 "
1812. May 821 "Bunnell, Wilson, and Steven200
22 "
23 "
1818. Jan. 1524 "John Thorn310
25 "
26 "Wm. McDaniel1400
1819. May 3127 "William Ingle200
28 "
1818. Jan. 1529 "Charles Birch220
1817. May 6Riding schoolCharles Birch15150
1816. Dec. 531 Bidborough St.Pamment Emmins990
1809. Mar. 932 "Thomas Lumley
1815. Dec. 311 Claremont PlaceThomas Swinbourne
2 "
1817. Mar. 213 "Thomas Swinbourne4200
4 "
5 "
6 "
7 "
8 "
9 "
See Tonbridge St., No. 3310 "James Payne; included in lease, dated 8th Dec. 1808, of No. 33, Tonbridge Street, before mentioned.
11 "
12 "
See Tonbridge St., No. 27.13 "James Burton; included in the lease, dated 8th May 1812, of No. 27, Tonbridge Street, before mentioned.
1819. Mar. 2014 "Thomas Swinbourne700
15 "
16 "
17 "
18 "
19 "
20 "
21 "
See Burton Crescent, No. 17.1 Speldhurst StreetJames Burton; included in lease dated 21st June 1810, of No. 17, Burton Crescent, after mentioned.
1811. June 22 "John Hobbs15150
3 "
See Hadlow St., No. 15.4 "James Burton; included in the lease, of 20th March 1819, of No. 15, Hadlow Street, after mentioned.
Carried forward
Brought forward
See Bidborough St., No. 27.5 Speldhurst StreetWilliam Ingle; included in lease, of 31st May 1819, of No. 27, Bidborough Street, before mentioned.
1818. Sept. 76 "Joseph Hallam10100
1818. Sept. 77 "John Thorn3180
8 "
See Lancaster Street, No. 239 "Thomas Jennings; included in the lease, of 1st July 1817, of No. 23, Lancaster Street, after mentioned.
10 "
11 "
See Judd St., No. 32.12 "John Thorn; included in the lease, of the 21st July 1809, of No. 52, Judd Street, after mentioned.
1810 Feb. 2713 "Francis Oxley18180
14 "
15 "
16 "
17 "
18 "
See Tonbridge St., No. 2119 "James Burton; included in the lease, 7th May 1812, of No. 27, Tonbridge Street. before mentioned.
20 "
See Tonbridge St., No. 2721 "James Burton; included in the lease of 7th May 1812, of No. 27, Tonbridge Street, before mentioned.
22 "
1824. April 823 "William Bowers1220
1818. Jan. 524 "John Simmons880
25 "
1819. Oct. 126 "William Ingle700
27 "
1818. Jan. 1528 "John Thorn10100
See Judd St., No. 32.29 "Thos. Robinson; included in the lease, of 20th Oct. 1809, of No. 32, Judd Street, after mentioned.
See Judd St., No 5030 "Richard Parrott; included in the lease, of 9th July 1811, of No. 50, Judd Street, after mentioned.
31 "
See Bidborough St., No. 16.32 "Henry Tovey; included in the lease dated 5th Dec. 1816, of No. 16. Bidborough Street, before mentioned.
1817. July 133 "Valentine Wortley880
1818. Jan. 1534 "George Bishop880
35 "W. Wagstaff2000
1817. July 136 "John Simmons16160
37 "
See Bidborough St., No. 1638 "James Burton; includod in the lease, dated 20th March 1819, of No. 10, Bidborough Street, before mentioned.
39 "
1818. Jan. 1540 "James Lake880
1817. July 141 "Thomas Swinbourne16160
42 "
See Bidborough St., No. 3.43 "William Holman; included in the lease, dated. 15th Jan. 1818, of No. 5, Bidborough Street, before mentioned.
1816. Dec. 544 "Wm. Bromsall Hutt550
1817. July 145 "Thos. Lampert12120
1810. June 1446 "William Cade1400
47 "
1810. Oct. 748 "Jas. Richard Parry1700
1810. June 211 Judd StreetChas. Knyvett3000
2 "
3 "
4 "
5 "
6 "
1810. June 217 "Chas. Knyvett2000
8 "
9 "
10 "
1810. June 2111 "Wm. Mortlock1500
12 "
13 "
1810. June 2114 "Wm. Turner3000
15 "
16 "
17 "
18 "
19 "
1810. June 2520 "Wm. Turner3000
21 "
22 "
23 "
24 "
25 "
1810. Feb. 2726 "Wm. Turner2100
27 "
1810. Feb. 2728 "John Saunders18180
1808. Aug. 3029 "John Thorne2100
30 "
1808. Aug. 3031 "Wm. Mitchell18180
1809. Oct. 2032 "Thos. Robinson31100
33 "
34 "
1809. Oct. 2035 "Thos. Robinson31100
36 "
37 "
Carried forward
Brought forward
1809. April 2038 Judd StreetFrances Oxley660
39 "
40 "
41 "
See Bidborough St., No. 1942 "Thos. B. Nash; included in the lease, dated 27th Feb. 1810, of 19, Bidborough Street, before mentioned.
43 "
44 "
45 "
1811. July 946 "Richard Parrott2100
47 "
1811. July 948 "Richard Parrott2100
49 "
1811. July 950 "Richard Parrott2100
51 "
1809. July 2152 "John Thorn31100
53 "
54 "
1811. June 2555 "Thomas Dundas1500
56 "
57 "
1812. May 858 "William Green2100
59 "
60 "
61 "
62 "
63 "
64 "
1812. May 865 "James Burton1000
66 "
67 "
68 "
69 "
1812. May 870 "Edward Woodgate10100
1812. May 871 "Edward Woodgate10100
1812. May 872 "Edward Woodgate10100
1812. May 873 "Thos. Porter7100
74 "
75 "
1811. June 2576 "Thos. Porter2100
77 "
78 "
79 "
1809. July 2180 "Wm. Mitchell18180
1809. July 2181 "Jas. Fuller18180
1809. July 2182 "Wm. Mitchell18180
1810. Dec. 131 Lancaster StreetWm. Houlston17140
1818. Sept. 72 "John King12120
See No. 93 "Edward Smith; included in the lease, dated 2nd Dec. 1819, of No. 9 in the same street, after mentioned.
1819. May 314 "James Burton200
5 "
6 "
See Speldhurst St., No. 267 "Wm. Ingle; included in the lease, dated 1st October 1819, of No. 26, Lancaster Street, after mentioned.
8 "
1819. Dec. 29 "Edward Smith4160
10 "
11 "
12 "
13 "
14 "
15 "
16 "
17 "
1818. Sept. 718 "John Cooper18160
19 "
1818. Sept. 720 "John Cooper18160
21 "
22 "John Burton1600
1817. July 123 "Thos. Jennings1000
See Speldhurst St., No. 7.24 "John Thorn; included in the lease, of 7th Sept. 1818, of No. 7, Speldhurst Street, before mentioned.
25 "Edward Wilson and others.990
See Tonbridge St. No. 726 "Thomas Chandless; cluded in the lease, dated 1st Oct. 1819 of No. 78, Tonbridge Street, before mentioned.
27 "
28 "
29 "
30 "
31 "
32 "
33 "
See No. 434 "James Burton; included in the lease, dated 31st May, 1819, of No. 4 in the same street before mentioned.
See Hadlow St., Stables35 "Charles Birch; included in the lease, 6th May 1817 of stable in Hadlow Street after mentioned.
36 "
See No. 4.37 "
1819. Oct. 138 "George Arundel
39 "
See No. 440 "James Burton, included in the lease 31st May, 1819 of No. 4 in the same sheet before mentioned.
41 "
1818. Sept. 742 "John Green880
1818. Sept. 743 "Thomas Parker12120
See No. 144 "Wm. Houlston included in the lease 13th Dec. 1810, of No. 1, in the same street, before mentioned.
Carried forward
Premises.Tenancy.Rental.
£s.d.
Brought forward
1809. July 211 Hadlow StreetThomas Scott3104
1810. Feb. 72 "W. H. Rayner990
1810. Feb. 273 "John Hill18180
4 "
See No. 15 "Thomas Scott; included in the lease, dated 21st, July 1809, of No. 1 in the same street, before mentioned.
6 "
1810. Dec. 137 "Wm. Houlston1500
8 "
9 "
1817. May 6StablesCharles Birch1500
See Lancaster St., No. 4.10 Hadlow StreetJames Burton; included in the lease, dated 31st May 1819, of No. 4, Lancaster Street, before mentioned.
See Tonbridge St., No.11 "Thomas Chandless; included in the lease, dated 1st Oct. 1819, of No. 7, Tonbridge Street, before mentioned.
12 "
See Lancaster St., No. 413 "James Burton; included in the lease, dated 31st May 1819, of No. 4, Lancaster Street, before mentioned.
14 "
1819. Mar. 2515 "James Burton200
16 "
See Tonbridge St., No. 717 "Thos. Chandless; included in the lease, dated 1st Oct. 1819, of No. 7, Tonbridge Street, before mentioned.
18 "
19 "
See No. 1520 "James Burton; included in the lease, dated 20th March 1819, of No. 15 in the same street, before mentioned.
21 "
1812. May 822 "James Burton500
23 "
1818. Jan 1524 "George Watson990
25 "A. Champ1400
See Speldhurst St., No. 2626 "Wm. Ingle; included in the lease, dated 1st Oct. 1819 of No. 25, Speldhurst Street, before mentioned.
27 "
28 "
29 "
See Bidborough St., No. 2730 "William Ingle; included in the lease, of 30th May 1819, of No. 27, Bidborough Street, before mentioned.
31 "
32 "
33 "
See Speldhurst " No. 2634 "Wm. Ingle; included in the lease, 1st Oct. 1819, of No. 26, Speldhurst Street before mentioned.
35 "
36 "
37 "
1818. Jan 1538 "Thomas Parker and Joseph Hallum.880
1810. Dec. 1339 "William Houlston1500
40 "
41 "
1810. Feb. 2742 "William Houlston1400
43 "
44 "
45 "
1810. Feb. 2746 "William Houlston1400
47 "
1809. Apr. 201 Leigh StreetJ. R. Parry900
2 "
3 "
1807. Mar. 94 "James Payne5400
5 "
6 "
7 "
8 "
9 "
1808. Aug. 3010 "Thomas Jennings3600
11 "
12 "
13 "
1810. June 2114 "Joseph Bunnell2100
15 "
16 "
17 "
18 "
19 "
See Judd St., No. 8020 "Wm. Mitchell; included in the lease, dated 21st July 1809, of No. 80, Judd Street, before mentioned.
21 "
See Judd St., No. 7622 "Thomas Parker; included in the lease, dated 25th June 1811, of No. 76, Judd Street, before mentioned.
23 "
See Lancaster Street, No. 124 "William Houlston; included in the lease, dated 13th Dec. 1810, of No. 1, Lancaster Street, before mentioned.
25 "
26 "
27 "
See Hadlow St., No. 128 "Thos. Scott; included in the lease, of the 21st July 1809, of No. 1, Hadlow St., before mentioned.
Carried forward
Brought forward
See Hadlow St., No. 4629 Leigh StreetWilliam Houlston; included in the lease, dated 27th Feb. 1810, of 46, Hadlow Street, before mentioned.
30 "
See Burton Crescent, No. 131 "James Burton; included in the lease, dated 20th Dec. 1809, of No. 1, Burton Crescent, after mentioned.
32 "
See Judd St., No. 14"William Turner; included in the lease, dated 21st June 1810, of No. 14, Judd Street, before mentioned.
"
1808. Dec. 82 Burdon StreetJames Burton3000
3 "
4 "
5 "
6 "
7 "
8 "
1810. Oct. 119 "James Burton1000
10 "
11 "
12 "
13 "
1818. Sept. 714 "Isaac Cuthbert990
1818. Sept. 715 "Edward Bishop990
1818. Sept. 716 "William Bowers990
1818. Sept. 517 "James Burton500
1819. May 3118 "Thomas Hasker200
19 "
20 "
1810. Dec. 1226 "James Burton1500
27 "
28 "
29 "
30 "
1808. Dec. 831 "James Burton3000
32 "
33 "
34 "
35 "
36 "
37 "
38 "
1811. Jan. 2938 "James Burton1500
39 "
40 "
41 "
42 "
43 "
1811. July 944 "James Burton2100
45 "
46 "
47 "
See No. 3948 "James Burton; included in the lease, of 29th Jan. 1811, of No. 39 in the same street, before mentioned.
1811. July 949 "James Burton1500
50 "
51 "
52 "
53 "
See No. 3954 "James Burton; included in the lease, of 29th Jan. 1811, of No. 39 in the same street, before mentioned.
55 "
56 "
57 "
58 "
1809. Dec. 201 Burton CrescentJames Burton2000
2 "
3 "
See No. 14 "James Burton1500
5 "
6 "
7 "
8 "
9 "
10 "
See No. 111 "James Burton; included in the lease, of 20th Dec. 1809, of No. 1 in the same street, before mentioned.
12 "
13 "
14 "
15 "
16 "
1810. June 2117 "James Burton740
18 "
19 "
20 "
21 "
22 "
23 "
24 "
25 "
26 "
1811. July 927 "James Burton1500
28 "
29 "
30 "
31 "
32 "
33 "
1811. Dec. 1634 "James Burton1500
35 "
36 "
37 "
38 "
1811. July 939 "James Burton1500
40 "
41 "
42 "
43 "
44 "
45 "
Carried forward
Brought forward
1810. Feb. 2746 Burton CrescentJames Burton1500
47 "
48 "
49 "
50 "
1810. Dec. 1251 "James Burton1500
52 "
53 "
54 "
55 "
56 "
1811. June 2557 "James Burton700
58 "
59 "
60 "
61 "
62 "
63 "
1809. July 211 Crescent PlaceJames Burton. No. 12 is included in the lease, dated 8th Dec. 1808, of No. 2, Burlington Street, before mentioned.1000
2 "
3 "
4 "
5 "
6 "
12 "
See Burton Crescent, No. 4.7 "James Burton; included in the lease, dated 10th Dec. 1811, of No. 34, Burton Crescent, before mentioned.
1809. July 2128 Marchmont StreetJames Payne889
1809. Oct. 2029 "James Burton13100
See No. 1, Leigh Street30 "J. R. Parry; included in the lease, dated 20th April 1809, of No. 1, Leigh Street, before mentioned, with stables and premises in Crescent Mews, South.
See Burton Street, No. 41 Draper's PlaceJames Burton; included in the lease, dated 9th July 1811, of No. 44, Burton Street, before mentioned.
2 "
3 "
4 "
1813. Jan. 285 "Wm. Hart10100
6 "
7 "
8 "
9 "
10 "
11 "
12 "
13 "
14 "
15 "
96 "
17 "
1813. Feb. 2518 "Wm. Hart10100
19 "
20 "
21 "
22 "
23 "
24 "
25 "
26 "
27 "
28 "
29 "
30 "
31 "
32 "
1809. Mar. 91 Mabledon PlaceJohn Venn2000
2 "
3 "
4 "
1809. Mar. 95 "Joseph Bunnell2000
6 "
7 "
8 "
1808. Dec. 89 "Thos. Lumley2650
1808. Dec. 810 "Thos. Lumley18180
1809. Oct. 2011 "Wm. Hewitt18180
See Burton Crescent, No. 34.12 "James Burton; included in the lease, dated 10th Dec, 1811, of 34, Burton Crescent, before mentioned.
1809. Oct. 20.13 "Saml. Anstice2100
14 "
15 "
16 "
17 "
18 "
1808. July 119 "Lewis Vulliamy3400
20 "
1808. June 321 "John Pimm17170
1808. May 3122 "John Balchin17170
Crescent Mews, North.
1809. Oct. 20Stables, &c.Peter Matthias880
1811. Dec. 14"John Brine2000
1811. Jan. 29"James Burton200
1813. Jan. 28"James Randall500
1815. Mar. 16"James Burton500
1815. Dec. 21Stables, &c., and Farrier's shop.James Burton1000
1817. Mar. 21Two housesJohn Hobbs260
Stables, &c.R. Champ220
1817. July 1House and stablesHenry Nunn880
1816. Dec. 5HouseDavid Karr550
1817. July 1"Daniel Herringshaw550
1815. Dec. 21"Richd. Hatfield440
1815. Dec. 21"John Hobbs440
1815. Dec. 21"John Bowers440
1813. Jan. 28StablesJames Burton180
Carried forward
Brought forward
Crescent Mews, South.
1813. Dec. 25 stables, &c.James Burton200
1814. June 96 stables, &c. and houses.James Burton500
1811. Dec. 163 stables, &c.James Chapman220
1812. May 88 coachhouses and stables.Thos. Chandless500
Crescent Mews, North.
HousesJ. R. Nicholls2500
"J. McDaniel1000
£2,52650

