Report on the Charities of the Clothworkers' Company
Part I

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

572-599

Citation Show another format:

'Report on the Charities of the Clothworkers' Company: Part I', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 572-599. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69737 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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CLOTHWORKERS' COMPANY.

PART I.

TO THE CHARITY COMMISSIONERS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES.

In pursuance of a Minute of the Board dated the 13th day of December 1859, I have inquired into the condition and circumstances of the Charities under the management of the Company of Clothworkers of the City of London, which comprise the following endowments:—

I have stated under the title of every distinct Charity the result of my inquiries relating to it.

Aaron's Gift.

Samuel Aaron, by his will of the 10th April 1730, gave to the Company 300l., requesting them to distribute 12l. at Christmas, viz., 10l. amongst 10 poor men in the almshouse formerly at Islington, and now in Monkwell Street, and 2l. amongst the eight poor women in the Whitefriars Almshouse, which is now in Islington.

This gift (of which it appears only 274l. 10s. was received from the executors) is considered as part of the endowment of the Countess of Kent's Almshouses, and is not paid to them separately, but included in the general allowance of 20l. each. The almsmen receive also more than the prescribed allowance. (See Heath's Endowment.)

Mrs. Acton's Charity.

By a Minute of the Court of Assistants of the 4th of October 1837, the master communicated to the court that he had received from Mrs. Acton, the widow of Mr. Samuel Acton, a liveryman of the Company, a free gift to the Clothworkers' Company of 1,000l.; and it was thereupon resolved that the thanks of the court be conveyed to Mrs. Acton for the very liberal gift, with an assurance on the part of the court that the proceeds of that sum, when invested, should be scrupulously devoted to charitable purposes, in conformity with the wishes expressed by the donor.

This money was invested in the purchase of 1,082l. 11s. Consols in the name of the Company, The dividends have been applied in pensions of 7l. 10s. each for four blind persons, the first of whom appeared to be nominated by the Company. The Company, I was informed, have always considered that the words "free gift" and the thanks of the Company for it, imply that the Company received the money free from any charitable trust. Under this impression the return of income tax has not been applied for, nor has any charge for management been made by the Company. It appears to me, certainly, that the language of the resolution implies that the Company received the money on a trust, which they cannot repudiate. It is a question of no actual importance at present, as the Company have always disposed of the money to the poor, as above stated. (fn. 1)

Armer's Charity.

William Armer, by his will of the 3rd September 1575, gave 50l. to the Clothworkers' Company, to be delivered out to five honest householders of the handicraft of clothworkers for three years, every of them giving security for the repayment thereof. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury on the 11th October 1575. This is one of the charities included in the loan fund administered according to the scheme in the report of the Master in Chancery of the 21st July 1840, referred to under Heydon's Charity.

Barkin's Charity.

James Barkin, by his will of the 20th September 1675, gave 100l. to the Clothworkers' Company, to be lent out to five young men free of the said Company, to each of them 20l. for three years without interest, upon giving security for the repayment thereof at the end of the time. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury the 5th July 1677, and the money was paid to the Company, and is included in the loan fund administered according to the scheme in the master's report of the 21st July 1840, referred to under Heydon's Charity.

Bayworth's Gift.

John Bayworth, by will of the 21st March 1622, gave to the Clothworkers' Company a messuage in the parish of St. Mary, Fenchurch, upon trust yearly at Easter—
and the residue amongst the poor handicraftsmen of the said Company.

£s.d.
To pay to Christ's Hospital100
To the poor of the almshouses at Farnham0134
To the parson of St. Mary Fenchurch for a sermon on All Saints' Day, 10s.; to the churchwardens of do. for repairing of church, 10s.100
To the parson of Farnham for a sermon on All Saints' Day, 10s.; to the repairing of church and schoolhouse, 10s.; to the poor of the parish, 10s.; to the schoolmaster for a sermon, 6s. 8d.; to the clerk for keeping clean the testator's monument, 3s. 4d.200
To the renter warden of the said Company034
To the clerk of do.034
To the master and wardens 40s. a piece towards their charge in dining with the Lord Mayor1000
1500

The property consists of the house, No. 134, Fenchurch Street, let to Thomas Heath, for a term of 21 years, expiring at Midsummer 1864, at a rent of 120l.

