Report on the Charities of the Haberdashers' Company
Part I

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

420-456

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'Report on the Charities of the Haberdashers' Company: Part I', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 420-456. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69727 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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HABERDASHERS' COMPANY.

Mr. Hare's Report. Part 1

TO THE CHARITY COMMISSIONERS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES.

In pursuance of a Minute of the Board of the 7th day of November 1862, I have inquired into the condition and circumstances of the following charities under the management of the Haberdashers' Company of the City of London, and I have stated in the Report under the head of each specific endowment, the result of my investigation.

The Haberdashers' Company, under the style of "The Master and four Wardens of the Fraternity of the Art or Mystery of Haberdashers in the City of London," consists of the master, four wardens, and court of assistants, and the livery and freemen of the Company.

The master and wardens are chosen by the court of assistants, the court electing each year a master and two senior wardens from the court, according to their standing, and they elect also, two junior wardens, from the livery, not on the court. The senior is the first warden, and the next the second warden, each serving as well as the master, for a year, and succeeding to each other's office in turn. Of the two junior wardens, one serves as third, and the other as fourth warden, and at the end of the year, these two junior wardens are elected on the court.

The number of the court of assistants varies from 30 to about 46. The number of freemen are about 800, of whom 444 are liverymen.

William Adams' Charities.

By indenture of the 27th November 1656, made by William Adams of the one part, and the Haberdashers' Company of the other part, after reciting that the said William Adams had conveyed to the Haberdashers' Company certain lands and tenements in Staffordshire, it was declared that the said Company should pay the several yearly sums following:—

To a minister at Newpert for catechising children, &c.20l.
To a schoolmaster40l.
To an usher20l.
For apprenticing 3 poor boys24l.
To 4 learned ministers and 3 other persons for visiting the schoolhouse, &c.2s.
To a poor boy as bellringer at the school20s.
To a poor boy for cleaning the said school-house20s.
For repair of the said school-house and almshouses5l.
For 4 exhibitions at Oxford or Cambridge20l.
To the 4 poor aged almspeople20l. 16s.
To 20 poor people of the Company20l.
To the clerk and beadles2l.

The institution was further established and regulated by Acts of Parliament passed in the 12th and 13th years of King Charles the 2nd. The deeds and accounts are set forth in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry for the county of Salop. (Vol. 5, p. 416, et seq.)

The property of the charity in Staffordshire seems to have been demised for long terms of years to a person named Justice and his representatives, under the direction in the will of the testator, which appears to have given the lessee a right of renewal. The renewed lease granted under this direction expired in 1784, and no further claim to renewal seems to have been made on the part of the lessee. The estate was then let to several tenants at a great increase of the aggregate rent, and a suit was instituted in the Court of Chancery by the AttorneyGeneral at the relation of Richard Whitworth, Esq., against the Haberdashers' Company, and Randle Tonner, the heir-at-law of W. Adams, the founder of the charity, for the direction of the Court as to the application of the increased income. The surplus rents were claimed in this suit by the heir-at-law of W. Adams.

The Court, however, in this suit, determined that there was no resulting trust in favour of the heir-at-law of the founder, and the usual reference was then made to the master to approve of a scheme, which was settled in the year 1797.

The rents were further increased in or previous to the year 1808, when a further scheme was settled, having regard to the augmented income, and many of the foregoing payments were increased not only beyond the sums fixed by the original trust, but by further additions made to the augmentation of 1797.

The Commissioners of Inquiry set forth the state of the property of the charity, and the condition and administration of the institution at the time of their inquiry in May 1820.

The property consists of the following particulars:—

£s.d.
1. The estate at Woodseves, in the parish of Drayton, Staffordshire, which was purchased in 1667, under the direction of the founder's will; with the produce of the timber. It consists of a farmhouse and buildings and 92a. 0r. 15p. of land, let to Thos. Thompson, on lease for 21 years from Michaelmas 1861 (determinable by either party at the end of 14 years) at the rent of13800
(This rent is an increase from 95l., the rental under the preceding lease, improvements having been made in draining on the land and otherwise.)
2. Knighton Mount Farm.—A farmhouse and buildings and 240a. 2r. 2p. of land, let to Wm. Peover for 21 years from Michaelmas 1861 (determinable as above)46000
(This is an increase from 306l., the rental under the preceding lease.) The new demise includes two plots of land, 10a. 0r. 30p., taken from Palin's farm (see No. 5 infra).
3. Knighton Grange Farm.—A farmhouse and buildings and 238a. 3r. 2p. land, let to Thos. Clark on lease for 21 years from Michaelmas 1861 (determinable as above)38900
(This is an increase from 243l.)
4. Knighton Hall Farm.—A good farmhouse and buildings and 220a. 1r. 37p. of land, let to Henry Clark on lease for 21 years from Michaelmas 1861 (determinable as above)40600
(This is an increase from 290l., it includes 2a. 3r. 15p. of land taken from Palin's farm (see No. 5 infra).
Part of Palin's farm, let to Thos. Lycett, bought and held by the Haberdashers' Company in trust for this charity and for Jones' (Monmouth) Charity, under the following circumstances:—
In the year 1856, the Company presented their petition to the Court for its sanction to the application of 1,938l. 12s. 4d. 3 per cent. consols, the produce of an investment of the purchase money for a strip of land, crossing the Knighton Hall farm, taken by the London and Birmingham Canal Company, together with other funds belonging to the Company as Governors of the Grammar School of William Jones in Monmouth, in the purchase of a farm called Palin's, the lands of which were intermixed with the property of Adams' Charity. The Court approved the purchase, and 1,750l. 15s. 9d. and 18l. 7s. 11d. stock was sold out, and producing cash for payment of 1,689l. 10s. 10d., the purchase money and interest for 31a. 3r. 26p. of land, part of Palin's farm, which is now divided between the tenancies of Peover (No. 2). Henry Clark (No. 4), Lycett (No. 5). The entire farm consisting of a farmhouse and buildings and a. r. p. of land
£1,39300

By an order of the Court of Chancery of the 1st April 1856, it was ordered (inter alia) that the messuages and lands and the purchase money for the same be apportioned between the charities of William Adams at Newport, and the charities of William Jones at Monmouth, respectively, in manner following, such parts of the said messuages, &c., as with the timber thereon should be equal in value to the proportion which the produce of the 1,938l. 12s. 4d. Consols, thereinafter directed to be sold should bear to the entire purchase money of 7,460l., or as near thereto as circumstances would admit, and as were convenient to be held with other lands belonging to the said charity estate of William Adams; and the remaining parts of the said messuages, &c., be apportioned to the said charity of William Jones of Monmouth. Under this order the apportionment was made and separate conveyances were taken, to the Company as governors of the two several charities. By a deed of the 24th January 1856, settled by the Court, Palin and others the vendors, conveyed to the master and wardens, as governors of the possessions of the free grammar school of Newport, of the foundation of William Adams, all and singular the lands and hereditaments containing in the whole 31a. 3r. 26p. mentioned in the schedule thereunder written, all which said lands were then in the occupation of Maria Hodgkins, and were situated in Knighton, in the parish of Adbaston, Staffordshire, and were formerly known by the description following:—All those several closes of land situate in Knighton aforesaid, called or known as Holly Meadow, containing 1a. 3r. 18p.; Wards Yard or Garden in three parts, and called Near Wards Yard, Far Wards Yard, and Wards Yard Meadow containing by estimation 6a. 0r. 25p., part of the Cliff Field, the entirety of which contained 7a. 3r. 3p.; the upper and lower Millings, containing together 7a. 3r. 7p., or thereabouts; the Solomon, then laid to lower Millings aforesaid, containing by estimation 0a. 2r. 22p.; the Davipott, in two parts, containing together by estimation 10a. 0r. 24p.; the Yard, containing by estimation 1a. 0r. 10p.; and which lands and hereditaments were formerly the estate of Robert Pigott, afterwards of William Waller, afterwards of Thomas Lloyd, afterwards of Thomas Borrow, and since of Sarah Palin,—

£s.d.
Brought forward1,39300
5. Lycett's tenancy under this charity comprises 18a. 3r. 21p. land, part of Palin's farm (purchased as aforesaid), 3a. 0r. 29p. land, part of the old estate of this charity, formerly let with Knighton Hall farm. The 22a. 0r. 10p. land belonging to Adams' Charity, is demised by a separate lease to Thos. Lycett for 21 years from Michaelmas 1861, at a rent of4500
6. A public house called the "Haberdashers' Arms" (formerly a cottage and shop let to Hayward), and a blacksmith's shop, and 9a. 2r. 23p. land, let to Joseph Hayward as a yearly tenant33150
7. The woodreve's cottage and 12a. 0r. 6p. land; the woodreve, John Wood, occupies the cottage rent free, and pays as a yearly tenant for the land18150
The tenant also pays as interest on about 30l., advanced for the purchase of bones as manure for the land1100
8. The Woodlands, the total quantity 76a. 3r. 38p. The average produce for seven years from 1854 to 1861 was 283l., and for 14 years up to 1861 the average annual produce was 159l. 11s. 9d.23000
The estate was managed for many years, and a receiver appointed by the Court of Chancery, up to 1852
£1,72200
9. The school forecourt and playground and schoolmaster's house, and four almshouses and gardens, containing altogether from about 1½ to 2 acresIn hand.
The cottage, stable, and barn formerly let to widow Watkins, was some years ago pulled down, and the land held with it was thrown into the adjacent farm, of which it now forms a part; the cottage and land let to Eleanor Ray, is now included in the Knighton Hall demise.

In the arrangement for the apportionment of Palin's estate, belonging to the two charities, the freehold called the Cliff Field was divided between them. As a matter of convenience, it was subsequently found expedient to exchange 2a. 3r. 15p. of the land apportioned to Adams' Charity for the same quantity of land belonging to the Monmouth Charity. This was effected under an order of the Enclosure Commissioners of 22nd May 1862.

At the expiration of the last leases in 1861, the farms were let by tender, and in most cases the old tenants, who were not persons of much capital or enterprise, were removed, and new tenants introduced. The rents, it will be observed, were thus generally and considerably increased. The surveyor of the governors makes a half-yearly report of the state of the farm and buildings, and looks after the performance of the covenants of the lessees.

The sum of 12,426l. 0s. 5d., 3 per cent. consols, which at the time of the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry, stood to the credit of the cause, on the account of this charity, has been for the most part expended in rebuilding, in a substantial manner, the farmhouses and buildings on the Staffordshire property. This application being approved in Court, was necessarily made under the orders of the Court, and was therefore sanctioned by its authority. The sum now in Court to the credit of the cause, The Attorney-General v. Haberdashers' Company, (—), is 3,993l. 2s. 9d., 3 per cent. consols.

£s.d.
The dividends1191510
Rental1,72200
1,8411510

The above sum includes the remainder of the 1,938l. 12s. 4d. 3 per cent. consols, the produce of an investment for land taken by the governors from the London and Birmingham Canal Company (see No. 5 above), which was not expended in the purchase of Palin's farm, and which was transferred to this account by order of the Court of the 24th November 1856. The following statement shows accurately the disposition of this fund:—

£s.d.
3 per cent. consols, Birmingham land account1,938124
1856, Aug.—1,750l. 15s. 9d. sold, produced in cash 1,672l.1,750159
187167
18l. 7s. 11d. ditto for interest on purchase money produced 17l. 10s. 10d. cash18711
16988
1857, Feb.—28l. 2s. 2d. transferred for redemption of land tax2822
14166

The above 141l. 6s. 6d. the residue was transferred to the sum of 3,851l. 16s. 3d., making the above amount of 3,993l. 2s. 9d., 3 per cent. consols.

There has been no general scheme for the administration of the charity since that of 1808.

By an order of the Court of Chancery of the 13th February 1821, made upon the petition of the Company in the suit, the salary of the head master of the school was increased from 150l. a year to 175l. 10s., and the salary of the usher was increased from 75l. to 87l. 10s. These augmentations were ordered to commence from March 1819.

By an order of the 25th July 1835, upon a like application, the salary of the head master was increased to 190l. a year, and 10l. a year was granted to him for his remuneration in acting as secretary to the visitors; and the salary of the usher was increased from 87l 10s. to 100l.; the writing and arithmetic master's salary was raised from 45l. to 100l. a year, and he was at the same time appointed English master.

The woodreve's salary was raised from 2l. to 30l. Under an order of the Court of Chancery of the 23rd December 1852, a subscription of 5l. was allowed to the Adbaston National Schools.

The suit having been terminated and the receiver discharged in 1853, the Haberdashers' Company thenceforward took upon themselves the duty of making such necessary alterations and arrangements as appeared to be necessary.

At Christmas, 1855, the salary of the clerk of the governors was raised from 6l. to 45l. After the receiver was discharged, the clerk received the rents of the estates, without commission. The former salary had been regarded as covering the minor duties, and all special services had been paid for as costs. The augmented salary the governors fixed to include all business except special law expenses.

In 1856, the Company allowed the head master and the usher, each a further sum of 10l. for teaching French.

Under the order of the Court of Chancery, a surveyor had been appointed in December 1852, at a salary of 10l. a year; his duties being confined to a survey of the buildings on the charity land.

At Midsummer, 1854, the governors raised the salary of the surveyor to 25l., and included in his duties the survey of the land and the making a half-yearly report of the state of the property. At Midsummer, 1856, this was raised to 42l., and the superintendence of the surveyor was extended to the new purchase of Palin's land. At a recent court of the Company, held in the past year, the salary of the surveyor was raised to 65l., having regard to the increased income of the property. The care of the woods is entrusted to him, and he is considered to have exercised a very beneficial superintendence over that part of the property.

The salary of the woodreve has also been raised since March 1856, from 30l. to 40l. by the authority of the company.

At Midsummer, 1854, under the authority of the Charity Commissioners, a retiring pension of 50l. was allowed to the Rev. William Sandford, who has been usher of the school. Mr. Sandford is the incumbent of Newport.

The company have recently appointed an examiner of the school; the gentleman who has been appointed is one of the masters of the City of London School. His allowance is 10l. for each half-yearly examination, and travelling and other expenses for printing and otherwise.

The first examination under this appointment was at Midsummer, 1861, and at that time the number of boys in the school was only 38. Before the appointment of the examiner there had been only 32, subsequently the number of scholars on the foundation had been gradually increased, until in August last, as hereafter stated, they amounted to 63.

The successive modifications of the original scheme are shown on the following table, the objects described in italics, being those for which the founder had made no provision.

Founder's Scheme.Scheme of 1797.Scheme of 1808.Subsequent Alterations by Order of the Court of Chancery.Subsequent Alterations by the Governors.Totals.
£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.
The minister of Newport2000400060006000
The head master of the school4000100001500019000
Additional as secretary to the visitors1000
For teaching French100021000
The usher or second master20005000750010000
For teaching French100011000
The English master, formerly writing and arithmetic master300045001000010000
The four exhibitioners2000600090009000
The bellringer and sweeper, 1l. each100200300600
100200300
Allowance for books, including coals and advertisements10001000Average261810
The visitors of the school140210031003100
Average expenses.
The repairs, average of the last seven years, of the school and almshouses32903290
The three apprentices2400360054005400
Examiners average fees and travelling expenses34263426
The four almspeople20160520078007800
The woodreve and bailiff200300040004000
The clerk20045004500
The beadle and porter300300
The 20 poor of the Haberdashers' Company2000500075007500
Planting the wood, drawing, &c., average of last seven years20020096610
Insurance of school premises and farm houses1150210030003000
Subscription to Adbaston School500500
Rent, Audit, and deputation expenses, and average of 7 years32903290
Surveyor6500
1,073106

In addition to the above charges, there is at this time an additional incumbrance in the pension of 50l. per annum to Mr. Sandford.

I am informed that the prospective surplus income is for some time expected to be absorbed by the improvements in the farm buildings and the erection of cattle sheds. The average expenditure of the past seven years for the improvements, erection of buildings, and draining, fences, &c., have been 135l. 14s. 10d.

The Company, by a deputation of its members, visit the school and premises once in every two years, or every alternate year. The deputation on these occasions inspect the farms as well as the institution itself, and require and receive information as to all local matters affecting the charity and its arrangements.

Among other things, they occasionally inquire whether the duties imposed by the founder on the minister of Newport have been performed. A letter from Newport of the 25th October last from the head master, states, that about 60 boys (of whom about five only belong to the school) attend at the national schoolroom on Sunday mornings, and are catechised. The catechising, I am told, is sometimes by the minister or curate, and sometimes by the teachers of the Sunday school. The churchwardens have occasionally been requested to certify that the catechising has been performed. The Rev. William Sandford, the present minister, was formally usher of the school, and in that character has a retiring pension of 50l., which was sanctioned by the Charity Commissioners (Order, 3rd June 1854) in consideration of his yielding up possession of the usher's house, which he had been allowed to occupy since his retirement from the school in 1852). I am told that he claims an addition to the foundation allowance in consequence of the great increase on the rents. It may be material to remark that the gift to him is, not only entirely for catechising, "but for his better encouragement in the works of the ministry," a declaration which may afford some ground for the claim of the minister to augmentation.

In the course of the enquiry, I was attended by Mr. Heane, who appeared on behalf of the incumbent and the parish, and urged the claims of the living to an augmentation of the minister's allowance, pro ratâ with the increase of the income of the charity.

He stated that at the time of the endowment the income of the minister was only about 15l. a year, and the Easter dues; but that since that time the tithes had been purchased by the Governors of Queen Ann's Bounty, and annexed to the living, which is now worth about 220l., with a parsonage house, let for about 5l. or 10l. a year to the parish clerk, and not suitable for the dwelling of the minister. He represented the parish as purely agricultural, with a population of about 3,000 and about 600 houses, rated to the poor's rates. I append to this report some communications I have received from Mr. Sandford, both on the subject of the claims of the incumbent and on the improvement of the school.

The visitors of the school are chosen or nominated by the Company, vacancies being generally filled up on the recommendation of the remaining members.

The present visitors are—

The Earl of Bradford.

Sir Thos. F. F. Boughey, Bart.

John Cotes, Esq.

Charles B. Borough, Esq.

Rev. J. D. Piggott.

Rev. F. C. Twemlow.

Rev. H. G. Bunsen.

Rev. Edwd. Meredith Longdon.

Rev. J. K. Charlton.

Rev. G. T. O. Bridgeman.

The school comprises three principal classes or divisions, the upper school, the middle school. and the lower school. Every boy generally enters into the lower school, which is under the superintendence of the English master. The master admits scholars as probationers, but the regular admission takes place at the quarterly meetings of the visitors, and under their order. At these meetings the boys are examined and promoted from the lower to the upper school. There is in the town an English school, having some endowments partly from the same founder, and there is also a national school. The visitors require that every boy should be able to read tolerably well before he is admissible to this school.

The number of boys in the school since the year 1850 were as follows:—

185065 boys.
185451 "
185541 "
185642 "
185738 "
185834 "
185935 "
186027 "
186147 "
1862, February58 "
" August63 "

It is contemplated to appoint a French master specifically for the teaching of that language, which is not considered at present to be efficiently taught, in which case the 10l. allowance to the present master and usher will be discontinued.

The present head master is the Rev. Dr. Saxton, who was appointed in 1846. His emoluments consist of the 210l. a year, above stated, together with his house rent free. Each boy pays an admission fee of 2s. 6d., of which, 1s. 6d. goes to the head master, and 1s. to the usher, and no further payment whatever, either for books or otherwise. This payment by a recent order of the court of the Company has been increased to 10s. to be divided in the same proportion, subject to the sanction of the Charity Commissioners.

The Rev. J. R. Heawood is the second master, and Mr. R. Crowther the English master.

The schoolhouse consists of a large room for the school, which affords space for all the classes, and an adjoining room occupied by the library, which is for the most part composed of works bequeathed by the founder. The Company have lately added some modern books of a more popular kind to be lent to the school boys; about 30l. has been applied to this purpose.

Both of the masters' houses are of sufficient capacity to enable them to take boarders.

Several suggestions have been made by the head and second masters, as well as by Mr. Sandford, for the improvement of the school. I append their letter to this report. It has also been proposed to enlarge the area from which the boys are to be admitted, and to comprise within it all the parishes in the Newport Union, which include a part of the county of Stafford.

This would seem to be a very desirable measure. It is impossible not to feel that the educational results of this charity are quite disproportioned to the amount of its income, and to the advantages which a better organization would afford. Any scheme for the extension of the benefits of the school should probably be considered in connexion with the other schools for the poor in Newport, and especially embracing also arrangements by which the other endowed school in Newport may be made ancillary to the educational wants of the parish and district.

The four exhibitioners are appointed by the visitors in conjunction with the head master.

They receive the 22l. 10s. per annum, and the allowance is tenable for four years. They are paid by the clerk of the Company on receipt of the certificate of residence. The present exhibitioners are Hartshorne, Lindop, and B. and L. Jones.

The school has also jointly with other schools in Shropshire the benefit of a share of the exhibition founded by Mr. Careswell in 1689, in Christ Church College, Oxford. The estate of this foundation has, I am informed, been increased in value, and is now administered under a decree of the Court of Chancery settling a scheme. I have not, however, been able to ascertain the title of the cause. In May 1861, the visitors report that Thos. C. Lindop, one of the scholars of the Newport school was elected to a Careswell exhibition. The name of the same young man is found in the list of the exhibitioners under this foundation. I have been furnished by the head master with a return of the Careswell exhibitions elected from the Newport school since 1821. This is contained in a letter containing also some suggestions for the improvement of the institution, to which I have before referred, and which I append.

The apprentices are chosen by the head master, minister, and churchwardens as provided by the statutes. A form of certificate is forwarded to the clerk of the Company, and the payment is made to the vestry clerk of the parish of Newport.

The premium of apprenticeship is 18l. apiece, as settled by the Court of Chancery, 1808.

There are four almshouses, each containing a sittingroom and small washhouse below, and a sleeping room above. The furniture belongs to the inmates.

The almspeople receive 7s. 6d. a week each, under the scheme of 1808; they are all single persons. The two houses on one side are occupied by men, and the two on the other side by women, elected by the parish in vestry; the allowances are paid by an agent of the clerk of the Company who resides in the town.

The payments to the 20 poor of the Haberdashers' Company of 3l. 15s. each are made according to the scheme of 1808. The same recipients are not chosen two years in succession. The master, wardens, and fifteen oldest members of the court of assistants who may be present make the election, each of these gentlemen nominate one person in turn.

The accounts of the charity are made up by the Company to the 24th November (St. Katherine's Day) in every year. The balance of cash to the credit of the charity on the 24th November 1861, was 290l. 14s. 9d. The accounts are not finally made up until February. It has been usual to invest any balance, but this was not done last year, the Company having received the rents earlier than usual, are now in advance upwards of 200l., a balance which constantly fluctuates, and has been in the course of the year upwards of 400l.

The Company have recently received an application from the churchwardens, and guardians, and overseers, and other inhabitants of Adbaston, the parish in which the lands of the charity are situated, requesting some annual allowance for the vicar of that parish. The lands, I am informed, were tithe free under the Local Act of the 12th Car. 2, set out in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 5, p. 422). I should doubt, however, whether this Act would extend to tithes. It provides that all the lands and hereditaments conveyed by Adams to the Company for the purposes of the charity should be at all times therein-after free, discharged and acquitted of and from the payment of all, every, or any manner of taxes, assessments, or charges civil or military whatsoever thereafter to be laid and imposed by authority of Parliament or otherwise; and that the said manor, messuages, and premises, and the owners and occupiers thereof or any of them should not at any time thereafter be rated, taxed, or assessed to pay any sum or sums of money or be otherwise charged in any way whatsoever for or in respect of the said manor, lands, and hereditaments, or any of them, for or towards any manner of public tax, assessment, or charge whatsoever." This most remarkable piece of legislation has thus exempted and been held by the Courts of Law to exempt the estates of the charity from every public burden. It may be observed, however that the exemption of tithes is of no importance to the incumbent as the tithes are in lay hands. The court of the Company have recently, in the present month (Nov. 1862) agreed to an allowance of 20l. per annum, if sanctioned by the Charity Commissioners. The tithes of the parish are in the hands of a lay impropriator. The vicar has only a stipend of 90l. a year.

I append documents which have been forwarded to me by the incumbent and the head master of the school. (fn. 1)

Aldersey's Charity.

By letters patent of Queen Elizabeth of the 2nd January 1594 reciting the intention of Thomas Aldersey to establish a free grammar school in Bunbury, Cheshire, and for maintaining a preacher and curate, and for the relief of the poor of Bunbury. It was ordained that there should be for ever there a free grammar school to be called "The Free Grammar School of Thomas Aldersey in Bunbury," to consist of one schoolmaster, and one usher, and that there should be for ever a preacher, and a vicar or curate assisting the said preacher for the care of souls, the master and wardens and the preacher and schoolmaster to be governors by the name of "The governors of the possessions and revenues purchased and assigned by Thomas Aldersey for the maintenance of the free grammar school, and preacher of the Divine Word, and the relief of the poor in the parish of Bunbury."

By a lease of the 20th October 1593, Thos. Aldersey demised to John Aldersey for 500 years at 122l. a year, the rectory of Bunbury, the tithes within the parishes and hamlets of Bunbury, Alpeckham, Beston, Tarnton, Calvely, Wardell, Tirleston, Haughton, Spurstall, Petferton, and Bowesley in Cheshire.

By a subsequent lease of the 12th November, 1594, the said Thomas Aldersey demised to Ralph Egerton for 2,000 years at the yearly rental of 8l., all his tithes within the township of Ridley, in the parish of Bunbury.

And by deed poll of the 28th February 1594, Thomas Aldersey granted to the governors of the school, the said rectory of Bunbury and the tithes, etc., adding thereto Ridley. To hold to the use of the said governors for the purposes of the said letters patent.

And by a further lease of the 31st March 1595, Thomas Aldersey demised to the governors for 2,000 years at the rent of a red rose, all that messuage called the Chantry House, in Bunbury, and parcels of land containing 7 rods in length and 4 rods in breadth and all that tenement late of Thomas Bunbury and the orchard meadow and all that parcel of land called Barncroft and the fourth part of Gorston's Croft to be for the better maintenance of the preacher, schoolmaster, and usher of Bunbury school that they might be provided with competent dwelling-houses, and for the better applying themselves to their several offices. Under these instruments the governors take the two reserved rents of 122l. and 8l. yearly, making 130l. a year, both of which arise out of the rectory and tithes comprised in the gift, and which are now vested in the representatives and descendant of the lessees.

The governors also take under the instrument of 1595:—

1.—A house, buildings, and lands 23a. 2r. 3p. (subject to a quit rent of 8s. yearly), occupied by the preacher.

2.—The school house and playground. The house has been repaired and improved by the aid of a recent grant from the Committee of Council on Education.

3.—The Chantry house, orchard, garden, and croft which was directed to be appropriated to the schoolmaster. The schoolmaster, Mr. Baily, appointed in 1861, has now a cottage and 3a. 0r. 20p. land. It does not appear whether this is the same house and land originally appropriated to the schoolmaster.

The present lettings of this property are set forth in Appendix F to this report.