Summary.

£s.d.
St. Pancras Estate (Sandhills)2,52650
City Estate1,15000
Total3,67650

Two houses, Nos. 5 and 6, Judd Place, West, on the north side of the New Road, near Judd Place, were given up to the Church Building Commissioners, under the statute enabling them to take such grants from trustees and others, upon which the church of St. Luke, King's Cross, has been built.

This, and the whole of the rest of the property on the North side of the New Road, had been granted upon leases under a building agreement for the term of 99 years, made with James Haygarth, at an aggregate rental of 84l. a year, which was reduced to 76l. by the grant of the two houses to the Church Building Commissioners.

On a petition of the Skinners' Company to the Court of Chancery entitled in the cause of the Attorney General v. The Skinners' Company, an order, dated 13th July 1861, was made by the Master of the Rolls, reciting that the Court being of opinion that it would be fit and proper that the agreement of the 18th June 1861 made between the Skinners' Company and the Midland Railway Company for the purchase by the latter of the whole of the Charity estate on the north side of the New Road at the price of 32,000l. should be confirmed; ordered that the same should be carried into effect, and that the petitioners on payment to them of the purchase money should convey the estate to the Midland Railway Company. The purchase money was paid to the Company in August 1861, and was thereupon under authority given to them in the same order applied in the first place in paying off the 12,000l., owing to George E. Beecham, Esq., which had been some years previously borrowed under the authority of the Court for the buildings and alterations in the school premises, and on which 4 per cent. interest had been paid.

The order expressed that the Company should be at liberty out of the purchase money to pay off all principal moneys, interest, and costs in respect of the said 12,000l. charged upon the school estate. That a sufficient part of the said purchase money be set apart for the purpose of restoring the exhibitions to the original number of four; and that the Company also be at liberty to apply a portion of the said purchase money in repairing and altering the school buildings and premises according to their present exigencies, and that a scheme should be settled for applying the residue of the purchase money for such other purposes for the benefit of the said school, as the judge should think fit.

The Master of the Rolls has recently approved of plans and specifications for altering and rebuilding part of the school premises at an expense not exceeding 14,000l., but the works have not yet been executed.

The whole of the residue of the fund beyond the sum appropriated in payment of the mortgage is now invested in the sum of 18,887l. 3l. per cent. Consols standing in the corporate name of the Company.

The outgoings on the estate are—

£s.d.
(1861–2.) Preparing and serving notice of dilapidations on the Sandhills estate (St. Pancras)16860
Surveyor's report on the estate and superintendence (1861–2)156140
Incidental expenses (1861–2)179
Law charges on the London and Sandhills estates (1861–2)40169
Carried forward33746
Brought forward33746
Collecting rents, Accountant and Book keeper8000
Clerk5000
Surveyor3000
Expenses, messengers, porters, stamps, stationery, printing annual view of the estate, &c., which are carried to the account of the Company6000
£55746

The school is now governed by the scheme of the Court of Chancery, approved by the order of the Court of the 12th June 1844, and certain additional rules and regulations settled by the governors. I annex copies of the scheme and rules.

The disbursements under the scheme are—

£s.d.
Rev. Dr. Welldon, head master50000
Rev. Edward Ind Welldon, usher20000
Four assistant masters (1861–2) at 84l.33600
(See Clause XLIII., by which this portion of the staff of the school is made to depend on the number of scholars.)
Examiners at visitation31100
£
The expenses of the governors at the annual visitation (see Clause XLIX.)200
Deduct for expenses of visitation allowed by Sir A. Judd32
16800
Rewards at visitation and silver pens (Clause XVI.)736
£s.d.
Repairs (average of nine years)36240
From which is to be deducted as paid by Sir A. Judd's estate4428
31814
Surveyor about3500
The rates and taxes on the Tonbridge school87142
Coals for the school2000
Insurance on school premises, including master's house1540
Insurance on usher's house5126
Insurance on chapel296
(1861–2.) A donation towards the repair of Tonbridge church3500
Twelve exhibitioners at any college at either of the universities1,20000
(In 1861–2 I find only 10 exhibitioners on the list. They are, under the scheme, held for three years.)
£2,961150

The outgoings on the estate may therefore be reckoned at about 550l. a year and the expenses of the institution at about 3,000l. In April 1862 there was a cash balance of 6l. 10s. 4d.

The number of scholars in the school in July 1862 was—

Foundation boys84
Non-foundation boys76
160

The foundation boys are those whose parents or guardians are living in Kent, within 10 miles of Tonbridge, which is the interpretation affixed by the master and the court in the scheme of 1824 on the words of the charter, "in dc'a villa et patria ib'm adjacen."

The non-foundationers, except underspecial circumstances, must be boarders, and may be so either with the masters or with some person licensed by the Skinners' Company. There is at present only one pers on licensed to receive boarders other than the masters. The child of a parent living beyond the area and residing with a relation in the town has been usually admitted as a non-foundationer Many about 30) of the foundationers are boarders.

The charges of pupils are then as follows;—

Foundation Boys.

Upper School.Total.
£s.d.£s.d.
French440660
Mathematics220
Lower School.
£s.d.
Writing and Arithmetic330550
French220
The sum of 10l. 10s. is apportioned between the head and second master as follows:—
£s.d.
Head master7100
Second master300
£10100

Non-Foundation Bots

Upper School.Total.
£s.d.£s.d.
66016160
Lower School.
£s.d.
33015160
220
Both Schools.
£s.d.
10100

The following are optional expenses for the special instruction referred to:—

German4 guineas per annum.
Drawing4 " "
Music4 " "
Dancing4 " "
Fencing4 " "
Drilling15s. per annum.