The payments are made to Christ's Hospital of 20s.; to the churchwardens of Farnham, 2l. 13s. 4d.; to the master and wardens, 10l.; to the renterwarden and clerk, 6s. 8d.; to the parish of St. Gabriel, Fenchurch Street, 1l. 2s. 6d. (including 2s. 6d. for the parish clerk, which does not appear to have been included in the gift).

The balance is carried to the funds, which are applied for the benefit of the poor of the Company in pensions. (See Rogers' Gift.)

The Company do not themselves administer the portion of the gift which is for the poor of the almshouses at Farnham, but the whole is paid to the churchwardens of that parish. (fn. 2)

Blundell's Charity.

Peter Blundell, by his will of the 9th June 1599 gave to the Company 150l. on trust, with parcel thereof to purchase lands, out of the rents of which 40s. yearly to be paid to the poor people of Bridewell, and the residue employed as that the wardens should have the benefit thereof for their pains.

The Company purchased a house in Friday Street, which is No. 36, and let to a Mr. Richardson for a term of 21 years, expiring in March 1865, at a rent of 28l. The sum of 2l. a year is paid out of the rents to the treasurer of the Bridewell Hospital. The residue is disposed of by the Company according to the internal arrangements. (fn. 3)

Blunt's Charity.

William Blunt, otherwise Blownte, by his will of the 24th April 1596, gave 50l. to the Clothworkers' Company (in addition to 50l. already given by him to the said Company) the money to be delivered to 10 poor men at 10l. a piece for three years freely, and giving security for the repayment thereof at the end of that time. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury in the year 1596, and the two sums of 50l. were included in the loan fund administered according to the scheme in the Report of the Master in Chancery of the 21st July 1840 referred to under Heydon's Charity.

Richard Boylston's Charity.

Richard Boylston, executor of Thomas Boylston, by deed poll of the 14th December 1648, after reciting that the said Thomas Boylston, deceased, had on the 3rd August 1642 lent to the Parliament in the name of the Clothworkers' Company 100l. for the pressing necessities of Ireland, to be repaid out of the next subsidies, granted and assigned to the said Company The said sum of 100l., with full authority to receive the same, upon condition that the said Company should yearly, on St. Stephen's Day, the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary, and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, distribute to so many of the 24 poor men and women of the said Company partakers of the charitable benevolence of Mr. William Lambe, deceased, as should on the several feast days make their personal appearance at the usual place of meeting, and attend the said master and wardens to the chapel of St. James in the Wall, and there hear the several sermons there preached, twelve pence a piece, that is to say, if they all appeared there 24s. every feast day, but in default of their appearance then only 12d. to every one that should appear.

It would appear that this loan bore interest or was repaid in 1648, for the payment to the poor appears to have commenced in 1648 and continued to 1813. It was then paid to the almspeople until 1819, when it ceased.

From the year 1838 when payment was resumed, the sum of 3s. has been given to 24 poor persons, who received Lambe's clothing on the 1st October in every year. There is an attendance at the chapel on that day.

Boylston's Charity.

Thomas Boylston, by his will, declared that he had in 1648 delivered to the Company 800l. for the maintenance of a lecture in the parish church of Burton-uponTrent, and to pay to a preacher for the same 31l. 4s., and to the clerk and sexton 16s. a year.

This bequest is charged as a share of the purchase money of the King Street and Cheapside Estate. (See Heath's Almshouses.)

The Company attribute 32l. out of the rents to this gift, and pay the amount annually to the lecturer at Burton-upon-Trent, who is now the vicar of the parish, upon a certificate that the lecture has been delivered.

Bricklis' or Brykles' Charity.

John Brykles, by his will dated the 8th November 1440, bequeathed to the Church of Allhallows the Great and to the parson, his lands and tenements in the parish of St. Martin Vintry, and also an annual rent of 26s. 8d. out of a certain cellar and premises in Harbour Lane, and the yearly rent of five marks. The payment was settled by an award of the 20th May 1515, made for settling variances concerning the premises, the arbitrators awarded that the Clothworkers' Company should for ever thereafter pay the said five marks (3l. 6s. 8d.) to the parson, churchwardens, and parishioners of the said parish. The sum of 3l. 6s. 8d. accordingly is paid by the Company to the church wardens of Allhallows the Great, and is applied by them as fully described in my report of the charity in that parish. (fn. 4)

Barbara Burnell's Charity.