The master and wardens appointed the preacher or chief incumbent of Bunbury and also the perpetual curate. The present preacher is the Rev. W. B. Garnett; who was appointed or presented in 1853, and the present perpetual curate is the Rev. Wm. Lowe, who was appointed or presented November 1861. On the occasion of the last appointment an estimate was made by the order of the master and wardens of the income of the vicar and curate. This estimate I append, marked G, by which it appears that the total income is about 169l. a year, and that there is a new vicarage built in 1847, with contributions chiefly from the governors of Queen Anne's bounty. It appears that no residence or land was originally assigned for the vicar, the statutes as to him saying, "that being sole and unmarried he is to have one room in the preacher's house."

The entire payments out of the funds provided for the original foundation are:—

£s.d.
Preacher66134
Vicar2000
Schoolmaster2000
Usher1000
Poor of Bunbury1000
Poor of Haberdashers' Company368
£13000

The Haberdashers' Company receive annually from Mr. Aldersey 3l. 6s. 8d., deducting 15s. 6d. for land tax, and leaving 2l. 11s. 2d., which is given by the master and wardens to the poor of the Company together with 4l. 8s. 10d. supposed to be the dividend on 148l. 1s. 1d., 3l. per cent. annuities represented as standing in their corporate name.

It appears to have been the habit of the Company to distribute 7l. a year, in sums of 20s. each, to seven poor persons of the Company, and this 7l. they ostensibly derive from the 3l. 6s. 8d., part of the Bunbury tithe rentcharge, and the dividends of a nominal sum of 148l. 1s. 1d., 3l. per cent. consols, being part of a larger sum of stock standing in the name of the Company. The sum of 7l. and 1l. to the clerk should, however, be the produce of a separate investment, and not mixed up with the 3l. 6s. 8d. It appeared primâ facie that the annual payments for the poor of the Company from this gift had in fact fallen short of the obligation of the Company by the amount of the 3l. 6s. 8d. a year brought in aid of the attributed dividends. The Commissioners of Inquiry do not seem to have been aware of the gift of 300l.; they allude to the 7l. a year being made up of the 3l. 6s. 8d., and other moneys. Upon an examination of the instruments, it appeared, however, that the 3l. 6s. 8d. is in fact given to the Company, and not to the poor of the Company, as is stated in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, p. 194). That Report, in describing the statutes made by the founder, concludes (line 9 from the bottom), "and 3l. 6s. 8d. among the poor of the Haberdashers' Company." On referring to the statutes, copies of which are preserved in the books of the Company, it appears that the same (It. 20), after providing for the application of the 122l., and 8l. for the preacher, curate, usher, schoolmaster, and poor people, concludes:—"The remainder thereof, being 3l. 6s. 8d. yearly, to be paid to the master and wardens of the Haberdashers' Company for the time being to the use of the said Company."

Then follows:—

"Item:—It is ordained by the said T. Aldersey that the aforesaid 300l. given by him to the Company shall be either bestowed in lands to the use of the Company, or otherwise; the same 300l. to be from time to time employed for the benefit of the brethren of the Company and at their discretion. And of the profit thereby arising, or by the revenues of such lands as shall be purchased, that the said master and wardens in the month of November shall give and dispose as follows:—Unto seven poor men of the Company, or unto poor widows of deceased brethren, 20s. a piece, and the other 20s. to the clerk of the Company for his pains."

The question upon this is, whether the Company ought not actually to invest 300l. and apply the interest or dividends, so far as it will go, in payment of 20s. a year to as many poor men of the Company as it will extend to pay, or divide the income equally amongst seven; or whether, as the Company insist, it is sufficient for them to pay 20s. each to seven poor men; such being the limit of their liability. The question is one of little importance. In the future accounts the supposititious sum of 148l. 1s. 1d., 3l. per cent. consols, will be expunged, and the Company propose to insert in its place a nominal investment of enough to produce 7l. a year.

The master and wardens have recently abolished or suspended the office of usher, and appointed Mr. Baily, the master of the school, with the joint salary of master and usher, he providing, at his own expense, a proper qualified teacher. It would appear that a portion of the land apportioned to the master and usher is now let, and the income carried into the school accounts, and forms a portion of the school income. These changes have been gradual since 1855. It had been recommended to them in October 1855 to apply for a grant from the Committee of Council, and submit the school to the Government inspector, a course, however, of which they did not then approve. Later, in December 1855, the master and wardens accepted the recommendation of Mr. Garnett to appoint an usher, who was a certificated master, and at the same time sanctioned a rule that weekly and quarterly payments should be taken from boys of a better class, the amount to be left to the preacher. In July 1856, Mr. Garnett, the preacher, as visitor of the school, reported that the school, which in February 1856 contained only 36 pupils, had increased in June of the same year to 95, of whom about 12 were sons of farmers, tradesmen, and a professional man paying the full quarterly charge of 10s., the rest being of the labouring class paying 2d. a week, and a few free boys. In September 1856 the court overcame its reluctance to admit the interference of the Council and to apply for a grant, which, to the amount of 50l., together with a small capitation grant, was subsequently obtained. The school is an example of the advantage of introducing reasonable capitation charges into a free school.

The state of the school subsequently in 1856, and its improvement, and the income or value of the vicarage, will appear from the documents appended hereto, viz.:—

A.—Report of the Rev. W. B. Garnett, 19th October 1862.

B.—Letter of the Rev. W. B. Garnett, 1st September 1862.

C.—Reports of the inspector of schools from 1855 to 1861.

D.—Printed report of rules.

E.—Printed account of the school, 1856.

F.—Table of the rents of the school premises.

G.—Printed notice to candidates for the presentation to the vicarage.

A.

To the Master, Wardens, &c., of the Haberdashers' Company.

Bunbury Rectory,
October 19th, 1861.

Gentlemen,

I beg respectfully to present my report upon this school up to the present time, and the accounts of the school up to 1st January 1861. I could not finish the latter sooner, as I waited for the payments of the late Rev. J. Martin, which I did not receive, as he was in difficulties, so that the amount due from him is not entered.

The school is in a most flourishing condition, and I am sure the court will read with pleasure the statement of its finances, and the tables numbered I. and II. sent herewith, showing the grades of the parents who send boys to the school, and also the attendance and age of the boys.

I may also call the attention of the court to the reports of H.M.'s inspectors for five years, commencing with 1856, where it is called a "degenerate grammar school," and ending with that for 1860, our last inspection, where it is styled this "excellent school." I should feel gratified if the court will permit these reports to be read before them, and I feel sure they will then take into favourable consideration my suggestion that the present master, who now only holds the appointment of usher (though he has had the entire work of the school, the late head master giving up his money stipend and retaining a house and land in accordance with a permission from the court when the school came under my management), that the present usher, Mr. Wm. Bailey, be appointed head master, and that the office of usher be not filled up, that office being now most efficiently filled by two pupil teachers paid by Government, and two monitors paid out of the school funds. The school was intended by the founder to be a free school, but the original endowment being quite inadequate, your Worshipful Company sanctioned my making a scale of payments from the boys. The highest sum is 10s. a quarter, the lowest 2d. a week. Every boy is admitted by myself, and I always tell the poorer people that if they really cannot afford to pay, that their children shall be taught free, and I am proud to say that I have not a single boy who avails himself of the privilege. All books, except copy books, are provided by the school, though I encourage as much as possible the pupils to purchase books, which, being their own, they take care of and have for study when they leave school. By the means that I have adopted, added to voluntary subscriptions from three of the principal landowners, I am enabled to give the master a salary of 110l., to provide pupil teachers, defray all expenses, and have a balance in the bank of 71l. 15s. 7¾d. I may also mention that we have a drawing master from the Chester School of Art, who gives a lesson each week of one hour's duration; he is paid by voluntary contribution from some of the boys themselves, but the whole school gets the advantage; and I may mention, as a striking instance of the attention the lads pay to their work, that out of 26 boys who competed for prizes last year, given by the Government School of Science and Art, 24 were successful.

If the new minute of the Privy Council comes into operation, the master, Mr. Bailey, will lose 33l. per annum, his guaranteed augmentation by the Government. I shall then have to consider whether I can make this sum up to him out of the funds of the school, and I trust that I may be able to retain him, for his conduct of the school has been worthy of the highest praise.

I trust that the court will approve of what I have done as visitor of this school, and I have great pleasure in again being able to make a favourable report.

I remain, &c. W. B. Garnett, Preacher of Bunbury and Visitor of the Aldersey School.

Tables above referred to.

Children of—
Professional men.Farmers.Small tradesmen.Labourers.Total.
7363544122
Rates.10s. a Quarter.6s. a Quarter.5s. a Quarter.3s. a Quarter.2d. a Week.1d. a Week.
Number25416144518

B.

Bunbury Rectory, Tarporley,
December 1st, 1862.

Sir,

In reply to your letter, I beg to furnish you with the following statement, and shall be glad to afford more detailed information if necessary.

Thos. Aldersey, haberdasher, of London, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, by letters patent made the following arrangements with regard to the church and schools in Bunbury.

It was ordained that there should be "one preacher of God's word," with a salary of 100 marks, a house, and about 28 acres of land.

"One vicar or curate assistant to the same," with a salary of 20l., and if not objected to by the preacher, a lodging in the preacher's house.

One schoolmaster, who was to have for his salary 20l. and the chauntrey house.

And one usher, who was to have 10l. and a house.

These money payments are now paid by Thos. Aldersey, Esq., of Aldersey, high sheriff of the county, to those holding the respective offices. Mr. Aldersey is lessee for 500 years.

£s.d.
Preacher, Rev. W. B. Garnett, M.A.66134
Vicar or curate, Rev. W. Lowe2000
MasterMr. W. Bailey3000
Usher
A sum of ten pounds to poor of the parish, at discretion of preacher, schoolmaster, and wardens1000
£126134

The full value of the tithes was at that time 127l., which the founder distributed amongst the officers as stated above. The balance of 1l., or thereabouts, he gave to the poor of the Haberdashers' Company.

The tithes now are worth some 1,000l. a year, but the payments of those who do the work, alas, continues as in the time of Elizabeth.

However, the payments are all duly made. The ten pounds to the poor of the parish has been, I believe, added to other parish monies, and distributed on St. Thomas' Day; but I have written to the agent to pay it to me and the master, so that we may be able to give an accurate account of its distribution according to the founder's direction "that it be distributed by the preacher, schoolmaster, &c."

For an account of the houses and land under the endowment, see Note (A.) F.

I come now more especially to the grammar school, which when I came to Bunbury I found in a useless condition, see Note B., a. b., where it is described by Her Majesty's Inspector, Rev. J. P. Norris, as "a degenerate grammar school of very little use indeed." I obtained permission from the Haberdashers' Company to re-organise the school, I being, by virtue of my office of preacher, the visitor of the school.

I prepared a scheme, which I submitted to the parishioners and to the Haberdashers' Company, which is stated in Note C.

The school was intended by the founder to be free, but owing to the poverty of the endowment it was quite impossible to obtain masters for the stipends allotted. It became necessary then to organise a scale of payments which was proposed to and approved by a parish. Indeed for years, when the Rev. Mr. Martin was head master 1l. 1s. a year was charged.

I, accordingly, taking into consideration the amount of the endowments, endeavoured so to arrange the scale of payments, that all in the parish might receive a share of the benefit. In this, I think I have been most successful; though had I again to make the arrangement, I should raise the payments of the better classes of the people to one guinea.

At this rate the school would be actually self supporting. At present, we receive 30l. per annum from voluntary contributions, and the voluntary payments are requisite in order that we may obtain Government grants.

As to the efficiency of the school, I will merely refer you to the seven reports, Note B., of Her Majesty's Inspectors for the seven years during which the school has existed in its improved form. But when I say that it furnishes an excellent education to the children of the farmers and professional men, including my own (for I have three sons there), and at the same time affords the same advantages to the boys of the poorest person in the parish, I think that its present state will be appreciated.

I would observe further, in reference to the payments of the pupils, that I myself admit each applicant, and in doing so I ask every poor person whether they can afford to pay the sum charged (2d. a week), at the same time telling them that if they can honestly state that they cannot really pay that sum we will take their children free. I am pleased to say that we have not, at present, one free boy on the books.

I may also state, in confirmation of the reports of Her Majesty's Inspectors, and of myself, that we this week received an application from a Commission under the French Government to afford them statistics of the working of this school.

You make inquiry as to a sum of 18l. 14s. 2d. under the head of endowment. When I re-organised the school, I found that the then head master, the Reverend John Martin, late vicar, held his office of master as a sinecure, paying to the usher his share of the endowment paid by Mr. Aldersey, and retaining in his own hands the house and land attached to the head master's post.

This arrangement I did not alter. Mr. Martin continued to pay to the funds of the school the 20l. (less income tax, which I suppose accounts for the 18l. 14s. 2d.) and to retain the premises.

At his death, in September 1861, I recommended the Haberdashers' Company to unite the two offices of head master and usher, which they decided to do during their pleasure. But that the school may not suffer from want of an usher, we have two pupil teachers and two paid monitors, so more than supplying his place.

Out of the endowment and general funds, I pay Mr. Bailey, the head master, salary 100l., in lieu of house 10l., head master's stipend 20l. = 130l. The remainder is spent on the general expenses of the school, and the balance reserved for a fund for rebuilding it when it shall have arrived at a sum sufficient to warrant our making the attempt.

In addition to the reports of Her Majesty's Inspectors on the condition of the school, I append also their endorsements of the master's certificate.

I also send a list from which you will at once see the numbers out of each rank attending the school, and their respective payments; also the average attendance of those who pay the highest fees, and also of those paying the lowest.

I trust that this statement may be satisfactory; if it is not sufficiently complete I shall be happy to supply any omissions. If the Charity Commissioners come to any decision upon the matter, I would suggest that there should be a provision by which the scale of fees might be raised as circumstances required.

The alteration in the Educational Code, which is about to come into operation may injuriously affect our means.

I believe that the school now is fulfilling to the utmost the intention of the founder.

Before I conclude, I will draw your attention to the fact that in the statutes allusion is made to the education of "women children" in the school. For this purpose we have a separate national school for girls and young boys, at which about 100 children are taught.

In the hopes that what has been done will meet with approbation.

I remain, Yours faithfully, W. B. Garnett.

I see there is an enquiry to be carried on at Haberdashers' Hall. on Saturday next. May I ask that this statement may be given to the Commissioner for his perusal there.

Note C.

Reports on the Aldersey Grammar School by Her Majesty's Inspectors.

a.

Rev. J. P. Norris, 22nd November 1855.

Schoolroom, a spacious room; floor, tiled. Playground unenclosed. Residence, two cottages belonging to trust. Desks loose, of a clumsy heavy form, placed against the wall. The clergyman is the master, the school being conducted by his usher. It is about to be re-organised as soon as the consent of the Haberdashers' Company shall have been obtained. It is proposed to make it a model school for farmers' and labourers' children combined.

P.S. 1856.—This has been done very successfully. The school is now under a certificated master.

b.

Rev. J. P. Norris, 25th November 1856.

Last year I visited this school under the old regime, a degenerate grammar school of very little use indeed. This year I find it re-organised, under a most promising certificated master, trained at Welshpool and Battersea (Mr. Bailey), who is carrying it on after the most approved methods as a model school for farmers' children, combined with those of labourers. He is prepared to teach Latin to any whose parents may desire it. The school appears to be already very popular, and the results are strikingly good, considering the short time the master has been here.

Rev. J. P. Norris, 11th November 1857.

My examination of this school was most satisfactory. Instead of the decrepit grammar school of former years, the parish has now a prosperous and efficient school of elementary education, in the higher classes of which the farmers' sons are receiving an excellent commercial training. The first class not having been grounded by Mr. Bailey, are unequally advanced in some respects, but they have caught the hearty spirit with which their master does his work, and are making good progress. The singing and drill are excellent. I wish the building was more worthy of the school.

Rev. J. P. Norris, 4th November 1858.

This school has passed an excellent examination. It is rapidly winning for itself a place among the best schools of my district. Twenty of the boys are farmers' sons, paying 10s. a quarter, and twenty of them were over 14 years of age. The sum arising from pence last year was 80l. Thus it may be instanced as a very successful as the King's Somborne type of school. It is highly to be desired that the girls' school in the same village would be similarly re-organised.

Rev. S. J. G. Fraser, 20th October 1859.

The admirable order of this school is highly creditable to Mr. Bailey's skill and power of command. The children render a cheerful and willing obedience, and show great interest in the subjects of instruction. Mr. Bailey has succeeded in obtaining a high level of attainments, and in inducing habits of thoughtfulness and industry. I was well pleased with the results of my examination, especially with the command of thought and expression shown by the first class.

Rev. J. P. Norris, 7th November 1860.

This excellent school is going on most satisfactorily. I only wish the building were more worthy of the teacher and his work. The first class consists chiefly of farmers' and tradesmen's sons. They learn Latin or algebra and book-keeping, besides the usual subjects. Both this class and the second passed a very good examination in religious knowledge, English grammar, and arithmetic. The order and discipline are excellent. Mr. Bailey conducts the school with energy and ability. That the parents appreciate his work is shown by the fact that the school fees last year reached the sum of 97l.

More than half the school are labourers' children, paying twopence a week and under.

Rev. S. J. G. Fraser, 4th December 1861.

This school is still as cleverly conducted as ever, and the results are most satisfactory. The attainments are of a high average, and the boys use their knowledge with considerable facility and intelligence. The order is very good. The average attendance is 88 per cent. of the number who have attended, and the number of boys who have attended at least 176 days is 68. These good results are very creditable to the school.

Reports on Mr. Bailey's Certificate.

N.B.—A schoolmaster on leaving the training college is classed, but does not receive his parchment certificate until he has been two years in charge of a school. Mr. Bailey, at the end of two years, received the highest certificate which is granted to any teacher until he has been seven years principal teacher of a school, viz., First Division of Class II. The following was the report on Mr. Bailey by the Rev. J. P. Norris, Her Majesty's Inspector of Schools: —"Mr. Bailey has shown already that the possesses more than ordinary qualifications for the work of a teacher."

Report by Rev. J. P. Norris, 4th November 1858.

"Mr. Bailey's school is steadily advancing. He has interested his boys in their work, and given them habits of application."

Report by Rev. S. J. G. Fraser, 20th October 1859.

"The instruction is soundly given, and the attainments of the scholars are well advanced. The general tone of the school is good, and the order excellent."

Report by Rev. J. P. Norris, 7th November 1860.

"The school has passed an excellent examination throughout, and the general order is most satisfactory."

Report by Rev. S. J. G. F e, 4th December 1861.

"The attainments of the boys are of a high average, and the general order excellent."

Report by Rev. A. T. Bonner, 27th November 1862.

"The condition is excellen in respect of both order and attainments, and reflects much credit on Mr. Bailey's ability and industry."

Table showing the class of Children in the School, and the Fees paid by them.

Sons of—
Professional Gentlemen.Farmers.Tradesmen.Small Tradesmen, Artizans, or Labourers.
8251757

Numbers paying—

10s. per Quarter.6s. per Quarter.5s. per Quarter.3s. per Quarter.2d. per Week.1d. per Week.
2051417456

Table showing a Comparison between the better and poorer Boys as to Attendance and Age (for Year ending 31st October 1862).

Average number of days attended by poorer boys = 168.1.

Average age = 11.0.

Average number of days attended by better boys = 166.4.

Average age = 11.2.

Attendance.

Average attendance for year ending 31st October 1861 = 88.1 per cent. (fn. 2)

Average attendance for year ending 31st October 1862 = 87.5 per cent. (fn. 2)

D.

Bunbury Aldersey Grammar School.

This school will open on Monday, the 4th of February, under the superintendence of Mr. W. Bailey, certificated master, of Battersea Training College, London.

The school was intended by the founder to afford a free education for the children of the parish and neighbourhood, but the salary arising from the old endowment being insufficient to secure the services of a competent master, it was agreed at a public meeting of the parishioners that payments should be received from the children attending the school.

The visitor, the Rev. W. B. Garnett, has received permission from the governors, the Haberdashers' Company, to re-organise the school in such a manner as to meet the requirements of the present time, provided the master selected bears a Certificate of Merit. It has, therefore, been his object to place the school in such a position as to afford the best possible education at a reasonable charge.

The course of instruction will embrace the following subjects:—Scripture, reading, writing, grammar, history, geography, Latin, music, agricultural chemistry, bookkeeping, arithmetic, mensuration, land-surveying, algebra, mechanics, and geometry.

The visitor confidently hopes from the position held by Mr. Bailey on the list of Queen's Scholars, from his Certificate of Merit (1st Class) in his first year, and from the high testimonials he has received of him, that he will be able to impart instruction in the foregoing subjects, so as to give satisfaction to the parishioners.

School hours will be from 9 o'clock till 12 in the morning, and from. 2 o'clock till 5 in the afternoon. In the winter months the school in the afternoon will open at half-past 1 o'clock, the time of leaving being at the discretion of the master.

Every Saturday will be a whole holiday.

Terms of Admission.

1. A few boys, the children of poor widows, or of parents whose circumstances render them quite unable to pay the the lowest fee, will be admitted free at the discretion of the visitor; and it is earnestly requested that none who can afford to pay will apply for a free admission.

2. Children of labourers will be admitted at 2d. a week.

3. Children of farmers renting less than 40 acres of land and of small tradesmen, will be received upon payment of six shillings a quarter.

4. Children of farmers and tradesmen, not included in No. 3, will be admitted at ten shillings a quarter.

In cases where two or more children of the same family attend the school, the first only will be charged the full price, every additional child being admitted at half-price.

All payments must be made in advance; the quarterly payments at the commencement of each quarter, and the weekly payments on each Monday.

The above charges include slates, pencils, pens, all books (except writing books), &c.

It is hoped that these charges will meet the approbation of the parishioners; but should any cases present themselves to which the foregoing rates do not strictly apply, the visitor will be happy to make a special arrangement.

1. All scholars must be kept clean and tidy, and attend school with regularity. It is particularly requested, should any child through sickness or any urgent cause be unable to attend the school, that notice to that effect be given to the master, either by a note from the parent, or a message by a grown-up person. Absence without leave from the master, cannot on any account be permitted.

2. The scholars must attend regularly, on Sundays, the place of worship selected by their parents.

3. Those parents who wish their children to be admitted to the school are requested to call at the Rectory, on any morning between the hours of nine and ten.

(Signed) W. B. Garnett.

E.

Bunbury Aldersey Grammar School. Receipts and Disbursements for the Year ending December 31st, 1856.

Donations.

£s.d.
Marquis of Cholmondeley1000
J. Tollemache, Esq.2500
Mrs. Garnett500
Mr. Catherall (Chester)110
" Walton050
" Hull026
Earl Grosvenor500
T. Cawley, Esq.100
Mr. Challinor050
" Baker026
" Richardson020
" Rutter020

Annual Subscribers.

£s.d.
T. Aldersey, Esq.1000
Dowager Mrs. Aldersey1000
Lord Crewe1000
A. H. Davenport, Esq.1000

Receipts.

Dr.

£s.d.
To annual subscriptions4000
" donations4800
" endowment:£s.d.
Rev. J. Martin18142
Usher's salary968
Rents of cottages (¾ year)7160
" fields (½ year)176
3744
" Committee of Council on Education:
Grant towards floor, desks, &c.5000
Capitation grant6150
56150
" school pence:
Quarterly scholars30136
Weekly "16116
Sale of books640
5390
" Mr. Large (for boards)050
£235134

Expenditure.

Cr.

£s.d.
By master's salary9000
" books, maps, &c.:£s.d.
Com. of C. on Education134
Soc. for promoting Christian Knowledge1174
Mr. Catherall14160
" Dickinson8011½
" Lowndes1110
39911¼
" Mr. Bunce8411
" " Walton0103
" " Dutton, glazier547
" " Oakley070
" Mrs. Elson127
" coals117
" carriage of coals, &c.0611
" clock0150
" rent of playground400
" expenses to London500
" sundries2114
To balance in hand012
£235134
Number of boys admitted during the past year124
" " left " "13
" " on Register, December 31st, 1856111

W. B. Garnett, Visitor.

F.

1862.

Bunbury Aldersey Grammar School.

Tenant.Rent.
£s.d.
Chauntrey HouseBenjn. CookHead Masters.1000
PlaygroundDo.100
Heath Field allotmentS. Dodd1100
Usher's houseSaml. Kirkham440
In two dwellingsJ. Harding550
Small fieldB. Cook100
Small allotmentS. Dodd0140
£23130

Income from all sources, including Government grant, endowment, scholars' payments, and voluntary subscriptions for 1861, 170l. 19s.

G.

Vicarage or Curacy of Bunbury, near Tarporley, Cheshire.

The vicar or curate of the parish of Bunbury is appointed by the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers, under a charter granted by Queen Elizabeth on the request of Thomas Aldersey, Esq., by which it is ordained that there shall be for ever appointed "a preacher of the Divine word, and also a vicar or curate to the same preacher, assistant, for the observation of the cure of souls and divine ministration within the parish."

The present preacher is the Rev. W. B. Garnett. The estimated annual value of the vicarage or curacy is as follows:

£s.d.
Founder's endowment2000
Rentcharge on land1400 (fn. 3)
Land, now let for2400
Dividends on 942l. 10s. 1d., Reduced 3l. per Cent. Annuities, from Queen Anne's Bounty2856
Fees, about2300
10956
Estimated value of house, garden, and paddock6000
Total estimated gross income£16956

The vicarage house is a good one. It was built in 1847.

There is a district church and a chapel within the parish, and the care of other portions of the parish is also provided for, whereby the population under the charge of the vicar or curate numbers about 1,800 only, but it is widely scattered.

Under the charter, the vicar is removable by the Haberdashers' Company for absence from his duties for 30 days in the year, and for other misconduct, also for undertaking any other charge.

Applications from candidates, with original testimonials, must be sent in, addressd to the clerk, on or before Monday, the 11th of November instant.

Jno. Curtis, Clerk.

Haberdashers' Hall, Gresham Street West, London, E.C., November 1, 1861.

Rev. W. Lowe.

Arnold's Charity.

Thomas Arnold, prior to 1669, gave to the Company a rentcharge of 26l. out of lands at Islington for them to distribute to 20 poor men at St. Katherine's tide, for ever, as Sir Nicholas Rainton directed by his will. The charge is payable out of the lands mentioned in the decree of the court referred to by the Commissioners of Inquiry, comprising the "Angel" Inn at Islington. It is paid by Messrs. Child, the bankers, on account of Mr. George Thornhill, or his representatives. The whole sum of 26l. is now paid without deduction of land tax, and is distributed in donations of 1l. 6s. to 20 poor persons of the Company, in the month of October of every year. (fn. 4)

Aske's Hospital.

Robert Aske, by will of the 18th January 1688, gave to the Haberdashers' Company 20,000l. to be laid out in the purchase of land within one mile of London, to build an almshouse for 20 poor single men free of the Company, and to buy so much land as thereout might be paid to each poor man 20l. per annum; and the remainder of the money which should not be disbursed at the finishing of the houses and the purchase of the said land, was to be laid out in land for the maintenance of so many poor boys as the remainder of the said money would produce at 20l. each for meat, drink, clothing, and schooling. And the testator gave the residue of his estate to the Company for the maintenance of the said charity.