Boys intended for the military colleges can be taught military drawing.

Some of the parents of the boys (widows and others) who are not qualified to attend to the getting up the lessons of their sons in the evening place them for a couple of hours in the evening under the tutorship of the masters. They make their private arrangements with the master, but a suggested scale is that of 1l. 1s. per term for every evening per week. There are very few boys in the 6th, 5th, or 4th forms who adopt this plan, not more, I am told, than two in each form. In the lower forms there are more boys whose parents avail themselves of such assistance.

The fees above stated, exclusive of such tutorial fees, are received by the head master, who makes himself responsible for the payment the assistant masters to whose stipends vary from 150l. to 300l. per annum, including the 84 allowed by the scheme.

The scholarship from Lady M. Boswell's foundation at Sevenoaks school, has not been held in the time of the present master (19 years).

I annex printed forms of notices which are published as to the terms of admission to the school, and I also append a letter from an inhabitant of Tonbridge, which is not of sufficient importance to require comment. The observations which it contains as to the number of assistant masters is answered by the fact that an assistant master is granted for every 20 boys after the first 40.

The following suggested improvements of the school scheme have the sanction of Dr. Welldon, the head master, as I gathered from his evidence:—

1. The abolition of the gifts of silver pens under the 16th clause of the scheme and the substitution of prize books.

2. That the exhibitions should be open to the entire school without any preference and the clause in XXXI. as to preference should be abolished.

3. That the exhibitions to the universities being at present too numerous and too large in amount for the school, have the effect of inducing persons to go to the university who are unfitted for it, and tend to diminish effort when they are there. It is proposed that there should be henceforth three in number of 100l., 80l., and 60l. in value.

4. That instead of such abolished university exhibitions, certain minor exhibitions of 50l., 40l., or 30l. a year should be held by scholars, during their residence in the school, and awarded upon a competitive examination to boys showing classical and mathematical talent.

5. That the period of attendance in the school to qualify a scholar for the university exhibition be reduced by substituting "four" for "five" in Clause XXX.

6. That in all examinations, whether for the university exhibitions or the proposed minor exhibitions, mathematical should be placed on an equal footing with classical learning, and the Clause XXXVII. should be amended by adding after the word classical the words "and mathematical learning combined or separately."

7. That there should be two examiners, so that the mathematical examination may be as complete as the classical.

8. That the restriction of 84l. per annum by Clause XLVII. as the salary of the assistant master be abolished, and that the mathematical and French masters be recognised as a part of the school staff, with assistant masters for other modern languages and subjects of study as occasions and the progress or means of the school should present.

9. That the limitation of the assistant masters to 20 borders each by Clause XLVI. be extended to 30, it being practically found that boarding schools with so small a number as 20 boys are not remunerative.

I think that these suggestions deserve the serious attention of any authorities having power to amend the scheme. They seem to me in every respect judicious and desirable improvements. As to Nos. 3 and 4, the reduction of exhibitions which tempt people to go to the universities without any special adaptation for the life for which such an education should qualify them, and the establishment of minor exhibitions, which, as in cases of Bangor and Sevenoaks grammer school schemes, might afford means for educating children of the really poor at the school, would be but measures of prudence and justice.

Fisher's Exhibition.

Henry Fisher, by deed poll of the 30th April, 4th Elizabeth, granted to the Company certain messuages and tenements in the City of London for the support of a student at Oxford.

£s.d.
To the scholar2134
Tutor134
Principal and scholars of Brazenose1134

On the 30th April 1833 an information was filed by the Attorney General at the relation of Dr. Knox, the then master of Tonbridge school, and Samuel Forbes Auchmuty, a student of Brazenose College, the exhibitioner elected by the Company under the foundation (an infant by his next friend), against the Skinners' Company and the principal and scholars of Brazenose College, Oxford, to determine the question of the right of the exhibitioner to the entire rental of the estate, and on the 30th April 1833 upon the hearing it was declared that according to the true construction of the deed of gift the Company were beneficially entitled to the surplus rents and profits of the messuages and hereditaments after providing for the payments directed to be made by the said H. Fisher by the said deed of gift. And it was ordered that the information should stand dismissed with costs.

This suit disposes of all question with regard to the right of the property in Gracechurch Street and Pewter Alley.

Prior to the foregoing suit, the sum of 2l. 13s. 4d. a year for the scholar having been some time in arrear was augmented to 20l. a year by agreement between the Company and Brazenose College, and the 13s. 4d. per annum for the tutor was augmented by like agreement to 4l. 6s. 6d., and the 1l. 13s. 4d. to the college was augmented to 2l. 16s. 8d.

The Company now elect an exhibitioner from Tonbridge school, who is at the same time a scholar at Brazenose, to whom they pay 20l. a year so long as he is at college. The exhibition is generally full; if not, the fund is to be accumulated to increase the exhibition. There is not at present any accumulation.

The 4l. 6s. 6d. and 2l. 16s. 8d for the tutor and the college are annually paid in one sum to the bursar of the college.

Fisher's Charity.

Henry Fisher, by deed poll of the 30th April, 4th Elizabeth, directed the Company to cause two sermons to be made in St. John, Walbrook, yearly, and to pay for the same 10s. each.

And he directed the Company to permit certain persons to occupy tenements in Harrow Alley, 10 paying yearly for the same 6s. 8d. each, and after their deaths to bestow the same upon decayed men and women of the Company, at their discretion, paying such yearly rents, and using and behaving themselves in a quiet manner.

Nothing is known of the tenements in Harrow Alley. The site of the locality is, in fact, unknown. One sermon is preached in St. John, Walbrook, on the Thursday of Corpus Christi, and for this the Company pay the preacher 2l. 2s. a year (who is generally selected by the master of the Company), the pulpit being allowed to be so used by the rector of the parish.

Sir Thomas Smith's Charity.

Sir Thomas Smith, by his will of the 18th April 1619, gave to the Company several messuages in the City of London, upon trust, out of the rents to make the payments following:—
and the residue to the Company to be disposed of in exhibitions from Tonbridge school.

£s.d.
To the parish of Bidborough, Kent, for bread to six poor, 5l. 4s.; to the parson, 2s.; churchwarden, 2s.; and clerk, 2s.5100
To the parish of Tonbridge, Kent, bread for 12 poor persons1080
To the parish of Speldhurst, Kent, for bread for six poor persons5100
For bread for the three parishes at the annual visitation at Tonbridge080
To the 24 poor people in clothing2400
To the parish of Otford, Kent, for bread5100
To the parish of Sutton-at-Hone, for bread5100
To the parish of Darent, Kent, for bread468
To the master of Tonbridge School1000
To the usher of Tonbridge School500
To six scholars from Tonbridge School for exhibitions6000
Towards defraying the Company's expenses at the yearly visitation at Tonbridge6134

And the testator directed that when the leases expired, and the revenue increased, it should be applied by the Company for the poor of the parishes of—

Sutton-at-Hone,
Darent,
Wilmington,
Otford,
Tonbridge,
Bidborough,
Speldhurst, and
Shorne.

The devised property consists of the following particulars:— (fn. 1)

I.—Two houses, Nos. 20 and 21, Lime Street, let to John Adamson on lease for 21 years, from Lady Day 1843.85l.
II.—Warehouses forming the angle at the corner of Watling Street and Old Change, in the parish of St. Augustine. This property, which formerly was let to J. Wood, Mr. Clew, Mr. Shand, and Mr. Challis, and lately to Wilson, Shand, Richardson, and Keith, is now as to part of No. 32 and 34 Old Change, and the property in Watling Street, under agreement (subject to the sanction of the Commissioners) to be let to Phillips, Faithful, and Palmer on a building lease for 70 years, from Lady Day 1863, at the yearly rent of 160l. for the first eight years and a quarter, at a peppercorn for next six months, and 275l. for the remainder of the term; and as to part of Nos. 32 and 33, Old Change, under a like agreement, to Palmer at the yearly rent of 350l. per annum, from the 9th September 1863, for the same term. In the first lease the lessee proposes to lay out 6,000l., and in the second 3,000l. in the rebuilding.510l. until 1871, and 625l. thence-forward.

The land tax has recently been redeemed in anticipation of the improvements of the premises, the payment is to be made by instalments; and has not yet been brought into the account.

There is also a sum of 1,000l. 3 per cent. Consols standing in the corporate name of the Company, with other funds of their own, which had accumulated in respect of unappropriated exhibitions, on which a dividend of 28l. 17s. 6d. a year is received, and is added to the annual income out of which exhibitions have been increased.

The collection of the rents, receipt stamps, &c. amounted in the year 1861 to 25l. and is carried, as in other cases in this Company, to the general account of the Company, out of which the payment to the committees, the salary to the clerk, and other incidental expenses are paid.

The specific payments are made according to the direction in the will.

The master and wardens, and any member of the court of assistants who thinks proper (generally 14 or 15), attend annually at Tonbridge, at the school, and then the 24 poor and generally aged men from the parishes of Tonbridge, Bidborough, and Speldhurst, who are selected by the churchwardens of the several parishes, attend, and each receives 1l. value of coarse blue cloth.24l.

At the same time the following sums are paid to the churchwardens of:—

£s.d.
Bidborough5100
Tonbridge1080
Speldhurst4100
Bread at the same time given away to the same people080
The payments are made also, if they attend, and if not, by remittance—
Otford5100
Sutton-at-Hone5100
Darent468
The master and usher of the school1500
The portion of the expenses of the visitation carried to the account of the Company6134
The six exhibitions at the University, which are now always full6000

These have been increased to 15l. a year by means of the dividend on the stock, arising from unappropriated exhibitions in former times.

There is no specific investment of these accumulations, but the Company holds itself liable to make the amount up to 15l. per annum.

The disposition of the residue under the last clause of the will, which gives the increased rents of the houses and premises to the poorest people of the parishes mentioned in that clause, is an unfortunate bequest, having regard to the existing state of the law, as it causes the distribution of a continually increasing fund in a manner which cannot but be injurious. It is impossible to suppose that the testator ever contemplated that the income would become so enormous. He had regulated his gifts to the parishes just named at from 5l. to 10l. each, and it is reasonable to suppose that he calculated the possible increase at a sum which would afford something less. The rents mentioned at the former inquiry as having been received before the then existing rents would have sufficed to give about 5l. or less to each parish, they were by increased rentals produced after 1820, raised to 20l each. By the subsequent increase of income they have been brought to 35l. in each parish, and will hereafter be far more. It is obvious that some legislative remedy should be applied to such a state of things.

The residue was distributed in 1861, as follows:—

£
Parish of Bidborough35
" Tonbridge35
" Speldhurst35
" Otford35
" Sutton-at-Hone35
" Darenth35
" Wilmington35
" Shorne35
£280

In June 1862 there was a balance of 590l. 11s. 6d. cash. (fn. 2)

Lampard's Exhibition.