Barbara Burnell, by her will of the 27th June 1630, gave to the Company 300l. to purchase lands and pay yearly to the parson and churchwardens of Stanmore, 7l. for a distribution of 12d. every Sunday for bread for the poor, the parish clerk to have weekly one pennyworth thereof and 2s. yearly on Michaelmas Day for keeping his monument clean, and to bestow 4l. 6d., the residue, in clothing for six poor women And that the Company should also pay yearly to a poor scholar of Oxford, the sum of 5l. The 300l. is under the deed of June 1734 (see Heath's Almshouses) charged as a portion of the King Street and Cheapside Estate. It appears by the books of the Company that the Company, by an order of the 14th October 1685, had directed that the 300l. should be a charge on their Islington estate. The proportion of the rents of the estate attributed to this charity is 12l. a year.

The sum of 7l. a year is paid annually to the churchwardens of Great Stanmore and the Exhibition has been increased to 20l. per annum. (See Pilsworth's Charity.)

John Burnell's Gift.

John Burnell, by his will of the 15th December 1603, gave to the Company 100l., to be lent to two young men, free of the Company, at 5l. per cent. to be employed as follows: 2l. 12s. for bread to 12 of the poorest inhabitants of St. Michael Crooked Lane, 1l. 6s. for bread to the parish of Great Stanmore, and 1l. 2s. in coals among the poor of the said Company.

The loan fund is dealt with under the order of the Court of Chancery of 31st July 1840, confirming the master's report of the 21st July 1840, referred to in the report on Heydon's Charity.

The Company charge themselves with the interest whether the fund be lent or not, or be or be not productive, and apply the same as follows:—

£s.d.
To the parish of St. Michael, Crooked Lane, paid to the churchwarden2120
To the parish of Great Stammore, paid to the churchwardens160
To the poor of the Company being part of Rogers' gift120
Total£500

Thomas Burnell's Charity.

By a deed poll of 10th July 1655, the Company, in consideration of 65l. paid by Thomas Burnell, covenanted with the parson and churchwardens of Allballows, Barking, to pay them 52s. a year for bread.

The rector and churchwardens of Allhallows are paid 52s. a year by the Company.

T. Burnell's Charity.

By a deed poll of the 10th June 1655, the Company, in consideration of 135l. paid by Thomas Burnell, covenanted with the parson and churchwardens of Stanmore, Middlesex, to pay yearly 5l. 8s., as follows: 2l. 9s. 6d. on the 29th September, and 19s. 6d. respectively on the 25th December, 25th March, and 27th June to be applied, 30s., part of the said 2l. 9s. 6d., to be added to 4l. 6s., the gift of Barbara Burnell, for clothing six poor women, and the remainder 19s. 6d., and also the other quarterly sum of 19s. 6d. to be paid to the said parson and churchwardens to furnish 1s. 6d. of good Suffolk cheese for the poor, to whom should be made a distribution of bread by John and Barbara Burnell, and Robert and Catherine Hilson.

The Company pay the 5l. 8s. to the churchwardens of the parish of Great Stanmore.

Burton's Gift.

Francis Burton by deed, 9th August 1684, released and assigned to the Company a deed or grant of 20s. per annum, made by the Company in the 27 Henry I. to Rowland Hill and his wife (who had given 30l. to the Charity) to pay annually for ever to two artizan clothworkers 10s. each.

This gift is distributed with Rogers' Charity.

Christian's Gift.

Philip Christian, by his will of the 6th December 1653, gave two houses in the parish of St. Faith to the Company to pay to two poor boys, natives of the Isle of Man, 10l. a piece; but if it should happen that there be a free school in the town of Peel, Isle of Man, the said 20l. a year should go to such school, the schoolmaster to have 18l. and the other 2l. for providing books, &c. and also to pay 7l. a year to seven poor men or women free of the Company, to the master and four wardens 10s. a piece, to the clerk 6s. 8d., and to the beadle 3s. 4d.