And by a codicil of the 20th January 1688, the testator appointed the master wardens and assistants of the Company to be governors of the said hospital, and directed that the 20 poor boys should be freemen's sons of the Company, and if it happened thereafter that any of the revenues should fall short the same should be deducted out of the income for the poor boys.

By an Act of Parliament passed the 20th December 1690, the master and wardens of the Company were made a corporate body by the style of "Governors of the possessions and revenues of the hospital at Hoxton, of the foundation of Robert Aske."

By the evidence taken before the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 2, p. 127, and Appendix, p. 286), it was represented that the governors under the will and under certain ancillary bequests, became possessed of the sum of 31,905l. 1s., of which nearly 4,000l. was absorbed by legacies, debts, and charges, and that out of the residue there was laid out—

£s.d.
In the erection and furnishing of the hospital11,78767
In the purchase of land at Hoxton, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch2,00000
In the purchase of the Kent estates13,21160

It is difficult to reconcile this account with the tables then laid before the Commissioners, but it would be vain at this distance of time to re-open the inquiry.

With reference to the hospital and the estates, and their present condition, it may be stated, broadly, that the hospital including the chapel, school, officers' residences, and almshouses have been rebuilt, since the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry, at an expense which would seem not to fall greatly short of 18,000l. that the Hoxton estate has been entirely let on building leases (except the portion occupied by the hospital), and that the property is now covered with upwards of 500 houses, the leases of many of which are about to expire, and all of which will have fallen into hand in little more than 20 years from this time, that the Kentish estates consist of somewhat less than 2,000 acres of which nearly one-fourth is leasehold of the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, and the lease will expire in about 13 years, the Chapter having declined to accept a fine for renewal as heretofore, and the governors of the charity having resolved not to adopt the alternative of enfranchisement, but to let the lease run out.

The freehold portion of the Kent estate is as follows:—

£s.d.£s.d.
1. Butterland farm in the parish of Kings North, a good farm house and new barn built in 1855 at a cost of 640l., and other farm buildings, and the old farm house converted into cottages, and 584a. 2r. 39p. of land let to Wm. Scott, for 21 years from Michaelmas 1850 at55000
and interest on the 640l. at 5 per cent.3200
58200
Subject to a deduction of 15l. per annum for drain tiles1500
56700
In the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 2, Appendix, p. 289) the farm is stated to be 448a. 2r. 34p. In 1848, 41a. 3r. 5p. of land adjoining was purchased at the price of 2,150l. out of the purchase money for 16a. 3r. 11p. taken by the Hastings and Ashford Railway Company (London and South Eastern) for 2,200l.
2. Park Farm in the parish of Kings North, a farmhouse and buildings and 294a. 1r. 14p. of land, let to Wm. Hart for 21 years from Michaelmas 185030000
3. Lime Kiln Farm in the same parish, and a farmhouse and farm buildings and 90a. 2r. 22p. of land, let to Horace Wills for 12 years from Michaelmas 1856.10000
and Interest on 229l. 9s. 9d. expended in draining1194
4. Singleton Farm in the parish of Great Chart, and a good farmhouse with a moat and buildings and 246a. 1r. 16p. of land, let to Clarke Wills for 14 years from Michaelmas 185425000
Interest on 250l. expended in draining12100
5. Bevenden Farm in the same parish, a new house and buildings and cottages made of the old farmhouse and a brick granary and 143a. 1r. 35p. land let to Henry Buss for 21 years from Michaelmas 184410700
Interest on 394l. 3s. 4d. expended in draining1941
6. The woods in the parishes of Kings North, Great Chart, and Buckinge, 182a. 2r. 5p., average receipts for timber and underwood for 14 years21900
The leasehold property held under the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury, of which the last renewal was obtained in Michaelmas 1854 at a fine of 968l. 12s. 6d., is as follows:—
7. Chart Court Lodge and Court Reed Farm in the parish of Great Chart. The Old Manor House and the Court Reed Farmhouse and buildings and 373a. 2r. 14p. of land, let to Henry Andrews for 14 years from Michaelmas 185544000
Interest on 170l. 3s. 6d. laid out in draining8100
8. Worting Mill in the same parish, a water corn mill and dwelling house and farm buildings and 38a. 0r. 24p. of land, let to Henry Andrews for 14 years from Michaelmas 184810500
The tenant is holding over with the consent of the Company.
Interest on money expended on the mills, and in draining pipes5130
9. Prior's Mead in the same parish, a meadow containing 1a. 3r. 1p., let to the Dean of Norwich, the Rector of Great Chart, tenant from year to year4100
10. Rowfrith and Hele Wood containing 27a. 2r. 33p. wood land. The Company having the underwood but not the timber. The underwood is cut about every 12 years, and used chiefly for hop poles. This is included in the average of the produce of the woods.
2,149165

The total acreage of the Kent estate, according to the latest leases and reports is, freehold land, including the woods, 1,542a. 0r. 11p., and of the leasehold, including the woods, 441a. 0r. 12p., making together 1,983a. 0r. 23p. The property includes the manor of King's North, but there are no manorial rights or receipts.

The outgoings on this estate:—

£s.d.
Leasehold rents to the dean and chapter19132
Quit rent0168
In the year 1861 the expenses of draining on the four farms, exclusive of the 15l. allowed to the tenant of Butterland, was 92l. 8s. 3d.
In the same year, the cost of a new cart shed at Norton Mill was 43l. 4s. 6d., and other repairs 3l. 3s. 11d., which should of course be considered as annual charges (expenses on other estates in 1861, 18l.) say yearly14000
£s.d.
Labour and expenses in the woods and nursery140150
Trenches and planting, etc.
Rates and taxes on the woods and nursery3276
Cartage of timber, timber flaying, grubbing, manure, bailiff, etc., draining pipes, being expenses generally referrable to the woods3670
Making the total disbursements on the woods20996
It thus appears that the wood lands, considerable as is the quantity of land which they comprise, really produce to the charity no more than about 10l. a year.
The insurance on the farm buildings, in seven different policies for an amount in the whole of 16,300l.5711
The deputation and receiving rents:—
Three members of the Company once in two years, and the clerk twice a year, visit the estates. The latter receives the rents.
£s.d.
There are dinners to the tenants on these half-yearly receipt of rents, 186152104
1860—The receipt of rents by the clerk without the deputation28125
8129
4200
The surveyor receives a commission, say annually of 5l. per cent. on the amount of rents and the produce of the underwood. The present surveyor is Mr. Dickson, he surveys and superintends the farms, and reports to the Company twice every year, and he also makes occasional visits as circumstances require6617
£53520

Taking, therefore, the gross produce of the Kent estate to be 2,149l., and outgoings specially chargeable on that estate to be 535l. the net income of the Kentish property under the management of the Company would be 1,614l.

Hoxton Estate.

The Hoxton estate is described in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry, Appendix (p. 287), as about 21 acres of land. It is situated within the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, and it is now entirely covered with buildings. The property is bounded on the north by Bevenden Street, and Aske Terrace, and Pimlico Walk; on the west by a road called East Road, which leads to the City Road; on the south by property behind or lying south of Park Street, belonging to, by a section of Great Chart Street and property abutting at the back of Great Chart Street and the (closed) burial ground of the Company, thence eastward by a line drawn towards the north along Pittfield Street and Haberdashers' Walk, and again on the south by property behind and abutting at the back of Ashford Street, and thence again eastward by Fontain's Soap Manufactory, and again southward by property abutting at the back of East Street, and again eastward to a line drawn irregularly from a point about 20 ft. from High Street, Hoxton, to a place called Pound's Buildings, and thence joining the northern boundary in Pimlico Walk near the Britannia Theatre.

The chapel, schoolhouse, and houses for the chaplain, schoolmaster, and matron, with the open ground in the front and the rear occupying a space of about 230ft. frontage in Haberdashers' Walk, and about 283ft. in depth. The present buildings do not stand exactly on the site of the former buildings. The almshouse and other buildings originally formed one long line covering a space which now forms the east end of Buttesland Street, and a part of the north-east corner of the buildings from that Street. The old buildings were pulled down in 1822, and the new buildings were completed in 1827. The old materials were sold for 3,185l.

The estimated expense of repairing the building, was to have been 6,860l., and the removal of the old buildings was supposed to afford a better opportunity of laying out the estate.

The Commissioners of Inquiry report that the Company had accumulated a fund of 4,500l. to meet repairs and fines (Vol. 2, p. 129).

The entire cost of the new buildings including sewers, extra walls, architect, etc., is stated to have been 15,699l. —thus considerably exceeding the estimate. The expense was met by a sale of the accumulated consols then belonging to the charity which had increased to—

£
6,500
and688
making7,1883 per cent. consols.

These sums of stock were sold and produced 6,454l. 14s. 6d. cash.

The governors borrowed of the Company at various times sums of stock, on account of the charity, making together 12,669l. 15s. 5d. 3 per cent. consols, which is stated to have produced 10,482l. 6s. 3d. cash, and adding that sum to the 6,454l. 14s. 6d. cash, and the fund arising from the sale of the materials, the total expenditure would seem to be about 20,000l., the accuracy of which at this distance of time it is not easy to test.

The actual cost of the new hospital and works connected with it, as it appears in the account books was:—

£s.d.
Contract price12,29500
Extra works, etc.31700
Boundary walls to the back of the hospital and burial ground81400
Sewer in front35600
Levelling and laying out ground, clerk of the works, etc.63000
Fittings up and furniture, clock and statue2,89400
Net Architect's charges1,57500
£18,88100

The sum produced by the stock, which is not thus accounted for went into the general balance.

It must be stated that the governors undertook the rebuilding and laying out of the land and charging the charity estate, upon their own authority, without any application to the Court of Chancery or other sanction.

The Hoxton estate was let upon building leases, for various terms varying from about 50 to 65 years, under which 529 houses were built; whereon an aggregate ground rental was reserved of 1,432l. 11s.

I subjoin a table of the leases, and of the holdings under them, as they lately appeared upon an account forwarded to this office.

Rental of the Hoxton Estate.

Property.Tenancy.Rent.
£s.d.
Houses 7 and 10 to 15, East StreetJ. Wilkinson49½ years, from Ladyday 182315100
Nos. 1 to 24 and 32 to 51, Singleton StreetF. Hooper65 " " Christmas 1829188100
" 28 to 30, Buttesland StreetF. W. Gerish65 " " Christmas 18340100
" 1 to 16, Great Chart Street, and Nos. 1 and 2, Haberdashers WalkJ. Emanuel61 " " Midsummer 18346000
" 14 and 15, East RoadW. Walker65 " " Christmas 18290100
No. 16, East RoadF. W. GerishSame term900
Nos. 56 to 59, Buttesland StreetJ. Stone61 years, from Christmas 18299120
No. 3, Haberdashers' Place, EastJ. J. Stephens54¼ " " Midsummer 18184100
Nos. 54 and 55, Singleton StreetA. Tillett61 " " Midsummer 1824640
No. 62, Buttesland StreetT. RottonSame term0
Nos. 60 and 61, Great Chart StreetT. Hanson"0
No. 39, Buttesland StreetH. Greely"0
Nos. 38 and 39, Great Chart StreetT. Neave"800
" 25 and 26, Bevendon StreetW. S. Reynolds"1000
" 2 to 5, Haberdashers Place, West, and 1 to 8 and 19 to 23, Haberdashers StreetJ. Jones61 years, from Midsummer 18025100
" 40 to 49, Ashford StreetW. Bennett59 " " Michaelmas 181327100
No. 34, Ashford StreetJ. Paynter59½ " " Ladyday 1813400
Nos. 17, 33, and 35, Ashford StreetJ. HallSame term1200
" 9 and 10, Ashford StreetT. Dunston54¼ years, from Midsummer 1818800
" 3, 7, and 8, Ashford StreetT. Ordway55¼ " " Midsummer 1817850
" 37 to 42, Aske StreetC. Looseley59¼ " " Midsummer 18131590
" 10 to 11, " "C. Jones60 " " Michaelmas 1823600
No. 9, " "M. CarterDo.2150
Nos. 3, 4, and 5, Robert StreetS. Henny54 years, from Michaelmas 1818900
No. 42, " "T. White55 " " " 18172150
" 41, " "S. TaskerDo.2150
Nos. 31 and 32 and 43 and 45, Robert StreetHoldom and Simmons52 years, from Michaelmas 1820850
" 26 to 28, Robert StreetR. Honeychurch61 " " Midsummer 1822600
No. 25, Robert StreetW. Hurt60 " " " 1823300
" 3, Aske TerraceW. Watkins' executors57 " " " 1806100
Nos. 1 and 2, Aske TerraceW. WhitingDo.200
" 29 and 31, Ashford StreetS. Collins53½ years, from Ladyday 1819800
" 18 to 23, Ashford StreetWm. Hanley52¼ years, from Midsummer 182050150
" 12 to 23, Aske Street
" 34 to 36, Aske Street
No. 16, Ashford StreetJ. Wilkinson53½ years, from Ladyday 1819400
Nos. 14 and 15, Ashford StreetT. Trendall53¼ " " Midsummer 1819800
No. 11, Ashford StreetJ. Carter54½ " " " 1818400
Nos. 43 and 44, Ashford StreetJ. Wilson51 " " Michaelmas 18217100
" 23 to 25, Ashford StreetL. Child50½ " " Ladyday 1822600
" 6 to 8, Ashford StreetR. Weston58¼ " " Midsummer 1825720
" 4 to 7, Kingsworth PlaceJ. Pullen50½ " " " 18201100
No. 30, Robert StreetW. Cleak47¾ " " Christmas 18242150
" 29, " "J. Cloutman51½ " " March 18212150
" 19, " "J. Aspin55 " " Michaelmas 1817400
" 28, Robert Street, and No. 1, East StreetW. Holcombe59¼ " " Midsummer 1813600
" 16, East StreetJ. Greed50 " " Michaelmas 1822400
" 11, " "W. Paice53 " " " 1819400
Nos. 7 and 14, East StreetT. Comerford51 " " " 1821700
No.2, " "E. Joyne54½ " " March 1818400
" 12, Haberdashers Place, EastM. Dickie54¼ " " Midsummer 18184110
Nos. 6 to 9, Haberdashers Place, EastJ. Jeffery54 " " Michaelmas 181817130
No. 3, Haberdashers Place, East, and Nos. 1 to 3, Aske StreetJ. YoungDo.9150
Nos. 41 to 43, Great Chart StreetJ. Cuff61 years, from Midsummer 18241200
No. 40, " "R. HallDo.400
" 37, " "P. W. FieldDo.400
Nos. 30 and 31, " "E. J. W. ShepherdDo.800
No. 27 " "T. EldridgeDo.400
Nos. 25, 26, 28, 29, 33 to 36, Great Chart Street, and Nos. 7 and 10, East RoadE. F. Yates61 years, from Midsummer 1824360
The Cottage at the north corner of Park StreetT. MustonDo.400
No. 21, Bevendon StreetG. HughesDo.500
Nos. 19 and 20, Bevendon StreetJ. PowerDo.1000
No. 11, " "E. MessengerDo.500
Nos. 5 and 6, " "T. BrandDo.100
No. 24, Haberdasher StreetJ. Chaplin57¼ years, from March 1807410
Nos. 13 to 17, Haberdasher StreetM. Jones56¼ " " " "1150
No. 10, " "G. BrittonDo.4100
No. 9, Haberdashers Street, and 9, Haberdashers Place, W.J. Holcombe56 years, from Midsummer 18079100
No. 8, Haberdashers Place, W.W. Leese56½ " " Christmas 1806100
" 7, " "S. PayDo.100
" 6, " "G. Heslop57 years, from Midsummer 1806100
Nos. 16 and 17, Aske TerraceH. ReevesDo.10100
No. 14, " "T. LeonardDo.550
Nos. 12, 13, 17, and 18, Robert StreetR. Honeychurch49½ years, from March 18232150
No. 6, " "J. Brettell51 " " Michaelmas 18214100
Nos. 5, 8, 13, 36, and 37 " "J. Stiles53 " " " 181913150
" 14 and 15, Haberdashers Place, EastJ. Edwards54½ " " March 18189130
" 26 and 27, East RoadW. Johnson61 " " Midsummer 18241200
No. 75, Buttesford StreetW. OliverDo.600
" 63, " "M. Downing61 years, from 1824700
Nos. 3 and 4, East Street RoadD. Gibbs61 years, from 18241200
" 1 and 2 " "B. G. MaltbyDo.2200
Nos. 17 and 18 " "W. PotterDo.11100
No. 38, Buttesland StreetW. NorrisDo.400
" 12, East Street RoadT. DouglasDo.600
" 25, " "J. LayDo.600
Nos. 52 and 53, Singleton StreetJ. S. GrayDo.880
" 33 to 37, Buttesland StreetJ. WatsonDo.8120
No. 32, " "W. DoreDo.400
" 19, East Street RoadJ. BondDo.600
" 39, Robert StreetJ. HartDo.2150
Nos. 5 and 6, East Street Road, and Nos. 1 to 6, Park StreetW. BakerDo.3100
" 17 to 24, Great Chart StreetT. DunstonDo.2400
" 45 and 46, Great Chart Street, and Nos. 8 and 9, East Street RoadG. BarwickDo.1440
No. 44, Great Chart StreetR. MarterDo.4100
" 6, Aske TerraceJ. S. Englehart57¾ years, from Michaelmas 1805550
" 8, " "T. LloydDo.500
" 2, Ashford StreetT. Lloyd53½ years, from March 18192150
" 22, Bevendon StreetE. Woollen61 " " Midsummer 1824500
" 2, Haberdashers Place, EastT. Knight56¾ " " Christmas 18154100
" 44, Robert Street, and No. 4, Haberdashers Place, EastE. LetchDo.780
" 20 to 22 Robert Street, and No. 1, Haberdashers Place, EastT. Phillips60 years, from Michaelmas 18121700
Nos. 27, 28, and 30 to 33, Haberdashers StreetR. Viney56 " " Midsummer 1807380
" 12 and 13, Ashford StreetT. Walton53¼ " " " 1819800
No. 62, Great Chart StreetJ. Morris61 " " " 18248100
Nos. 38 and 39, Robert StreetJ. Adey52 " " " 18205100
" 25 and 26, Haberdasher StreetE. Snowdon55 " " Michaelmas 1808900
No. 32, Great Chart StreetA. McWilliams61 " " Midsummer 1824400
Nos. 36 and 37, Ashford StreetT. Goddard54¾ " " Christmas 1817800
" 7 and 8, East StreetW. Smith55 " " Michaelmas 1817800
No. 1, Ashford StreetJ. Richardson54 " " " 18182150
Nos. 64 to 72, Buttesland StreetT. Elsom61 " " Midsummer 18243130
" 52 to 55 " "W. Austin62 " " " 1837200
No. 24, Robert StreetT. GoodmanYearly tenant18140
" 2, East, StreetJ. Miller21 years, from Christmas 18371200
Nos. 20 to 22, East RoadJ. Brent65 " " Midsummer 1834300
" 74 to 76, Great Chart StreetL. WillcockDo.1200
" 28 to 31, Singleton StreetG. Livan56 years, from Midsummer 183414100
" 22 to 24½, East Street Road
" 11 to 33, Haberdasher StreetT. Simon56¼ years, from March 1807550
" 12 to 14, " "Wm. JonesDo.100
No. 34, " "J. S. Gray55 years, from Midsummer 1808500
" 5, Aske TerraceR. Chubbs57¼ " " March 1806550
" 57, Great Chart StreetT. Eldridge55¾ " " Michaelmas 18293100
Nos. 7 to 16, Park StreetT. Bilham57 " " Midsummer 18283100
No. 5, Aske StreetS. Rushton53 " " Michaelmas 18192150
" 73, Great Chart StreetL. Willcocke61 " " Midsummer 1838400
Nos. 24 to 27, Buttesland StreetJ. Lermitte59 " " " 18401000
" 9 and 15, Aske TerraceT. Westwood57½ " " Christmas 180510100
" 1 to 3, Kingsworth PlaceG. T. Ovenden53 " " Michaelmas 18198150
" 1, 3, 4, 9, and 10, Robert StreetJ. EdwardsDo.1000
" 33 to 34, " "T. Killingly52 years, from Michaelmas 1820850
" 26 to 33, Aske StreetH. Selby51 " " " 18211200
" 24 and 25, Ashford StreetT. Foster53 " " " 18193150
" 26 and 27, " "A. Tillett54¾ " " " 1817700
No. 10, Haberdasher Place, EastJ. Spiers56 " " Midsummer 1807550
" 11, " "J. DavisDo.4100
" 13, " "J. Claybrook52¾ years, from Christmas 18194120
Nos. 18 and 19, Aske TerraceW. Taylor56½ " " " 1806300
" 12 and 13, " "A. Warner55 " " Midsummer 1808400
No. 25, Haberdasher StreetJ. WareDo.550
Nos. 11 and 13, East Street RoadS. A. Fuller61years, from Midsummer 18246100
" 56, 64, and 65, Great Chart Street
" 1 to 4, and 7, 8, 10, 12 to 18, and 23 and 24, Bevenden Street
No. 27, Bevendon StreetS. HarringtonDo.400
" 28, East Street RoadJ. HemmingDo.700
" 9, Bevenden StreetW. SheltonDo.500
Nos. 66 and 72, Great Chart StreetW. Austin61 years, from Midsummer 1838100
No. 31, Buttisland StreetR. Dougal65 " " " 18344100
Nos. 40 to 48, Buttisland StreetW. Austin58 " " " 18411130
" 5 to 10, " "W. Austin60 " " " 1839100
No. 51, " "T. Gilbert62 " " " 1837100
Nos. 60 and 61 " "F. J. McCarthy61 " " " 18241200
" 73 and 74, " "G. BurgeDo.1000
" 46 to 48, Great Chart StreetJ. Bamford55¾ years, from Michaelmas 182913100
No. 49, " "E. Woollen61 " " Midsummer 18244100
Nos. 52 and 53, " "G. Selby65 " " " 1834200
No. 63, " "J. W. Cropley61 " " " 18244100
Nos. 11 to 20, Buttesland StreetW. Austin59 " " " 1840100
No. 19, Ashford StreetW. Browning49¼ " " " 1823400
Nos. 17 and 18, Park StreetJ. Davies61 " " " 1824900
No. 4, Ashford StreetW. Fryett55¼ " " " 18172150
" 7, Aske TerraceR. Parvin57¾ " " Michaelmas 1805550
" 40, Robert StreetP. W. Wood54 " " " 18182150
Nos. 5 and 6, Ashford StreetG. Herring55 years, from Michaelmas 18175100
No. 4, Aske TerraceG. Waller57 " " Midsummer 1806500
Old North Wing of Aske's HospitalR. Stanton49 " " " 18147200
Nos. 1 to 4, Buttesland Street, and 4, 5, and 55, Great Chart StreetW. J. Hurst60 " " " 1839020
No. 21, Buttesland StreetT. Fairful61 " " " 1838026
Nos. 22 and 23, Buttesland StreetJ. Lermitte59 " " " 1840026
" 3 and 4, Haberdashers WalkT. Orchard61 " " " 18240100
" 8 to 10, Kingsworth PlaceE. Milbank52¾ " " Christmas 1829050
No. 35, Robert StreetW. Clapham53 " " Michaelmas 18192150
" 4, Aske StreetT. ChoteDo.2150
" 29, Haberdashers StreetT. Simon56¼ years, from March 1807500
Nos. 58 and 59, Great Chart StreetG. Bankhurst61 " " Midsummer 1824900
No. 36, Haberdashers StreetR. Evans55 " " " 1808070
Nos. 28, 30, and 32, Ashford StreetJ. Scarffe52 " " Michaelmas 18200100
£1,432110

These leases, it will be seen, terminate at various periods from the present time to the year 1885.

The following table has been furnished to me as exhibiting their progressive extinction:—

Leases expiring at Midsummer 1863.

Houses.Houses.
North Wing (Stanbridge)1
Aske's Terrace (South Side)19
Haberdashers Place (West)12
Haberdashers Street36
68

Rents, 125l.

Leases expiring at Michaelmas 1872.

Houses.
East Street (No. 2, Rack-rent)15
Kingsworth Place10
Robert Street45
Aske Street (44 houses, 17 expire in 1883)26
Ashford Street49
Haberdashers Place (East)15
160

Rents, 448l. 6s.

1 Rack-rent, 21l.

Leases expiring Michaelmas 1883.

Aske Street18

Rent, 45l. 12s.

Leases expiring Michaelmas 1885.

Houses.
Haberdashers Walk4
Great Chart Street76
Park Street18
East Road28
Bevenden Street27
Singleton Street55
Buttesland Street75
283
529

Rents, 619l. 14s.

The Haberdashers' Company have lately issued advertisements for tender with a view to re-letting the property, the leases of which are near the time of their expiration.

The proposals for letting are for terms of 21 years. I append a printed copy of these proposals.

The income of the Hoxton estate at present is, 1,450l. 17s.

This is somewhat more than the reserved rental, owing to the Company having entered upon one of the tenements, in default of performance of the covenants by the lessee, and the same is now let at the rack-rent.

The outgoings on the Hoxton estate are scarcely separable from the general expenses of the hospital, except perhaps the salary of Mr. W. Snooke, the surveyor, whose business is to superintend the Hoxton estate, 50l.

As the times of the expiration of the leases approach, the surveyor makes a special survey of the premises with a view to dilapidation. A survey of the property now about to be re-let was made in 1849 when a charge of 21l. was allowed.

If this be considered as a special charge of management on the Hoxton property, it reduces the net-rent to 1,400l.

The net produce from the two great sources of the charity income is, therefore, as follows:—

£
Kent estate (as above stated)1,614
Hoxton estate (as above stated)1,400
£3,014

But this is subject to an incumbrance in respect of the stock borrowed from the Company by the governors for the rebuilding the hospital. Of this there was repaid at different times previously to 1844, 2,753l. 3s. 3d., 3 per cent. stock, leaving in that year 9,916l. 12s. 2d., 3 per cent. stock, due to the Company.

From 1844 to 1861 nothing was paid in reduction of this debt.

In 1861 the governors repaid a sum of 1,169l. 15s. 5d., 3 per cent. stock, which was purchased with 1,077l. 13s. 1d. cash, leaving a debt of 8,746l. 16s. 9d., 3 per cent. consols.

The interest payable upon this remaining debt is, therefore, 262l. a year, or thereabouts, which being deducted from the clear income of 3,014l., leaves 2,752l. applicable to the purposes of the endowment.

This sum which would appear to be the clear income of the charity, after full allowance for every charge on the property is, however, subject to further deduction before it becomes applicable to charitable purposes, in respect of what are called the general expenses.

These are the salaries of—

£
Mr. Curtis (clerk)105
Mr. Fisk, accountant55
Mr. Hooper, beadle30
£190

The available income is, therefore, further reduced to the sum of 2,562l.

The average disbursements of the charity for nine yeare (1853–1861), exclusive of the general expenses above, viz., clerk, accountant, and beadle, are stated to have been 2,104l. a year.

An average of the total income of the estate for 14 years, from 1848 to 1861 inclusive, is stated to be 3,512l., and the total expenditure on all accounts, including interest for the same period was 3,427l.

