Report on the Charities of the Skinners' Company
Appendix

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

343-350

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'Report on the Charities of the Skinners' Company: Appendix', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 343-350. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69721 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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APPENDIX.

Tunbridge, April 25, 1863.

Sir,

We, the undersigned, hope that you will not consider the following suggestion relative to the Tunbridge school as out of your province to present to the notice of the worshipful Company of Skinners.

The Company is going to expend a large sum of money upon a new school, which will be a lasting ornament and improvement to the ancient town of Tunbridge.

We have seen, Sir, the plans of the elevation, and the building is already in progress, but we find, to our great surprise, that though there will be a fine central tower, admirably adapted for such a purpose, there is to be no clock.

Upon the paramount necessity of a good turret clock in a building of this kind we need not dilate, as the utility is so apparent that we feel sure it has only to be properly represented to the worshipful Company to be at once acceded to.

A couple of hundred guineas would be sufficient for the purpose, which we are sure will not weigh for one moment in the scale against the benefits to be derived, leaving the ornamental part of the question out of view. Immediate steps, however, should be taken, as a peculiar chamber is needed for the purpose.

Hoping, Sir, that you will excuse the liberty we have thus taken in intruding ourselves upon your notice, and will kindly further our object,
We remain, Sir,
Your very obedient servants,
(Signed) Edw. Scoones.

G. Wielding, M.D.

J. H. Pattisson, L.L.B.

C. Otway, Clerk, M.A.

G. J. Handford, Clerk, M.A.

Wm. Stephen Thomson, M.A.

Sydney Alleyne.

Wm. Gorham.

Arthur T. Beeching.

Saml. E. Pierce.

Chas. Male, Colonel.

William M. Till, M. D.

Gentle Brown.

John Gorkam, Surgeon.

Henry Larkings, Merchant.

Wm. Chippendale, Gentleman.

L. M. Wibmer.

R. Mamison, Grocer.

A. T. Skinner, Ironmonger.

Jos. Snelling, Bookseller.

Chas. Smith, Grocer.

E. Stidolph, Auctioneer.

T. P. Charlton, Land Surveyor.

J. F. Bowman, Gentleman.

J. H. Schröder, Gentleman.

Mrs. Alderson.

Mrs. Sifton Wynne.

Mrs. Streeten.

Mrs. Fredk. Pryor.

Mary Neville.

Mrs. F. Savile.

C. Tucker.

John Collins.

Mrs. Surber.

W. Fleming, B.C.L., Tunbridge Castle.

Chas. H. Peake.

Geo. Punnett.

Richard Ware, Postmaster.

W. Wells, Chemist.

Thos. J. Secker, M.A., Clerk.

Joseph Newington.

Richard L. Allnut, M.A., Incumbent of St. Stephen's.

B. Baker.

J. J. Benzie, Hair Dresser, &c.

Mark G. Thompson, Watch Maker &c.

Tonbridge School.

Head Master.

Rev. James Ind Welldon, D.C.L., late Fellow of St. John's Coll., Camb.

Necessary Expenses.

Board, washing, &c., with tuition in classics, mathematics, French, &c.:—

(fn. 1) Upper School66guineas per annum.
Lower "63ditto
Chapel fund1ditto
Entrance4ditto

Ten guineas are deducted for foundationers. (fn. 2)

A deduction is made for clergymen's sons; and when more than one of a family are in Dr. Welldon's house at the same time.

Optional Expenses.

Modern department10 guineas per annum.
Private studyditto
French or German (private lessons)6ditto
Drawing4ditto
Linear drawing1ditto
Dancing4ditto
Gymnastics2ditto

Linear drawing is taught throughout the Lower School and suspension, and to such lads in the other forms as desire to learn.

Head Master.

Rev. James Ind Welldon, D.C.L., late Fellow of St. John's Coll., Camb.

Second Master.

Rev. Edward Ind Welldon, M.A., late Fellow of Queen's Coll., Camb.

Assistant Masters.

Rev. J. R. Little, M.A., late scholar of St. John's Coll., Camb.

J. Langhorne, Esq., M.A., late scholar of Christ's Coll., Camb.

Rev. J. Stroud, M.A., late postmaster of Merton Coll., Oxford.

D. Hanbury, Esq., M.A., Trinity Coll., Camb.

E. H. Goggs, Esq., B.A., Christ's Coll., Camb.

D. S. Ingram, Esq., B.A., scholar St. John's Coll., Camb.

A. C. Pearson, Esq., B.A., St. John's Coll., Camb.

M. Berncastel, Modern Languages.

J. Hayden, Esq., Organist and Choir Master.

Mr. Monk, Writing and Arithmetic.

The Upper School consists of the VI., V., IV. Forms and suspension.

No boy (Statutes XXIII., XXIV.,) can be admitted unless of the age of eight years, able to write competently, and read English perfectly.

No boy can be allowed to continue in Dr. Welldon's house who is not out of the Lower School by 15 years of age, out of the Fourth Form by 17 years of age, and out of the Fifth Form by 18 years of age.

Each boy, on becoming a boarder, will be required to produce a certificate of good conduct from his late master.