From an entry in the Company's Records it appears that a decree in Chancery was made in 1686, which assigned two thirds of the estate to the school, and the other third to the poor of the Company. An entry in the book of the Company of the 21st January 1747, states as follows:—

"This day Dr. Thomas Wilson, rector of St. Stephen Walbrook, attended this court and presented a memorial and request, setting forth that he had been the last year to visit his father, the Bishop of Man, and brought a petition from thence from Mr. Tear, master of the school of Peel in that island, that the contents of the said petition were true as the poor man had represented, that the schoolhouse founded by Mr. Philip Christian was now by length of time in such a ruinous condition that it must be taken down and rebuilt. That he procured from his friends in London some monies towards it, but far short of completing that good work, therefore humbly hoped this Worshipful Company would be pleased to become contributors to so good a design which would be an act of charity and a lasting advantage to that poor town and neighbourhood. The court thereupon ordered the said schoolmaster's petition to be read and the contents considered, but the request not to be granted for an augmentation to his salary, the estate out of which his salary is paid being three houses in Lovell's Court in Paternoster Row, two of them let at 12l. per annum clear of taxes, and the other now empty and has been so for about five years. That by a decree in 1686 two thirds are for the schoolmaster and the other third for the poor of the Company, That, notwithstanding, no more than 12l. per annum is made of this estate, 10l. per annum is continued to be paid to the schoolmaster although he is not entitled to more than 8l. till the rents are increased. That in regard to the schoolhouse, it appears by the said decree that upon stating of the then account the Company had received 230l., and thereby it was ordered that 80l. should be deducted by the Company to defray the charges of the suit, and the remainder, being 150l. to be divided according to the will, so that 100l. should be paid to complainants for the building of a schoolhouse as prayed for by their bill, and 50l. for the relief of the poor of the Company, which 100l. was paid on the 19th August 1686 to Horatio Darling by virtue of a letter of attorney from the then Bishop of Man; that the Company having no concern or anything to do with the schoolhouse and in consequence lying under no obligation whatsoever to be contributory to the upholding such schoolhouse, yet to manifest their readiness to promote and encourage all charitable good designs were pleased to vote that 10l. 10s. should be paid (as the Company's charity and benevolence) upon completing the said building by the quarter warden of the Company for the time being, and Dr. Wilson being required to come into Court was acquainted with the resolutions of the court afore-mentioned, for which he returned thankful acknowledgments for himself and on behalf of the inhabitants of the town of Peel for the court's favor to the poor schoolmaster by allowing him now more than the Company are obliged to pay him, and also of a further generous and charitable act of contributing towards the support of the said schoolhouse."

The property under this endowment now consists of the houses Nos. 8, 9, and 10 Lovell's Court, Paternoster Row, let to Messrs. Remnant and Evans on lease for 21 years from Christmas 1848, at the yearly rent of 105l. This money is divided according to the decree, two thirds to the Peel school and one third to the poor of the Company. The payment for the school is made to the Bishop of Sodor and Man annually after deducting 5l. 5s. for the annual expenses. The net amount is 66l. 10s. to the school (of which 63l. is yearly paid), and 33l. 5s. to the poor of the Company. The difference between the 63l. and the 66l. 10s. is reserved as a repairing fund. A letter from the Bishop of the 26th January 1860 states that "the school is in a very satis"factory condition in every other respect but that of room. The buildings are, I trust, likely to be extended this year, and the sum of 38l. 14s. 1d. which you name" (being the sum referred to by the clerk of the Company as being in hand) "will no doubt be most acceptable, but I will not apply for it without it is really wanted."

In the year 1842 the sum of 100l., in 1845 15l., and in 1848 15l., were paid by the Company in addition to the share of the rents for the assistance of the school and in aid of the repairs.

The payment for the poor of the Company is made to the general relief and pension account. (See Rogers' Charity.)

Oliver Claymond's Charity.

Oliver Claymond or Clement, by a codicil to his will of the last day of February, 31 Henry VIII. (1540), enrolled in the Mayor's Court in 1542, amongst other things directed the Company out of lands and tenements which he devised to them, to find a pascall light and sepulchre light at Easter within the parish of Allhallows Staining, London, and finding yearly four staff torches and the garnishing of 24 other torches in the said church on Corpus Christi day to accompany reverently the Sacrament at the procession of the same day. It appears also as stated in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 27, p. 332) by an old paper in the possession of the parish of Hitchin, Herts, the same person charged his houses with a sum of 6l. 13s. 4d. a year, payable by the Company in augmentation of the vicarage of Hitchin.