The sum of 2l. 13s. 4d. a year is payable out of an estate at Lamberhurst, Kent. About six years ago it ago it was apportioned by the vicar and churchwardens to a boy of the name of Nottidge. It is suggested that it would be better to vest the nomination of the scholar in the governors of the school rather than in the vicar and churchwardens, for the present method of election discourages the parents of youths in the school from making application, and it is therefore but rarely paid. Abstractedly there would not seem to be any reason why it should not afford an opportunity of helping a boy of poor parentage through the Grammar School.

Thomas Hunt's Charity.

Thomas Hunt, by will of 1st July 1557, gave all the rest of his goods not before bequeathed to the Company to be bestowed upon lands, and the rents thereof delivered to young men, 20l. each for three years, paying 10s a year as interest, viz., for the Company, 6s. 8d.; clerk, 2s.; and beadle, 1s. 4d.: and that when the rents should amount to 400l. that thenceforth the rents should be bestowed towards the relief of five poor men.

The property, which is understood to be the produce of this endowment, consists of:—

£s.d.
I.—Three houses, Nos. 24, 25, and 26, Rood Lane, let to Thomas Piper on lease for 61 years, from Lady Day 181765120
II.—Warehouses and premises in the rear, let to Messrs. Warner on lease for 61 years, from Lady Day 18175740
Carried forward£122160
Brought forward122160
III.—Two houses, Nos. 24 and 25, Fenchurch Street, and 30 and 31, Rood Lane (formerly let to W. Forsyth), and a warehouse adjoining the premises in Rood Lane (formerly let to J. Gordon), on lease to E. Edwards for 71 years, from Christmas 1859. This is an increase from 577l. 10s. according to the terms of the lease63000
IV.—House, No. 26, Fenchurch Street, let to F. Wapell for 21 years, from Christmas 185616000
V.—House, No. 27, Fenchurch Street, let to George Moffatt for 21 years, from Christmas 185615000
£1,062160

The charge for collection of the rent is 5l. per cent. A committee of the Company attend quarterly to receive the rents which are paid by the tenants at the Hall, and the per-centage for collection is carried to the account of the Company. The members of the committee attending to receive the rents are paid 1l. 1s. each for their attendance at the committee. The sum charged for collection, stamps. &c., in 1861 was 50l. 10s. 4d. The law charges in the same year were 11l. 17s. 2d. The net income is therefore about 1,000l. In 1861 the land tax was redeemed on the Fenchurch Street property comprised in the lease to Edwards, on which it had not been previously redeemed, at an expense of 474l. 17s.

On the 24th June 1862 a balance of 472l. 15s. 2d. cash stood to the credit of the Company.

The Court of Chancery in the year 1822 settled a scheme for the administration of the charity, which is set forth in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 8, p. 352).

The scheme directed the accumulation of 4,000l. to be lent to freemen of the Company in the manner specified in the first seven clauses of the scheme; and, second, the application of a sum of 150l. a year for the relief of five decayed freemen and householders until the 4,000l. should be accumulated; and, third, that the residue amounting to 69l. 16s. should in the meantime be retained by the Company to defray their costs and charges; and, fourth, when the 4,000l. should be accumulated, then the whole residue of the rents and profits, after payment of the costs and charges, should be given towards the support and relief of as many decayed freemen of the Company and their widows so that no freeman or his widow should be entitled to receive more than 70l. per annum.

First, the accumulation of 4,000l. took place and forms a separate account; I annex a copy of the account made up to June 1862. The sums marked X are supposed to be irrecoverable, and if that be so the fund is now reduced by nearly the sum of 900l.

The residue is now administered according to the directions given under the fourth head; namely, in pensions to freemen and their widows, after payment or deduction of 5l. per cent. for stationery, collecting rents, and management generally, and also law charges. These deductions were, in 1861, 5l. per cent., for management 50l. 10s. 4d., and law charges 11l. 17s. 2d.

The residue was, in 1861, divided between 18 pensioners, male and females receiving pension, varying from 25l. to 70l. They have been occasionally as low as 20l., the total amount of the pensions being 750l.

I append a balance sheet of the Compamy showing the state of the loan fund at this time.

Sir Andrew Judd's Almshouses and Alice Smith's Gift.

Sir Andrew Judd, by his will of the 2nd September 1558, devised to the Company property in the parish of Allhallows, Lombard Street—

£s.d.
Occupied by Judd and Jackson, of the value of700
Occupied by Smyth, of the value of800
Occupied by Pepp, of the value of2134
Occupied by Peterborough of the value of200
Making together the annual value of19134

And he directed that 4s. a week, or 8d. each person, should be paid by the renter warden to six poor almsmen inhabiting the almshouses in the close of St. Helen, and also 1l. 5s. 4d. annually for coals for the said almspeople, and that the renter warden should have for his pains 10s. yearly out of the rents and profits of the premises.

And Alice Smith, by her will of the 10th July 1592, directed her executors to purchase lands of 15l. a year to be conveyed to the Company who were to pay—

£s.d.
For the almspeople in Great St. Helen's1080
For three poor women of Allhallows, Lombard Street1160
For two poor women of St. Gabriel's, Fenchurch140

and the residue to the poor of the Company.

The Commissioners of Inquiry state that there was nothing in the books of the Company to show that any such purchase had been made.

In the course of the suit of the Attorney General at the relation of the Rev. C. Hardinge against the Skinners' Company, in which a decree was made on the 16th of March 1820, and on appeal on the 22nd November 1821, the defendants the Skinners' Company either admitted or proved that they held under the will of Alice Smith property in the parish of Allhallows immediately adjoining the premises comprised in the said will and statutes of Sir A. Judd; and the master by his report of the 10th March 1823 certified that he had directed inquiries and surveys to be made with a view to distinguishing the two properties so as to enable him to comply with the directions in the decree, and to state the particulars whereof the same messuages and lands devised by Sir Andrew Judd consisted, and what were the then present rents thereof. And the master certified that it having been proposed before him, on behalf of the said parties, as the only means of dividing the estates held by the governors of the Free Grammar School from those which they acquired under the said will of Alice Smith, to have the whole of the property, then in the possession of the said defendants, situate in the said parish of Allhallows, and which it was admitted comprised no more than what the defendants, held as such governors and under the said will as aforesaid, valued by competent persons and then divided in the proportion of 19l. 3s. 4d. and 15l., being the respective values of the said several properties in the said 16th century, and apportion the said messuages or tenements and hereditaments according to such values respectively having regard to the situation of such respective properties as far as the same could be defined or made out. But inasmuch as by the said decree the said master was not authorised to make such valuation and apportionments, but required to set forth the particulars of the said property, he could not act in the same without the authority of the Court; that, by an order made in the cause dated the 13th March 1823, it was referred to the master to apportion the respective messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments held by the defendants respectively as governors of the said Free Grammar School of Tonbridge and under the will of Alice Smith, having regard to the respective values thereof as stated in his said report of the 10th March 1823, and the situation of such several properties so far as the same could be defined, and made out, that the said master, by his report dated 10th July 1823, made in pursuance of the lastmentioned order, certified that having considered the evidence laid before him, and having had regard to the respective values of the several messuages and hereditaments held by the said defendants respectively as governors of the Grammar School and under the will of Alice Smith, as stated in his said report, and to the situation of the same as far as they could be defined or made out he found and apportioned the several messuages, lands, and hereditaments, mentioned and comprised in the first schedule to his report, to be held by the said defendants in respect of the messuages and hereditaments devised by the will of Alice Smith as aforesaid.

By an order made in the cause of the 26th July 1823 it was ordered that the said last-mentioned report be confirmed, and it was declared that the several messuages and hereditaments mentioned in the first schedule to the said report were held by the said defendants in respect of the messuages and hereditaments devised by the will of Alice Smith in the said order named as therein mentioned.

The property thus apportioned to Alice Smith's Charity now consists of the following particulars:—

£
No. 3, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to P. Cox for 21 years, from 185555
No. 4, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Burnell for the same term80
No. 5, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Thomas Candall, for 21 years, from 186370
No. 6. Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Ascett for 21 years, from 185245
No. 7, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to Wm. Wharf, tenant from year to year30
Nos. 8 and 9, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Taylor for 21 years, from 1860100
No. 10, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Webb for 21 years, from 186225
No. 11, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to T. Lowenthal for 21 years, from 185570
No. 12, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Hay for 21 years, from Christmas 185380
No. 13, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Parrot for same time80
Carried forward635
Brought forward635
No. 14, Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to — Richardson for 21 years, from 185390
No. 15. Skinners' Place, Leadenhall Market, let to J. Davis for 21 years, from 186063
£788

The whole of this estate was rebuilt under the arrangements stated in the report of the master in The Attorney General v. Skinners' Company of the 25th January 1841, mentioned in my report on the property of the grammar school, the expenditure being out of the funds belonging to the Company, which were thus dedicated to the charitable trust, and Nos. 1 and 2 Skinners' Place, which had formerly been allotted to this charity under the apportionment above stated, were given up in exchange to the Tonbridge School, and rebuilt at the expense of the charity.

The master, by a further report of the 24th December 1824, found the premises devised or expressed to be devised by the will of Sir A. Judd to be as follows:—

Premises.Tenants.Rental.
£s.d.
House at north-west corner of Pewter Platter Alley.Mrs. Elisha Wilson6500
Annuity charged on the "Bell" and other houses in Gracechurch Street.Thomas Maxwell's Executors.1000
House, north side of St. Helen'sMessrs. Gillett5000
House in St. Helen'sA. Claridge4000
For lights looking into almshouses at St. Helen's.Stone's representatives100
House and the Cold Bath, St. Mary Axe.— Merriman70176
Meeting house adjoining the last premises.John Barber42100
Two houses next adjoiningJohn Harvey2400
House and Meeting in Camomile Street.— Leyburn3100
Meeting house in same streetMr. Clark25100
Two tenements in Old Swan Alley, Thames Street.Geo. Scholey33500
66776

The Court, by the decree of the 11th August 1826, declared that according to the true construction and effect of the will of the said Sir A. Judd the Skinners' Company became and were entitled for their own use to the rents of such of the messuages, &c. devised by such instrument as consisted of the several particulars set forth in the fourth schedule to the master's report, subject to the payment thereout of such one of the several specific sums in the said will mentioned as thereafter set forth, viz., 4s. to be paid weekly to the six almsmen of St. Helen's as in the said will directed, the yearly sum of 10s. to the renter warden of the Company, and the annual sum of 1l. 5s. 4d. for coals to be distributed among the six almsmen as in the said will directed, and also subject to a contribution out of such rents towards reparations since the filing of the information of such part of the messuages used as the school premises at Tonbridge as was originally erected for such purpose, and also subject to a contribution towards the 150l. annually allowed to the defendants in taking their accounts in the cause for the expenses of visiting the school at Tonbridge for the time past, and also towards the 200l. allowed for that purpose by the scheme for the establishment of the said school, such contributions for repairs and for the past and future expenses of visiting the said school to be apportioned and made according to the relative annual value of the messuages devised by the will of the said Sir A. Judd with the annual value of the messuages, &c. purchased of J. Gates and T. Thorogood, such annual values to be ascertained by the master.