Each boy will be expected to bring six towels and two pairs of sheets.

A term's notice is required before removals, or payment for a term.

The Christmas holidays commence on the Thursday before Christmas Day, and last five weeks; the Easter holidays on the day before Good Friday, and last two weeks; the Midsummer holidays on the last Wednesday in July, and continue till the next Friday six weeks.

Every boy will be required to return on the day closing each vacation, as the business of the school will recommence on the next morning before breakfast.

Exhibitions, &c., to which the Scholars of Tonbridge School are eligible.

Sixteen exhibitions of 100l. a year each (four of which are awarded annually), to be held for four years by boys going to the universities of Oxford or Cambridge; to these all boys in the school are eligible—preference being given to scholars upon the Foundation, if qualified in the judgment of the examiner.

By the regulations boys must have been five years at the school before they are eligible to these exhibitions; and no one can sit for them if more than 19 years of age. The examination is in the last week in July.

A fellowship at St. John's College, Oxford, founded by Sir Thomas Whyte.

One scholarship of 20l. per annum at Brasenose College, Oxford, founded by Mr. Henry Fisher.

Six exhibitions of 16l. per annum each, tenable at any college of either university, founded by Sir Thomas Smith.

One exhibition of 2l. 13s. 4d. per annum, founded by Mr. Thomas Lampard.

One exhibition of 35l. per annum (in default of scholars from Sevenoaks School), founded by Mr. Robert Holmedon.

Two exhibitions of 75l. per annum each, tenable at Jesus College, Cambridge (in default of scholars from Sevenoaks School), founded by Lady Mary Boswell.

Two exhibitions of 6l. per annum each, founded by Mr. Worrall.

Greek and Latin No charge for foundationers. (fn. 1)

Optional Expenses.

Mathematics, &c. (in Upper School)4 guineas per annum.
Writing, Arithmetic, &c. (in Lower School)3 " "
French2 " "

Extra Expenses.

German4 guineas per annum.
Drawing4 " "
Music4 " "
Dancing4 " "
Fencing4 " "
Drilling15 shillings "

Boys intended for the military colleges, can be taught military drawing, &c.

No boy can be admitted unless of the age of eight years, able to write competently, and to read English perfectly.

Sir,

Charity Commission. Tonbridge Free Grammar School.

Tonbridge, Kent, 30th April 1863.

Having read your notice of the 18th instant, affixed to our parish church, that you, as Inspector of Charities, should attend at Skinners' Hall, Dowgate Hill, on the 1st proximo, to receive information touching the management of the Free Grammar School of Tonbridge, and any improvement, in the statutes or otherwise, whereby the benefit of the same may be extended, I, as one of the many cestui que trusts of the school property, avail myself of your invitation to address you.

Many of the inhabitants of Tonbridge and its vicinity have larger families than pecuniary means. I may say, by way of short preamble, I have 10 sons, one of whom has completed his education at this school, two are now at it, and others preparing for it, and therefore it is a subject of importance to myself.

The school property has the reputation of being very large, and likely to be increasingly so by the falling in of leases, &c.

1st. I would suggest that the statutes and regulations of the school should be more freely distributed among the parents of the school boys than they are, that a printed copy should be given on each boy's admission for guidance and information of parents and scholars.

If, as I understand, that they are out or nearly out of print, it would be well to have a new edition forthwith printed and circulated.

There is reference in them made to certain original orders of Sir Andrew Judd; these should be given in notes for the right understanding of the statutes.

2ndly. That the annual accounts of the school estates and funds be advertised in the local papers in a clear and intelligible form, or at least printed and transmitted to the parents of the boys.

3rdly. The objects of the founder being twofold—first, a gratuitous education in grammar to the youths in Tonbridge and parts adjacent; and, secondly, the benefit of the town of Tonbridge from the increase of trade and other advantages, which would result from the influx of scholars—all regulations, and extensions, therefore, which may operate as inducements to parents to send their boys to Tonbridge school, would be in strict conformity with and complete fulfilment of the declared objects of the founder.

The education here is not now confined to what is understood by "grammar." The time of the masters is not therefore wholly devoted to instructing therein, which it ought to be, or the boys ought to be gratuitously taught writing, arithmetic, mathematics, French, &c., out of funds of the school estates if they are included under the term "grammar," instead of being extra charges.

The present annual payment for each boy by his parents for learning at the school is—

£s.d.
Writing and arithmetic330
Mathematics440
French220
A year990

To say nothing of other acquirements and accomplishments learnt and paid for by the parents of foundationers, or boys of the first class, which are generally included in a liberal education.

4thly. Upon the supposition that the school property has the wherewithal that this school should a free and thorough education in its fullest sense as far as possible and become a model to other schools similarly circumstanced and not to be fettered by precedents here or elsewhere, if not suited to the circumstances and requirements, the place, and age.

5thly. That an assistant master should be appointed for a less number of scholars than 40 boys in the first class or foundationers, (see Statute XLIII.), and that there be an assistant master for every 10 or 15 boys.