In the year 1551 the following note appears in the Rental Warden's Account:—

"Paid the vicar of Hitchin for his resignment of his title, and such evidence as he had to show concerning an annuity of 20 nobles a year going out of Mr. Claymond's lands, 19l. 6s. 8d.

In 1555, an agreement was made with the vicar to pay 4l. per annum. In 1558, the rental warden paid 4l. per annum. In 1560, the vicar was paid 10l., on condition that he would make no further claim for his annuity. On the 16th May 1569, it is stated that the Company purchased the annuity for 100l. In 1591, the opinion of counsel was taken on the objections of the Company to pay the annuity, and other proceedings were taken which are not at this time very intelligible. In July 1593, the vicar of Hitchin exhibited a bill in the exchequer for the recovery of the annuity. Since that time it is stated in the books of the Company that the payment has been regularly made.

The Company hold premises Nos. 62 and 63, Mark Lane, and 23, Abchurch Lane in fee, which they enter in their books as derived from this devise, and which produce a large rental. Out of the two former houses, they pay 20s. a year to the churchwardens of the parish of Allhallows Staining, and out of the latter 6l. 13s. 4d. a year to the vicar of Hitchin. (fn. 5)

Cornell's Charity.

George Cornell, by his will of the 5th of April, 1850, bequeathed to the Clothworkers' Company 2,000l., 3l. per cent. annuities, upon trust to pay six annuities of 10l. a year to six blind persons, members of the Company, and in the event of there not being a sufficient number of such persons, members of the Company, then to such other blind persons, citizens of London, as the court of the said Company should in their discretion think deserving of the said annuities.

The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, the 9th May 1850.

The sum of 1,800l. was received, after the legacy duty was deducted, but the Company added sufficient to make up the 2,000l. stock, which was purchased in the 3l. per cent. reduced annuities, and which now stands to their account.

The dividends, amounting to 60l. a year, are divided annually amongst six poor blind persons, some being members of the Company, and the others freemen of the city. It may be observed that the Company construe the word "citizen" to be confined to freemen of the city of London.

It certainly appears to me that the modern Acts which have opened the parliamentary franchise to the inhabitants and householders, must also have entitled them to the appellation of citizens. (fn. 6)

Dixon's Gift.

Thomas Dixon, by his will of the 2nd June, 1574, gave 250l. to Christ's Hospital, to purchase lands of 10l. a year, viz., 6l. for the Hospital, and 4l. for the Clothworkers' Company, and he directed that if the rent should increase, the amount should be divided rate and rate alike between the said Hospital and Company.

The estate is managed by Christ's Hospital, and the Company receives their proportion of the rents from that institution, according to an account rendered by the Hospital to the Company, and which the master and auditors and wardens sign; but I do not find that the account of Christ's Hospital is in fact audited. In 1858–9, the income of 384l. 11s. 1d. was subject to the payment of 51l. 6s. 6d. for outgoings, and after having applied 6l. to Christ's Hospital and to the Clothworkers Company 4l.; the surplus profits, amounting to 204l. 3s. 3d., were divided equally between the two institutions.

The moiety of this balance 102l. 1s. 8d., 4l. was distributed to the poor of the Company in pensions and in casual aid as stated under the head of Rogers' Charity and forms part of the distribution there mentioned.

George Neale Driver's Charity.