The effect of the decree in the suit Attorney General v. Skinners' Company (referred to more particularly in the report on the Grammer School) was to exonerate the whole of the devised property of Sir A. Judd from any charitable trust, except the sums before stated as expressly directed to be paid by the renter warden, viz.:—

£s.d.
1. The sum of 4s. a week to the six almsmen in St. Helen's almshouse1080
Coals, do.154
Renter warden0100

2. The contribution towards the repairs of the ancient part of the school house at Tonbridge. This contribution has to be calculated by the relative annual value of the devised premises and the annual value of the school estate.

3. The contribution towards the sum of 200l. allowed to the defendants by the scheme for the expenses of visiting the school.

The first contribution was determined in 1862 thus:

£s.d.
The repairs were27528
The school estate3,615100
The devised estate689126
£4,30526

The proportion therefore of the 275l. 2s. 8d. to be paid by the devised estate was 44l. 2s. 8.

The contribution to the expenses of visitation is determined on the same principle, the difference being only that the charge is fixed.

The specific payments directed by the testatrix (exclusive of the gift to the almspeople) are made as follows:—

£s.d.
To the churchwardens of All Saints, Lombard Street1160
To the churchwardens of St. Gabriel, Fenchurch Street140
£300

A charge of 5l. per cent. is made by the Company and carried to their own account for collecting rents, and taxes and incidental expenses. This has been about 38l. a year for some years past. In 1861 it was 38l. 19s. 0d. The net income is then applied to the benefit of the almspeople and for the general poor of the Company.

The application, so far as the almshouses and almspeople are concerned, is as follows:—

The Company are the governors of the almshouses at St. Helen's and Mile End. In the almshouses at St. Helen's there are six almsmen, and in the almshouses at Mile End 12 almswomen.

The almshouses in St. Helen's on the left hand after passing the gateway and entry into Crosby Square, consist of a building with one outer door and six apartments for almsmen, which were founded by Sir A. Judd in his lifetime.

St. Helen's Almsmen.

£s.d.
Six men, 8d. a week each (See Sir A. Judd's charities by will)1080
Six men, 22l. 10s. 8d. a year, paid quarterly13540
(These two sums with 8s. 8d. a quarter under Judd's will, make 6l. 10s. a quarter to each).
Occasional donations on festivals and incidental expenses of nursing, &c. (1861)1180
One of the almsmen, who is gatekeeper, 1s. per week2120
Water rate, 1l. 16s. 0d.; insurance, 2l. 5s. 0d.; rates, 3l. 13s. 4d. (1861)7144
Coals19100
Gas8160
Vicar of St. Helen's, Bishopsgate, at which church the almsmen attend500
Repairs (average of nine years)1700
£217124

The Mile End almshouses were built under the will of Lewis Newberry:—

£s.d.
Twelve almswomen, at 19l. a year each, paid quarterly22800
They also receive 1l. a year from Spurling's trust, making 20l. a year in the whole1200
Occasional donations to other poor persons of the Company on festivals &c., incidental expenses in case of sickness, &c.14123
One of the almswomen salary as gatekeeper1000
Gardener 6l. a year, with roots, &c. (1861)13176
Carried forward27899
Brought forward27899
Chaplain of the almshouses, lately Rev. W. Barry, a curate of Stepney. The offiee is generally held by a curate of that parish4000
A chapel clerk660
Water rate, 5l.; gas, 4l. 8s. 4d.; insurance, 2l. 5s. 0d.11134
Coals4250
Repairs (average of nine years to 1861)5500
Nurses to aged almswomen (1861)2920
£462161

The present rental of the property being higher than formerly will probably leave a balance to be carried forward or credited to the fund for the general poor of the Company.

I have calculated the present or prospective income at 788l. per annum and the present rate of disbursement for the almspeople at about 680l. per annum, including the small gifts of Sir A. Judd, leaving a surplus of about 100l. a year. The rent of the Leadenhall Market property is, however, very variable, and depends greatly upon the personal circumstances and success of the tenants in their trades.

The donations and incidental expenses of the almshouses and almspeople have considerably exceeded the amounts charged in the account of the Company, it being the habit to charge only so much as the fund will bear and so as exactly to balance the account.

The actual endowments possessed by the Skinners' Company in trust for charitable purposes amount to about 2,575l. a year, and in addition to this sum the Company give away ordinarily upwards of 1,000l. per annum in other annual payments in relief of members of the Company and in general donations and contributions to public charities. Two freemen of the Company in decayed circumstances receive each pensions of 150l. a year, and large donations are occasionally made to individual freemen or pensioners on especial exigencies.

Newberry's Charities.

Lewis Newberry, by his will of the 20th February 1683, gave to the Company 100l. to be lent gratis to two young freemen; and also 50l. to the Company to be employed by them as they should judge most to conduce to their public benefit.

And he directed the residue of his estate to be laid out for the use of six poor widows by purchasing some small piece of ground and building so many houses for them, and endowing the said houses with the remainder of his estate.

It appears by the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 8, page 351, and Appendix, p. 757) that the Company received from the executors of Mr. Newberry the sum of 1,851l., and that the executors built the almshouses at Mile End as directed by the will. By an agreement between the executors of Mr. Newberry and the Company, the latter seems to have bound itself to pay 5l. per cent. on the 1,851l. for the support of the almspeople.

The almshouses consist of two rows of tenements, one end of which abuts on the Mile End Road and adjoining Trinity Almshouses, with a considerable garden at the rear. There are 12 doors, each opening into one room on the ground floor, occupied by twelve women. They are maintained by the Company principally from Alice Smith's Gift (as to which see my report on Sir Andrew Judd's Almshouses and Alice Smith's Gift). It does not appear that the interest on the 1,851l. at 5 per cent. has been brought into the account of the almshouses or of the other charity funds of the Company. The officers of the Company approve of my suggestion that the interest on this fund should be brought into account as a permanent endowment of the Mile End Almshouses, which will then have the effect of enlarging the balance of Alice Smith's Gift applicable to the general poor of the Company.

There is no record of the distinct existence of the 100l. for loans, nor is there any such application.

Spurling's Charity.

Henry Spurling, by his will of the 1st October 1730, directed his executors to purchase 200l. Bank Stock upon trust to pay the dividends amongst the poor persons in the hospital at Mile End belonging to the Company.

The bank stock was sold out in 1801, and from that time the Company has charged its funds with an annual sum of 12l. a year, which is given in equal portions to the 12 almspeople at the Mile End Almshouses (see my report on these almshouses in the account of Sir A. Judd's and Alice Smith's charities).

M. Awdeley's Gift.

Margaret Awdeley, by her will of the 18th November 1716, gave the Company 100l. to be lent to poor young beginners, and she gave 700l. to the Company to purchase lands to pay to the churchwardens of Hackney 35l. a year to be employed as follows:—

£s.d.
To the poor in bread540
For repairing the parish church5160
For repairing the bridges, &c. between Clapton Street and Shoreditch400
Towards the maintenance of a school2000

There is no trace of the existence of the 100l. to be lent out to young beginners. It has been probably lost.

The Company pay 35l. a year to the churchwardens of Hackney, who do not furnish the Company with any account of its disposition.

Blundell's Gift.

Peter Blundell, by his will of the 9th June 1599, gave to the Company 150l. to purchase lands to pay 40s. to the poor prisoners of the Wood Street Compter, and the residue for the benefit of the Company.

The hall of the Company is on the site of Whittington College, and is probably the estate on which the 40s. a year is charged.

The sum is paid to Mr. Temple, the receiver appointed by the Court of Aldermen.

Sir James Lancaster's Charities.

Sir James Lancaster, by his will of 18th April 1618, reciting that he had levied a fine of his manor of Maidenwell and of other lands in the parishes of Somercotes, Abie, Claythorpe, Farford, and Pamber, and that he bargained and sold to certain trustees an annuity of 100 marks issuing out of lands, which were the Lord Wattall's, declared that the said fine should enure to the use of the said trustees, and that they should stand seized of the said yearly rent to the intent that the rents of the lands and the said yearly rent should be paid over to the Company to be bestowed as follows:—

£s.d.
To the poor of Basingstoke, Hants3000
To a preacher there4000
To the Free School of Basingstoke, Hants2000
To a schoolmaster of Basingstoke, Hants1368
To three poor scholars at Oxford and Cambridge (15l. each)4500
To poor widows of freemen2000
To four poor preachers (5l. each)2000
To a schoolmaster, Kingscleare, Hants2000
To the poor of the same place1000
To the Company3500
For an annual dinner368

And he directed that his executors should make a purchase of lands of 30l. or 40l. a year for the Company to dispose of as follows:—

£
To the poor of Basingstoke45
To the increase of the payments of the three poor scholars15

By a decree of the Court of Chancery of the 10th July 1713, made in the cause of the Attorney General v. The Skinners' Company. Upon the undertaking of the corporation of Basingstoke to pay the charities in full, it was ordered that the four poor scholars studying divinity at Oxford and Cambridge, and the four poor widows and preachers named by the Skinners' Company, should be entered in a book and notice given to the town of Basingstoke, who were to pay the Company the charities given them by the will, and it was ordered that two of the scholars should be sent to Oxford and two to Cambridge; and the Company were to be allowed 3l. 6s. 8d. per annum for a dinner in place of the gift of the 35l. given to the Company.

The Corporation of Basingstoke under this arrangement pay the Company 103l. 6s. 8d. a year, out of which the Company apply—

£s.d.
To the payment of four poor scholars at Oxford and Cambridge6000
They are filled up by applications from the different colleges, being generally sons of clergymen with large families.
To the poor preachers. The vacancies are advertised, and many applications are made for it by beneficed clergyman from all parts of the country. It is never given to any incumbent of a benefice of more than 100l. a year2000
To poor widows of freemen of the Company2000
(Three widows of the Company receive 6l. 13s. 4d. each, annually making up 20l. a year.)
The sum allowed for the dinner carried to the account of the Company368
£10368

Meredith's Charity.

John Meredith, by his will of the 16th April 1630, gave to the Company a messuage in West Smithfield to pay to three poor aged freemen and two poor aged freemen's widows 39l. (3s. a week each).

£s.d.
To the renter warden 10s., clerk 6s., and two beadles 6s.120

and the residue to be disposed of at the discretion of the Company.

And he also gave to the Company a close of 8 acres in Clerkenwell to pay to—

£s.d.
Two poor unbeneficed preachers1000
For coals to the poor of the Smithfield quarter of the parish of St. Sepulchre4100
To the poor of St. Bartholomew the Less100
For coals to poor prisoners in London480

and the residue of the rents to the Company to such uses as they in their grave wisdoms and discretions should think meet and convenient.

The last-mentioned gift of the residue has not, so far as I can discover, been the subject of any suit or judicial construction, and I assume there is no doubt it must be taken as an absolute gift to the Company. They, however, deal with it as a fund for general charity at their discretion.

The estate charged consists of Clarke's Close, containing about 8 acres of land, on the west side of Goswell Street Road, going from St. John Street to Islington, and near Sadler's Wells.

It is now built upon under leases granted by the Company at ground rents of 525l. a year.