6thly. That the salary of every assistant be considerably raised above 84l. per annum, so as to ensure first-rate instruction, and at the same time to enable them to devote themselves to the development of the scholars' mental powers and to their instruction without parents having to supplement the present mode of education by a costly private tutorial system, which is now absolutely necessary with respect to 19 out of 20 schoolboys.

This reformation or improvement was strongly urged by the late Prime Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, and has been adopted in some of its colleges.

7thly. The plan of the 16 munificent exhibitions appears to me good, though it is not sufficiently defined what is meant by "duly qualified."

8thly. Alterations in the house and buildings for the head master of the school were imperatively required, especially the dormitories were not in a state fit for the scholars. (See Statutes XXI.)

The want of a clock in the plans of the proposed new buildings is considered a serious omission, and your attention is drawn to the subject by a memorial largely signed in the town, and which want of time, I understand, only prevented being much more numerously signed.

9th. I must add that the school, though susceptible of the above improvements for the twofold object of Sir Andrew Judd, appears to me to be very well mastered, and that it reaps its full proportionate share of success at the universities, &c.

I have the honour to be, Sir,
Yours truly,
J. H. Pattisson.

Thos. Hare, Esq.,
Inspector of Charities.

The Statutes and Regulations of the Free Grammar School at Tunbridge,

founded by Sir Andrew Judd, Knight, 1553, of which the Master, Wardens, and Court of Assistants of the Worshipful Company of Skinners of London are Governors.

Introduction.

By the letters patent or charter of King Edward the Sixth made in the seventh year of his reign, A.D. 1553, for erecting and establishing a grammar school in the town of Tunbridge, in the county of Kent, for the institution and instruction of boys and youth in the said town and country there adjacent ("expressed in the language of the said charter, "in dictâ Villâ et Patriâ ibidèm adjacente"), it was ordained that from thenceforth there should be one grammar school in the said town of Tunbridge, which should be called the Free Grammar School of Sir Andrew Judd, Knight, in the said town, for the education, institution, and instruction of boys and youth in grammar, with one master and under-master, to continue for ever; and it was further ordained, after the death of the said Sir Andrew Judd,—who was thereby empowered, during his life, to make fit and wholesome statutes and ordinances in writing, for the government and direction of the master and undermaster and scholars of the school aforesaid, and other things concerning the said school,—that the master, wardens, and commonalty of the Mystery of Skinners of London, for the time being, should be called, and they were thereby constituted governors of the possessions, revenues, and goods of the said school, with full power and authority to nominate and appoint the said master and under-master of the said school so often as the said school should be void of a master and under-master; and that the same governors, with the advice of the warden and fellows of the college of All Souls, in the University of Oxford, for the time being, from time to time, should, and might be able to make, if need should be, fit and wholesome statutes and ordinances in writing, concerning the order, government, and direction of the master and under-master, and scholars of the school aforesaid, for the time being, and other things touching and concerning the same school, and the order, government, preservation, and disposition of the revenues to be appointed for the same school, which same statutes and ordinances it was ordained should be inviolably observed from time to time for ever: and the said Sir Andrew Judd, in his lifetime, in exercise of the power given to him by the said charter, made certain orders or statutes in writing, which he appointed to be observed for the government of the said Free Grammar School.

A suit having been instituted in the Court of Chancery, touching the school estates, and the application thereof, and for the establishment of the school, by the decree made therein, dated the 16th day of March 1820, it was, amongst other things, referred to one of the masters of the said Court, to approve of a scheme for the future establishment of the Free Grammar School, having regard to the then annual rents of the school estates.

By the report of the said master, dated the 24th day of December 1824, he certified that, having considered of the several schemes which had been laid before him, together with the said letters patent, and the said orders or statutes of the said Sir Andrew Judd, he had thought it expedient and proper to consider, that the privileges of the said Free Grammar School should not only extend to boys and youths whose parents or guardians should bonâ fide reside within the town and parish of Tunbridge, but also to such boys and youths whose parents or guardians should reside in any other parish or place in the county of Kent, within the distance of ten miles by the ordinary roads and ways from the church of the said town of of Tunbridge; which boys and youths should be considered as constituting the first class: and, that there might be a sufficient number of youths to receive the exhibitions therein-after mentioned, he had thought it proper and advisable, that there should be another, or second class, comprehending all boys and youths of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, who being qualified under the regulations therein-after mentioned, should be capable of receiving the said exhibitions: and the said master further certified, that he had thought it requisite and proper to alter and enlarge several of the said orders of the said Sir Andrew Judd, and that certain other of the orders of the said Sir Andrew Judd appeared to him to be inapplicable or unnecessary for the future government of the said school: and the said master being of opinion that exhibitions for youths going from the said school to one of the universities of Oxford or Cambridge, might be most beneficially established, he had prepared such articles as appeared to him to be necessary for effectuating that purpose; and also such other new articles as from the then present circumstances appeared to him to be necessary for the future government and establishment of the said Free Grammar School; and that the several articles thereinafter set forth in his said report formed, and he had approved of the same as, a proper scheme for the future establishment of the said Free Grammar School, from Christmas 1824, having regard to the then annual rents of the said school estates.