By an indenture of the 2nd July 1853, between George Neale Driver of the one part, and the master, wardens, and commonalty of the Clothworkers' Company of the other part, reciting that the said G. N. Driver was seised of the hereditaments therein-after described, subject as to those firstly described to an indenture of lease of the 17th November, 1696, whereby the same were demised for 500 years at the rent of 5l. And as to those secondly described to an indenture of lease of the 1st October 1694, whereby the same were demised for 500 years at 5l. 15s. per annum, and reciting that the said G. N. Driver was a member of the said Company, and in token of his esteem for the same had determined, to make such settlement of the said hereditaments in their favour as thereby effected. It was witnessed that the said G. N. Driver conveyed to the said Company, and their successors and assigns, all that piece of ground on the south side of Wellclose Square, near Ratcliffe Highway, Middlesex, containing in breadth from east to west 20 feet, and in depth from north to south 79 feet, together with the messuage or tenement, buildings and offices held therewith, and known as No. 35, Wellclose Square. And also all that other piece of ground situate on the east side of Wellclose Square aforesaid, containing in breadth 23 feet, and in depth 100 feet, together with the messuage, &c. held therewith, and known as 41, Wellclose Square aforesaid, to hold the same, subject to the said two leases unto the said Company, their successors and assigns for ever, upon trust to apply the rents thereof for the 1st, 3rd, and each successive corresponding alternate year for ever thereafter for the use of the said Company, and to apply the rents for the 2nd, 4th, and each successive corresponding alternate year for ever thereafter for such purposes of charity as the court of the said Company should direct, and whether by payment thereof to any indigent person or persons or otherwise as such court might think proper and without responsibility for the application thereof.

The rents of this estate are as follows:—

£s.d.
No. 35, Wellclose Square500
" 41, "5150
10150
£s.d.
The deductions are Crown rents030
" " land tax0127
" " property tax0121
178

The balance of the rents for each alternate year is given away in such year at the nomination of the master of the Company for the time being to one poor person.

Edward's Gift.

William Edwards, by will of the 7th April, 1700, gave 100l. in money to the Company to pay yearly at Christmas to 10 poor artisan clothworkers or their widows 10s. a piece amounting to 5l. a year.

This charity the Company administers with Rogers' Charity.

Thomasine Evan's Gift.

Thomasine Evans, by her will of the 11th October 1596, gave to the Clothworkers' Company five tenements in St. Catherine Coleman parish, London, on condition every second year to choose eight poor widows or wives of the age of 50 years dwelling within the city of London, whereof two to be of St. Mary, Abchurch parish, and every second year bestow on the said eight poor women one gown of cloth of 20s. value, and on further trust to provide two cart loads of coal to the poor of St. Catherine Coleman, and the like to St. Mary Abchurch.

The Company is the proprietor of the property in Crutched Friars devised by this will.

The Company pay annually—

£s.d.
To the parish of St. Catherine Coleman1000
" " Mary Abchurch1000

The sum of 4l. a year is considered to have been included in the expenditure of clothing referred to under Hobby's Gift. The four persons receiving clothing in 1857 received articles to the amount of 18l. 11s. 8d.

These recipients and those under Webb's Charity attend at the church at St. Mary-at-Hill on the 5th September in every year, if a week day, or on the following Monday. (fn. 7)

Farrington's Charity.

It appears by a resolution of the court of the Company of the 15th November 1613, that Richard Farrington, by his will, gave to the Company 60l. to buy some rent, to be distributed yearly to the poor of the said Company, which 60l. was received of Mrs. Farrington, late wife and executrix of the said Richard Farrington, by Mr. Darkehurst, the last year quarterwarden, and was not employed and bestowed according to the said Richard Farrington's will: and forasmuch as it was not thought fit by this course that the said money should lie dead in the hands of the Company without any benefit coming to the poor thereby, according to the intent of the said Richard Farrington, it was therefore on that day agreed that from thenceforth until the said 60l. might be conveniently bestowed and laid out upon some purchase of land or rent, according to the said Richard Farrington's will. There should be distributed to the poor of the Company yearly, in regard to the use of the said money, 3l. half-yearly to be distributed by the master and wardens at the usual times of distribution of the rent of the lands given to the Company by Mrs. Holligrave.

The sum of 3l. a year is given away to the poor with the funds referred to in the report of Rogers' and other gifts.

Finch's Charity.

James Finch, by his will of the 15th February 1508, gave to the Clothworkers' Company certain premises in Hey Wharf Lane, in the parish of Allhallows the Great, upon trust that the master and wardens of the said Company should find and sustain yearly for evermore a Doctor or Bachelor of Divinity of good and honest fame and conversation to read divinity within Whittington College of London three days in every week, and that such reader from time to time should be elected by the master of the said college by the parson of Allhallows in Honey Lane, by the parson of St. Stephen, Walbrook, and by the parson of St. Peter, Cornhill, and by their successors, for the time being or by three of them, and the testator ordained that the said master and wardens should pay yearly to the said reader of divinity for his salary to be had of the issues and profits of the said premises 10l. at two terms of the year at the Feasts of Easter and St. Michael.