A detailed account of the present disbursements on the existing charitable establishments will afford a more accurate representation of the proportion of the general income actually applied to charitable purposes.

The School.

Up to 1853, the chaplain the Rev. John L. Turner, received 800l. a year for the board and education of 20 boys, with an additional allowance of 54l. 5s. 6d. for nurses, &c. In the year 1852, Mr. Turner was not re-elected, and the Company gave him a retiring pension 50l. a year, an application was made to the Commissioners for their sanction, but no decision was come to, and the Company has still continued to pay the pension.

The chaplain has since that time been paid a distinct salary, and the maintenance of the boys has been placed under the direction of a matron.

£s.d.
The clothing of 20 scholars average10000
The house-keeping expenses amount to nearly 30l. a year for each boy, but it includes also the board of the schoolmaster and matron, and the additional women servants. An account of these expenses are kept by the matron, showing under weekly tables the amount of the bills, of the baker, brewer, butcher, grocer, and greengrocer, milkman, &c.; and the wages of extra servants and payments for occasional labour.
The matron, schoolmaster, and boys have a common table. The expense in 1861 was, house-keeping 434l. 14s. 10d., washing 41l. 10s. 3d., wages 38l. 13s. 3d., coals 31l. 4s.59624
£69624
Schoolmaster's salary—The present schoolmaster is Mr. George Casterfield, who was appointed in November 1852. (Duties, see Appendix, 13–15, Statutes)10000
French master.—Monsieur Thebaudin3000
Drawing master.—Mr. Sankey2000
The Matron's salary.—Mrs. Elizabeth Williams, who was appointed in November 1852. (Duties, see Appendix, 16–18, Statutes.) The stipend has been raised in the last year from 35l. to 40l.4000
Examiner.—Half-yearly examination 2l. 2s., and other expenses at examinations5140
Excursion (1861)5180
Stationery for the school14158
£912100

Almshouses.

There are at present 13 pensioners, who receive 16s. a week, and 5s. each on the Founder's day, and the offerings at the Sacrament. Average expenditure for 7 years, 1856–1861, has been60838
(In the year 1861 the sum was only 556l. 16s.)
One of the almsmen is the gatekeeper, for which he is allowed 2s. per week540
Winding clock, &c.4146
Occasional expenses, burial of a deceased almsman, advertising, &c.1000
£62822

Officers whose duties extend both to the school and the almshouse:—

£s.d.
The salary of the Chaplain.—The duties of the chaplain are the sound religious instruction of the 20 scholars. He is to officiate twice on Sunday in the chapel, and also on Wednesday and Friday, and to visit the pensioners. (See pp. 9–13, Statutes, Appendix.) The present chaplain is the Rev. Alfred Jones, who was appointed in April 185415000
The Chapel Clerk.—His duties are to attend the chapel on Sundays, and the quarterly meetings, and he also teaches singing to the boys1000
The Surgeon.—Dr. Sparke. (Duties, see pp. 35–36 Statutes, Appendix)31100
£191100

Other expenses both applicable to the school and the almshouses:—

£s.d.
Insurance (on 12,000)3869
Rates and taxes (1861)8538
Repairs and painting, average of 8 years ending 1861180150
£30455

The condition of the endowment of the Charity may in round numbers be thus summed up:—

Gross Income.—£
Kent2,150
Middlesex1,450
£3,600
Disbursements££
Kent536
Middlesex50
586
Interest of mortgage debt262
Governors' general expenses190
1,038
£2,562
Board, lodging, and education of 20 boys912
Pensions and allowances to aged men, varying in number from 13 to 20628
1,540
Chaplain, chapel clerk, and surgeon191
Repairs, insurances, &c.305
496
2,036
Annual surplus income about£526

The future variations in this surplus, supposing the establishments to continue as they are, will be principally caused, first, by the increase of the Middlesex rental, by the proximate falling in of the leases, and secondly, by the diminution of the Kentish rental, about 13 years hence by the termination of the Chapter leases; to which may be added the payment of the mortgage debt by the application of the existing surplus.

The hospital consists of 20 houses, each containing a sitting-room and wash-house on the ground floor, and a bed-room over, all of which have a separate outer-door; covered portico extending the length of the building on each side. The almsmen are limited to single men or widowers, and above 50 years of age, freemen of the Company. At the present time, only 13 houses are occupied, a sufficient number of qualified applicants not being found. The chapel forms the centre building at the bottom of the quadrangle, and the chaplain's house and the schoolmaster's are on each side of the chapel. The matron's house is between the chaplain's and the school, and over the committee room. The schoolroom consists of a single room, under the boys' dormitory, having access from the master's house, one part of the lower floor of which latter house forms the boys' dining-room.

The chaplain is a married man, but the schoolmaster is unmarried. The matron is a widow.

The boys are appointed by the court of assistants as a body. The applications are referred to the Charities Committee, who return to the court three names for one vacancy, four names to two vacancies, and so on, selecting always two names beyond the number of vacancies. I do not find any rule adopted as a principle of selection, but generally speaking, preference is given to liverymen's sons over those of freemen. The court are generally, but not universally, bound themselves by the decision of the Committee having before it the number of votes for each candidate. The Committee of Charities consists of master and wardens (5), and about 12 more. They are elected by the court of assistants for two years, half going out every year, but the election generally proceeds by rotation. The boys are admitted between 8 and 10, and they leave the school at the age of 15. No record is taken of the subsequent career of the boys, but I am informed that the present master and two members of the court were brought up in the school.

King's Gift.

Joseph King, by will of the 20th May 1717, gave to the hospital 500l. as an encouragement to taking boys into the hospital. It is probable that this sum forms part of the stock mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (see p. 225), and before referred to.

Smith's Gift.

Sir John Smith, by will of the 15th January 1733, gave 100l. to the hospital. This formed part, as it would appear, of the stock mentioned before, which existed at the time of the last inquiry.

Turgis' Gift.

Mrs. Mary Turgis, by will of the 12th September 1704, gave 50l. for the poor of the hospital. This forms part of the general funds of the charity.

Pope's Gift.

Peter Pope, by will of the 28th of November 1807, gave to the hospital 500l. consols, for the use of that institution. This formed part, it is assumed, of the stock of the Company, sold out under the circumstances before stated. (fn. 5)

Bank's Charity.

John Banks, by will of the 21st March 1716, gave to the Company his leasehold estate in St. James's, West minster, to pay thereout 220l. a year, as he should by deed appoint; and further, out of the residue, to discharge a mortgage debt of 10,000l., and to make some other payments.

And by deed of appointment of same date he directed payment of the said 220l. as follows:—

£
For two dinners at the hall for the trustees12
Ditto for his relations therein described6
To the clerk of the Company20
To his clerk5
To the beadles12
For a sermon at the meeting house adjoining the hall2
Clerk and sexton1
To the minister and deacons of the congregation to which he belonged (10l. to be distributed, and 2l. for an entertainment)12
To his wife during widowhood20
To several relations various annuities, with remainder to their descendants130
220

The deed then directed that after the payment of the mortgage debt the annuities to his relations should be doubled.

£s.
1300
And that the following additional sums should be paid:—
For putting out apprentices or towards the marriage of the descendants of his relations2000
To 10 poor men free of the Company and on the livery1000
To 10 other poor men500
To 20 poor freemen's widows1000
To 5 poor men of St. Bennett, Paul's Wharf250
To 5 poor single women of the said parish250
To 5 poor men of Battersea parish1210
To 5 poor single women of Battersea parish1210
To 5 poor men of St. Mary Overy, Southwark1210
To 5 poor single women of ditto1210
For a dinner for the poor freemen, widows, and inhabitants on the days of payment120

It appears by the recitals in an Order of the Master of the Rolls of the 6th May 1824, made on the petition of the Haberdashers' Company in a cause of Elizabeth Mitchell and others against Sarah Holloway and others, that for several years prior to the determination of the lease, which expired on the 26th February 1822, the trustees, in pur suance of John Bank's directions, applied for a further grant of the said trust estates, but the terms proposed by His Majesty's Commissioners for a further grant of the said premises were, in the opinion of the trustees and surveyors with whom they advised, so high, both with respect to the fine and rent required, that the trustees did not feel themselves justified in acceding to them, conceiving that it would have been prejudicial to the interests of the said charities to have accepted such terms; and His Majesty's Commissioners having refused the terms proposed by the trustees, the said trust estate was delivered up to them on the 26th February 1822, when all the rents of the said leasehold estate ceased, and a sum of 1,152l. 10s. was on the 9th May 1822 paid by the said clerk to the said Commissioners of the balance then remaining in his hands, and was accepted in full satisfaction of all claims and demands on the trustees in respect of dilapidations or otherwise. That the trustees, on examining and auditing the account of receipts and payments by their said clerk up to Midsummer 1823, found a balance of 564l. 4s. 11d. in his hands, which it was necessary for him to retain for the purpose of making the annual payments directed by the said John Banks up to Midsummer 1820. That there was then standing in the name of the Accountant-General, in trust in the cause at the bank, the sum of 58,580l. 12s. 10d. consols, which had arisen from the investment of the said receiver's and clerk's balances and of the dividends of stock purchased therewith. That great part of the dividends which would in future become due on the same stock would be applicable to the payment of the several annuities and charges directed to be paid by the said John Banks, inasmuch as there was no other source from which the same could be defrayed, except the rents of two freehold houses in St. John Street, Middlesex, the annual rents whereof do not exceed 45l. 13s. 6d.

And by the said ordre it was ordered that the dividends which should become due and payable the 58,580l. 12s. 10d. consols, standing in the name of the Accountant-General in trust in the ause, be from time to time paid to Thomas George Knapp, clerk and receiver, or to any future clerk and receiver to be approved by the said Company, the Company undertaking thereout to pay the various charities and annuities directed by the will and deed of appointment of the said John Banks, and the order of the court of the 22nd May 1792 from time to time as the same should become due, and for the purposes aforesaid the said Accountant-General was to draw on the bank, &c., &c. And it was ordered that the petitioners should be at liberty to retain the surplus of such dividends for the use of the said Company as directed by the said will and deed of appointment of the said John Banks.

The present endowment, therefore, consists of:—

£s.d.
No. 99, St. John Street, Clerkenwell, let to Samuel Hooker for 21 years, from Michaelmas 185437100
No. 98, St. John Street Clerkenwell, let to Henry Thomas Wood, from Midsummer 18464500
82100
The dividends on 58,580l. 12s. 10d. 3 per cent. consols standing in the name of the Accountant-General in trust in the cause of Mitchell v. Holloway1,75784
£1,839184

The tenants are bound to repair, and they insure the premises.

The General Expenses.

£s.d.
The clerk of the Company as receiver3000
The surveyor of the premises in Clerkenwell880
The disbursements on account of the charity are:—
The sermon at the meeting house adjoining the hall200
The chapel is situated in Staining Lane, on the property of the Company, and has lately been rebuilt by them. It is let by the Company to a Mr. Hobbs, the minister of an Independent Congregation (who I am informed is blind). There are sermons in the chapel twice on Sundays. Two sermons are preached on the half-yearly days of meeting in January and July, when the 12 members of the court of assistants, who are trustees of the charity, and all the pensioners under it attend. On that occasion an extract from the deed of appointment is always read.
The clerk and sexton (who is the same person)100
The 10 poor liverymen of the Company, aged 40 years and upwards. (They are continued for their lives on the list)10000
The 10 poor freemen of the age of 50 and upwards. (They also are continued for their lives)5000
The 10 inhabitahts (five men and five women) of St. Benet, Paul's Wharf. (The list is filled up as vacancies occur on the certificate of the parish officers that they are not receiving parochial relief. The vestry recommend two persons on every vacancy, of whom the trustees select one. (5l. each)5000
(The Company add a donation of 10s. each, in addition to the endowment.)
The 10 inhabitants (five men and five women) of Battersea, who are likewise recommended by the vestry of that parish, who select two names as vacancies occur, 2l. 10s.2500
The ten inhabitants (five men and five women) of St. Mary's Overy, Southwark, recommended in like manner by the vestry (each 2l. 10s.)2500
20 poor widows of freemen of the Company, selected by the trustees (5l. each)10000
The sum of 3s. 6d. each to the above 70 recipients of pensions, in lieu of the 12l. appointed for the dinner1250
The Company allow the beadles of the three parishes (10s.)1100
For the putting out apprentices, helping to set up in business or towards the marriage of such or so many of the issue and descendants of his brothers and sisters, and in such proportions as the trustees should think fit.
A pedigree of the relations of John Banks, showing the descendants of the heirs of testator, and his sisters Elizabeth Hopkins and Ann Deane and Mary Mitchell. Additions are made to the pedigree as parties apply claiming to be descendants and producing statutory declarations and proper certificates.
The descendants reside in various parts of England and Wales, many being in the Principality. They apply first for apprentice fees, and, secondly, for setting up in business, or for portions.
The trustees meet on these occasions, yearly, in May for distribution, when applications are made in writing, on printed forms (copies of which I append). Those who live near the town attend the meeting, and the cases being then considered, the sums are awarded.
£40530

In the year 1861–2 there were the following applications and gifts:—

Name.Applied for.Trade.Granted.
For Apprenticeship.
£s.£s.
John Ashman250Shoemaker, Board and lodging.200
John Davis300Coachbuilder, five years. Apprenticed without board.100
Sarah Jane James480Dressmaker for three years, with board and lodging.150
David P. JonesChemist, three years.Nil.
Mary Osborne600Music Teacher, three years. Board and lodging.Nil.
Thomas Price380Carpenter, four years. Board and lodging.150
Ann Rees480Dressmaker, three years. Board and lodging.150
Paid Apprenticeship7500

For setting up in business.

Martha, C.4310Dress and bonnet maker.200
Edward Charles Cross.650Printer200
Charles James R. Davis.500Engineer150
Mary Griffiths2000General shopkeeper.200
William Edward Lowes.350Scale machine maker.150
9000
(All these had grants as apprentices.)
Marriage Portion.
Mary Frances Ashman3503500
(who had been apprenticed)
£20000
The minister and deacons of the testator's congregation near the "Three Cranes" (Jewry Street, Minories). An information was instituted by the AttorneyGeneral at the relation of John Thomas Halret v. Rev. Henry Heap, to establish the right of certain persons to the annual sum of 12l., and by a supplemental information which was afterwards filed at the relation of Thomas Palmer, and others, against the Company, and under the two informations a decree was made on further directions, dated 20th December 1839, whereby the relators in the said cause were declared entitled as the minister and the deacons of the congregation assembling in Jewry Street Chapel, to the future payments of the annuity as well as to the arrears which had accrued pending the proceedings, after deducting the Company's costs.
(The annuity has ever since been paid to the minister and deacons.)
The last receipt was signed—
Frederick Silver, minister1200
Francis Elliott and William J. Terry, deacons1200
The clerk of the Company2000
To his assistant500
The beadle of the company700
The under beadle or porter500
£65430

The testator, by his will, gave certain annuities of 10l. and 20l. per annum to his sisters and nephews and nieces, named in his will, amounting in the whole to 130l. a year, and to their respective children, and if any failure of issue in one branch the annuity to be added to the other branch, and the issue of the other families at the discretion of his trustees, or the major part of them, and upon the discharge of the debt and interest and charges on his estate in Westminster, the said annuity should be doubled and made 260l. a year.

The Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, p. 229) reported that 157l. 10s. per annum of these annuities had been purchased by the Company. I have not entered into the question of this purchase, but it would appear that there were difficulties in the way. If the estate was construed as a charity, no person would take more than a life interest, and it would, perhaps, be difficult to construe it as an estate tail. As a gift in perpetuity it would be void. The general gift over being to the use of the Company, the matter is probably not important, as in that case the Company would be alone benefited by the failure of the preceding objects.

The annuities paid to the representatives of the persons whose annuities have not been disposed of, are—

£s.d.
Mrs. Catharine Johnson, a daughter of S. Ricketts, under a marriage settlement.
Mrs. Ricketts was daughter of Thomas K. Atkinson, of, who was the grandson of Josh. Rand, and which Thomas Atkinson was in right of his wife entitled to an annuity of 15l. per annum, as representative of the Rand family, and also to 2l. 15s. per annum, part of Hopkins' Annuity, making together 17l. 15s. Mrs. Holloway died 14th January 1788, and by her will gave Miss Atkinson an annuity of 21l. 10s., which increased her annuity to 39l. 5s. In 1791 Miss Atkinson married Edward Rhodes, and in 1792 the annuities were doubled making 78l. 10s.78100
David Jones, executor under the will of Samuel Jones, another descendant1200
William Price Do.300
Mary Price Do.300
William Herbert1100
Mary Parry1100
Mary Hughes1100
Ann Hale1100
£112100

The expenses of the trust:—

The dinner to the relations, or any allowance in respect of it has been discontinued, the Company (as above stated) having purchased many of the annuities.

£s.d.
The dinner to the trustees, for which 12l. is provided, is now commuted and forms a part of the charge of the expenses of the trust, as a guinea each to the trustees on each of the three attendances in the year. Refreshments on such occasions, and two dinners in 18618494

The surplus of the income is paid over to the general account of the Company. There was in 1861, 820l. 7s. 7d.

Sir George Barnes' Charity.

Sir George Barnes, by his will of the 15th February 1557, gave to the Company his interest in the lease of a windmill in Finsbury for the poor of the Company in the almshouses in Staining Lane. The property devised by this will seems by the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, p. 190), to have been alienated so far back as 1678. It was sold for a sum of 100l. and the Company in respect of this sum pay annually 4l. to four poor freemen of the Company. The Company hold more than sufficient stock in their corporate name to pay this and the other charges on their funds in respect of interest.

In July at the quarterly court of the Company the following charities, including this of Sir George Barnes, are distributed:—Raynton's, White, French, Barnes, Thos. Barnes, Aldersey, Monox, Gourney, Trotman, Bowcher, Johnson, Hall, and Cleave. Four persons received 1l. each on account of Barnes' Gift, in 1861. Occasionally the gift is larger, but the rule is that no person receive more than 2l. 6s. at any quarterly distribution.

Barnes' Charity.

Thomas Barnes, by will of the 20th August 1663, gave to the Company a house in Lombard Street to dispose of the rent as follows:—

£
To four poor old freemen32
To four poor old freemen's widows10
To 12 poor old men or widows12

and the residue for the Company.

The devised estate consists of the house, No. 50, Lombard Street, let to Mr. Fisher, a stationer, for 21 years from 1852, at the rent of 130l. a year.

The Company pay pensions to four freemen f the Company of 8l. a year each, and 2l. 10s. each to four poor freemen's widows. The sum of 1l. is also given to each of 12 poor freemen or freemen's widows at the July distribution (see Sir George Barnes' Charity).

The residue is carried to the account of the Company.

Barrett's Charity.

Martha Barrett, by her will dated between 1580 and 1590, gave to the Company 200l., to be lent to four young men for four years, two of them to pay 3l. 6s. 8d. for the poor of Isleworth and Totteridge, and the other two to pay 5l. for a scholar at Magdalen College, Cambridge.

Of the capital fund there is no present trace; but the Company charge themselves with 3l. 6s. 8d. a year, nominally attributing 111l. 2s. 3d., 3l. per cent. consols, part of the stock belonging to them, as representing the capital of one sum of 100l. Two sums of 1l. 13s. 4d. yearly are paid, one to the churchwardens of Isleworth, and the other to the churchwardens of Totteridge. The exhibition to Magdalen College has not been paid for a century and a half.

Benskyn's Charity.

Ralph Benskyn, by will of the 14th September 1603 gave 50l. to the Company to be lent to a young man paying yearly 20s. to St. Martin Orgar parish. The 20l. which formed the whole sum received by the Company in respect of this legacy, is stated to have been lent out and lost in 1662; but the Company pay 8s. to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Martin Orgar, and attribute of their 3l. per cent. consols a sum of 13l. 6s. 8d. stock as the capital.

Blundell's Charity.

Peter Blundell, by will of the 9th June 1599, gave to the Company 150l. to purchase lands, and thereout pay 40s. for poor prisoners in Newgate. The fund was invested in the purchase of a house, now No. 8, Poultry, which is let to Robert Burchall for 21 years from Christmas 1851 at the rent of 110l. The Company pay 2l. a year to Mr. Temple, at the Guildhall, for the prisoners. The residue is given to the Company.

Boddington and Boulter's Charity.

Robert Boddington, by will of the 4th February 1700, gave to the Company 400l. to pay 20 poor people 20s. a year apiece; and

Edmund Boulter, in 1702, gave 100l., to be laid out with the said 400l. The Company laid out, it appears, a sum of 480l. 3s. 6d. of these bequests in the purchase of the ground rent of 20l. a year, upon the reversion of an estate now Nos. 92, 93, 94, 95, and 96, Bishopsgate Street, and four houses in Montague Court (which is entered by a passage between Nos. 94 and 95), three of which, Nos. 9, 10, and 11, are at the east end, and one at the north side of the court. The ground rent is payable during the continuance of a lease which was for 200 years, and expires in 1897.

The Company have since 1831 ceased to allow the land tax on the rent, and have received the clear sum of 20l., which after allowing 2l. 2s. as a salary to the surveyor is distributed in April, yearly, in sums of 17s. 6d. each to 20 poor of the Company, men and women. The April gifts include these and Adams', Carpenter's, and Offley's Charities. The surveyor in his report on this estate made in June 1862, states, "that the boundary marks in Bishopsgate Street are so placed as to define the extent of the property in the simplest manner possible." In the Report of 1861 the surveyor says, "that No. 95 requires some internal painting in consequence of the re-erection of the house in the rear, and the tenement on the left-hand side of Montague Court, and Nos. 10 and 11 in the south-east corner, require repair and painting. Marks were ordered to be placed on the back walls of Nos. 92, 93, and 94, Bishopsgate Street."

Bond's Charity.

William Bond, by will of the 3rd August 1671, gave to the Company a rentcharge of 50l. a year, payable out of messuages in Allhallows, Bread Street, viz., 24l. to six poor single aged freemen, and 26l. for the relief of the poor of the Company in general.

An ex officio information was filed by the AttorneyGeneral against the Company to obtain a declaration that the surplus rents of a house in Bread Street in possession of the Company might be declared to belong to William Bond's Charity; it appearing, as stated in the Reports of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, p. 223), that the Company had assumed possession of the premises in virtue of their title to the rentcharge. The Court declared that the surplus rents belonged to the Charity and the amount was settled by the master, and a sum of 2,185l. 19s. 9d., 3l. per cent. consols, was transferred by the Company to the credit of the cause, Attorney-General v. Haberdashers' Company, where the same now remains, the dividends being payable to the clerk of the Company for the time being under the order of the Court of 29th July 1829.

The property and income of the Charity, therefore, now consists of the following particulars:—

£s.d.
House, No. 52, Bread Street, let to Peter Poland for 21 years from Midsummer 1851, at20000
Dividends on 2,185l. 19s. 9d., 3l. per cent. consols, in Court65118
265118

The scheme settled and approved by the Court in the suit for the administration of the Charity is as follows:—

That instead of the six poor single aged men free of the said Company receiving the 4l. yearly apiece, as directed by William Bond, they should yearly receive 10l. apiece, at such times and by such proportions as the master, wardens, and assistants should think fit, and that the residue of the dividends of the said bank annuities, and the rents and profits of the said estate after payment for the insurance of the premises from fire, the surveyor's annual charge, and any other incidental expenses regarding the management of the Charity or Charity property, should be yearly laid out in purchasing good warm woollen coats and cloaks and other articles of wearing apparel or bedding, or fuel to be distributed by the said master, wardens, and assistants among the poor in general of the said Company, at such times and by such proportions as to the said Company should seem expedient. But, nevertheless, the said master, wardens, and assistants were to be at liberty in cases of emergency, and where it should appear that a small pecuniary assistance would be usefully bestowed by any written order or orders to make donations in money at their discretion, such donation not at any one time to exceed 20s.

That in the distribution of the charities thereby directed preference should in all cases be given to the most deserving of such persons as had never received parochial relief, or had been the longest without having received such relief, and in no case was any part of the said Charity to be given to any that at the time should be in the receipt of parochial relief or who should have been in such receipt, and should for the purpose of enabling themselves to receive the benefit of the said charities colourably or for a short time only have ceased to receive such parochial relief.

That distinct accounts should be kept of the receipt and expenditure on account of the said Charity, and such accounts should be audited once a year, and when so audited signed by the master and wardens.

That the estate and premises belonging to the said Charity should be duly and properly managed, and let to the best advantage at an annual rent under the superintendence of the said Company and their officers.

The insurance of the premises is repaid by the tenant.

£s.d.
The annual charge of the surveyor is220
Charges of management (calculated at 5l. per cent.) on the income (1861)13510
15710

The Company under the scheme pay pensions of 10l. a year to six poor single men of the Company who generally retain their pensions during their lives, unless their circumstances materially change.

The Company have always confined the distribution of the clothing to eight poor freemen and eight poor freemen's widows, although their discretion as to the increase of this distribution was unlimited, whilst they have disposed of the whole of the residue in gifts of 20s. each to the poor of the Company although their power as to this distribution in money appears to be intended by the Court to be restricted. In the clothing gifts every man has a complete suit of blue cloth, with underclothing and shoes. Each woman has also a complete outfit of clothing. The sum allowed for the men's clothing is about 5l., and about 3l. for the women. The men's clothing is obtained from the tradesmen of the Company, and the materials of the women's clothing are purchased and given to them with 25s. for making it up.

Both sets of recipients are required to appear annually before the court in their new apparel. The same persons generally continue to receive the clothing year by year.

After paying the pensions and the expenses of the clothing, the balance has of late years considerably exceeded 100l. a year. The whole of this, except a small balance kept in hand (in 1861 a balance of 21l. 13s. 3d.) is given away in sums of 1l. each to poor freemen or widows of freemen of the Company, the numbers of the recipients ranging from 110 and upwards. This distribution is made at the December court with Buckland's and Paradine's Gifts. In 1855 the number of recipients were increased from 90 to 110. In 1857, in addition to the 110, a further number of 110 gifts of 1l. was made, to dispose of the balance. In 1859 the extra distribution beyond the 110 was 55. In 1860 the extra distribution was 10, and in 1861, 25 additional gifts were made. (fn. 6)

Bowcher's Gift.

A loan charity created by the gift of 100l. by Thomas Bowcher. This capital is in the same situation as Gournay's, and the other loan fund to be lent at interest. Notwithstanding the scheme, no sums are lent at interest, and 66l. 13s. 4d., 3 per cent. stock, is nominally appropriated to meet the 40s. a year. That sum is given to the poor of the Company in two sums of 20s. each, at the July distribution.

Bramley's Charity.