By orders of the Lord High Chancellor, dated respectively the 18th of July 1825 and 12th June 1844, it was directed that the aforesaid report as to the scheme for the future establishment of the Free Grammar School at Tunbridge should be varied in certain articles of the same scheme, and that the scheme for the establishment of such Free Grammar School should be, and consist of the several articles therein-after mentioned, reserving at all times to the Skinners' Company,—they taking the advice of All Souls, College, in the University of Oxford,—the power to make such regulations respecting the said Free Grammar School, as having relation to the plan thereby directed to be carried into execution, are not inconsistent with the said plan; and also such regulations, as having no relation to the said plan, the said Company had authority to make, prior to the institution of the said suit; the same being made with the advice of the said college, where it was requisite for the Company to act with such advice, and without it, where such advice was not necessary, as in the said order is mentioned.

The Scheme.

For the future establishment of the Free Grammar School, as directed to be carried into effect by the said order of the Court of Chancery, is as follows, viz.:—

I.

That the master of the said school be whole of body, well reported, Master of Arts in degree, if it may be, chosen by the Company of Skinners of London, to whose direction the founder committed the governance of his said school and order, always foreseen that the schoolmaster and usher teach the grammar approved by the King or Queen's Majesty, and that the schoolmaster be first allowed by the ordinary, and by examination found meet, both for his learning, and dexterity in teaching, as also for his honest conversation, and for right understanding of God's true religion, set forth by public authority, whereunto he shall stir and move his scholars, and also shall prescribe to them such sentences of Holy Scripture as shall be most expedient to induce them to godliness.

II.

That the master always appoint and elect the usher, as often as the place shall be void, whom, so appointed, and presented to the said Company of Skinners, they are to admit, not knowing sufficient cause to refuse him.

III.

That the master and usher have their houses and wages during their lives, not sufficiently convicted to have neglected their office; and if it shall happen that either of them be so convicted at any time, yet that he be not straightly removed, but gently warned and admonished, and so for the second time; and that then, if, after the second admonition, he do not amend and diligently follow his office and charge in the school that he, so offending, be utterly expulsed and removed, and another to be received into his room, and to be done with all diligence by the said Company of Skinners.

IV.

That the master and usher shall neither of them be a common gamester and haunter of taverns; nor by any extraordinary or unnecessary expenses in apparel, or otherwise, become an infamy to the school, and an evil example to the young, to whom, in all points, they ought to show themselves an example of an honest, continent, and godly beha iour.

V.

If it happen that the master or usher be visited with a common disease, as the ague, or any other curable sickness, that he, so visited, be tolerated for the time, and his wages fully allowed, so that his office be discharged by his sufficient deputy; but if they or any of them fall into any infectious or incurable disease, especially through their own evil behaviour, then that he, so infected, be removed and put away, and another to be chosen in his room.

VI.

If it happen that the master or usher, after long time spent in the school, do wax impotent, and unable, through age or other infirmities, to endure the travail and labour necessary in the school, that he be favourably borne withal, so that his office be satisfied by his sufficient deputy, although he himself be not present.

VII.

That the master or usher be at liberty to remain single, or to marry, or to take priesthood, so that he trouble not himself with any care or worldly business that might hinder his office in the school.

VIII.

That if any controversy happen to arise or grow between the master and usher at any time, that they then refer the whole matter to the master and wardens of the Company of Skinners in London, and to their successors; and they to stand to their order and determination in the same, upon pain of deprivation from their office.

IX.

If there happen to be such contagious sickness as the plague, or such like, that the school cannot continue, yet, nevertheless, both the master and usher shall have their wages fully paid, being always in readiness to teach as soon as God shall make such contagious sickness to cease.

X.

If it shall happen that the master or usher shall die at any time in their office, their executors or administrators shall receive so much money as for his or their service was due at the hour of his or their death, and in such case the room to be supplied with as much convenient speed as may be; and, for the vacant time, the survivor to satisfy for the whole charge, and to receive so much as is due for the time.

XI.

That the master keep a register, and in the same write the name and surname of every scholar at his entering; and that the same master of the same school shall make a just and true account to the said master and wardens of Skinners, or two of them, yearly, of all such scholars as shall have been received into the school, and the names of such as shall have departed thence, so that a true account may be kept thereof.

XII.

Acknowledging God to be the only author of all knowledge and virtue, it is declared by the said Sir Andrew Judd, that the master and usher of the school, with their scholars, at seven of the clock, do, first devoutly kneeling on their knees, pray to Almighty God, according to the form to be by the master prescribed.

XIII.

That the master, twice in a month at least, examine those that be under the usher's hands, to understand how they profit and go forward in their learning.

XIV.

That the usher practise and use such order and form in teaching as the master shall think good.

XV.

That all the scholars, upon Sabbaths and Holydays, resort in due time to Divine Service in the parish church of Tunbridge, the master and usher, or one of them at the least, being present to oversee them; and that the master and usher do duly, every Monday in the morning, call to reckoning all such of his scholars as shall either absent themselves from the church, or come tardy to it, or otherwise use themselves not reverently there in praying, every one of them having a Prayer Book, in Latin or English, according to the said master's appointment.

XVI.