The Company, out of their property in Hey Wharf Lane in Thames Street, pay annually 10l. a year to the reader of Whittington College, who is now the Rev. Thos. Hill, the perpetual curate of the parish of the Holy Trinity, Minories. (fn. 8)

Frankland's Gift.

William Frankland, by his will of the 19th August 1574, gave to the Company his two tenements in Thames Street, upon condition to pay 20s. a year for coals to the poor in the parish of Allhallows the Great, and 3l. a year to the parish of Skipton, Yorkshire.

The property of the charity consists of a house in Thames Street, occupied by a Mr. Andrew McLaren, as a tenant to the Company. The rentcharge of 4l. a year is disposed of as follows:—

£s.d.
To the churchwardens in Allhallows the-Great100
To the churchwardens in Skipton in Yorkshire300
£400

The latter parish returns an account to the Company of the persons' names who receive the dole. (fn. 9)

Gregory's Charity.

Edward Gregory, formerly a member of the Company, by deed of the 4th June 1845, granted to the Company and their successors all that yearly rentcharge of 4l. payable out of the manor of Cowlesfield Esturmey, in the county of Wilts, and also out of all the lands and tenements formerly of Lawrence Low, situate in Cowlesfield, Cowlesfield Esturmey, and Whiteparish in the county of Wilts, upon trust to pay the same on the 26th December in every year unto one of the three most aged blind pensioners receiving pensions from the said Company, every nomination to be made between Michaelmas and Christmas days, and every such nomination to be deemed an appointment during the pleasure of the master, wardens, and commonalty And on the death of such augmented pensioner the next payment of the said 4l. should fall into the general funds of the Company for the purpose of indemnifying the said Company against the trouble and expense of receiving and paying the said augmentation pension, and that after the lapse of a year from the death of any augmented pensioner the said Company should elect another pensioner, and so on from time to time for ever: Provided that preference should be given to pensioners free of the said Company.

The Company receive 4l. a year from a solicitor at Devizes, Wilts, agent of Sir Frederick Bathurst. The Company pay the money annually to one of the three most aged of the blind pensioners. The sum is continually paid to the pensioner until he or she dies.

All the pensioners who have lately received it have attained upwards of 90 years of age.

Halse's Charity.

John Halse, by his will of the 10th August 1573, bequeathed 100l. to the Clothworkers' Company to the intent that the master and wardens should deliver the same to four young men of the Company by even portions to occupy the same without interest for three years, and so from three years to three years for ever. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, and the said 100l. received by the said Company. It is now included in the loan fund, and administered under the scheme settled by the Master's Report of the 21st July 1840.

Hamer's Charity.

Ralph Hamer, by his will (date unknown), gave 100l. to the Clothworkers' Company, to be lent out to four young men free of the said Company, two to be retailing drapers, and the other two working clothworkers, to have the money by equal portions for seven years, finding securities for the repayment thereof at the end of that time.

This is included in the Loan Fund and administered under the scheme of the 21st July 1840, referred to under Heydon's Charity.

Heath's Almshouses.

John Heath, by his will of the 23rd January 1640, gave to the Clothworkers' Company 1,500l., and directed that 300l. should be laid out in erecting five tenements of brick, and that with the remaining 1,200l. the Company should purchase lands of the clear yearly value of 60l., and ten poor men of the Company aged 60 years who should be clothworkers or dressers of cloth, to inhabit the said tenements, and for want of clothworkers ten other mechanics and handicraftmen free of the Company, towards whose maintenance the rent and profits of the land should be equally divided.