Thomas Bramley, by deed of the 20th August 1602, assigned to the Company several leasehold premises in St. Bartholomew Exchange of the yearly value of 61l. 5s., to be distributed as follows:—

£s.d.
To the poor of the Company1000
" St. Thomas's Hospital500
" Christ's Do.500
" St. Bartholomew's Do.500
" Poor of St. Margaret, Lothbury500
" Poor of St. Bartholomew's parish500
" Master and wardens168
" Clerk100
" Beadle and porter0100

And he directed that the wardens should deduct 20l. a year out of the rents to be lent out to young men of the Company. The premises conveyed by this deed were burnt at the Great Fire, and the Company having, it is stated, no funds to rebuild, surrendered the site to the Clothworkers' Company (the lessors of the premises) for 150l., for which sum they charge themselves with interest at 3l. 6s. 8d. per cent., making 5l. annually, appropriating 166l. 13s. 4d. consols, which dividend is equally divided between the two parishes of St. Margaret, Lothbury and St. Bartholomew, Royal Exchange, and paid on the receipt of the respective churchwardens.

Buckland's Charity.

Richard Buckland, by will of the 22nd August 1573, gave to the Company three messuages in the parish of St. Michael le Quern, London, to pay—

£
To four poor householders of the Company4
To the poor of St. Michael le Quern1
To the poor of Shepperton1

The Company appropriate 200l., 3 per cent. consols, as representing the fund produced by the sale of these messuages not long after the Great Fire. The sum of 6l. a year is disposed of—as to 4l.—in sums of 20s. each to four poor freemen of the Company, at the December distribution, and 1l. to each of the parishes of St. Michael le Quern (on the receipt of the churchwardens) and the parish of Shepperton on the receipt of the rector.

Lady Burghley's Charity.

Lady Mildred Burghley on the 11th September 1583, gave to the Company 200l., in consideration of which they granted to the dean of St. Paul's and the dean of Westminster 10l. a year, to be distributed as follows:—

£s.d.
To four sermons, yearly, at Cheshunt, each 13s. 4d.2134
For 20 poor householders or widows468
To setting the poor at work300

And she further gave 200l. to the Company; 120l. to be lent to six inhabitants of Romford, and 80l. to be lent to the inhabitants of Hoddesdon, Cheshunt, and Waltham Abbey.

The Company charge themselves only with the sum of 10l. a year, under the circumstances mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, p. 192), and in respect of which they nominally appropriate 333l. 6s. 8d., 3 per cents.

The sum of 10l. a year is still paid to the churchwardens of Cheshunt.

The sum of 100l. for loans to poor tradesmen of Romford, without interest, is still occasionally lent on these terms. It appears by memorandum in the books of the Company, and the letter of the vestry clerk of Romford of the 27th December 1831, that a sum of 20l., lent to Wm. Sarell on the 24th February 1825, was lost by the failure of the principal and the sureties. The vestry clerk of Romford prepares the bonds, which are sometimes deposited with the Company. There is at present one bond of 20l. in the strong box of the Company, and the remaining sum is supposed not to be lent, but to be in the hands of the vestry clerk.

Caldwall's Charity.

Florence Caldwall, who died in 1614, by her will gave to the Company a messuage on Ludgate Hill of 20l. a year, to pay—

£s.
To St. Martin, Ludgate, for bread212
To the parish of Rollestone, Staffordshire70
For gowns, &c. for six poor men of the Company66

And the residue for the Company.

This Charity appears to have been one which suffered at the Great Fire. The ground on which it stood was sold to the City for widening Ludgate Hill, in 1667, for a sum of 92l. 10s. In respect of this the Company appropriate 99l. 8s. 11d., 3 per cent. consols, sufficient to produce 2l. 19s. 8d. a year, of which the Company pay 16s. 4d. a year to the parish of St. Martin, Ludgate, and 2l. 3s. 4d. a year to the parish of Rollestone, Staffordshire.

Carpenter's Charity.

Thomas Carpenter, by will of the 29th April 1731, gave to the Company 400l., and the produce disposed of to 20 poor people.

The Company appropriate 400l., 3 per cents. consols, as representing this Gift. The dividends on that sum amounting to 12l. a year, are distributed to 20 poor freemen of the Company at the April court in sums of 12s. each.

Frances Clarke's Charity.

Mrs. Frances Clarke, by indenture of the 20th January 1608, gave 200l. to the Company, they covenanting to pay yearly to two poor scholars 5l. each. The Company doubled the amount of these exhibitions under the circumstances mentioned in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, p. 198), and they appropriate nominally a sum of 666l. 13s. 4d., 3 per cent. consols, as the capital fund. The dividends or interest of 20l. a year are paid to two exhibitioners, one at Christ Church, Oxford, and one at any college at Cambridge. The present exhibitioners are George Plumtree Howse, of Pembroke College, and Sidney Richard Maynard Walker, of Christ Church, Oxford.

Cleave's Charity.

Thomas Cleave, by his will (date unknown), gave to the Company 54l., on consideration to pay 10 poor widows 40s. a year. The Company appropriate nominally 66l. 13s. 4d., 3 per cent. consols, as the capital of this Gift, and they distribute 2l. a year, in sums of 20s. each, to two widows of freemen, as part of their July distribution, amongst the poor of the Company.

Wm. Cleaves's Charity.

William Cleave, by will of the 11th of May, 1665, gave to the Company two messuages in St. Swithin's parish for the poor of the Company.

And by a codicil of the 16th April, 1667, he gave to the Company 300l.,—200l. for the relief of the poor of the Company, and 100l. towards rebuilding the Company's hall The premises devised by this testator are:—

£s.d.
No. 83. Cannon Street with No. 6, Oxford Court, forming one continued tenement of about 100ft. in depth, 16ft. breadth of frontage, and 25 ft. breadth in Montague Court, is let to John Shaw for 21 years from Midsummer 18539000
Interest on 333l. 6s. 8d. consols, nominally appropriated from by the Company in respect of the legacy of 200l. given by the codicil1000
A compensation or reimbursement of 50l. for rebuilding a party wall to the house in the court, which cost the Charity 59l. 5s. 0d., for which they received 50l., and invested the same in 52l. 0s. 4d., 3 per cent. consols1112
£101112

The outgoings are:—

£s.d.
The salary of clerk500
" " surveyor1160
£6160

The Company have comtemplated the imposition of an additional charge of 5l. per cent. for management on this and other charities.

The Company pay 16 poor widow of freemen a pension of 5l. each, annually—80l.

This distribution has been increased in the number of recipients or pensioners as the funds have augmented.

There is at present a balance of cash to the credit of this Charity amounting to 83l. 2s. 7d. (fn. 7)

Culverwell's Charity.

Nicholas Culverwell, by will of the 22nd October 1569, gave 300l. to the Company, whereof 100l. to be lent to five of the poorest young men of the Company, and for the remaining 200l. the Company to pay 10l. a year to two of the poorest preachers, one at Christ's College, Cambridge, and one at Magdalen College, Oxford.

The Company appropriate 333l. 6s. 8d., 3 per cent. consols, the interest or dividends on which, amounting to 10l. a year, is paid to two preachers at the universities, nominated by the Bishop of London. The present preachers are the Rev. W. D. Macray, at Magdalen College, Oxford, and the Rev. I. P. Sandberg, of Christ's College, Cambridge.

As to the 100l. to be lent out, I refer to my report upon the loan charities without interest.

Mrs. Elizabeth Freeman's Charity.

Elizabeth Freeman, by Indenture of the 3rd December 1630, gave to the Company 100l., they covenanting to pay 5l. a year for putting forth poor children, apprentices, in the parish of Aspeden, Herts.

The Company appropriate 166l. 13s. 4d., 3 per cent. consols as representing this gift, and they pay the dividends or interest, amounting to 5l. a year, to Sir Henry Lushington, the present lord of the manor of Aspeden, to whom the selection of the objects is entrusted.

French's Charity.

George French, by will of the 10th May 1699, directed his executor to pay 20 poor aged freemen of the Company or their widows 2s. 6d. each.

The Company having received 40l. in respect of this bequest, appropriate 83l. 6s. 8d., 3 per cent. consols as nominally the capital fund, and pay 25s. each to two of the poor of the Company at the July distribution.

Gale's Charity.

Thomas Gale, by will of the 27th August 1540, gave 50l. for the payment annually of 1l. 6s. 8d. to St. George, Botolph Lane, for the churchwardens to distribute,—

s.d.
To the clerk and beadle of the Company20
To six poor housekeepers of the parish40
To six poor haberdashers40
And for an obit168

Under a Covenant of the 1st September 1589 this gift was settled at an annual sum of 20s., to be paid to the parson and churchwardens, which the latter were to distribute in certain portions amongst the poor of that parish, and the parson and churchwardens, the poor householders of the Company, and the clerk and beadle; but the practice at the last inquiry was, and still is, to pay the 20s. a year to the churchwardens, leaving the entire distribution to them; nothing is paid to the clerk or beadle of the Company, nor is there any evening service in the church at which the recipients could attend.

A nominal sum of 33l. 6s. 8d. consols is appropriated as the capital of the Charity.

Garrett or Gerrard's Charity.

The will of Henry Garrett, alias Gerrard, purported to devise to the Company, a house in Holborn, but it is stated that the devise was declared void, but that the Company purchased and again sold the house, reserving a quitrent of 1l. 1s. 8d. It is still paid to the Company as charged on two houses lately occupied by—Tregham, a confectioner, on the north side of Holborn, west of Hatton Garden. The Company pay 15s. a year to the Churchwardens of St. Sepulchre, and 6s. 8d. a year to the Churchwardens of St. James Clerkenwell.

Gournay's Charity.

This is one of the loan charities, arising from the gift of 300l. by Richard Gournay, to be lent out at 5 per cent. and the interest to be given—

£s.d.
To the poor of the Company500
To Christ's Hospital500
To a poor scholar studying Divinity at Oxford or Cambridge500

There is no fund lent by the Company at interest, and therefore, notwithstanding the scheme, the sum is not appropriated as a loan charity. The Company charge themselves with a nominal sum of 500l., 3 per cent. consols to produce 15l. a year, out of which they pay to an exhibitioner at the University 5l. (the present exhibitioner is Mr. N. G. Wilkins, of St. John's College, Cambridge); a further sum of 5l. to Christ's Hospital, and the remaining 5l. to the poor of the Company, in sums of 20s. each at the July distribution.

Catharine Hall's Charity.

A loan charity, founded by the gift of 50l. by Catharine Hall, for which she directed that the young man of the Company receiving it should distribute a load of coals yearly to the poor. Like the other funds for which interest was to be paid (see Bowcher's, Gournay's, &c.), it is not lent, and the Company appropriate 66l. 13s. 4d., 3 per cent. consols to meet an annual charge of 40s. settled as equivalent to a load of coals, which is given to two poor persons of the Company at the January court.