The Company administer the funds so far as relates to the foregoing charges as follows:—

£s.d.
To nine widows, 12 guineas per annum each11380
To four poor preachers, 20l. per annum each8000
To the churchwardens of the parish of St. Sepulchre4100
To the poor prisoners (this is paid to Mr. Temple the officer of the corporation)480
To the poor of St. Bartholomew the Less100
£20360

The remainder of the fund being distributed at the entire discretion of the Company without any legal obligation, I have not thought it within my province to inquire into it.

J. Draper's Gift.

John Draper, by his will of the 18th April 1496, gave four messuages in St. Antholin's parish to the Company to pay 13s. 4d. for the poor of St. Antholin and 13s. 4d. to Ludgate or Newgate gaols.

The Company hold property in Budge Row and the neighbourhood, in the parish of St. Antholin, which having been devised for superstitious uses, forms, I presume, part of the estate purchased and confirmed to the several companies respectively by the Act of James 1st referred to in my report on the Fishmongers' Company.

The Company pay 13s. 4d. to the churchwardens of St. Antholin's parish, and the sum of 13s. 4d. to Mr. Temple, the officer of the corporation, for the prisoners of Ludgate and Newgate.

N. Jennings' Charity.

Nicholas Jennings by his will (date unknown) founded an obit to be kept on the day of his death for ever, and devised for that purpose a tenement called the Ram's Head in Eastcheap, giving over either the residue of the estate or the residue of the 2l. a year, appointed for the obit, to the poor of Barking.

The Company have not at present any property in Eastcheap. The premises belonging to them in that locality were taken for the purpose of the improvements at the foot of London Bridge. This estate was probably included in the re-purchase by the Company of the estate held by them for superstitious uses and confirmed by the Act of James 1st mentioned in my report on the Fishmongers' Company. Nothing is now recorded with respect to this estate as a charity.

Attwell's Charity.

Laurence Attwell gave by his will of the 6th November 1588 to the Company his messuages in Fenchurch Street, his house in St. Thomas the Apostle, his lands, &c. in Godalming, also his interest in tenements at Christchurch, London, upon trust, with the profits thereof to make a stock, whereby poor people might be set on work, reserving only 20l. a year for a dinner.

The Commissioners of Inquiry in their report (Vol. 8, p. 375) stated that the rents and profits were received by the Company and carried to the general account without any particular application thereof being made of them for charitable purposes, and they appear to have certified the case to the Attorney General.

An information ex-officio was therefore filed by the Attorney General, praying that the Company were mere trustees for the application of the rents and profits of the messuages, &c. to the charitable purposes mentioned in the said will; and that it might be declared that the whole of such rents ought to be distributed accordingly and an account might be taken of the rents and profits of the said messuages, &c. which have been received by the defendants from such time as the Court should think fit to direct and of the application thereof by the Company, and that what upon such account appeared to have been received by the Company might be answered and paid by the Company; and that, if necessary, it might be referred to the master to approve of a scheme for the application of such arrears and of the future rents thereof; and that a proper person might be appointed to receive such rents with the usual directions.

After hearing the cause on the 3rd February 1825, the Court ordered that it should be referred to the master to take an account of the rents, &c. received by the defendants since the filing of the information, and that he should inquire and state in what manner such rents had been applied since that time. And it was ordered that the, master should approve of a scheme for the application of the income of the charity estates and state the same to the Court.

The master made his report dated the 12th February 1827, whereby he found that the defendants had received on account of the rents of the said messuages, &c. since the filing of the information 1,067l., and that the defendants had disbursed thereout 67l. 3s. 3d. for taxes and repairs, leaving 999l. 16s. 9d.; and he found that the defendants stated that the surplus of the said rents had been applied generally in objects of charity and had been added to and mixed up with the surplus of the general funds of the Company, which were appropriated more particularly as follows:—

£s.d.
Towards the maintenance of 12 almswomen of Mile End, annually34300
Annual donation to the Dowgate Ward School550
Annual donation to the Vintry Ward School10100
Annual distribution to certain poor widows7500
Annual donation to the National and sunday schools at Tonbridge1050
To two poor preachers of the City1000
Annually distributed to poor members of the Company24000
£69400

And he found that the property possessed by the Company under Attwell's will, consisted of certain houses in the City of London and a house and land at Godalming, the whole income of which amounted to 533l. 10s. And he certified that there had been laid before him on the part of the Company a scheme to the effect following:—

That in submitting the scheme therein-after mentioned for the appropriation of the annual income of the charity, it was material, in the first place, to advert to the peculiar objects of charity within the literal meaning expressed in the will, namely, that the residue should be lent as capital to be employed, whereby poor people might be set at work, and yet this capital should be kept whole and increased yearly with the revenues, so that according to that method, if it should be strictly followed, it would amount to perpetual accumulation of capital, the testator's will being made long previous to the statute, which prohibits a perpetual accumulation of capital, such mode cannot be objected to as illegal, though it is submitted that it would be impolitic from the vast accumulation which must in time accrue from the funds and by the employment of it to the purposes of trading and working companies, it would become extremely injurious, and prejudicial to individual traders working upon their own capital, and moreover it was further submitted that the accumulations if suffered to go on in perpetuity, would eventually arrive to such an extent as must render it absolutely impracticable to apply the fund in the manner before alluded to; and the scheme went on to propose the establishment of almshouses for poor freemen of the Company, and to allow them certain stipends as therein mentioned.

And he further certified that on the part of the Attorney General there had been laid before him a scheme for the application of the income, whereby it was prepared as follows:—

Scheme.

That instead of the 20l. allowed by L. Attwell towards a dinner at the Company's Hall on the election day, taking into consideration the difference in the value of money at that time and at the date of the will, there should be allowed for that purpose 100l. out of the rents of the Charity estate.

That the residue of the said rents after the payment of all outgoings should be lent out in sums not exceeding in any one case 200l. by the Company to young men of good characters, beginners in trade, without interest, taking security by bond from the borrower and sufficient security or securities.

That the amount of the loans, the period of repayment, and the security to be taken should be settled by the Company according to the circumstances of the applicants for such loans, that members of the said corporation when they should be proper objects, should have the preference.

That a register should be kept of the sums of money lent out and the security taken for the same with all the particulars of the loans, and all proper and necessary caution should be used to prevent the money from being lost for want of timely application for the same when the period of repayment should arrive.

That before any money should be lent by the said Company on account of the said charity, all proper and due inquiry should be made into the circumstances and character of the borrowers and their sureties.

That the estates and property of the charity shall be duly managed and let to the best advantage under the superintendence of the said Company and their officers, and that a regular account of the receipts and expenditure in respect of the said estate should be kept and the sum made up and audited by the Company once in every year.

And the master further certified that he had considered the said two several schemes laid before him on the part of the Company and of the Attorney General, and the several facts and circumstances respectively stated. But inasmuch as the scheme of the Company appeared to him to go to a greater extent than under the decree he should be authorised to sanction without the authority of the Court, the said master certified that he had not thought fit to allow the same, and therefore he approved of the lastmentioned scheme, except so far as regarded the proposed allowance of 100l. per annum for a dinner which the master did not feel himself authorised to allow, the founder having limited the amount to 20l., without the sanction of the Court for that purpose.

The estate now consists of—£s.d.
A house in Modiford Court, Fenchurch Street, let to — Nicholson for 21 years, from Michaelmas 185525000
A house, No. 36, Fenchurch Street, let to Messrs. Barber on a building lease for 61 years, from Lady Day 185831000
A house, No. 12, Great St. Thomas Apostle, let to Thos. Pollock on a building lease for 61 years, from Christmas 18585000
Houses and tenements and garden ground and land containing 9½ acres at Godalming, Surrey6500
£67500

The outgoings of the estate are a charge of 5 per cent. on the rental for management and the expense of surveys relating to the premises and occasional subscriptions to local purposes at Godalming.

The scheme allows the Company the sum of 100l. a year, as suggested by the Attorney General.

The operation of this scheme has been to accumulate a constantly increasing loan fund of which advertisements are published, and which is lent out in sums of 200l. without interest, and without any expense in preparing the security, the whole cost being borne by the fund. A stamped bond is given with two securities for each loan.

The charge for preparing the security depends upon the extent of the inquiries made in each case, and I am informed the average may be 10l. for each loan.

The money is lent for three years, but it is often impossible to recover it punctually, and then it is received by instalments. The charges of the management of the loan, including bonds and attendances for receiving of instalments amount to about 150l. a year.

There are generally more applicants for the loan fund than can be received but not commonly more persons to whom it is thought secure to lend it.

The fund has accumulated to the sum of 11,165l. 7s. 6d., of which 8,255l. is now out on security to about 46 persons, of whom seven are freemen of the Company. It is not believed that any very considerable portion of this is irrecoverable.

I append to this report a table of the names of the borrowers, and the dates of the respective loans up to the 1st May 1863.

Sir Wolstan Dixie's Charity.

Sir Wolstan Dixie, by his will of the 15th May 1592, gave to the Company 500l., of which 200l. was to be lent to four poor young men, 50l. each, and 300l. to be lent to ten poor young men, 30l. each, they to pay for every 50l. 1l. 13s. 4d., and for every 30l. 1l., whereof the wardens should have 1l. and the clerk and two beadles 6s. 8d. each, and for coals to the poor of St. Michael Bassishaw five marks (3l. 6s. 8d.).

And he gave to the Company an annuity of 10l. for a lecture of divinity at St. Michael Bassishaw.

The Company has no account of the 500l., nor was any such account rendered at the time of the last commission of Inquiry, it is supposed to be lost, and I do not find that any legal proceedings have been taken with reference to this charity. The Company receive 10l. a year from the Merchant Taylors' Company for the rentcharge, which they pay over to the lecturer appointed by the parish of St. Michael Bassishaw, and they pay also 3l. 6s. 8d. to the churchwardens of the same parish.

Mrs. F. Clark's Gift.

Frances Clark, by her will (date not known), referring to a payment of 200l. made in her lifetime to the Company, and to an indenture whereby they covenanted to pay 10l. a year to the poor and lame of St. Thomas' Hospital, directed that the Company should see the same performed.

The Company pay 10l. a year to the treasurer of St. Thomas' Hospital.

Stoddard's Charity.

William Stoddard by his will of the 24th February 1611, gave a copyhold tenement and 17½ acres of land to trustees upon the trusts declared in an indenture of even date.

And by such indenture they were directed to sell the copyhold and purchase freehold lands, &c. of 100 marks a year, and pay thereout for two dinners yearly for the and the residue for the poor children of the hospital.

£
Poor children of Christ's Hospital4
To the resident officers of the hospital1
To the Skinners' Company for the relief of their poor6

The governors of Christ's Hospital pay 6l. a year to the Skinners' Company, who have two presentations to Christ's Hospital, which are confined to sons of freemen of the Company. The Company always inquire into the means of the parents to advance their children in life after the education given in the hospital, and give the advantage to those who have the better means of so doing.

The 6l. a year is not specifically affixed, but is applied with the other funds of the Company to the general purposes of charity.

Joan Bush's Charity.

Joan Bush, by her will of the 30th March 1566, directed the Company to distribute to poor people within the City of London four cart loads of coal.

The Company appear to have given a bond to the Corporation of London for the performance of this trust, and they pay annually 16s. a year to the churchwardens of St. Margaret Moses, and the same sum to each of the churchwardens of St. Giles, Cripplegate, and St. Sepulchre.