Considering that virtue and knowledge, by praise and reward, are in all estates maintained and increased, and especially in youth, it is declared by the said Sir Andrew Judd, that in every year, once, to wit on the day of the visitation of the school herein-after appointed, there be kept in this school disputations upon questions provided by the master, from one of the clock at afternoon, till even song time, at which disputation the master is to desire the vicar of the town, with one or two others of knowledge, or more, dwelling nigh, to be present in the school, if it please them to hear the same:—the disputations ended, to determine which three of the whole number have done best by the judgment of the master and learned hearers; and that the first allowed have a pen of silver, whole of gilt; the second a pen of silver parcel gilt; the third a pen of silver, for their rewards; and that the whole company go in order decently, by two and two, into the parish church, the three victors to come last next to the master and usher, each of them having a garland upon their heads, provided for the purpose, and in the church, then and there to kneel or stand in some convenient place, to be approved by the discretion of the wardens and master of the school, and to say or sing some psalms or hymns, with a collect, for the preservation of the King's or Queen's Majesty, and to have some honourable remembrance of their founder, so to be appointed and devised by the master. (fn. 3)

XVII.

That it shall not be lawful for the master or usher, or any of their friends, at going away from their office, to spoil beforehand, or take away from thence, any such things as are set up and fastened in their house or houses, and planted in their orchards or gardens, but freely to leave the same with as good will as for their time they have enjoyed the use thereof.

XVIII.

That the Company of Skinners have an inventory in their hands of all things that appertain unto the school, be they books or implements in the master's or usher's house, so that at the departing they may be staid to the school's behalf.

XIX.

That there shall be truly written, word for word, two copies of these ordinances, the one ever to remain in the hands of the Skinners, the other in the custody of the master of the said school; or at such time as the master's place is vacant, to remain in the usher's hands, so that they both may thereby learn what appertaineth to their office, and also that on their admission they shall promise, before honest witnesses, to keep and see executed all such points as concern them and their scholars, to the uttermost of their power, during all the time they remain in the office.

XX.

That both the master and usher shall endeavour themselves to the continual profiting of all the said scholars of the said grammar school, and of their parts faithfully observe and keep all the points and articles herein-before and herein-after contained, as by the same orders more plainly doth and may appear; and finally, if the said master or usher shall manifestly neglect or break any such orders, being thereof twice admonished by the said master and wardens, governors aforesaid, and, notwithstanding, continue the breach thereof, that then it shall be lawful to the said master and wardens, governors aforesaid, to expel and put out the party so offending, and to place another able man in his room or office.

XXI.

That the house and buildings for the master of the said school shall be made to accommodate, and shall be maintained in a state fit for the accommodation of his family and scholars; and that a suitable house and building shall be provided and maintained for the usher, his family, and scholars.

XXII.

That the master of the said school shall not take, or board, diet, or lodge in his house, or rooms, above the number of sixty scholars, inclusive of the twelve scholars mentioned in the sixth original order of Sir Andrew Judd; and that the usher shall not take above the number of forty scholars, inclusive of the eight scholars mentioned in the said sixth original order of Sir Andrew Judd, unless it shall seem convenient to the Company of Skinners that the said master and usher, upon occasion may have a greater number at board and lodging with them.

XXIII.

That no boy be admitted into the school, who shall not at the time of the application for admission, be of the age of eight years.

XXIV.

That no boy be admitted into the said school, who shall not, previously thereto, be able to write competently, and read English perfectly; and the master of the said school, for the time being, shall examine every proposed scholar, and admit him, if he shall be so qualified, but not otherwise.

XXV.

That no boy shall be allowed to continue in the said school after he shall have completed the nineteenth year of his age.

XXVI.

That any housekeeper of the town of Tunbridge shall be permitted to receive not exceeding thirty boys as boarders, who shall be scholars of the said Free Grammar School, provided such inhabitant shall obtain from the said governors a written license for that purpose, upon the production of testimonials from the master as to the moral character and fitness of the applicant for the charge of such boarders, and that the said license be renewed annually by the said governors.

XXVII.

That the salary of twenty pounds, given to the master by the said Sir Andrew Judd, be increased to the sum of five hundred pounds per annum, clear of all deductions; and that the salary given by the said Sir Andrew Judd to the usher be increased to the sum of two hundred pounds per annum, clear of all deductions; the said salaries to be paid half-yearly, at Christmas and Midsummer, by the said governors, out of the rents of the said estates; such respective salaries to commence from Midsummer Day, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four.

XXVIII.

That the annual sum of seven pounds ten shillings be paid by every boy, who shall not be in the first of the aforesaid two classes described in the master's report to the scheme, to the master, and the annual sum of three pounds to the usher, for his instruction at the said school: such payments to be respectively made by the parents or guardians of the said boys.

XXIX.

That sixteen exhibitions of one hundred pounds a year each be founded, as part of the establishment of the said school, for the boys thereof, who shall go off to the University of Oxford or Cambridge, under the regulations herein-after set forth.

N.B.—By an order of the Court of Chancery, dated 14th August 1828, these exhibitions are reduced from four to three in number every year, until a certain debt incurred for erecting the school buildings is satisfied.