Footnotes

1 Wm. Adams' Charities.
6th Jan. 1865.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date governors were authorised to effect certain improvements upon certain farms at Knighton in Adbaston, and to provide cost (estimated at 462l.) by sale of stock standing in names of governors arising from accumulation of surplus income. Tenants to pay as additional rent, 6l. per cent. on outlay.
3rd Sept. 1867.
By opinion of Board of this date governors were advised that apprentices might be placed out either as indoor or outdoor apprentices, and that premium might be paid over to local trustees of the charity to be applied according to their discretion for the benefit of the apprentices.
21st Feb. 1871.
By order of Board of this date governors were authorised to grant to Rev. Dr. Saxton on his relinquishing office of head master of school, an annual pension of 95l.
12th Jan. 1877.
By order of Board of this date governors were authorised to contribute out of surplus income sum not exceeding 70l. towards cost of erection of national school in parish of Adbaston.
27th Nov. 1878.
By Order in Council of this date Her Majesty declared her approbation of the following scheme under the Endowed Schools Acts for the administration of "Adams' Grammar School Foundation."
In the matter of the foundation for a school and other charitable purposes known as the Free Grammar School of Newport, in the county of Salop, of the foundation of William Adams; and
In the matter of the Endowed Schools Acts, 1869, 1873, and 1874.
Scheme for the Administration of the abovementioned Foundation, and of all the Endowments thereof.
Future administration of foundation.
1. The above-mentioned foundation and its endowments shall henceforth be administered in accordance with the provisions of this scheme, under the name of Adams' Grammar School Foundation, herein-after called the foundation.
Continnance of corporation.
2. The corporation of the governors of the possessions and revenues of the free grammar school of Newport, of the foundation of William Adams, herein called the governors, shall be continued; and, subject as herein provided, all rights, powers, and liabilities of the said corporation, and all lands and hereditaments, and all terms, estates, and interests therein respectively belonging to the foundation, and vested in the said corporation, shall remain so vested: Provided that, the members of the said corporation notwithstanding their incorporation shall be chargeable for such property as shall come into their hands, and shall be answerable and accountable for their own acts, receipts, neglects, and defaults in respect of the administration of the foundation, and shall be subject, jointly and severally, to any legal control or authority in the same manner and to the same extent as if they were not incorporated.
Management of property.
3. The estates and property of the foundation, except as otherwise hereby provided, shall continue to be managed by the governors according to the general law applicable to the management of property by trustees of charitable foundations. And the governors shall duly account to the school governing body or managers herein-after mentioned for the rents and proceeds thereof, and shall pay over to the said managers, or as such managers shall direct, the income of such estates and property, after deducting all proper charges for management and necessary outgoings, and subject as provided in clause 9 of this scheme. And in case of dispute as to such deductions or payments, either party may refer the matter to the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, whose decision shall be final. But any land buildings occupied exclusively for the purposes of either school of the foundation shall be managed exclusively by the managers of such school, and so far as belonging to the foundation shall be vested in the official trustee of charity lands and his successors in trust for such managers.
Religious opinions no disqualification.
4. Religious opinions, or attendance or non-attendance at any particular form of religious worship, shall not in any way affect the qualification of any person for being one of any governing body under this scheme.
Vesting personal property.
5. From and after the date of this scheme all stock in the public funds and other securities belonging to the foundation, and not hereby required or directed to be otherwise applied or disposed of, shall be transferred to the official trustees of charitable funds in trust for the managers.
Timber and minerals.
6. Any money arising from the sale of timber or from any mines or minerals on the estates of the foundation shall be treated as capital, and shall be invested in the name of the official trustees of charitable funds, under the direction of the Charity Commissioners, except in any special cases in which such Commissioners may allow such money or any part thereof to be otherwise dealt with.
Accounts.
7. The accounts of the governors in respect of the foundation shall be made up and balanced to the 31st day of December in every year. The accounts shall be examined by the governors, and signed by them and their clerk, if any, or other officer within 21 days after the day to which they are made up. As soon as practicable after the accounts are so signed they shall be audited in accordance with regulations to be approved by the Charity Commissioners.
Statement of accounts.
8. The governors shall cause a statement showing their receipts and expenditure to be printed in such form and with such particulars as may be from time to time prescribed by the Charity Commissioners, and shall send the same within 30 days after the audit to the managers and to the managers of the girls' school, and to the Charity Commissioners, and publish an abstract thereof in one or more local newspapers.
Trusts for minister, apprentices, and almspeople, and for poor of Haberdashers' Company.
9. The trusts of the foundation for the benefit respectively of the minister, apprentices, and almspeople of the foundation and of 20 poor people of the Haberdashers' Company, shall be administered by the governors according to the regulations in force relating to such minister, apprentices, almspeople, and poor people respectively up to the date of this scheme, except that the payment thereunder to such minister shall henceforth be at the rate of 100l. a year, and that the payment thereunder to be divided equally amongst such almspeople shall henceforth be at the rate of 104l. a year.
The Schools.
Governing body of schools.
10. Subject as herein provided the governing body of the schools, herein-after called the managers, shall, when completely formed and full, consist of 13 persons, of whom two shall be called ex officio managers, and 11 shall be called representative managers.
Ex officio managers.
11. The ex officio managers shall consist of the master and the senior warden respectively for the time being of the Company of Haberdashers of the City of London, if they respectively shall be willing to accept the office of manager.
Representative managers.
12. The representative managers shall be competent persons duly qualified to discharge the duties of the office, and shall be appointed by the following electing bodies respectively in the following proportions, and for the following terms of office, that is to say—
Five for the term of seven years by the court of assistants of the said Company of Haberdashers, not less than four of such five being resident within 10 miles from the parish church of Newport aforesaid;
Two for the term of six years by Her Majesty's justices of the peace acting in and for the petty sessional division in which Newport aforesaid is situate;
Two for the term of five years by the Newport, Salop, local board; and
Two for the term of five years by the ratepayers of the parish of Newport aforesaid, and of such part of the parish of Chetwynd as lies within a mile from the parish church of Newport aforesaid, which part of the parish of Chetwynd is in this scheme referred to as Chetwynd End.
Such appointments shall be made as often as there may be occasion by the body entitled to appoint, at a meeting thereof which shall be convened, held, and conducted as nearly as may be in conformity with the ordinary rules or practice of such body, or failing such rules or practice, then in conformity with regulations to be made or approved by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales. The term shall be in each case reckoned from the date of the appointment. The first representative managers shall be appointed as soon as conveniently may be after the date of this scheme. The chairman or other presiding officer of each meeting at which the appointment of any representative managers or manager shall be made, shall forthwith cause the names or name of the persons or person so appointed to be notified, in the case of the first such appointment to the governors, and in the case of every subsequent appointment to the chairman of the managers or their clerk, if any, or other acting officer. Any appointment of a representative manager not made as aforesaid within six calendar months from the date of this scheme, or of the notice herein-after prescribed of the occurrence of a vacancy, as the case may be, shall for that turn be made by the then existing managers.
The proper expenses, if any, attending the appointment of every representative manager, unless otherwise provided for, shall on the particulars thereof being submitted to and allowed by the Charity Commissioners be paid by the managers out of the income of the foundation.
Vacancies.
13. Any representative manager who, during his term of office, shall become bankrupt or incapacitated to act, or express in writing his wish to resign, or omit for the space of one year to attend any meeting, or, in the case of any representative manager appointed as being resident within 10 miles from the parish church of Newport aforesaid, shall cease to be so resident, shall thereupon forthwith vacate the office of manager; and the managers shall cause an entry to be made in their minute book of every vacancy occasioned by any of the said causes, or by the death or the expiration of the term of office of any representative manager; and as soon as conveniently may be after the occurrence of any vacancy a new manager shall be appointed by the body entitled as aforesaid to make such appointment. Any manager may be re-appointed. Notice of the occurrence of every vacancy of the office of representative manager shall be given, as soon as conveniently may be, by or under the direction of the managers to the proper electing body or the clerk, if any, or other acting officer of such body.
Declaration by managers on entry into office.
14. Every manager shall, at or before the first meeting which he attends upon his first or any subsequent appointment, sign a memorandum declaring his acceptance of the office of manager, and his willingness to act in the trusts of this scheme. And until he has signed such a memorandum he shall not be entitled to discharge the functions of a manager.
Meetings of managers.
15. The managers shall hold meetings in some convenient place in Newport, or elsewhere, as often as may be found necessary or desirable, on and at convenient days and times to be appointed by themselves, and to be notified to each manager by the clerk, if any, or by some other person acting under the direction of the managers, at least seven days previously to every meeting. Such meetings shall be held at least twice in each year, and one of them in each year shall be on a stated day approved by the governors.
Preliminary meeting.
16. A preliminary meeting for the arrangement of the conduct of the business shall be held at Newport upon the summons of the governors upon some day to be fixed by them being within one calendar month from the time at which the full number of managers shall have been completed, or from the expiration of the first three calendar months after the date of this scheme, if the full number of managers shall not then have been completed.
Chairman.
17. The managers shall, at the said preliminary meeting, and afterwards at their first meeting in each year, elect one of their number to be chairman of their meetings for the current year, and they shall also make regulations for supplying his place in case of his death, resignation, or absence during his term of office. The chairman shall always be re-eligible.
Quorum and voting.
18. A quorum shall be constituted when five managers are present at a meeting. All matters and questions shall be determined by the majority of the managers present at a duly constituted meeting; and in case of equality of votes the chairman shall have a second or casting vote. Whenever any decision is carried by the votes of less than a majority of the whole number of managers for the time being any two managers may, within 15 days from the day of the decision, require by a notice addressed to the chairman of the meeting that the decision shall be once reconsidered at a special meeting, to be held not later than one calendar month next after such decision.
Special meetings.
19. The chairman or any two managers may at any time summon a special meeting for any cause that seems to him or them sufficient. All special meetings shall be convened by or under the direction of the person or persons summoning the meeting by notice in writing delivered or sent by post to each manager, specifying the object of the meeting. And it shall be the duty of the clerk, if any, to give such notice when required by the chairman or by any managers having a right to summon such meeting.
Adjournment of meetings.
20. If a sufficient number of managers to form a quorum are not present at any meeting, or if the business at any meeting is not fully completed, those present may adjourn the meeting to a subsequent day and time, of which notice shall be given in manner aforesaid to each manager.
Minutes.
21. A minute book and proper books of account shall be provided by the managers, and kept in some convenient and secure place of deposit to be provided or appointed by them for that purpose, and minutes of the entry into office of every new manager, and of all proceedings of the managers, shall be entered in such minute book.
Accounts.
22. The managers shall cause full accounts to be kept of their receipts and expenditure in respect of the foundation; and such accounts shall be stated for each year, and examined and passed annually by the managers at the first meeting in the ensuing year, unless some other meeting shall be appointed for the purpose with the approval of the Charity Commissioners, and every such account shall be signed by the managers present at the meeting at which it shall be passed.
The managers shall cause sufficient abstracts of their accounts to be published annually for general information. Such abstracts shall be in the form given in the schedule hereto, unless some other form is prescribed by the Charity Commissioners, in which case the form so prescribed shall be followed.
Business arrangements.
23. The managers may from time to time make such arrangements as they may find most fitting for the custody of any deeds and other documents in their charge belonging to the foundation, for deposit of money, for the drawing of cheques, and also for the appointment of a clerk or of any necessary agents or other proper officers for their assistance in the conduct of the business of the foundation, at such reasonable salaries or scale of remuneration as shall be approved by the Charity Commissioners, but no governor acting as such clerk or officer shall be entitled to any salary or remuneration.
Managers may act although body not full.
24. After the full number of managers shall have been completed according to the provisions of this scheme, or after the expiration of the first three calendar months after the date of this scheme, if the full number of managers shall not then have been completed, the managers for the time being, if a quorum is constituted, may act for all the purposes of this scheme, although their body, as hereinbefore constituted, is not full.
Temporary school arrangements.
25. So far as may be practicable and convenient, the school may be carried on as heretofore until the end of the school term, if any, which may be current at the date of this scheme, or until such other time as may be approved by the Charity Commissioners, on proper application made to them for the purpose.
Provision as to present head master.
26. The present head master shall, at or before the time so allowed under the foregoing clause, declare to the managers in writing, whether or not he is willing to take and hold the office of head master of the boys' school under this scheme, and if he shall declare himself to be so willing he shall retain the office without further appointment, subject in all respects to the provisions of this scheme; but, if he shall fail to make such declaration within the time so allowed, or shall declare that he is not so willing, the managers may forthwith remove him from the said office.
Provision as to another master and pension to a former master.
27. Nothing in this scheme shall prejudice any interest within the meaning of the 13th section of the Endowed Schools Act, 1869, which at the passing of the Endowed Schools Act, 1868, was vested in Mr. Richard Crowther as English or third master of the school or in the Reverend Charles Waring Saxton, D.D., formerly the master of the school, in respect of his yearly pension of 95l.
Saving of interests of scholars.
28. Any payment, or exemption from payment, scholarship, exhibition, or other benefit to which any boy who was on the foundation on the 1st day of January 1878 is legally entitled thereunder shall be continued to him.
Provisions as to schools to be brought into operation as soon as practicable.
29. The managers shall take all requisite measures for bringing the provisions of this scheme into active operation for the regulation of the schools to be established or main tained under this scheme as soon as practicable, and they shall have power to make all suitable and proper arrangements for that purpose.
Boys' school and girls' school.
30. A school for boys, and if and so soon as the funds of the foundation will admit a school for girls, to be called the Adams' Grammar Schools, shall be established or maintained under the foundation in or near Newport aforesaid. The boys' school shall be a day and boarding school under a head master, and the girls' school shall be a day school only under a head mistress.
Special exemptions from religious instruction and worship.
31. The parent or guardian of, or person liable to maintan or having the actual custody of, any day scholar in either school may claim, by notice in writing addressed to the head master or head mistress, the exemption of such scholar from attending prayer or religious worship, or from any lesson or series of lessons on a religious subject, and such scholar shall be exempted accordingly, and a scholar shall not, by reason of any exemption from attending prayer or religious worship, or from any lesson or series of lessons on a religious subject, be deprived of any advantage or emolument in either school to which he or she would otherwise have been entitled. If the parent or guardian of, or person liable to maintain or having the actual custody of, any scholar who is about to attend the boys' school, and who but for this clause could only be admitted as a boarder, desires the exemption of such scholar from attending prayer or religious worship, or from any lesson or series of lessons on a religious subject, but the persons in charge of the boarding houses of such school are not willing to allow such exemption, then it shall be the duty of the governing body of such school to make provisions for enabling the scholar to attend such school, and have such exemption as a day scholar, without being deprived of any advantage or emolument to which he would otherwise have been entitled. If any teacher, in the course of other lessons at which any scholar exempted under this clause is in accordance with the ordinary rules of either school present, shall teach systematically and persistently any particular religious doctrine, from the teaching of which any exemption has been claimed, as in this clause before provided, the governing body of such school shall, on complaint made in writing to them by the parent, guardian, or person liable to maintain or having the actual custody of such scholar, hear the complaint, and inquire into the circumstances, and, if the complaint is judged to be reasonable, make all proper provisions for remedying the matter complained of.
Instruction.
32. Subject to the foregoing provision, religious instruction in accordance with the principles of the Christian faith shall be given in each school under such regulations as shall be made from time to time by the governing body of such school. No alteration in any such regulation shall take effect until the expiration of not less chan one year after notice of the making of the alteration shall have been given by the governing body of the school concerned in such manner as they shall think best calculated to bring the matter within the knowledge of persons interested in such school.
Teachers not to be members of of a governing body.
33. No head or assistant master or teacher of either school shall be a member of a governing body under this scheme.
The Boys' School.
Boys' school site and buildings.
34. As soon as conveniently may be the managers, either by altering or adding to the present school buildings, or by acquiring or erecting other buildings upon some convenient site, shall provide for the boys' school proper school buildings suitable for not less than 100 day scholars and 50 boarders, and planned with a view to convenient extension, and may apply for the purpose a sufficient sum to be provided or raised, if needful, by the governors on the application of the managers out of the capital endowment or property of the foundation by sale or otherwise, but for all the purposes of this clause the governors and the managers shall act subject to the consent and approval of the Charity Commissioners.
Masters not to be required to be in Holy Orders.
35. No person shall be disqualified for being a master in the school by reason only of his not being, or not intending to be, in Holy Orders.
Head master. Appointment.
36. There shall be a head master of the school. He shall be a graduate of some university in the United Kingdom. Every future head master shall be appointed by the managers at some meeting to be called for that purpose, as soon as conveniently may be after the occurrence of a vacancy, or after notice of an intended vacancy. In order to obtain the best candidates, the managers shall, for a sufficient time before making any appointment, give public notice of the vacancy and invite applicants for the office by advertisements in newspapers, or by such other methods as they may judge best calculated to secure the object.
Dismissal.
37. The managers may dismiss the head master without assigning cause, after six calendar months' written notice, given to him in pursuance of a resolution passed at two consecutive meetings held at an interval of at least 14 days, and convened for that purpose, such resolution being affirmed at each meeting by not less than two-thirds of the managers present.
The managers, for what in their opinion is urgent cause, may, by resolution passed at a special meeting convened for that purpose, and affirmed by not less than two-thirds of the whole number of managers for the time being, declare that the head master ought to be dismissed from his office without the aforesaid notice, and in that case they may appoint another special meeting to be held not less than a week after the former one, and may then by a similar resolution, affirmed by as large a proportion of managers, absolutely and finally dismiss him. And if the managers assembled at the first of such meetings think fit at once to suspend the head master from his office until the next meeting, they may do so by resolution affirmed by as large a proportion of managers. Full notice and opportunity of defence at both meetings shall be given to the head master.
Declaration to be signed by head master.
38. Every future head master, previously to entering into office, shall be required to sign a declaration, to be entered in the minute book of the managers, to the following effect:—
"I, declare that I will always to the best of my ability discharge the duties of head master of the boys' school of Adams' Grammar School Foundation at Newport during my tenure of the office, and that if I am removed by the managers, I will acquiesce in such removal, and will thereupon relinquish all claim to the mastership and its future emoluments, and will deliver up to the managers, or as they direct, possession of all the property of the school then in my possession or occupation."
Head master's official residence.
39. The head master shall dwell in the residence assigned for him. He shall have the occupation and use of such residence and of any other property of the school of which he becomes the occupant as such head master, in respect of his official character and duties, and not as tenant, and shall, if removed from his office, deliver up possession of such residence and other property to the managers, or as they direct. He shall not, except with the permission of the governors, permit any person not being a member of his family to occupy such residence or any part thereof.
Head master not to have other employment.
40. The head master shall give his personal attention to the duties of the school, and during his teame of office he shall not accept or hold any benefice having the cure of souls, or any office or appointment which, in the opinion of the managers, may interfere with the proper performance of his duties as head master.
Masters not to receive other than authorised fees.
41. Neither the head master nor any assistant master shall receive or demand from any boy in the school, or from any person whomsoever on behalf of any such boy, any gratuity, fee, or payment, except such as are prescribed or authorised by this scheme.
Jurisdiction of managers over school arrangements.
42. Within the limits fixed by this scheme, the managers shall prescribe the general subjects of instruction, the relative prominence and value to be assigned to each group of subjects, the arrangements respecting the school terms, vacations, and holidays, and the payments of day scholars, and the number and payments of boarders. They shall take general supervision of the sanitary condition of the school buildings and arrangements. They shall determine what number of assistant masters shall be employed. They shall every year assign the amount which they think proper to be contributed out of the income of the foundation for the purpose of maintaining assistant masters and providing and maintaining a proper school plant or apparatus, and otherwise furthering the current objects and efficiency of the school.
Managers to consider views and proposals of the head master.
43. Before making any regulations under the last foregoing clause, the managers shall consult the head master in such a manner as to give him full opportunity for the expression of his views. The head master may also from time to time submit proposals to the managers for making or altering regulations concerning any matter within the province of the managers. The managers shall fully consider any such expression of views or proposals, and shall decide upon them.
Jurisdiction of head master over school arrangements.
44. Subject to the rules prescribed by or under the authority of this scheme, the head master shall have under his control the choice of books, the method of teaching, the arrangement of classes and school hours, and generally the whole internal organisation, management, and discipline of the school, including the power of expelling boys from the school or suspending them from attendance thereat for any adequate cause to be judged of by him: Provided that, upon expelling or suspending any boy he shall forthwith report the case to the managers.
Assistant masters.; Payment for school objects.
45. The head master shall have the sole power of appointing and dismissing all assistant masters, and shall determine, subject to the approval of the managers, in what proportions the sum assigned by the managers for the maintenance of assistant masters, or the other current objects of the school, shall be divided among the various persons and objects for which it is assigned in the aggregate. And the managers shall pay the same accordingly, either through the hands of the head master or directly as they think best.
Income of head master.
46. The head master shall receive a fixed yearly stipend of 150l. He shall also be entitled to receive a further or capitation payment calculated on such a scale, uniform or graduated, as may be fixed from time to time by the managers, at the rate of not less than 2l. nor more than 5l. a year for each boy attending the school. The amount of this further or capitation payment shall be ascertained and paid to the head master by the managers, together with the proper proportion of his fixed stipend, at such convenient intervals or times as the managers may think fit.
Boarders.
47. The managers may make such regulations and arrangements as they may think right for the reception of boarders either in the house of any master, or in a hostel or hostels conducted under the management of the managers, or, if they think fit, in both of those ways.
Payments for tuition and boarding.
48. All boys, including boarders, except as herein-after provided, shall pay tuition fees to be fixed from time to time by the managers, at the rate of not less than 6l. nor more than 12l. a year for any boy; except that for any boy living within any of the following areas with his parents or guardians, that is to say, the area of the parish of Newport aforesaid and Chetwynd End, the area within three miles from the parish church of Newport aforesaid, and the area within five miles from the parish church of Newport aforesaid, the tuition fee shall be at the rate of 3l. yearly, but so that the number of boys paying under this clause at such last-mentioned rate is never more than 80 at any one time, and that the preference under this clause is always given according to the order in which the said three areas are named above. Except as aforesaid no difference in respect of these fees shall be made between any scholars on account of place of birth or residence or of their being or not being boarders. The payments to be required from boarders exclusive of the tuition fees shall not exceed the annual rate of 35l. in a hostel, or 50l. in a master's house, for any boy. No extra or additional payment of any kind shall be allowed without the sanction of the managers and the written consent of the parent, or person occupying the place of parent, of the scholar concerned.
All payments for tuition fees shall be made in advance to the head master, or to such other person as the managers shall from time to time determine, and shall be accounted for by the person receiving them to the managers, and treated by them as part of the general income of the foundation.
Ages for school.
49. No boy shall be admitted into the school under the age of eight years. No boy shall remain in the school after the age of 17 years, or if he attains that age during a school term then after the end of such term, except with the permission of the managers, which in special cases may be given upon the recommendation of the head master.
To whom school is open.
50. Subject to the provisions established by or under the authority of this scheme, the school and all its advantages shall be open to all boys of good character and sufficient health who are residing with their parents, guardians, or near relations within degrees to be determined by the managers, or in some boarding house conducted under regulations made by the managers. No boy not so residing shall be admitted to the school without the special permission of the managers.
Applications for admission.
51. Applications for admission to the school shall be made to the head master, or to some other person appointed by the managers, according to a form to be approved of by them, and delivered to all applicants.
Register of applications.
52. The head master or some other person appointed by the managers shall keep a register of applications for admission, showing the date of every application and of the admission, withdrawal, or rejection of the applicant, and the cause of any rejection, and the age of each applicant.
Entrance examination.
53. Every applicant for admission shall be examined by or under the direction of the head master, who shall appoint convenient times for that purpose, and give reasonable notice to the parents or next friends of the boy to be so examined. No boy shall be admitted to the school except after undergoing such examination and being found fit for admission. Subject as herein provided those who are found fit shall, if there is room for them, be admitted in order according to the dates of their application.
54. The examination for admission shall be graduated according to the age of the boy, and shall be regulated in other particulars from time to time by or under the direction of the managers, but it shall never for any boy fall below the following standard, that is to say:—
Reading.
Writing from dictation.
Sums in the first four simple rules of arithmetic, with the multiplication table.
Instruction.
55. Besides religious instruction as herein-before provided, instruction shall also be given in the school in the following subjects:—
Reading, writing, and arithmetic.
Geography and history.
English grammar, composition, and literature.
Mathematics.
Latin.
At least one foreign European language.
Natural science.
Drawing and vocal music.
Greek may be taught at an additional tuition fee of not less than 3l. a year for each boy.
Subject to the above provisions, the course of instruction shall proceed according to the classification and arrangements made by the head master.
Annual examination.
56. There shall be once in every year an examination of the scholars by an examiner or examiners appointed for that purpose by the managers, and paid by them, but otherwise unconnected with the school. The day of examination shall be fixed by the managers after consulting with the head master. The examiner or examiners shall report to the managers on the proficiency of the scholars and on the condition of the school, as regards instruction and discipline, as shown by the result of the examination. The managers shall communicate the report to the head master.
Head master's annual report.
57. The head master shall make a report in writing to the managers annually at such time as they shall direct on the general condition and progress of the school, and on any special occurrences during the year. He may also mention the names of any boys who, in his judgment, are worthy of reward or distinction, having regard both to proficiency and conduct. The managers may award prizes of books or other suitable rewards or marks of distinction to any such boys.
The Girls' School.
Girls' School.
58. The girls' school, when established, shall be carried on in any suitable buildings hired or otherwise available for the purpose, and for its maintenance shall be entitled to so much of the income of the foundation as herein-after provided.
Managers of girls' school.
59. The girls' school shall be managed by a governing body consisting of the managers and two women, each appointed by the managers for the term of five years, but subject to vacating office earlier in the same way as the representative managers. The managers with such two women shall be called the managers of the girls' school. The managers of the girls' school shall act as one body in all matters within their jurisdiction, and shall conduct their business in the mode provided for the conduct of the business of the managers.
Income of head mistress.
60. The head mistress of the girls' school shall receive a fixed stipend of 80l. a year, and until a residence is provided for her a yearly allowance of not more than 30l. in place of such residence. She shall also receive a further or capitation payment being not less than 2l. nor more than 4l. for each girl attending the school, but calculated and paid in other respects according to the conditions hereinbefore prescribed for the boys' school.
Instruction.
61. The subjects of instruction for girls besides religious instruction, as herein-before provided, shall be:—
Reading, writing, and arithmetic.
Geography and history.
English grammar, composition, and literature.
Latin or some foreign European language or both.
One or more branches of natural science.
Domestic economy and the laws of health.
Drawing and vocal music.
Needlework, and
such other subjects as the managers of the girls' school may from time to time prescribe.
Fees.
62. All girls, wherever living, except as herein-after provided, shall pay tuition fees to be fixed from time to time by the managers of the girls' school, at the rate of not less than 4l. nor more than 8l. a year for any girl.
Other provisions as for boys' school.
63. The girls' school shall be subject to the like provisions as are contained in the foregoing clauses relating to the boys' school, except so far as the same require that certain school buildings shall be provided, or that the head master shall be a graduate or shall dwell in a particular residence or as is otherwise herein provided. For the purposes of this clause, such foregoing clauses shall be read as if the following modifications were made therein, namely, "managers of the girls' school" for "managers," "mistress" for "master," and "girl" for "boy," with any consequent modifications.
Scholarships and Exhibitions.
Foundation scholarships.
64. Scholarships shall be maintained in each school in the form of exemptions from the payment of all tuition fees and shall be granted for such periods and, subject to the provisions of this scheme, on such conditions as the managers or the managers of the girls' school, as the case may be, think fit. Boys or girls to whom such scholarships shall be granted shall be called foundation scholars. Subject as herein-after provided, one such scholarship in the boys' school shall be awarded to every applicant for admission who, being examined and found fit for admission as aforesaid, has for three years been educated at any of the public elementary schools in the school district of Newport aforesaid or in Chetwynd End, and has passed an examination in the highest standard for the time being recognised by the regulations of the Education Department in each of the ordinary, as distinguished from the specific, subjects of secular instruction, and brings from his last school a written report of conduct and character satisfactory to the managers. Subject as aforesaid the scholarships under this clause may be awarded in favour of candidates for admission to either school, on the result of the examination for admission, and in favour of scholars already attending either school upon the reports of the examiners made on the result of the annual examination, but no scholarship under this clause shall be granted to any such lastmentioned scholar unless the head master or head mistress, as the case may be, shall report that such scholar is deserving of it by reason of character and good conduct. No scholarship shall be granted under this clause in either school so as to extend the number of such scholarships to more than 10 per cent. of the scholars actually attending such school.
Other scholarships.
65. The managers shall apply not less than the sum of 60l. yearly in maintaining in the boys' school other scholarships each of the yearly value of not more than 15l. These scholarships shall be competed for by boys, whether being or not being in the school, who have been educated for at least three years at any of the public elementary schools in the school district of Newport aforesaid, or in Chetwynd End. No scholarship under this clause shall be granted for which there shall be no candidate so qualified as aforesaid who on examination shall be adjudged worthy to take it. Any money so left to be diposed of shall be applied in the manner herein-after directed concerning unapplied surplus of income of the foundation.
Exhibitions in boys' school.
66. Subject to such reasonable regulations, not inconsistent with the provisions of this scheme, as the managers may from time to time prescribe, the managers may, if the income is sufficient, establish in the boys' school four exhibitions tenable for four years at any place of higher education approved by them, to be called Adams' exhibitions, and be awarded to boys who are being and have for not less than three years been educated at the school.
In girls' school.
67. The managers of the girls' school may establish four like exhibitions in the girls' school.
Conditions as to scholarships and exhibitions.
68. Every scholarship and exhibition established under this scheme shall be given as the reward of merit, and shall, except as herein provided, be freely and openly competed for, and shall be tenable only for the purposes of education. If the holder shall, in the judgment of the governing body by whom the scholarship or exhibition was granted, be guilty of serious misconduct or idleness, or fail to maintain a reasonable standard of proficiency, or wilfully cease to pursue his or her education, such governing body may at once determine the scholarship or exhibition, and for this purpose, in the case of an exhibition held away from the school, may act on the report of the proper authorities of the school or place of education at which the exhibition is held, or on such other evidence as such governing body think sufficient. For the purposes of this clause the decision of such governing body shall be final in every case.
Application of Income.
Repairs and improvements fund.
69. As soon as the funds of the foundation will admit, the managers shall transfer the sum of 1,666l. 13s. 4d. Government Stock into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds, and shall place the same in their books to a separate account, entitled "Repairs and Improvements Fund." The income of such fund shall be paid to the managers, and applied by them in ordinary repairs or improvements of property used for the purposes of the schools respectively, and if not wanted for that purpose shall be accumulated by them for the like purpose in any future year or years. Until the repairs and improvements fund is provided, the managers shall treat the sum of 50l. a year as applicable to the same purposes as the income of the repairs and improvements fund.