Edward Lewis's Exhibition.

Edward Lewis, by will of the 3rd March 1673, gave to the Company 100l. to pay for the better maintenance of a poor scholar at Cambridge—5l. a year.

The Company pay annually 5l. a year to a poor scholar at Cambridge selected by the court. It is held until he takes his degree.

Randal Manning's Gift.

Randal Manning, by his will of the 9th January 1611, gave to the Company 120l., to be lent to three honest young men, each paying 1l. a year as interest, and to be distributed as follows:—

£s.
To the poor of St. Swithin's, London20
For a sermon in the parish church010
For the Company's officers010

Their is no loan fund in respect of this charity, but the Company continues to pay the 2l. 10s. per annum to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Swithin's, and the 10s. to the officers of the Company.

Fletcher's Gift.

Thomas Fletcher, by his will of the 5th October 1616, gave to the Company 300l. to purchase lands with part thereof to the value of 13l. a year, to be disposed of as follows:—

£
To the schoolmaster at New Woodstock4
To five sermons there (16s. each)4
To the almspeople there4

And the remainder of the 300l. to be lent to two young freemen at 5 per cent. for a dinner on the 10th May.

The Company pay 9l. 12s. a year to the Corporation of Woodstock, Oxfordshire, deducting 2l. 8s. for land tax. There is, however, no record of any investment of the fund. It is suggested that some investment was made upon which the land tax has been redeemed by the Company. The charge of 9l. 12s. seems, however, to have been the payment constantly made and accepted, as evidenced by receipts expressing the deduction for more than 30 years past.

Mary Wilkinson's Gift.

Mary Wilkinson gave 100l. to the Company to pay 5l. towards the relief and maintenance of the children of Christ's Hospital.

The Company pay 5l. a year to Christ's Hospital.

Sir William Alleyn's Charity.

Sir William Alleyn, by indenture of the 27th October 1567, gave to the Company 101l. 10s., they covenanting to pay 6l. to the churchwardens of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, viz.:—

£s.
For bread to 12 poor householders54
For the repair of the parish church07
To the parish clerk04
To the churchwardens05

The Company pay 6l. a year to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate.

All which I submit to the board.

Thos. Hare, Inspector of Charities.

3rd June 1864.