XXX.

That such boys as shall be of the first class of scholars, and shall be duly qualified to receive such exhibitions, shall be preferred to those of the second class. Provided such boys have been continuously of the first class for five years, or fifteen school terms preceding; but no boy shall be eligible to an exhibition unless he shall have been a scholar of the said school for five years, or fifteen school terms.

XXXI.

That the boys now in the school, whether above or under nineteen years of age, who shall respectively be applicants to go off to college upon the said exhibitions prior to Christmas, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, shall, in case such boys respectively shall, at the time of such application, have been five years in the said school, immediately after such application, be examined by such person or persons as the governors shall appoint; and, if found duly qualified, such boys shall respectively be thereupon presented by the governors to such exhibitions, provided that a number not exceeding two be presented in any one year.

XXXII.

That until Christmas, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, the said governors shall appoint an examiner to attend at the annual visitation, for the purpose of examining all the boys in the school.

XXXIII.

That upon the annual visitation, from and after Christmas, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, an examiner shall be appointed by the governors for the examination of the boys and youths who shall be canditates for the said exhibitions.

XXXIV.

That the said examiner shall be of not less than seven years' standing at, and a resident member of, one of the universities of Oxford or Cambridge, and have taken the degree of Master of Arts, or Bachelor of Civil Law, and that application be made by the said governors to the warden and fellows of the college of All Souls, Oxford, to nominate such examiner, if the said warden and fellows shall think fit.

XXXV.

That the said examiner do, on every annual visitation, publicly examine all the boys and youths in the said school, to ascertain their progress in learning.

XXXVI.

That the said examiner shall subsequently examine in the schoolroom all such boys and youths as shall become canditates for exhibitions, and shall report to the governor and master respectively, the names of all such of the said last-mentioned boys and youths in the said classes respectively, as he shall find qualified to stand for exhibitions.

XXXVII.

That the said examiner shall in such report arrange the names of the said candidates in the said respective classes, according to their respective excellence in classical learning.

XXXVIII.

That from and after Christmas, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, the said governors shall yearly present or give, at their said visitation, the exhibitions to any four of the boys and youths of the said first class, who shall be reported by the said examiner as qualified for the same; and in case there shall not be found in the said first elass boys and youths qualified as aforesaid for an university education, to receive the said four exhibitions, then the said governors shall present or give all or so many of the said annual exhibitions as the boys and youths in the first class shall not receive, to any of the boys and youths of the second class, who may be reported by the said examiner as qualified to receive such exhibitions.

XXXIX.

That the said examiner shall be paid the sum of fifteen pounds fifteen shillings; and also the further sum of fifteen pounds fifteen shillings for his travelling and other expenses; and that such payments shall be provided for by the said governors out of the said estates.

XL.

That the said exhibitions shall be held by the said exhibitioners for four years, from the commencement of the university term next after the presentation of such exhibitioner, and for such portion of the said four years only, as they shall be bonâ fide resident at one of the universities during the usual terms; and in case any of the said exhibitions shall cease before the expiration of such period as aforesaid, then the said exhibitions, for the residue of the said period, shall be given by the governors of the said school, for the time being, to any youths then, or formerly members of the said school, who shall have undergone the aforesaid examinations, and proved themselves qualified for the exhibitions, although they failed in obtaining the same, and who shall be then resident members of one of the said universities, and be under the degree of Bachelor of Arts; always preferring the youths of the first class to those of the second class.

XLI.

That, it appearing from the list of boys and youths now of the said school, and of the times of their entrance, that a small number only can be qualified to be candidates for the said exhibitions prior to Christmas, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, and that the full number of exhibitions intended to be hereby established cannot, at the soonest, be filled until four years from that period, the unappropriated surplus funds, and the surplus of the general account of the rents of the said estates, shall from time to time be applicable to the expense which will attend the alteration and repairs of the said house of the master, and of that intended for the usher, and of the schoolroom and other buildings, and of the garden and other grounds to be enjoyed therewith respectively, and the purchase of suitable books for a library, and increase of the number of exhibitions, or rewards to the said exhibitioners, who may distinguish themselves at either of the said universities, or for the establishment of other branches of classical education, or for any other purposes for the better establishment of the said school, as the court shall from time to time think proper to order and direct; and that for the purposes aforesaid, the said governors, or any persons interested in the said school, are to be at liberty to apply to the court as they may be advised.

XLII.

That all the assistant masters, which may be necessary for the boys of the second class, shall be provided by the master, and be paid by him, and the usher, in the proportions of their respective salaries.

XLIII.

That in case the scholars of the said school, belonging to the first class, shall amount to the number of forty, there shall be provided at the expense of the said estates, one assistant master, to assist in the education of such boys; and so an additional assistant master shall be provided for every additional twenty scholars, unless it shall appear to the Skinners' Company, with the advice of All Souls College, that an assistant master should be appointed for a less number of scholars in the first class than forty.

XLIV.

That every such assistant master requisite for the boys of the first class, shall be a member of the established religion of England, and, if such can be obtained, shall have taken a degree at either of the universities of Oxford or Cambridge.