Other expenses.
70. After defraying the expenses of management, and of any ordinary repairs or improvements of property used for the purposes of the schools which the income of the repairs and improvements fund, or the yearly sum payable in lieu thereof, may be insufficient to answer, and providing for any legal claims on the income of the foundation which may be due, and subject after the establishment of the girls' school to the provisions herein contained relating to the income applicable for the purposes of the girls' school, and after providing for any payment towards the cost of examinations under the Oxford or Cambridge University local examinations, as herein-after provided, the managers shall employ the income of the foundation applicable for the purposes of the boys' school in paying the head master, and in making the several payments herein-before directed or authorised for the purposes of the boys' school.
Pensions.
71. The managers may, if they think fit, and the income at their disposal suffice for the purpose, agree with the head master of the boys' school for the formation of a fund in the nature of a pension or superannuation fund, the main principles of such agreement being that the head master and the managers respectively shall contribute annually for a period of 20 years such sums as may be fixed on; that these contributions shall accumulate at compound interest; that in case the head master serves his office for 20 years he shall on his retirement be entitled to the whole accumulated fund; that in case he retires earlier on account of permanent disability from illness he shall also be entitled to the whole of the same fund; that in all other cases he shall, on his ceasing to be master, be entitled to the amount produced by his own contributions. If any question shall arise upon the construction or working of this provision, the same shall be referred by the managers to the Charity Commissioners, whose decision thereon shall be final and conclusive.
Income applicable to girls' school.
72. All sums received as income in respect of the girls' school shall be treated as part of the income of the foundation applicable for the purposes of the girls' school, and after the establishment of the girls' school the managers shall, at their first meeting in each year, determine what further sum out of the income of the foundation, not being less than 200l., shall for the current year be applicable in like manner, and shall place all such sums at the disposal of the managers of the girls' school accordingly, and the same shall be applied by the managers of the girls' school for the purposes of the girls' school, with the like powers as to pensions and otherwise as herein provided with respect to the income applicable by the managers for the purposes of the boys' school.
Residue.; Unapplied surplus.
73. If after providing for the ordinary expenses of the schools, and for the payments herein-before directed or authorised, there shall be any residue of income belonging to the account of either school, the governing body of such school may employ it for the purposes of such school in improving the accommodation or convenience of the school buildings or premises, or generally in extending or otherwise in promoting the objects and efficiency of such school. Whatever shall not be so employed shall, on passing the yearly accounts, be treated as unapplied surplus, and shall be deposited in a bank for the account of the managers, to the intent that the same, so soon as it shall amount to a suitable sum, shall be invested in the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in trust for the schools of the foundation in augmentation of its general endowment.
Payments for Oxford an Cambridge local examinations.
74. The managers may pay not more than 30l. yearly towards the cost of procuring for the schools of the foundation the benefits of the local examinations of the University of Oxford or the University of Cambridge.
General.
Further endowments.
75. The managers may receive any additional donations or endowments for the general purposes of the schools. They may also receive donations or endowments for any special objects connected with the schools which shall not be inconsistent with or calculated to impede the due working of the provisions of this scheme. Any question arising upon this last point shall be referred to the Charity Commissioners for decision.
General power of managers and managers of girls' school to make regulations.
76. Within the limits prescribed by this scheme the managers, and the managers of the girls' school respectively, shall have full power from time to time to make regulations for the conduct of their business and for the management of the schools respectively, and such regulations shall be binding on all persons affected thereby.
Question of proceedings under scheme.
77. Any question affecting the regularity or the validity of any proceeding under this scheme shall be determined conclusively by the Charity Commissioners upon such application made to them for the purpose as they think sufficient.
Construction of scheme.
78. If any doubt or question arises among the governing body under this scheme as to the proper construction or application of any of the provisions of this scheme, such governing body shall apply to the Charity Commissioners for their opinion and advice thereon, which opinion and advice when given shall be binding on such governing body, and all persons claiming under the trust who shall be affected by the question so decided.
Jurisdiction of ordinary abolished.
79. From the date of this scheme all jurisdiction of the ordinary relating to or arising from the licensing of any master under the foundation shall be abolished.
Jurisdiction of visitor.
80. From the date of this scheme all rights and powers reserved to, belonging to, claimed by, or capable of being exercised by Her Majesty, as visitor of this foundation, and vested in her on the 2nd day of August 1869, shall be exercised only through and by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales.
Charity Commissioners to make new schemes.
81. The Charity Commissioners may from time to time, in the exercise of their ordinary jurisdiction, frame schemes for the alteration of any portions of this scheme, provided that such schemes be not inconsistent with anything contained in the Endowed Schools Acts, 1869, 1873, and 1874.
Foundation to be governed exclusively by this scheme.
82. From and after the date of this scheme the foundation shall for every purpose, except as herein provided, be administered and governed wholly and exclusively in accordance with the provisions of the same scheme, notwithstanding any former or other scheme, Act of Parliament, charter or letters patent, statute, or instrument relating to the subject matter of this scheme, but without prejudice to any exemption of the endowment or any part of it under any Act of Parliament from any tax, assessment, or charge.
Scheme to be printed and sold.
83. The managers shall cause this scheme to be printed, and a copy to be given to every manager, manager of the girls' school, master, assistant master, mistress, and teacher, upon their respective appointments, and copies may be sold at a reasonable price to all persons applying for the same.
Date of scheme.
84. The date of this scheme shall be the day on which Her Majesty by Order in Council declares her approbation of it.
SCHEDULE.
Adams' Grammar School Foundation at Newport.
Abstract of Accounts for year ending—
N.B.—Receipts or expenses not falling under any specific heads should be inserted separately in an appropriate place under one of the more general heads.
Annual Income Receivable.
£s.d.
Income of estates
Three per cent. Government stock, annual dividend
Interest or dividends on other investments (to be set out separately)
Special or casual payments
Total gross annual income£
Receipts for Year ending—
£s.d.
1. From Endowment.
Income of estates
Dividends on 3 per cent. Government stock
Interest or dividends on other investments (to be set out separately)
Interest on cash at bankers
Special or casual payments
2. From Fees of Pupils.
Boys' School:—
1st quarter or term
2nd quarter "
3rd quarter "
4th quarter "
Girls' School:—
(As above for Boys' School.)
3. Incidentals.
Property tax returned
4. Hostel Account for Boys' School.
Net profit from
Total income of the year
Balance at commencement of account
Total receipts£
Expenses.
£s.d.£s.d.
1. Management of the Trust.
Salary of clerk or other officers Postage, stationery, stamps, &c. Advertisements
Law expenses (ordinary)
2. Expenses on Property in the occupation of the Schools.
Repairs, &c. in excess of income of Repairs Fund
Rates and taxes
Insurance
£s.d.£s.d.
3. Temporary Annual Expenses.
Interest on money borrowed (£ )
Pension payments
Specify according to Schools and Clauses.
Other payments
Property tax
4. Extraordinary Expenses of the year.
Specify in detail.
5. Investments made during the Year.
6. Net Expenditure on the Schools.
Boys' School:—
Salary of head master
Payment for assistant masters, school apparatus, &c.
Examiners' fees and expenses
Printing examination papers, &c.
Book prizes
Books (for library, &c.)
Paper, pens, ink, &c.
Gas, water, coal, &c.
Cleaning, porterage, &c.
Special payments:
Lecturer on any special subject
Prize-day expenses, &c., &c.
Girls' School:
(As above for Boys' School.)
7. Scholarships and Exhibitions.
Specify according to Clauses.
8. Payment for Oxford and Cambridge local Examinations.
Total expenditure of the year£
Unapplied surplus (less current balance)
Balance in hand at close of account
Total£
Repairs and Improvements Account for the Year ending
Dr.
£s.d.
Balance at commencement of account
Dividends on Government stock
£
Cr.
£s.d.
Ordinary repairs
Extraordinary repairs or improvements
Balance to next account
£
Hostel Account for Boys' School for Year ending
Receipts.
£s.d.
From fees for boarding:
1st quarter or term
2nd " "
3rd " "
4th " "
Total£
Expenditure.
£s.d.£s.d.
Maintenance:
Meat, &c.
Bread, &c.
Groceries
Beer
Vegetables
Other expenses:
Matron
Domestic servants
Washing
Medical expenses
Fittings and furniture
£
Net profit carried to general accout£
2 The average is slightly lower this year, owing to the prevalence of diphtheria and measles in the winter and autumn respectively.
3 These have arisen from investments made by the Governors of Queen Anne's Bounty, the land being annexed by deed to the vicarage.
4 Thomas Arnold's Charity.
File 29,484.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners, dated the 21st December 1877, the redemption and extinguishment of the above rentcharge was effected in consideration of the transfer previously made into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 866l. 19s. 4d. Consolidated 3l. per cent. annuities.
5 Aske's Hospital.
10 May 1864.
By opinion of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date the trustees were authorised to contribute 20l. towards cost of erecting school for poor at Kingsnorth, and to contribute 5l. per annum towards its support.
10 Nov. 1865.
By opinion of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to grant to John G. Sparter, M.D., Surgeon, an annual retiring pension of 15l.
3 Jan, 1868.
By order of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to expend two sums of 320l. each in the erection of two cottages on Park Farm, Kingsnorth, and in the erection of an oasthouse, &c., on Singleton Farm, Great Chart.
Feb. 1863.
By order of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to sell leasehold estates in Great Chart to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for 5,600l., subsequently invested (less approved costs) in the purchase of 5,954l. 8s. 11d. reduced 3l. per cent. annuities.
17 Feb. 1871.
By opinion of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to subscribe 5l. 5s. per annum towards schools of St. Peter's, Hoxton.
12 Nov. 1872.
By order of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to effect certain improvements of residence and buildings on Park Farm, Kingsnorth, at a cost of 1,175l. 4s., out of surplus income.
4 April 1873.
The above sum was extended by further order of this date to 1,368l. 5s.
20 Dec. 1872.
By order of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to effect certain improvements at Bevenden Farm in Great Chart and Bethersden (Kent), at a cost of 994l. 16s.
4 April 1873.
By further order of this date the above sum was extended to 1,300l., and it was directed that 52l. yearly be invested out of rents until amount expended replaced.
21 Jan. 1873.
By order of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to grant the following leases:—
(1.) Lease of "Haberdashers' Arms," 114, Pitfield Street, Hoxton, for a term of 21 years at the rent of 150l. (premium 4,000l. invested in the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in 4,324l. 6s. 6d. consols).
(2.) Lease of "Lion and Lamb," 35, Aske Street, Hoxton, for a term of 21 years at the rent of 130l. (premium 500l., invested in the name of the said Official Trustees in 539l. 6s. 3d. consols).
9 Aug. 1873.
By an Order in Council of this date Her Majesty declared her approbation of the following scheme under the Endowed Schools Acts for the administration of the hospital at Hoxton of the foundation of Robt. Aske.
As approved by Her Majesty in Council.
240.
Endowed Schools Commission.
County of Middlesex.
Parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch.
Scheme for the Management of the Hospital at Hoxton, of the Foundation of Robert Aske.
Part I.—General.
Object.
1. The general object of the above-named charity, hereinafter referred to as the Trust, shall be:—
(a.) To supply sound practical and liberal education for boys and girls by means of schools in or near London; and
(b.) To provide for poor people, who are free of the Company of Haberdashers in the City of London.
Repeal.
2. From the date of this Scheme all the particulars which by the Endowed Schools Act, 1869, sec. 46, are capable of being hereby repealed and abrogated shall, so far as they relate to the management of the Trust, be repealed and abrogated, except as is herein-after otherwise expressly provided.
Corporation.
3. Subject to the provisions of this Scheme the Corporation bearing the name or style of "Governors of the possessions and revenues of the Hospital at Hoxton of the Foundation of Robert Aske, Esquire," shall be continued in accordance with the regulations hitherto in force, and shall be the Governing Body of the Trust; and all rights, powers, and liabilities of the said Corporation, and all lands and hereditaments, not being copyhold, belonging to the Trust, and all terms, estates, and interests therein, and all stock in the public funds and other securities belonging to the Trust, shall remain vested in the said Corporation: Provided that, notwithstanding the incorporation of the Governing Body of the Trust, the constitution of such Governing Body may from time to time, on application made under the Charitable Trusts Act, be altered by the same authority and in the same manner as if such Governing Body were not incorporated; and the members of the said Governing Body shall be chargeable respectively for such property as shall come into their respective hands, and shall be answerable respectively for their own acts, receipts, neglects, and defaults, but not for the acts, receipts, neglects, or defaults of any others or other of them, and for the administration of the Trust, and shall be subject, jointly and severally, to legal control and authority in the same manner and to the same extent as if they were not incorporated.
Existing school.
4. The hitherto existing School of the Trust shall be carried on, and the hitherto existing trusts for the benefit of scholars attending such School shall be administered as heretofore, by the Governing Body of the Trust, hereinafter referred to as the Governors, for the benefit of such scholars as on the 1st January 1873 were scholars on the foundation of the Trust, for the period of one year from the quarter day next preceding the date of this Scheme, and shall then be closed.
Rights of scholars.
5. From and after the closing of the existing School of the Trust, every scholar, who was on the 1st January 1873 a scholar on the foundation, shall be entitled, during the period for which, except for this Scheme, he would have been entitled to remain on the foundation, to have his School fees paid for him out of the income of the Trust at any School of like character approved of by the Governors which the parent or guardian, or person liable to maintain or having the actual custody of such scholar, may select, and to receive such other advantages, or the equivalent thereof by way of maintenance or otherwise, to be provided out of the said income, as he would have been entitled to receive if this Scheme had not been made. If any difference occurs between any such scholar, or such parent, guardian, or person as aforesaid, and the Governors, the matter shall be referred to the Charity Commissioners, whose decision shall be final.
Provision in favour of certain officers.
6. In the event of suitable employment under the Trust not being offered to the Rev. Alfred Jones, hitherto Chaplain and Head Master of the School of the Trust, Thomas Kimber, hitherto Master, and Ruth Batten, hitherto Matron, under the Trust respectively, such employment being in each case equal in point of emolument to the office hitherto held by the person to whom it is offered, then from and after the closing of the existing School of the Trust, the said Rev. Alfred Jones shall be entitled to receive a pension or annual allowance of 120l. out of the income of the Trust, the said Thomas Kimber an annual allowance of 50l., and the said Ruth Batten, an annual allowance of 20l. during their respective lives. Any doubt or question which may arise as to the suitability or value of any employment so offered shall be referred by the said Governing Body to the Charity Commissioners for their opinion thereon, which opinion when given shall be final and binding on the said Governing Body and on the said Rev. Alfred Jones, Thomas Kimber, and Ruth Batten, respectively.
Jurisdiction of visitors.
7. From the date of this Scheme all rights and powers (if any) reserved or belonging to, or claimed or capable of being exercised by, any body corporate, persons or person, as visitors or visitor of the Trust, shall be transferred to Her Majesty, and all such rights and powers, and also any like rights and powers vested in Her Majesty on the 2nd day of August 1869, shall be exercised only through and by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales.
Jurisdiction of Ordinary.
8. From the date of this Scheme all jurisdiction of the Ordinary relating to or arising from the licensing of any Master under the Trust shall be abolished.
Saving of interests.
9. Notwithstanding anything herein contained, this Scheme shall not affect any of the following vested interests:—
(1.) The tenure by any person of any Exhibition or Apprenticeship fee payable out of the endowments of the Trust, which was held by him, or had been awarded to him at the date of the publication of this Scheme;
(2.) Such interest as any person may have in any pension or compensation allowance payable out of the endowments of the Trust to which such person was entitled on the 25th June 1868.
Part II.—Management of Property.
Estates.
10. All the estates and property of the Trust, not required to be occupied for the purposes thereof, shall be let or otherwise managed by the Governors or by their officers acting under their orders according to the general law applicable to the management of property by Trustees of Charitable Foundations.
Any money arising from the sale of timber, or from any mines or minerals belonging to the Trust, shall be treated as capital and invested, except in any special cases in which the Governors may be authorised by the Charity Commissioners to apply such money or any part thereof as income or otherwise.
Raising money.
11. All capital sums which, under the provisions of this Scheme, the Governors may be required to raise shall be raised by them by sale or mortgage of the real or personal property of the Trust, or by both those means, or otherwise, on such terms and subject to such conditions as may be sanctioned or prescribed by the Charity Commissioners in each case.
Clerk and agents.
12. The Governors shall make such arrangements as they may find most fitting for the custody of all muniments, title deeds, and other documents belonging to the Trust, for deposit of money, for drawing cheques, and for the appointment of a Clerk and of agents for the conduct of their business. If any such Clerk or agent is himself a Governor he shall not receive a salary.
Accounts.
13. The accounts of the Trust shall be made up and balanced to the 31st day of December in every year. The accounts shall be examined by the Governors, and signed by the Master of the Company of Haberdashers and the Clerk of the Trust within 21 days after the day to which they are made up. As soon as practicable after the accounts are so signed they shall be audited.
Audit.
14. With respect to the audit of accounts of the Trust the following provisions shall have effect:—
(1.) The Auditor in each year shall be appointed by the Lord Mayor. The Auditor shall receive such remuneration as the Lord Mayor directs, subject to the sanction of the Charity Commissioners, if at any time such sanction shall be required by the Governors; and such remuneration, together with the expenses of or incident to the audit, shall be paid by the Governors out of the income of the Trust:
(2.) The audit shall be held at the office of the Governors or some other convenient place to be fixed by them, and at a time to be fixed by the Auditor, but to be as soon as possible after the accounts are signed as herein-before provided:
(3.) The Auditor, at least 14 days before holding the audit, shall serve on the Governors and on the School Managers constituted under this Scheme notice of the time and place of holding the audit:
(4.) The Clerk of the Governors or some person authorised by them shall attend the audit and produce to the Auditor all books, bills, vouchers, and documents relating to the accounts:
(5.) Any Governor or School Manager entitled to act under the Trust may be present at the audit and object to the accounts:
(6.) The Auditor shall, as nearly as may be, have the like powers and be under the like obligation to allow and disallow items in the accounts, as in the case of an audit of the accounts of the School Board for London, and the Governors or any person aggrieved by the decision of the Auditor shall have a right of appeal to the Charity Commissioners, whose decision shall be final:
(7.) Subject to the provisions of this section the Charity Commissioners may from time to time make such regulations as may be necessary respecting the form of keeping the accounts and the audit thereof.
When the Auditor has completed the audit he shall sign the balance sheet.
Statement of accounts.
15. The Governors shall cause a statement showing their receipts and expenditure to be printed in such form and with such particulars as may be from time to time prescribed by the Charity Commissioners, and shall send the same within 30 days after the balance sheet is signed by the Auditor to the School Managers, and to the Charity Commissioners, and publish an abstract thereof in one London daily newspaper.
Application of income.
16. The Governors shall employ the income of the Trust, as follows:—
(1.) They shall pay the interest on loans raised by them under the provisions of this Scheme, and make such provision for the repayment of the loans as may be required by the conditions on which such loans may have been raised:
(2.) They shall pay what may be due to any person in respect of any interest hereby saved or of any right hereby commuted:
(3.) They shall defray the expenses of management of the property incurred under the provisions of this part of this Scheme:
(4.) They shall carry to a separate account the annual sum of 1,500l. in trust for eleemosynary purposes, as herein-after provided:
(5.) They shall pay to the Masters and Wardens of the Company of Haberdashers in the City of London the annual sum of 150l. in augmentation of the endowment founded by Throckmorton Trotman for aiding education in the parish of St. Luke, the whole of such endowment so augmented to be hereafter made subject to a Scheme to be prepared by the Endowed Schools Commissioners, or by the Charity Commissioners, with the object of providing education, not being merely elementary education, for children, at a cost to such children of 30s. a year each or thereabout:
(6.) They shall pay the residue to the School Managers constituted under this Scheme at such times and intervals, and in such manner as may be authorised or prescribed from time to time by the Charity Commissioners.
Part III.—Trusts for Almspeople.
Eleemosynary Trust.
17. Except as is herein-after otherwise provided, the above-mentioned annual sum of 1,500l. shall be administered by the Governors for the benefit of poor men that are free of the Company of Haberdashers, subject to such regulations as the Governors, with the sanction of the Charity Commissioners, shall from time to time prescribe.
Commutation of rights of Almsmen.
18. The Governors may, with the sanction of the Charity Commissioners, commute the right of any Almsman elected before the 1st October 1872 to reside in the Almshouses, and any other right of any such Almsman, upon such terms as may be agreed upon between them and any such Almsman, or as may be fixed by the Charity Commissioners as a fair compensation for the rights of such Almsman, in case the parties differ. Each Almsman elected since the 1st October 1872 shall be entitled to such annual sum or pension not exceeding 75l., as the Governors may from time to time determine, and to no other benefit under the Trust.
Disqualification of pensioners.
19. The pension or other privileges (if any) of any Almsman, who shall be or become an habitual drunkard, or be otherwise guilty of such improper conduct as in the opinion of the Governors may render him undeserving of such pension and privileges (of which they shall be the sole judges), may be suspended or reduced in amount, or altogether withdrawn by them.
Balance of trust fund.
20. If any part of the said sum of 1,500l. shall not be expended in any year, the surplus may be applied in the following year for similar purposes.
Part IV.—The School Managers.
Constitution of Governing Body for schools
21. The School Managers, herein-after referred to as the Managers, shall have the sole management of the Schools of the Trust and of the money payable to such Managers under and subject to the provisions of this Scheme. They shall, when their number is complete, consist of 15 members, who shall be appointed as follows:—
(1.) Nine, of whom two shall be women, shall be appointed by the Governors:
(2.) One shall be appointed by the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London:
(3.) One shall be appointed by the Common Council of the City of London:
(4.) Two shall be appointed by the Members of the School Board for London representing the Hackney division:
(5.) Two shall be appointed by the Members of the School Board for London representing the Greenwich division.
Each body entitled to appoint a Manager or Managers may appoint a member or members of their own body.
Terms of office.
22. Each Manager appointed by the Governors shall be appointed to hold office for seven years, and then retire. Each of the other Managers shall be appointed to hold office for five years, and then retire.
Disqualification, or death, and replacement.
23. If during his term of office any Manager shall become bankrupt or incapacitated to act, or shall intimate to the Managers in writing his wish to retire, or shall fail for the space of one year to attend any meeting, the Managers shall, after due notice to such Manager, cause a record of the fact to be entered in their books, and notify the same to the body by whom he was appointed; and upon such record being entered the Manager to whom it applies shall forthwith cease to be a Manager, and thereupon or upon the death of a Manager the proper body shall proceed to appoint a successor to the vacant place. A Manager vacating office by retirement, or non-attendance only, shall not be thereby disqualified for re-appointment.
Women Masters.
24. Women may be managers.
25. No Master or Mistress of any School of the Trust may be a Manager.
Religious opinions.
26. Religious opinions, or attendance or non-attendance at any particular form of religious worship, shall not in any way affect the qualification of any person for being a Manager under this Scheme.
Acceptance of office.
27. Every Manager shall, at or before the first meeting he or she attends in that character, sign a memorandum declaring his or her acceptance of the office of Manager and willingness to do his or her duty as such, in accordance with the provisions of this Scheme; and until he or she has signed such a declaration he or she shall not be entitled to act as a Manager.
Meetings of managers.
28. The Managers shall hold meetings in some convenient place to be fixed by themselves, as often as may be found necessary for the management of the Trust, and at least four times in each year, on some convenient days to be appointed by themselves.
Chairman.
29. The Managers shall, at their first meeting in each year, elect one of their number to be Chairman of their meetings for that year, and make regulations for supplying his place whenever he is absent.
Quorum.
30. A quorum shall be constituted whenever five Managers are present, and any such quorum may act notwithstanding any vacancy or vacancies in the full number of Managers. Whenever any decision is made in favour of which less than a majority of the Managers for the time being entitled to act have voted, the Clerk shall forthwith send a copy of the minutes of the business on which such decision was made to each Manager, and it shall be competent to any three Managers, within seven days from the day of the decision, to demand that the decision shall be once reconsidered at a special meeting, to be held at an interval of not less than 14 and not more than 21 days after the meeting at which such decision was made.
Special meetings.
31. The Chairman or any three Managers may at any time summon a special meeting for any cause that seems to him or them sufficient.
Notice.
32. All special meetings shall be convened by notice in writing to the Managers, specifying the object of the meeting. And it shall be the duty of the Clerk to the Managers to give such notice when required by the Chairman or any Managers having a right to summon such a meeting.
Voting.
33. Save as is herein otherwise expressly provided, all matters and questions shall be determined by the votes of the majority of the Managers present at any meeting; and in case of equality of votes, the Chairman of the meeting shall have a second or casting vote.
Adjournment of meetings.
34. If at any meeting there is not a sufficient number of Managers present to constitute a quorum, or if the business at any meeting is not fully completed, the Managers present may adjourn the meeting to a subsequent day, of which notice shall be given to all the Managers.
Books.
35. A minute book and proper books of account shall be provided by the managers, and kept in some convenient and secure place of deposit to be provided or appointed by them for the purpose.
Minutes.
36. Minutes of all proceedings of the Managers shall be entered in the minute book and duly signed. In the same book shall be recorded the entry into office of every new Manager and the names of all the Managers present at each meeting.
Accounts.
37. Full accounts shall be kept of the receipts and expenditure of the Managers; and such accounts shall be stated for each year, and examined and passed annually at the first meeting in the ensuing year and signed by the Managers then present.
Publication of accounts.
38. The Managers shall cause sufficient abstracts of the accounts to be published annually in one London daily newspaper, circulating in the neighbourhood of the several Schools of the Trust. Such abstracts shall be in the form appended to this Scheme, subject to such alterations or abridgments thereof as may be prescribed or authorised by the Charity Commissioners.
Custody of documents and appointment of agents.
39. The Managers shall make such arrangements as they may find most fitting for the custody of all documents belonging to their Trust, for deposit of money, for drawing cheques, and for the appointment of a Clerk and of agents for the conduct of their business. No such Clerk or agent shall be a Manager.
Precept for raising money.
40. In order to raise any capital sum which the Managers may from time to time be authorised to expend under the provisions of this Scheme, the Managers may serve their precept on the Governors requiring them to raise the same in manner herein-before provided, and the Governors shall forthwith proceed to raise and pay the same to the Managers accordingly. If any doubt arises as to the validity or propriety of any precept, the Governors or the Managers may refer the question to the Charity Commissioners, whose decision shall be final.
Part V.—The Schools.
Hoxton Schools and Hatcham Schools.
41. There shall be two establishments of Schools of the Trust, to be called the Schools of the Company of Haberdashers. One establishment shall be at Hoxton, and shall be called the Haberdashers' Hoxton Schools, and the other establishment shall be at Hatcham, and shall be called Aske's Hatcham Schools.
Adaptation of Hoxton buildings.
42. The site and buildings of the existing Hospital at Hoxton, or such part thereof as may be required for the purpose, subject nevertheless to the rights of any present Almsman occupying any part thereof, whose right of occupation shall not have been commuted by the Governors, or some other site in Hoxton which may be approved by the Endowed Schools Commissioners, if acting, or, if not, by the Charity Commissioners, shall be appropriated to the Haberdashers' Hoxton Schools, and shall at the expiration of twelve months from the date of this Scheme (unless the time be enlarged by the Endowed Schools Commissioners or Charity Commissioners), and thenceforth, subject as aforesaid, be occupied by the Managers for the purposes of such Schools, free from any interruption by or on behalf of the Governors. In enlarging and improving the said buildings, or in the erection of new buildings, and in adapting and fitting up the same for the purposes of Schools, the Managers may expend a capital sum of 5,000l.; but they shall not exceed that amount of expenditure unless with the sanction of the Endowed Schools Commissioners or Charity Commissioners.
Provision of site at Hatcham.
43. The Governors shall, within twelve months from the date of this Scheme, unless the time be enlarged by the Endowed Schools Commissioners, if then acting, or, if not, by the Charity Cammissioners, provide a site for Aske's Hatcham Schools. For this purpose they may obtain land by purchase or exchange on such terms as may be sanctioned by the Endowed Schools Commissioners or Charity Commissioners. The said site when provided shall be appropriated to Aske's Hatcham Schools, and shall be occupied by the Managers for the purposes thereof free from any interruption by or on behalf of the Governors. The Managers shall erect on such site buildings suitable for the said Schools, the plans whereof shall be subject to the approval of the Endowed Schools Commissioners, if then acting, and, if not, of the Charity Commissioners, and in erecting such buildings the Managers may expend a capital sum of 12,000l., but shall not exceed that amount of expenditure unless with the sanction of the Endowed Schools Commissioners or Charity Commissioners.
Day Schools.
44. All the Schools shall be Day Schools.
HolyOrders.
45. No person shall be disqualified from being a Master in any of the Schools by reason only of his not being, or not intending to be, in Holy Orders.
Religious instruction.
46. The parent or guardian of, or person liable to maintain, or having the actual custody of any scholar attending any school of the Trust as a day scholar may claim, by notice in writing addressed to the Head Master or Head Mistress of such School, the exemption of such scholar from attending prayer or religious worship, or from any lesson or series of lessons on a religious subject, and such scholar shall be exempted accordingly; and a scholar shall not, by reason of any exemption from attending prayer or religious worship, or from any lesson or series of lessons on a religious subject, be deprived of any advantage or emolument on the School or out of the Endowments of the Trust to which he or she would otherwise have been entitled. If any teacher in the course of other lessons at which any such scholar is, in accordance with the ordinary rules of the School, present, teaches systematically and persistently any particular religious doctrine, from the teaching of which any exemption has been claimed as provided by this clause, the Managers shall, on complaint made in writing to them by the parent, guardian, or person liable to maintain or having the actual custody of such scholar, hear the complainant, and inquire into the circumstances, and if the complaint is judged to be reasonable make all proper provisions for remedying the matter complained of.
47. Subject to the provisions herein contained the Managers and the Head Master and Head Mistress of each School of the Trust shall, within their respective departments as herein defined, make proper provisions for the religious instruction to be given in such School.
Appoint of head masters and head mistresses.
48. Save as is herein-after otherwise prescribed, every Head Master and every Head Mistress shall be appointed by the Managers. Every such appointment shall be made at a meeting to be called for the purpose. In order to obtain the best candidates the Managers shall, for a sufficient time before making any appointment, give public notice of the vacancy, and invite competition by advertisements in newspapers, and by such other methods as they may judge best calculated to secure the object.
Dismissal without assigning cause.
49. The Managers may dismiss any Head Master or Head Mistress without assigning cause, after six calendar months' written notice, given in pursuance of a resolution passed at two consecutive meetings held at an interval of not less than 14 days, and duly convered for the express purpose of considering the matter, such resolution being affirmed at each meeting by not less than two-thirds of the Managers present.
Dismissal for urgent cause.
50. For urgent cause the Managers may by a resolution passed at a meeting duly convened for the express purpose of considering the matter, and affirmed by not less than two-thirds of the whole number of Managers for the time being entitled to act, suspend any Head Master or Head Mistress from office; and in that case they shall appoint another special meeting to be held at an interval of not less than a week after the former one, and may then by a similar resolution affirmed by as large a proportion of Managers, wholly and finally dismiss him or her. Full notice and opportunity of defence at both meetings shall be given to the Head Master or Head Mistress concerned.
Declaration by Head Masters or Head Mistresses.
51. Every Head Master or Head Mistress, previously to entering into office, shall be required to sign a declaration, to be entered in the Minute Book of the Managers, in the following form:—
"I,, declare that I will always, to the best of my ability, discharge the duties of Head of School during my tenure of office; and that if I am removed by the Managers, according to the constitution of the said School, I will acquiesce in such removal, and will thereupon relinquish all claim to the office and its future emoluments, and deliver up to the Managers, or as they direct, possession of all their property then in my possession or occupation."
Occupation of Trust property by Head Masters and Head Mistresses.
52. Every Head Master and Head Mistress to whom a residence shall be assigned by the Managers shall dwell in such residence. Every Head Master and Head Mistress shall have the occupation and use of his or her residence (if any), and of any other property of the Trust of which he or she may become occupant, in respect of his or her official character and duties, and not as tenant; and shall, if removed from office, thereupon deliver up possession of such residence and other property to the Managers, or as they may direct. No Head Master or Head Mistress shall, except with permission of the Managers, allow any person to occupy his or her official residence or any part thereof.
Personal attention of Head Masters and Head Mistresses.
53. Every Head Master and Head Mistress shall give personal attention to the duties of the School in his or her charge, and shall confine himself and herself to the prescribed course of instruction. During tenure of office no Head Master or Head Mistress shall accept or hold any office or appointment which, in the opinion of the Managers, may interfere with the proper performance of his or her duties under the Trust; and no Head Master shall hold any benefice having the cure of souls.
Jurisdiction of Managers over scholastic arrangements.
54. Within the limits fixed by this Scheme the Managers shall in each School prescribe the general subjects of instruction, the relative prominence and value to be assigned to each group of subjects, the division of the year into term and vacation, the payments of the scholars, and the number of School hours in each week and of holidays to be given in each term. They shall take general supervision of the sanitary condition of all the School buildings and arrangements. They shall from time to time determine what number of Assistant Teachers shall be employed in each School. They shall every year assign to each School the amount to be paid out of the income of the Trust for the salaries of Assistant Teachers, and shall provide a proper plant or apparatus for carrying on the instruction given in each School.