Footnotes

1 Sir Thomas Smythe's Charity.
The grant of the leases of the secondly above-mentioned property upon the terms above stated were sanctioned by an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners, dated 28th June 1864.
By an order of the said Board, dated 10th May 1867, the Company were authorised to grant a new lease of the firstly above-mentioned property in Lime Street to Ebenezer Howard for a term of 80 years, from Midsummer 1865, at an annual rent of 220l., and such further amount of rent as shall be equal to 4l. per cent. for redemption of land tax, the lessee covenanting to expend 3,000l. in buildings on the demised property.
2 Sir Thomas Smythe's Charity.
The income of the charity having increased to an amount more than sufficient to satisfy the existing object of the charity, the Company applied to the Board for the establishment of a scheme for the future regulation of the charity.
The Board, upon consideration of the application of the Company, certified the case to Her Majesty's Attorney General, in order that he might cause proceedings to be taken ex officio for the establishment of a scheme for the future administration of the charity and for the application of the surplus income thereof.
The following scheme was approved by an order of the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice on the 2nd March 1883 for the future regulation of the charity:—
Scheme.
Property and management of property and income.
1. The property of the charity (a description whereof as now existing is contained in the first schedule hereto) shall remain vested in the master and wardens of the guild or fraternity of the Body of Christ of the skinners of London, herein-after called "the Skinners' Company," and the management thereof, and of the income thereof (as distinguished from the distribution of such income) shall remain in their hands.
Division of income into two funds.
2. The Skinners' Company shall, out of the income of such property, in the first place provide for all proper costs, charges, and expenses, repairs, and other outlay incidental to the management of the said property, and the costs, charges, and expenses of and incidental to the distribution of the funds, including the payment of examiners' fees, and shall divide the residue of such income into two parts (as herein-after mentioned), and shall carry one of such parts to an account, to be intituled "The Exhibitioners' Fund," and the other to an account to be intituled "The Poor Fund."
"The Exhibitioners' Fund."
3. The moneys to be carried to the account of "The Exhibitioners' Fund" shall consist of the annual dividends of the sum of 2,025l. 18s. Consolidated 3l. per cent. Annuities (which has been purchased with accumulations on the sum of 60l. a year given by Sir Thomas Smythe, the founder, for scholarships), and of future payments of the said sum of 60l. a year, which shall be contributed by the general income of the charity. If in any year the whole of the said dividends and sum of 60l. shall not be applied for the purposes of the said "Exhibitioners' Fund," the part unapplied shall be accumulated and added to the said fund, and such accumulations and the income thereof, or any part thereof respectively, may be applied in any succeeding year for the purposes of the said fund.
Application of "The Ex-hibitioners' Fund."
4. The Skinners' Company shall apply "The Exhibitioners' Fund" in providing for payment of exhibitions (to be called "Smythe Exhibitions") for poor scholars of Tonbridge School, in manner following:—
(a) Exhibitions at the universities of Oxford or Cambridge of such amounts, being not less than 20l. or more than 40l. per annum each, and tenable at such of the said universities, and for such terms, being not less than two or more than four years, and generally on such conditions as the Skinners' Company, in their discretion, shall from time to time direct.
(b) Exhibitions at Tonbridge School of such amounts, tenable thereat for such terms and generally on such conditions as the Skinners' Company, in their discretion, shall from time to time direct, but so that no more than 40l. a year shall be applied out of "The Exhibitioners' Fund" for this purpose.
Election of exhibitioners.
5. The Skinners' Company shall award such exhibitions to such boys only as by reason of straitened circumstances shall, in their opinion, stand in need of the assistance afforded by such award, and, subject as aforesaid, shall award such exhibitions on the results of such examinations as they shall deem sufficient, but they may withhold all or any of such exhibitions, if for want of a sufficient number of duly qualified candidates, or by reason of a lack of proficiency on the part of such candidates in the subjects in which they shall be examined, or for any other sufficient cause, it shall appear to the said Company to be expedient so to do.
The Poor Fund."
6. The moneys to be carried to the account of "The Poor Fund" shall consist of the remainder of the income of the charity.
Application of "The Poor Fund."
7. The Skinners' Company shall apply "The Poor Fund" as follows:—
(c) In making the payments set forth in the second schedule hereto in manner therein mentioned and in satisfaction of the specific payments (other than for scholarships) directed to be made by the will of the founder.
(d) In paying 25l. a year each to the incumbent and churchwardens of each of the parishes of—
Sutton-at-Hone (including Swanley);
Darenth (formerly called Durrant);
Wilmington;
Otford;
Tonbridge (the part remaining to the parish church);
Bidborough;
Speldhurst (including Rusthall);
Shorne;
to be applied by them respectively, but without division into moieties, in any of the ways in which the residue of "The Poor Fund" may under Clause 25 hereof be applied, for the benefit of such of the poor of their respective parishes as would be qualified to participate in such residue under the said clause;
(e) The residue shall be paid to the trustees, to be appointed as after mentioned, to be applied by them as herein-after directed.
Trustees.
8. For the purpose of applying such residue there shall for the present be 26 trustees, and they shall be appointed as follows:—
Five by the Skinners' Company; One by the inhabitants in vestry assembled of each of the following parishes or ecclesiastical districts:
Sutton-at-Hone parish,
Swanley district;
Darenth parish;
Wilmington parish;
Otford parish;
Tonbridge, parish church district;
Hildenborough,Ecclesiastical districts;
St. Peter, Southborough,
St. Stephen, Tonbridge,
St. Thomas, Southborough,
Holy Trinity,Tonbridge wells,
Christ Church,
St. John,
St. James,
St. Peter,
Bidborough parish;
Speldhurst parish,
Rusthall district;
Shorne parish;
St. Augustine parish, London;
St. Dionis Backchurch parish, London.
In case any new ecclesiastical district shall hereafter be formed out of any of the above-named parishes or districts, a trustee to represent such district under and for the purposes of this scheme shall be elected by the inhabitants of such district, in vestry assembled, as soon as conveniently may be after the formation of such district, and the number of trustees of this scheme shall be increased accordingly.
Parishes and districts to be considered as one.
9. For the purpose of applying such residue, the said parishes and ecclesiastical districts shall be considered as one parish.
Appointment of first trustees.
10. The solicitor to Her Majesty's Attorney General shall by notice in writing move the Skinners' Company and the inhabitants of the said parishes and districts to appoint the first trustees. Such notice shall, in the case of the Skinners' Company, be addressed to the clerk of that Company, and in the case of such parishes and districts to the incumbent of the parish or district. If the said company, or the inhabitants of any of the said parishes or districts, shall for eight weeks after receipt of such notice neglect to appoint trustees or a trustee pursuant to this scheme, it shall be lawful for the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, upon the application of the solicitor to Her Majesty's Attorney General, to appoint, on behalf of the body or persons so neglecting, first trustees or a first trustee of this scheme.
Appointment of new trustees.
1. If any trustee, whether originally appointed by the Skinners' Company, or by the inhabitants of the said parishes or districts, or by the inhabitants of any new district to be formed as aforesaid, or by the Charity Commissioners, shall decline to act, or shall become bankrupt, or file a petition for liquidation, or suffer his goods to be taken in execution, or compound with his creditors, or shall not attend any meeting of the trustees during a consecutive period of two years, or shall desire to be discharged from the trusts hereby reposed in him, or shall refuse or become unfit to act therein, or become incapable of acting therein, the trustees shall cause a record of the fact to be entered in their books, and upon such record being entered the trustee to whom it applies shall immediately cease to be a trustee; and thereupon, or upon the death of any trustee, the other trustee shall cause the vacancy to be forthwith notified to the body of persons having under this scheme the right of nomination, in order that such vacancy may be duly filled up, and if such body or persons shall not within three calendar months from the time when notice shall have been so given nominate a fit and proper person to fill up such vacancy, the same may be filled up by the Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales or by Her Majesty's High Court of Justice. All appointments of trustees, whether of first trustees or of new trustees, shall be made by the body or persons having the right of appointment at a meeting called and conducted as nearly as may be in accordance with the ordinary rules or practice of such body or persons.
Pending the filling up of any vacancy in the body of trustees, the continuing trustees may act for all purposes in the execution of the trusts hereby reposed in them.
First meeting of trustees.
12. Notice of the time and place for holding the first meeting of the trustees shall be given by the Solicitor to Her Majesty's Attorney General, in writing, to each trustee, not less than seven days previous to the time appointed, and such notice may be sent by post.
General meetings of trustees.
13. The trustees shall hold not less than four general meetings in each year, and such meetings shall be held on the first Wednesday in the months of January, April, July, and October respectively, unless the trustees shall appoint some other days for the holding thereof; and notice of the time and place for holding every meeting, not being an adjourned meeting, shall be given in writing to each trustee seven clear days at least before the time appointed for holding the same. Such notice may be delivered at or sent by post to the residence of each trustee.
Quorum and proceedings at meetings.
14. At every meeting any five of the trustees shall form a quorum; and, so soon after the time fixed for the holding of any meeting as a sufficient number of trustees shall be present to form a quorum, they shall elect a chairman from amongst the trustees present, and, in the event of an equality of votes on the election of chairman, the question shall be decided by lot between the persons having such equality of votes.
Power to rescind resolutions.
15. The acts and proceedings of a majority of trustees voting at any meeting properly held shall be binding on the whole of the trustees, until altered or rescinded as herein-after mentioned; but the trustees, or the majority of them present at any subsequent meeting duly held, shall have power from time to time to alter or rescind any resolution or direction which may have been come to or given at any previous meeting, provided that seven days' notice in writing shall be given in manner aforesaid to each trustee of any motion to alter or rescind any such resolution or direction. But such alteration or recision shall not prejudice or affect any acts or payments bonâ fide done or made in accordance with such resolution or direction prior to the alteration or recision thereof.
Casting vote of chairman.
16. The chairman of every meeting shall, in the event of an equality of votes, have in addition to his original vote a second or casting vote.
Power to adjourn.
17. If at any time there shall not, after the space of half an hour from the time appointed for holding any meeting, be a sufficient number of trustees in attendance to form a quorum, the trustees or trustee who shall be present may adjourn the meeting until some subsequent day. The trustees may likewise adjourn any meeting as they may think fit. Three clear days' notice of any adjourned meeting shall be given to each trustee in the manner herein-before directed.
Power to call special meetings.
18. Special meetings of the trustees may at any time be called, on the requisition in writing of two or more trustees, and such meetings shall be convened by giving seven clear days' notice in writing to each trustee, which notice shall specify the object, time, and place of the meeting. No business shall be transacted at a special meeting other than that which shall be mentioned in such notice. Special meetings may be adjourned in the same manner as ordinary meetings.
Power to appoint a committee.
19. The trustees may at any ordinary or special meeting appoint from their own body, as there may be occasion, three or more trustees to be a committee for the purpose of making any inquiry or performing any duty, which in the opinion of the trustees would be more efficiently executed by a committee.
Minute and account books to be kept.
20. The trustees shall provide a minute book, wherein shall be entered a minute of their proceedings at every meeting, which minute shall be signed by the chairman of such meeting, or of the next succeeding meeting, and in which book shall also be entered the reports of any committees appointed by the trustees. The trustees shall likewise provide all necessary account books, wherein shall be entered an account of the receipts and payments on behalf of the charity.
Clerk to be appointed.
21. The trustees may from time to time appoint some fit and proper person to be clerk to the trustees during their pleasure, at such annual salary as they shall think fit not exceeding 4 per cent. on the amount of "The Poor Fund" for the time being.
Duties of clerk.
22. The duties of the clerk shall be to summon the meetings of the trustees, to attend such meetings, to attend and give information to any committee of the trustees, to keep the accounts of the charity, and to furnish and send duplicates or true copies thereof in manner directed by the Charitable Trusts Acts, or otherwise, for the time being by law required; to preserve, subject to the direction of the trustees, all vouchers for payments made by or on behalf of the trustees; to enter in the minute book the minutes of every meeting of the trustees, and the reports of every committee that may be appointed; to attend to the application of "The Poor Fund," under the direction of the trustees, and to perform all such duties in respect of the charity and the management thereof as the trustees shall direct, or are by this scheme directed.
Banker.
23. The trustees shall appoint as their banker or bankers some responsible joint stock banking company, or some fit and responsible person or persons carrying on the business of bankers, with whom shall be deposited the moneys received by the trustees, and they shall change such banker or bankers at any time if they shall think fit.
Orders for money to be signed by two trustees and countersigned by clerk.
24. All payments by the trustees on account of the charity shall be made by cheques or orders of at least two of the trustees, and countersigned by the clerk (if any), and no such cheque or order shall be signed or countersigned except under the authority of an order of the trustees at a meeting duly convened. Provided that the trustees may make provision for small and casual payments by giving the clerk from time to time a cheque for petty cash for such amount not exceeding 20l. as they may think necessary, of which he shall duly dispose, and for which he shall account.
Application of "The Poor Fund" by trustees.
25. The trustees shall apply the residue of "The Poor Fund" herein-before directed to be paid to them in manner following:—
As to a moiety, To the following objects, or either of them, at the discretion of the trustees:—
(1) In granting pensions, not exceeding 15l. a year to poor persons, being inhabitants of one of the parishes or districts aforesaid, giving a preference to widows with children and those who have brought up families well and have been of good character, such pensions to be tenable for one year only, but renewable at the end of each year for the life of the recipient. Such pensions shall only be granted to persons who from age, ill-health, accident, or infirmity, are unable to maintain themselves by their own exertions, and shall not be granted to persons who shall have received parochial relief during the preceding twelve months (except medical relief or relief in an infirmary or during sickness), and shall only be granted after a full investigation of the character and circumstances of the applicant; such investigation resulting in proof, to the satisfaction of the trustees, that the intended pensioner has lived with reasonable providence, and has no relations able and liable to support him or her.
(2) In making contribution towards the purchase of annuities, present or deferred, but not exceeding 15l. a year each, for the benefit of persons qualified under the above subsection No. (1), or in making contributions, not exceeding in any one case 15l. in any one year, in aid of income and other means of support possessed by such persons.
As to the remaining moiety, and such part of the firstmentioned moiety as shall not have been applied in manner before directed.
To the following objects, or any of them, at the discretion of the trustees:—
(3) In payments not exceeding 5l. each, in order to encourage the continuance of their attendance at school, to or for the benefit of children attending some public elementary school, being children of poor inhabitants of one of the parishes or districts aforesaid, and being not less than 11 years of age, who shall have attended the same or some other public elementary school or schools for not less than three years next preceding such payment, and shall have received from the principal teacher of the school or schools last so attended such a certificate in writing of their good conduct, regularity in attendance, and proficiency during that period, as shall be satisfactory to the trustees.
(4) In payment of exhibitions of a yearly value, not exceeding 10l. each, tenable for any period not exceeding three years, either at any place of education higher than elementary or of technical, professional, or industrial instruction, to be approved by the trustees, by children of poor inhabitants of one of the parishes or districts aforesaid, not being less than 12 years of age, who shall have attended some public elementary school for not less than four years next preceding the award of such exhibition, and shall have received from the principal teacher of the school or schools last so attended such a certificate in writing of good conduct, regularity in attendance, and proficiency as shall be satisfactory to the trustees. The exhibitions shall be awarded by the trustees on the results of any examinations which they shall deem sufficient.
(5) In payment of sums not exceeding 10l. each for or towards furnishing outfits or tools for the children of poor inhabitants of one of the parishes or districts aforesaid, being under the age of 18 years, on entering a trade or occupation, or going into service, the trustees having received satisfactory evidence of the good character of the applicant.
(6) In payment of sums for the journey to and from and maintenance at any convalescent home, hospital, infirmary, or lodging at the sea-side or elsewhere, of sick or infirm poor inhabitants of one of the parishes or districts aforesaid, or their children, having received medical evidence that such a visit is likely to be of permanent benefit to the recipient.
(7) In subscriptions to any convalescent home, hospital, infirmary, or nursing institution, on the condition that the same shall enure to the benefit of the poor inhabitants of the parishes or districts aforesaid.
(8) In providing nurses in any of the parishes or districts aforesaid for attending generally to any epidemic among the poor therein, or particularly on the sick and infirm poor therein.
(9) In providing food, fuel, blankets, clothing, medical comforts or appliances, or medical attendance for the poor of the said parishes or districts who have not received parochial relief (except medical relief, or relief in an infirmary or during sickness) for the preceding 12 months, but so that not more than 50l. be applied out of such residue in any one year for the last-mentioned purposes.
No candidate for the benefits of the charity shall be disqualified for the receipt of the benefits offered by subsections 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8, of this section by reason only that he or she has been in receipt of parochial relief within the 12 months next preceding his or her application for such benefits.
Scheme to be printed.
26. This scheme shall be printed, and a copy deposited in the parish chest of each of the said parishes and districts and with the Skinners' Company, and at the office or residence of the clerk of the trustees, and every inhabitant of any of the said parishes and districts shall be at liberty to inspect such copies, and to take copies thereof, or any part thereof, on application to the incumbent and churchwardens of any of the said parishes and districts, or to the trustees or their clerk at all reasonable times.
The First Schedule.
Income.
£s.d.
2,025l. 18s. 0d. Consols standing in the name of the Skinners' Company60156
6,860l. 4s. 8d. Consols standing in the same name205162
A plot of ground in Lime Street in the City of London, with a new messuage or tenement erected thereon, Nos. 20 and 21, Lime Street, let to Mr. Ebenezer Howard for 80 years, from 24th June 1865, at a yearly ground rent of22700
A plot of ground, with a new messuage or tenement erected thereon, situate in Watling Street and Old Change, let on lease, dated 2nd June 1864, to George Jenkin Phillips, Robert Adnam Faithful, and Philip Palmer, merchants, for 70 years, from 25th March 1863, at a yearly ground rent of37400
Another plot of ground, situate in Cannon Street and Watling Street, adjoining west on the premises last described, with a new messuage or tenement erected thereon, let on a lease, 2nd June 1864, to Philip Palmer for 70 years, from 25th March 1863, at the yearly ground rent of 176l., to Christmas 1871, and thenceforth of29100
£1,158118
The Second Schedule.
£s.d.
To the incumbent and churchwardens of Bidborough, yearly13100
To the incumbent and churchwardens of Tonbridge, yearly1880
To the incumbent and churchwardens of Speldhurst, yearly13100
To the incumbent and churchwardens of Otford, yearly5100
To the incumbent and churchwardens of Sutton-at-Hone, yearly5100
To the incumbent and churchwardens of Darenth, yearly468
To be applied by them in their discretion for the benefit of the poor of their respective parishes who shall be communicants of the Church of England, and shall not have received parochial relief (except medical relief or relief in an infirmary or during sickness) during the preceding 12 months, in gifts of—
Food, fuel, blankets, clothing, or medical comforts or appliances, or in payment for medical attendance.
In the case of the Tonbridge parish, preference to be given to poor living within the manor of Southborough.—
To the chief schoolmaster of the free school of Tonbridge, yearly1000
To such one of the assistant masters of such school as the Skinners' Company shall select, yearly500
For the expenses of the Skinners' Company at their yearly visitation of the said school at Tonbridge6134
£8280
Thomas Hunt's Charity.
Under the authority of an order of the Board, dated 14th December 1866, the Company, as the trustees of the charity, granted a new lease of the site of the buildings above described, and Nos. 26 and 27, Fenchurch Street, to Mr. George Moffatt for a term of 77 years, from Lady Day 1864, at an annual rent of 415l., the lessee covenanting to expend a sum of 4,000l. upon buildings upon the demised property.
Under the authority of another order of the Board, dated 1st August 1879, the Company granted a new lease of the site of the three houses above described, and numoered 24, 25, and 26, Rood Lane, to Messrs. Hinton and White for a term of 80 years from the 25th March 1878 at an annual rent of 2,100l., the lessees covenanting to expend a sum of 10,000l. in buildings on the demised property.