XLV.

That the said master shall have the appointment and removal of all assistant masters, subject always to the visitatorial power of the governors.

XLVI.

That every assistant master shall be at liberty to take boys, scholars of the said school, as boarders in his house, not exceeding twenty in number.

XLVII.

That the salary of every such assistant master shall not exceed eighty-four pounds per annum.

XLVIII.

That a sum not exceeding twenty pounds per annum be allowed to the master for supplying the schoolroom with coals.

XLIX.

That the annual sum of two hundred pounds be allowed to the governors for the expenses of the visitation of the said school.

L.

That neither the master, usher, or assistant masters of the said school shall absent themselves therefrom, except at the periods of, and during the vacation.

LI.

That rules and regulations as to the hours of attendance in the school of the master, usher, and assistant masters, and boys, or youths, and the fixed holidays to be given, shall be submitted by the master of the said school to the said governors, during the recess at Christmas, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four, who are, before the expiration of such recess, to settle the same; and such governors are, from time to time thereafter, to alter or vary such rules or regulations, as circumstances may require, and in the settlement of such rules and regulations, and in any subsequent alteration or variation thereof, the said governors are to have regard to the twentieth and twentyfirst articles in the statutes of Sir Andrew Judd, in the said report set forth, and the general purpose of the founder as therein expressed.

LII.

That the said rules and regulations, when settled by the said governors, and as the same shall be from time to time altered or varied by them, as in the next preceding article is mentioned, shall be considered as, and be part of the scheme for the future establishment of the said Free Grammar School, and shall be from time to time added to the other articles herein set forth as forming the scheme for the future establishment of the said school, and the future conduct and government thereof, and the same shall be printed with such other articles, as is mentioned in the next or following article.

LIII.

That the governors do provide printed copies of the articles approved for the future government of the said school, to be distributed at their said annual visitation in the said school.

LIV.

That instead of the annual visitation of the governors as directed by the twenty-seventh original order of the said Sir Andrew Judd, being on the first or second day after May-day, it shall hereafter be held on the Tuesday next preceding the day on which the summer vacation in each year is appointed to commence.

Additional Rules and Regulations, settled by the Governors, viz.:

I.

That the master and usher, and such assistant masters as may be hereafter appointed, and all the scholars of the said school, shall daily attend at the school, from Lady Day till the 5th of November, at a quarter before seven o'clock, and from the 5th of November till Lady Day, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and prayers being read on their first entrance into the school, according to the 12th article, they shall continue in the school till half-past eight o'clock.

II.

That after breakfast, the master and usher, and assistant masters, and all the scholars shall return to the school at half-past nine, and shall continue therein until half-past twelve o'clock on whole school-days, and until one o'clock on half-holidays.

III.

That on whole school-days, the master and usher, and assistant masters, and all the scholars shall return to the school after dinner at two o'clock in the afternoon, and shall continue therein till four o'clock, and that then prayers shall be read according to the form to be by the master prescribed.

IV.

That the master and usher, and all assistant masters shall remain in the school, diligently teaching, reading, and intrepreting, during the several hours and times above prescribed, and that neither the master, usher, or any assistant master shall depart, or be absent from the school during such hours or times, without urgent and sufficient cause, and that in anywise either the master or usher shall be present always.

V

That the master be at liberty to give twelve holidays in the course of the year, the following to form part of the same, viz., the founder's day, the King's birthday, and the gunpowder plot.

VI.

That a certificate of the entry and admission of every boy into the school, in the form subjoined, be forwarded to the governors by the master of the school, on the same day (or following day at farthest to that) on which such entry and admission take place, viz.:

To the Master and Wardens of the Skinners' Company, Governors of Tunbridge School.

This is to certify that aged years, son of and of in the county of was this day entered and admitted a scholar of Tunbridge School as a boy.

Dated this day of 18

(Signed)

Master.

VII.

That no boy leave the school before the day and time appointed by the master for the commencement of the Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer holidays, except upon urgent and unavoidable necessity, and with permission from the master under his own signature.

VIII.

That no boy remain away from the school after the day appointed for his return by the master, except in case of illness or unavoidable necessity, of which notice must have been given to the master; as the active duties of the school will commence on the next day.

IX.

That during the half-year no boy be absent from the school without the especial permission of the master; and that a written notice be given to the master by the parent or guardian of every boy, whenever absence from school may be required.

X.

That all instances of disregard of the above orders be reported to the governors, who may direct that the halfyear in which the offence shall be committed shall not be allowed to form part of the five years necessary to qualify a boy to become a candidate for an exhibition.

XI.

That no boy after his admission into the school, shall be permitted to be absent from the same, except at the stated periods of the holidays, unless prevented by illness; of which a certificate, signed by a medical attendant, must be sent to the master, under the penalty of his being disqualified from becoming a candidate for an exhibition.

XII.

That the vacations be at three periods of the year, viz., at Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer; that the Christmas holidays do commence on the Thursday before Christmas Day, and that the boys do return on that day four weeks;— that the Easter holidays do commence on the day before Good Friday, and that the boys do return on that day two weeks;—that the Midsummer holidays do commence on the last Thursday in July, and that the boys do return on that day six weeks.