55. Before acting under the last preceding clause the Managers shall in all cases consult the Head Master or Head Mistress of any School concerned, in such a manner as to give him or her a full opportunity for the expression of his or her views.
Jurisdiction of Head Masters and Head Mistresses.
56. Subject to the rules prescribed by or under the authority of this scheme, the Head Master or Head Mistress of each School shall have under his or her control the choice of books, the methods of teaching, the arrangement of classes and school hours, and generally the whole internal organisation, management, and discipline of his or her School. Provided that if any Head Master or Head Mistress expels a scholar from his or her School, he or she shall forthwith make a full report of the case in writing to the managers.
57. The Head Master or Head Mistress of each School may from time to time submit proposals to the Managers for making or altering regulations as to any matter within their province, and the managers shall consider such proposals and decide upon them.
No gratuities to Masters or Mistresses.
58. No Master or Mistress of any rank in the Schools shall receive or demand from any scholar being educated at any School of the Trust, or from any person on behalf of any such scholar, any gratuity, fee, or payment, other than such payments as are prescribed or authorised by this Scheme.
Schools open.
59. Subject to such regulations as may be in force from time to time under the authority of this Scheme, the Schools for boys and girls shall be open to all boys and girls respectively who are of good character and of sufficient bodily health, and who are residing with their parents, guardians, next friends, or near relations within such degrees as may be fixed by the Managers by regulations to be made by them from time to time. No boy or girl not so residing shall be admitted to any School unless he or she has previously obtained the express permission of the Managers.
Mode of admission.
60. Applications for admission to any School shall be made to some person appointed by the Managers according to a printed form to be by them approved and delivered to all applicants.
Register of applications.
61. A register shall be kept of all applications, showing the date at which every application is made for the admission of a scholar, the date of admission, withdrawal, or rejection, the cause of rejection, and the age of the candidate for admission at the date of the application: Provided that every person requiring an application to be registered shall pay such fee as the Managers may fix in accordance with the provisions of this Scheme.
Entrance examinations.
62. Every candidate for admission to any School shall be examined by or under the direction of the Head Master or Head Mistress of such School, who shall appoint convenient times for that purpose, and give reasonable notice to the parents or guardians of those whose turn is approaching. No candidate shall be admitted to any School except on the terms of passing such examination. Those who are found fit shall, if there is room for them, be admitted in order according to the dates of their application. If there is not room for all, priority shall be given to children and grandchildren of Freemen of the Company of Haberdashers. Subject to such priority it shall be competent to the Managers to direct that if there is not room for all the candidates their priority shall be determined by competitive examination.
Payments for tuition.
63. Save as is herein otherwise expressly provided, each scholar shall pay such entrance and tuition fees as may be required of him or her under this Scheme. And all such payments shall be made in advance to such person as the Managers shall from time to time appoint for the purpose, and shall be accounted for by the person receiving them to the Managers, and treated by them as income applicable to the purposes of the School in respect of which they are received. No preference shall be given in respect of such fees to any scholar on account of his or her parentage or place of birth or residence. No extras of any kind shall be allowed without the sanction of the Managers, and all extras so allowed shall be optional on the part of the scholar concerned.
Annual examination.
64. There shall be once in every year an examination of the scholars in each School by an Examiner or Examiners appointed for that purpose by the Managers, and paid by them, but otherwise unconnected with such School. The Examiners shall make a report in writing to the Managers on the proficiency of the scholars in each School, and on the position of the several Schools as regards instruction and discipline, as shown by the results of the examinations. The Managers shall communicate to the Head Master or Head Mistress of each School the report relating to such School.
Reports of Head Masters and Head Mistresses.
65. The Head Master or Head Mistress of each School shall make an annual report in writing to the Managers on the general condition of such School, and on any special occurrences during the year. He or she may also mention the names of any scholars who in his or her judgment are worthy of praise or substantial reward, having regard both to proficiency and conduct.
Student Teachers.
66. In the case of any scholar attending any School, who evinces special promise and aptitude for teaching, the Managers shall be at liberty to make arrangements whereby he or she shall receive instruction in the art of teaching, and shall give such assistance in the ordinary work of instruction in the School as may be deemed desirable, and for these purposes they may prolong the time during which such scholar may remain at School. They may also award any reasonable sum, to be assigned partly to any scholar so retained as a Teacher, by way of remuneration for services rendered to the School, and partly to the Head Master or Head Mistress of such School by way of remuneration for instruction in the art of teaching given by him or her.
Haberdashers' Hoxton Schools.
Full number of scholars.
67. The Haberdashers' Hoxton Schools, herein-after referred to as the Hoxton Schools, are intended to consist of a Day School for about 300 boys, and a Day School for about 300 girls, each to be capable of enlargement at any future time.
Income of Head Masters and Head Mistresses.
68. The Head Master of the Hoxton School for boys shall receive a fixed stipend of 100l. a year. The Head Mistress of the Hoxton School for girls shall receive a fixed stipend of 75l. a year. Such Head Master and Head Mistress shall also receive payment according to the number of scholars in his or her School, that is to say, such sum calculated upon such a scale uniform or graduated, as may be fixed by the Managers, being at the rate of not less than 10s. nor more than 30s. yearly for each scholar. Payments under this clause shall be made terminally or quarterly, as the Managers shall think fit.
Assistant Teachers.
69. The Managers shall appoint and dismiss at their discretion all Assistant Teachers in the Hoxton Schools, and shall fix and pay their respective salaries.
Registration fee.
70. The fee, if any, payable on the registration of applications for admission to the Hoxton Schools shall be fixed from time to time by the Managers, but shall not exceed the sum of 2s. 6d.
Entrance and tuition fees.
71. The entrance and tuition fees payable for each scholar in the Hoxton Schools shall be settled by regulations to be made by the Managers from time to time, provided that no such entrance fee shall exceed 5s., and that no such tuition fee shall be less than 2l. or more than 4l. a year.
Ages.
72. The Managers shall make regulations from time to time for fixing the age of admission to the Hoxton Schools. No boy shall be allowed to remain in the Schools beyond the end of the School term in which he attains the age of 15 years, and no girl beyond the end of the School term in which she attains the age of 16 years.
Entrance examination.
73. The examination for admission to the Hoxton Schools shall be graduated according to the age of the candidate, but it shall never fall below the following standard, that is to say:—
Reading easy narrative and writing text hand;
Easy sums in the first two rules of arithmetic, with the multiplication table.
The Managers may raise the minimum standard from time to time if they deem it advantageous for either School to do so.
Subects of secular instruction.
74. The subjects of secular instruction in the Hoxton Schools shall be as follows:—
In both the Boys' School and Girls' School:—
Reading and Spelling;
Writing;
Arithmetic and Elementary Mathematics;
English grammar, composition, and literature;
The outlines of History;
Geography, political and physical;
Natural Science;
Latin or French, or both;
Drawing;
Music.
And in the Girls' School:—
Household Management and Needlework.
The Head Master or Head Mistress in each School shall settle the arrangements and classification of instruction in the prescribed subjects.
Exhibitions at the Schools.
75. The Managers shall assign an annual sum of 400l. for Exhibitions, not exceeding 12l. a year each in value, and tenable at the Hoxton Schools, and in conferring such Exhibitions the Managers shall distribute them in a fair proportion among boys and girls, having regard to the number of the scholars in each School. By way of additional Exhibitions tenable at the Schools the Managers shall grant exemption, total or partial, from the payment of tuition fees. Provided that the number of scholars holding Exhibitions at either School shall never exceed one-fifth of the whole number of scholars in such School.
One half of each class of Exhibitions established under this clause shall be conferred preferentially upon children who have been educated at some Public Elementary School or Schools for a space of at least three years, and have passed the Government Inspector's Examination in the standard suitable to their age and standing. And in conferring such Exhibitions the Managers shall make such arrangements as seem to them best adapted to secure the combined objects of attracting good scholars to the Hoxton Schools, and of advancing elementary education. If in the opinion of the Managers fit candidates do not present themselves for all the Exhibitions at any time offered to such children, such of the said Exhibitions as are not awarded to such children, and in all cases the remaining one-half of the said Exhibitions shall be open to all candidates to whom the Schools are open.
Leaving Exhibitions.
76. The Managers shall assign an annual sum of 600l. for Exhibitions of such value as they may think fit, tenable by scholars of the Hoxton Schools at any places of higher education or to enable them to gain a start in some profession or skilled trade. The said annual sum of 600l. shall be divided between the Boys' School and the Girls' School in proportion as nearly as may be to the numbers of scholars attending such schools respectively.
Aske's Hatcham Schools
Income of Head Master and Head Mistress.
77. Aske's Hatcham Schools, herein-after referred to as the Hatcham Schools, are intended to consist of a Day School for about 300 boys, and a Day School for about 200 girls.
78. The Head Master of the Hatcham School for boys shall receive a fixed stipend of 150l. a year. The Head Mistress of the Hatcham School for girls shall receive a fixed stipend of 100l. a year. Such Head Master and Head Mistress shall also receive payment according to the number of scholars in his or her School, that is to say, such sum, calculated upon such a scale, uniform or graduated as may be fixed by the Managers, being at the rate of not less than 2l. nor more than 4l. yearly for each scholar. Payments under this clause shall be made terminally or quarterly as the Managers shall think fit.
Assistant Teachers.
79. The Head Master or Head Mistress of each Hatcham School shall appoint and dismiss all Assistant Teachers in such School, subject only to an appeal to the Managers, and shall determine in what proportions the sum assigned by the Managers to such School for Assistant Teachers, and plant or apparatus shall be distributed, and the Managers shall arrange for the payment of the sum assigned accordingly. The Head Master and Head Mistress shall report in writing to the Managers every appointment of an Assistant Teacher made by him or her, and on the dismissal of any Assistant Teacher shall make a full report in writing of the case to the Managers. The Head Master and Head Mistress shall also make a report in writing to the Managers in each year of the manner in which the sum assigned for Assistant Teachers, and plant or apparatus has been distributed in the School under his or her control.
Registration fee.
80. The fee, if any, payable on the registration of applications for admissions to the Hatcham Schools shall be fixed from time to time by the Managers, but shall not exceed the sum of 5s.
Entrance and tuition fees.
81. The entrance and tuition fees payable for each scholar shall be settled by regulations to be made by the Managers from time to time, provided that no such extrance fee shall exceed 1l., and that no such tuition fee shall be less than 4l. or more than 8l. a year.
Ages.
82. No scholar shall be admitted into the Hatcham Schools-until he or she has attained the age of 8 years; and no scholar shall be allowed to remain in the Schools beyond the end of the School term in which he or she attains the age of 17 years, or beyond the age of 16 years, unless with the express permission of the Head Master or Head Mistress. And the Managers, upon the recommendation of the Head Master or Head Mistress, shall make regulations for the withdrawal of scholars in cases where from idleness or incapacity to profit by the instruction given they are materially below the standard of position and attainment proper for their age.
Test of progress at 13 years of age.
83. No scholar shall be allowed to remain in the Hatcham Schools beyond the end of the term in which he or she attains the age of 13 years, unless he or she has within the previous year passed a satisfactory examination in reading, writing, arithmetic, English grammar, and dictation, and the elements of geography; and the Managers shall make regulations for testing the attainments of the scholars for this purpose by some Examiner to be appointed by them.
Entrance examination.
84. The examination for admission shall be graduated according to the age of the candidate, but it shall never fall below the following standard, that is to say,—
Reading, Writing from Dictation, the first four rules of Arithmetic, and the outlines of English Grammar, and of the Geography of England.
The Managers may raise the minimum standard from time to time if they deem it advantageous for either School to do so.
Subjects of instruction.
85. The subjects of secular instruction shall be as follows:—
The English language and literature;
French and German;
Latin;
Arithmetic and mathematics;
History and Geography;
Natural Science;
Drawing;
Music;
And in the Girls' School:—
Household Management and Needlework.
The Head Master or Head Mistress in each School shall settle the arrangements and classification of instruction in the prescribed subjects. Greek shall not be part of the prescribed course of instruction, but may be taught in the Boys' School as an extra at an additional fee of not less than 4l. yearly for each boy taught.
Exhibitions.
86. By way of Exhibitions tenable at the Hatcham Schools, the Managers shall grant exemptions from the payment of tuition fees, provided that the number of such exemptions shall not exceed 10 per cent. of the number of Scholars attending the School.
Haberdashers' Exhibitions.
87. The Managers may also assign an annual sum of 1,200l. for exhibitions not exceeding 40l. a year each in value, and tenable at the Hatcham School, or at any other Schools approved by the Managers and the Governors. These Exhibitions are mainly intended for the maintenance and education of children and grandchildren of Freemen of the Company of Haberdashers, and shall be offered in the first instance for competition among boys and girls, in equal shares, who are children or grandchildren of such Freemen. No such Exhibition shall be awarded to any candidate whose attainments fall below the standard of the examination for admission to the Hatcham Schools suited to his or her age. In default of a sufficient number of fit candidates of either sex from among children of such Freemen as aforesaid, on the occasion of any such Exhibitions being offered, such of the Exhibitions as are not awarded to such children shall be thrown open to general competition among all the scholars of the Schools. No such Exhibition shall be tenable by any scholar concurrently with an exemption granted under the last foregoing clause. The Managers may from time to time make such regulations as they think fit for the boarding of any holders of these Exhibitions who may not be resident with their parents, guardians, next friends, or near relations within a convenient distance of the Hatcham Schools.
Leaving Exhibitions
88. The Managers shall assign an annual sum of 600l. for Exhibitions, tenable by scholars of the Hatcham Schools at any places of higher education or of professional training or study. The said annual sum of 600l. shall be divided between the Boys' School and the Girls' School, in proportion as nearly as may be to the number of scholars attending such schools respectively.
Award and Tenure of Exhibitions.
Conditions of award and tenure.
89. All Exhibitions provided under this Scheme shall be given as the reward of merit only, to be ascertained, subject to the provisions of this Scheme, in such manner as the Managers shall by regulations to be made by them from time to time prescribe. They shall be tenable only for the purposes of education, general or professional. They shall be payable by instalments at such intervals as the Managers shall direct. If the holder dies, his representatives shall be entitled only to the next ensuing payment of an instalment whenever payable.
90. No Exhibition shall be granted to any scholar already attending any School of the Trust if the Head Master or Head Mistress reports that such scholar is rendered undeserving of it by misconduct. Every Exhibition tenable at School shall be liable to forfeiture on the order of the Managers in case the Head Master or Head Mistress reports that the holder is guilty of misconduct, irregular in attendance, or fails to maintain a reasonable standard of proficiency. If the holder of an Exhibition after leaving School is guilty of gross misconduct or idleness, or wilfully ceases to pursue his or her education, it shall be competent to the Managers to determine the Exhibition as from the last preceding payment of an instalment.
Particulars of Exhibitions to be settled by Governors.
91. Subject to the provisions of this Scheme the Managers shall from time to time make regulations for determining the number, value, period, and conditions of tenure of all Exhibitions established under this Scheme, and all other matters relating to such Exhibitions, but they shall give reasonable notice of all such regulations to the Head Master or Head Mistress of each School of the Trust.
Science Classes.
Conditions of payments to science classes.
92. In the event of the establishment of any classes for instruction in science in the neighbourhood of Hoxton or Hatcham by any Local Committee or otherwise, the Managers may, instead of providing instruction in Science in the Schools of the Trust at Hoxton or Hatcham, as the case may be, make arrangements for the admission to such classes of any scholars attending such Schools, subject to the following conditions:—
(a.) The classes shall be in connexion with the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education, and shall be managed in accordance with regulations approved by that Department:
(b.) The course of instruction shall be that laid down in the Minute of the Lords of the Committee of Council on Education, dated the 24th November 1871, with such modifications as may from time to time be introduced therein by the proper authority:
(c.) The classes shall be regularly examined and inspected, and the teacher or teachers shall be duly qualified in accordance with the regulations of the said Science and Art Department.
Subject to the foregoing conditions, the Managers may pay for each scholar admitted to the classes such fees (not exceeding the ordinary fees charged for other students) as may from time to time be agreed upon between them and the managers of such classes.
Further regulations of Science and Art Department may be adopted.
93. If by reason of any provision in this Scheme a difficulty is found in conforming to any regulations which the said Science and Art Department may approve, or if for any reason that Department think fit to modify any condition in the last foregoing clause contained, the Managers may, notwithstanding this Scheme, comply with and accept any such regulations or modifications not being inconsistent with the first clause of this Scheme, or with anything contained in the Endowed Schools Act, 1869.
Part VI.—Application of Income.
Repairs and improvements.
94. The Managers shall charge the income payable to them under the provisions of this Scheme with the payment of an annual sum of 300l. to be placed to a separate account, entitled Repairs and Improvements, and to be applied to ordinary repairs or improvements, if wanted, of the property used for the educational purposes of the Trust, and if not wanted for that purpose to be accumulated and paid to the credit of such separate account for repairs and improvements. The Managers, at their discretion, may draw upon the accumulations, if any, for the purposes of repairs or improvements, ordinary or extraordinary.
Other expenses.
95. After defraying the expenses of management and after defraying the cost of any ordinary repairs or improvements which the income of the Repairs and Improvements Fund may be insufficient to answer, the Managers shall employ the income payable to them for the purposes of the Schools of the Trust in accordance with the provisions of this Scheme.
Pensions.
96. The Managers may, if they think fit and the income payable to them is sufficient for the purpose, agree with the Head Master or Head Mistress of any School of the Trust for the formation of a fund in the nature of a pension or superannuation fund, the main principles of such agreement being that such Head Master or Head Mistress and the Trust shall each contribute annually such sums and for such term, not less than 15 years, as may be mutually agreed upon; that these contributions shall accumulate at compound interest; that in case any such Head Master or Head Mistress serves for such term he or she shall on retirement be entitled to the whole fund; that in case he or she retires earlier on account of permanent disability from illness he or she shall also be entitled to the whole fund; that in all other cases he or she on ceasing to be Head Master or Head Mistress, or his or her representatives in case of his or her death, shall be entitled to the amount produced by his or her own contributions.
Residue.; Unapplied surplus.
97. If there is any residue of income the Managers may, subject to the provisions of this Scheme, employ it in increasing the stipend of the Head Master or Head Mistress of any School of the Trust, or in improving the accommodation of the School buildings, or in aiding the games of the scholars, or generally in promoting the spirit and efficiency of the Schools. Whatever they do not think fit to spend in these ways they shall on passing the yearly accounts state as Unapplied Surplus, and deposit in a bank; and if the sum so deposited rise to 300l. they shall invest the same in the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds to the general credit of the Trust.
Part VII.—General.
Further endowments.
98. The Governors may receive any additional donations or endowments for the general purposes of the Trust. They may also receive donations or endowments for any special objects directed by the donors, provided that such objects are certified by the Charity Commissioners to be for the general benefit of the Trust, or of any School of the Trust, and not calculated to give privileges to any scholar without regard to merit, and not otherwise inconsistent with or calculated to impede the due working of the provisions of this Scheme. The Managers may receive donations or endowments for educational purposes only on like terms.
Charity Commissioners to decide doubtful questions.
99. If at any time any doubt or question arises between the Governors and the Managers as to the proper construction or application of any of the provisions of this Scheme, either party may, after notice to the other, apply to the Charity Commissioners for their opinion and advice thereon. If at any time any such doubt or question arises among the Governors or Managers, such Governors or Managers shall apply to the Charity Commissioners for their opinion and advice thereon. The opinion and advice when given shall be binding.
Charity Commissioners to make new Schemes.
100. The Charity Commissioners may from time to time in the exercise of their ordinary jurisdiction frame Schemes for the alteration of any provisions of this Scheme, or otherwise for the government or regulation of the Trust, provided that such Schemes be not inconsistent with the general object of the Trust as defined in this Scheme, or with anything contained in the Endowed Schools Act, 1869. Provided also that the Charity Commissioners shall have the same power of acting upon application made to them by the Managers with respect to the endowments and income of the Trust hereby made payable to them as they would have if such application had been made by the Governors, and the Governors shall conform to any order made or directions given by the Charity Commissioners upon any such application.
Application for new Scheme.
101. In the year 1888, or at any earlier time when the gross income of the Trust, apart from payments of scholars, during a single year shall have exceeded the sum of 10,000l., the Governors and the Managers shall apply to the Charity Commissioners or to the proper authority for a new Scheme for the management of the Trust.
Scheme to be printed and sold.
102. The Governors shall cause this Scheme to be printed and a copy to be given to every person who shall become a Governor or Manager under the provisions of this scheme, and to every Master and Mistress appointed to any School of the Trust, and copies shall be sold at a reasonable price to all persons who may wish to buy.
Date of Scheme.
103. The date of this Scheme shall be the day on which Her Majesty by Order in Council declares Her approbation of it.
Aske's Hospital.
The Schools.
Abstract of Accounts for the year ending
N.B.—Receipts or expenses not falling under any of the specific heads should be inserted separately in an appropriate place under one of the more general heads.
Annul Income Receidvable.
£s.d.
Payments from Haberdashers' Company
Dividends on Government Stock
Interest or dividends on other investments (to be set out separately)
Total£
Receipts for year ending
1. From Endowment.
£s.d.
Payments from Haberdashers' Company
Dividends on Government Stock
Interest or dividends on other investments (to be set out separately)
Interest on cash at bankers
2. From Fees of Pupils.
Hoxton.Hatcham.
£s.d.£s.d.
Boys' Schools.
Entrance fees
Tuition fees:
1st quarter or term
2nd quarter "
3rd quarter "
4th quarter "
Girl's Schools.
Entrance fees
Tuition fees:
1st quarter or term
2nd quarter "
3rd quarter "
4th quarter "
3. Incidentals.
Property tax returned
4. Balance at date of commencement of account
£
Expenses.
£s.d.£s.d.
1. Management of the Trust.
Salary of Clerk
Postage, stationery, stamps, &c.
Advertisements
Law expenses (ordinary)
2. Expenses on property occupied by Schools.—
Hoxton.Hatcham.
Boys' Schools.£s.d.£s.d.
Repairs, &c., in excess of income of Repairs Fund
Rates and taxes
Insurance
Girls' Schools.
Repairs, &c., in excess of income of Repairs Funds
Rates and taxes
Insurance
3. Temporary annual Expenses.
Interest on money borrowed (£ )
Pensions or annual payments under § 96
Property tax
4. Extraordinary Expenses of the Year.
Specify in details.
5. Investments made during the Year.
Carried foward£
£s.d.£s.d.
Brought forward
6. Net Expenditure on the Schools.
BOYS' SCHOOLS.HOXTON.HATCHAM.
£s.d.£s.d.
Salary of head master
Payment for assistant masters, school apparatus, &c.
Examiners' fees and expenses
Printing examination papers, &c.
Exhibitions
Scholarships under § 75 and § 86
" " § 87
" " § 76 and § 88
Book prizes
Books (for library, &c.)
Paper, pens, ink, &c.
Gas, water, coal, &c.
Cleaning, porterage, &c.
Special payments:
Lecturer on any special subject
Prize-day expenses, &c., &c.,
Girls' Schools.
Salary of head mistress
Payment for assistant mistresses, school apparatus, &c.
Examiners' fees and expenses
Printing examination papers, &c.
Exhibitions
Scholarships under § 75 and § 86
" " § 87
" " § 76 and § 88
Book prizes
Books (for library, &c.)
Paper, pens, ink, &c.
Gas, water, coal, &c.
Cleaning, porterage, &c.
Special payments:
Lecturer on any special subject
Prize-day expenses, &c., &c.
Unapplied surplus (less current balance)
Balance in hand at close of the accounts
Total£
Repairs and Improvements Account for the year ending—
Dr.
£s.d.
Balance at commencement of account
Dividends on £ Government Stock
£
Cr.
£s.d.
Ordinary repairs
Extraordinary repairs or improvements
Balance to next account
£
6 Nov. 1874.
By order of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to purchase from Jones' Monmouth Charity, in consideration of the transfer in the books of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 3,431l. 12s. 8d., consols to such Charity by Aske's Hospital, four acres of land at Hatcham, New Cross.
11 May 1875.
By a certificate of this date, made under the provisions of clause 98 of the scheme, the said Board approved a declaration of trust of scholarship intended to be founded by John Curtis.
15 June 1875.
By order of the said Board of this date the trustees were authorised to apply the proceeds of the sale of 1,432l. 10s. 1d., consols held by the Official Trustees, towards payment of the cost of the erection of new school buildings at Hatcham and Hoxton.
30 July 1875.
By two orders of the said Board of this date the governors were authorised (1) to expend 813l. and incidental costs in improvements on Buttesland Farm, Ashford (Kent), and to provide the same (subject to its replacement in 10 years out of income) by the realisation of a sufficient portion of the sum of 5,954l. 8s. 11d., reduced 3l. per cent. annuities, belonging to the foundation, and (2) to apply the balance of the proceeds of such stock in further expenditure on above school buildings.
16 April 1876.
By order of the said Board of this date the governors were authorised to expend the sum of 267l. 10s. on new buildings on Singleton Farm, Great Chart, and to provide the amount out of surplus income. (The lessee to pay 10l. per annum increased rent.)
20 June 1877.
By order of the said Board of this date the governors were authorised to effect a compromise and adjustment of the question between themselves and the trustees of Dr. D. William's Charity with respect to the ownership of property in Hoxton.
14 Feb. 1882.
By order of the said Board of this date the governors were authorised to grant a building lease of property on the north side of Fanshawe Street, Hoxton, to Mr. Henry Doubleday for 81 years, at an annual rent of 50l.
1 Aug 1882.
By order of the said Board of this date the governors were authorised to effect certain alterations of existing buildings belonging to the Haberdashers' Hoxton schools at a cost of 1,495l., and approved expenses, and to raise the necessary amount by a loan from the Haberdashers' Company at 4 per cent. interest, to be repaid in eight years.
6 William Bond's Charity.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners, dated the 30th June 1874, made upon the application of the Haberdashers' Company, the following scheme was established for the regulation of the Charity:—
Scheme for the Management and Regulation of the above-mentioned Charity.
Trustees
1. The master and four wardens of the Haberdashers' Company shall continue to be the trustees of the Charity, and shall administer the same and its endowments subject to and in conformity with the provisions of this scheme.
Insurance, repairs, &c
2. The trustees shall from time to time cause the trust premises to be insured against loss or damage by fire in some insurance office of established character, and shall make such provision as may be requisite for the payment of the charges for such insurance, and for the repair of the trust premises, and for all other necessary and proper expenses of management.
Application of net income.
3. The clear amount of the annual rents, profits, and income of the Charity, after providing for the purposes aforesaid, shall be applied by the trustees to the relief of poor freemen or poor liverymen of the said Company or their widows, either in occasional gifts or pensions not exceeding 50l. in any one year to any one person, such gifts and pensions to be paid to the recipients in such proportions and subject to such rules and regulations as the trustees may from time to time think proper; or partly in such gifts or pensions, or partly in grants (subject in like manner to the rules and regulations of the trustees), for one or both of the following objects, viz.:—(1) Subscriptions to sick or convalescent hospitals or sea bathing infirmaries for the use and relief of poor freemen or liverymen of the said Company; and (2) the repayment of school fees of children of freemen or liverymen of the said Company at any public elementary school or other suitable and efficient school upon sufficient certificates being furnished to the trustees that such children have satisfactorily passed the examination at such school.
Accounts.
4. Full accounts shall be kept of the receipt and expenditure of the trustees in respect of the Charity in the books to be provided for that purpose, and such accounts shall be stated for each year, and examined and passed by the trustees annually.
Surplus income to be accumulated.
5. The unappropriated residue or surplus of the income (if any) shall be from time to time accumulated by the trustees in a bank of established character, until it shall amount to a suitable sum, when the same shall be invested by them in the name of "The Official Trustees of Charitable Funds" in Government funds; no such accumulated sum exceeding 100l. shall be allowed to remain in any bank uninvested.
Copies of scheme, &c may be taken.
6. A copy of this scheme, and of any rules or regulations which may be made by the trustees in pursuance of the third clause thereof, shall be kept with the books of account and other documents belonging to the Charity, and every person interested in the Charity shall be at liberty to take copies of the scheme, or any part thereof, upon making application for that purpose to the trustees, at such reasonable times and subject to such reasonable conditions as may be fixed and prescribed by them.
Scheme to be printed.
The trustees may cause this scheme to be printed at the expense of the Charity, and copies may be sold at such reasonable prices as the trustees may put upon them.
Questions to be referred to Commissioners.
8. If any doubt or question shall arise among the trustees, or any of them, as to the construction or proper application of any of the provisions of this scheme, or the management of the Charity, application shall be made by them to the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales for their opinion and advice, which, when given, shall be conclusive.
7 Wm. Cleave's Charity.
File 25038.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners, dated the 24th July 1874, the Company was empowered to grant a building lease to Messrs. Sandon for the term of 81 years, at the ultimate rent of 455l. per annum, of the premises belonging to the Charity, situate and being No. 107, Cannon Street and No. 7, Oxford Court.
File 25349.
By a further order of the same Board, dated the 7th January 1876, a scheme of which the following is a copy, was established for the regulation and management of the Charity.
Haberdashers' Company.
General Charity—William Cleave's.
H./25,349.
Scheme.
Charity Commission.
In the matter of Cleave's Charity, created by the Will of William Cleave, dated the 11th day of May 1665, and by a Codicil to the said Will dated the 16th day of April 1667.
The Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, having considered an application in writing made to them on the 21st day of October 1874, in the matter of the above-mentioned Charity, by
The Master and Wardens of the Fraternity of the Art or Mystery of Haberdashers, in the City of London, being the Trustees of the said Charity; acting by John Curtis, Esquire, their Clerk, duly authorised in that behalf by resolutions passed at duly constituted meetings of the said Trustees, held on the 7th and 12th days of the same month:
And it appearing to the said Board, that the gross annual income of the said Charity exceeds 50l.:
And that it is desirable that a scheme should be established for the future regulation of the said Charity in manner herein-after mentioned:
And upon notice of the intention of the said Board to make an Order for that purpose having been given, according to the direction of the said Board, more than one calendar month previously to the date hereof, by advertisement in the "Times" newspaper, on the 20th and 27th days of November, and the 4th day of December 1875 respectively, and in the "Guardian" newspaper, on the 24th day of November, and the 1st and 8th days of December 1875 respectively:
Do hereby Order, that the scheme set forth in the Schedule hereto be approved and established as the Scheme for the future regulation and management of the said Charity.
Schedule.
Scheme for the Regulation and Management of the abovementioned Charity.
Trustees.
1. The master and four wardens of the fraternity of the art or mystery of Haberdashers in the city of London, usually called the "Haberdashers' Company" and who are herein-after referred to as the Trustees, shall continue to be the Trustees of the Charity, and shall manage and administer the same, and its endowments, in conformity with the provisions of this scheme.
Clerk.; Surveyor.
2. The Trustees may, out of the yearly income of the Charity, pay to their clerk an annual salary not exceeding 10l. as a remuneration for his services in connexion with the administration of the Charity, which shall consist in attending the meetings of the Trustees, keeping the accounts of the Charity, and the Minute Book of the Trustees, and the register of the recipients, and a list of the applicants for the benefit of the Charity, and inquiring into and examining their respective characters and circumstances. and carrying on all necessary correspondence relating to the Charity. The Trustees may also pay to their surveyor an annual salary not exceeding 5l. as a remuneration for his services in inspecting and superintending the management of the estates of the Charity.
Application of income.
3. The clear yearly income of the Charity, which shall remain after the payment thereout of the said salaries and all other necessary and proper outgoings and expenses of management (for which purpose an annual sum to be calculated at a rate not exceeding 5l. per centum per annum upon the gross annual income of the Charity may be allowed) shall be applied by the Trustees, (subject to such reasonable regulations as they shall from time to time prescribe) in some or one of the following modes, that is to say:—
I. In the grants of annual pensions or sums to be calculated at a rate not exceeding 40l. per annum each to pensioners who shall be selected and appointed from time to time by the Trustees assembled at a meeting and shall be deserving poor persons, being liverymen or freemen of the said Company who from age, ill-health, accident, or infirmity shall be unable to maintain themselves by their own exertion or the widows of such persons, with a preference for such widows, and in all cases for those who being otherwise qualified as aforesaid shall have become reduced by misfortune from better circumstances.
II. In or towards assisting deserving poor persons, being liverymen or freemen of the said Company, but not being a master or warden or a member of the court of assistants of the said Company, to provide for the education of their children at any efficiently conducted schools by paying either wholly or in part the school fees of such children, or in awarding and paying gifts of not more than 5l. in each case to such children as aforesaid as rewards for meritorious conduct or proficiency in learning upon their leaving school and entering upon the duties of life.
III. In or towards placing or assisting to place any deserving poor persons having the qualifications mentioned in the last preceding clause, or the widows or children of such persons, at any well managed convalescent or other hospital or other similar institution, and in making any payment which may be necessary or proper for the accomplishment of those objects or either of them.
4. The particular schools or hospitals or institutions to be selected for the purposes aforesaid, and (within the limits aforesaid) the amount of the pensions, assistance, gifts, and payments to be granted, afforded, awarded, or made as aforesaid, shall be fixed and determined from time to time by the Trustees or a majority of them assembled at a duly constituted meeting.
Residue.
5. The residue or surplus income of the Charity (if any) may, if the Trustees shall so think fit and determine, be applied and expended by them, subject to such reasonable rules and regulations as they may from time to time prescribe, in and towards the promotion of any one or more of the objects aforesaid in favour and for the benefit of any deserving poor persons not connected with the said Company being resident inhabitants within the city of London.
Questions to be referred to Commissioners.
6. If any doubt or question shall arise as to the construction or proper application of any of the provisions of this Scheme, or the management of the Charity, application may be made by the Trustees to the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales for their opinion or advice, which when given shall be conclusive upon all persons claiming under the trust who shall be affected thereby.
Sealed by order of the Board this 7th day of January 1876.
Henry M. Vane,
Secretary.
L.S.