XIII.

That in all cases of extreme impropriety of conduct on the part of any boy, which may in the opinion of the master render it advisable to expel the boy from the school, the master shall in the first instance have the power of suspending him from attending in the school, and after reporting the case to the governors, shall, with their sanction, proceed to expulsion.

XIV.

That the gilt, parcel gilt, and silver pens be awarded to the three boys who shall, in the judgment of the examiner, have done best in the production of Greek verses, Latin verses, or Latin essays, so that no one boy may receive more than one of the pens as a prize at the same visitation in accordance with the statutes. All other prizes (except those given by the master of the school) to be awarded by the governors, according to the respective merits of the boys, as reported by the examiner.

The Scholars from Tunbridge School are eligible to the following Fellowship and Exhibitions.

A fellowship at Saint John's College, Oxford, founded by Sir Thomas Whyte.

Six exhibitions of 13l. per annum each, tenable at any college of either university, founded by Sir Thomas Smith.

One scholarship at Brasenose College, Oxford, of 17l. 9s. 6d. per annum, founded by Mr. Henry Fisher.

One exhibition of 2l. 13s. 4d. per annum, founded by Mr. Thomas Lampard.

One exhibition of 4l. per annum, (in default of scholars from Seven Oaks School,) founded by Mr. Robert Holmedon.

Two exhibitions of 75l. per annum each, tenable at Jesus College, Cambridge, (in default of scholars from Seven Oaks School,) founded by Lady Mary Boswell.

Two exhibitions of 6l. per annum each, founded by Mr. Worrall.

The Skinners' Company in account with Laurence Attwell's Fund.

Dr.

1863.£s.d.
May 1.To balance of rents received applicable to loans from this account at this date, from which amount the loans specified per contra have been made and are now outstanding11,16576
11,16576
1863.
May 1.To balance2,91076

Cr.

£s.d.£s.d.
By loans made to following, outstanding at this date:—
Sept. 1839.E. Williams500
"H. Suffell20000
July 1840.J. Stott10000
Aug. 1841.H. Woodhatch10000
July 1842.B. Thorn5000
Dec. 1843.J. Gill5000
Aug. 1848.J Johnson20000
Nov. 1848.H. S. Eicke20000
Jan. 1852.J. H. Smith20000
Jan. 1854.J. D. Dennis20000
"R. Arscott20000
July 1854.J. H. Hayward20000
Jan. 1856.C. Beauchamp20000
Feb. 1856.F. L. Moore10000
July 1857.W. McDaniel20000
"W. Aldridge20000
Aug. 1858.A. Edwards20000
March 1859.W. W. Pyne20000
"C. Moore20000
Nov. 1859.J. Sankey20000
Dec. 1859.E. Wade15000
July 1860.H. T. Duggins20000
"T. Allen20000
"R. Gibson20000
"H. Heath20000
Aug. 1860.F. Richardson20000
"C. Wilson20000
"J. Box10000
Sept. 1860.E. Christmas20000
Oct. 1860.E. Cleasby20000
Nov. 1860.H. T. Watts20000
Feb. 1861.W. J. Hayward20000
"J. Scratton20000
"G. A. Dean20000
July 1861.L. Dixon20000
"T. Elwin20000
"M. Dorman20000
"B. Annable20000
Oct. 1861.E. H. Clunn20000
Oct. 1862.H. Cumming20000
" 1862.J. Dorman20000
Dec. 1862.C. F. Cole20000
April 1863.J. Land20000
"A. Culverhouse20000
"— Soddy20000
"T. J. Jeffry20000
8,25500
1863.
May 1.Balance2,91076
11,16576

The Skinners' Company in account with Thomas Hunt's Estate.

1848.£s.d.
June 24.To amount to credit of this trust deducting amount of loans now outstanding as per contra4,00000
" Loans repaid to June 23, 1862, viz.:—
Edward Cleasby20000
George Colgate20000
J. Thurman20000
George Colgate20000
Faulconberg Shuttleworth20000
Edward Cleasby20000
Pinnock20000
5,40000
1862.
June 24.To balance at this date2,91000
1848.£s.d.
June 24.By loans made from this trust outstanding at this date, viz.:—
James Butler20000
Thomas Wright20000
Thomas Leekey20000
John Windscheffel5000
Thomas Hawkins20000
By cash paid in loans, viz.:—
Aug. 1848.Edward Cleasby20000
May 1851.George Colgate20000
Nov. 1851.E. H. Jones4000
May 1852.J. Thurman20000
Feb. 1854.Thomas Stevens20000
July 1854.George Colgate20000
Faulconberg Shuttleworth20000
May 1855.Edward Cleasby20000
Oct. 1856.Pinnock20000
1862
June 23.By balance carried forward2,91000
5,40000

Footnotes

1 All boys are considered to be in the Upper School who attend the mathematical master.
2 Boys whose parents or guardians are living in Kent within 10 miles of Tonbridge are considered on the Foundation.
All boys are foundationers whose parents or guardians (their parents being dead) reside in Kent within 10 miles of Tonbridge.
3 See 14th additional rule.