The almshouses at the time of the former inquiry were situated in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. On the 3rd November 1824, ten almshouses and a clerk's house were built in Monkwell Street, Cripplegate, adjoining Lamb's Chapel or St. James in the Wall (see Lambe's Charity). The present building bears the following inscription:—

"John Heath, by his will in 1640 having bequeathed property to the Clothworkers' Company for the building almshouses for the purposes of solacing the declining years of ten poor freemen of the Company aged 60 years or thereabouts, in pursuance of such bequest ten almshouses were erected at Islington, but the same becoming dilapidated, were taken down and the present built at the Company's expense, at the same time the adjoining chapel and clerk's residence were rebuilt, the whole being situated upon ground given by will to the said Company in 1568 by William Lambe, citizen of London. The first stone of the above was laid on the 3rd day of November 1824, by
"John Ward,
"Master."

The expense of the building of the houses and the repair of the chapel was 6,600l.

The Commissioners of Inquiry (p. 231) remark that the Company were unable to inform them how the legacy was dealt with from the time of its receipt by the Company until 1734, but they proceed to state the investments made by the Company in 1734 of the sum of 1,200l. and of other charitable bequests.

There being no account furnished of the disposition of the money by the Company from the year 1640 to the year 1734, a question arises similar to that to which I referred in the case of the investment of the 360l., the property of the Free Grammar School at Sutton-Valence. If the Company invested moneys in the intervening period in the purchase of real estate, as it was their duty to do, it might not have been in their power in the year 1734 to appropriate such lands to their own use and attribute the investments then made to the charities. Upon this, however, no evidence whatever has been brought before me, and farther than the statement of the officers of the Company that they have no knowledge of any anterior investments, or of any documents illustrating them, it is of course not in my power to penetrate. In a record book of the Company it appears that a dispute had taken place between the Company and some adjoining proprietors of land in King Street respecting lights. On the 10th July 1734, it appears by the same book that a draft deed was produced to the Company for the purpose of conveying and appropriating the estate purchased in King Street to the discharge of several charitable donations formerly given to this Company "the several sums of money having been received and no lands purchased therewith"; so that the estates so purchased may be always subject to the payment of the charities of such benefactors. It appears in the document book of the Company or index to their muniments, that by deeds of the 26th and 27th June 1720, there was a conveyance by Long and others to the Company of three houses in King Street. The deed of the 13th June 1734 referred to by the Commissioners of Inquiry is a conveyance from Thomas Hennand (who, I am informed, was then the Clerk of the Company) to the Company of the premises mentioned in the Report, and it recites as its basis a previous conveyance of the 12th and 13th June in the same year of the same lands by the Company to their clerk, reciting the said donations and the fact that the Company had at several times laid out 6,074l. 10s. (a greater sum) in the purchase of lands, and that the same was intended to be thus conveyed for the better and more effectual continuation and establishment of the several and respective pious and charitable uses therein mentioned.

The funds of the following charities were according to this deed charged in the following proportions on the estate:—

££s.
1599William Hewett300 110Topay per annum 15l. 5l.200
1610Richard Staper.110" "50
1620Sir Thomas Trevor100" "60
1622Thomas Hussey120" "75
1623
1631Barbara Burnell300" "120
1635John Heath1,000" "500
1640"1,200" "600
1648Thos. Boylston800" "320
1672Sir Wm. Peake100" "50
1675Sir John Robinson300" "120
1680Robert Hitchins1,500" "600
£5,940£2695
Paid for the purchase of houses in King Street3,62410
" " Billiter Street1,0500
" of the corner house in King Street1,4000
£6,07410

The present property of the charities mentioned in the foregoing table is as follows:—

£
No. 18, Billiter Street, yard and work-shops.Let to Edward Spencer, on lease for 22 years from Christmas 1841.60
No. 93, Cheapside.Let to the General Annuity Endowment Company for 80 years from Michaelmas, 1854, sanctioned by the order of the Charity Commissioners under their seal of the 6th February 1857.250for the first 12½ years and 400l. for the remainder of the term.
Nos. 38, 39 and 40, King Street Cheapside (now one house).Let to John Clarke, Edgar P. Stringer, Joseph Robinson, and Joseph C. Ridgway (who are directors of the Mutual Life Assurancs Society, but are not so described) on lease for 78 years from Michaelmas 1856, under the sanction of the Charity Commissioners by their order of the 16th April 1858.260until Michaelmas 1876, and then 300l. for the remainder of the term.
£ 570

The two last are building leases and no fines are now taken. The property has been the site of very valuable improvements. To the foregoing account it appears that at the former Inquiry the land tax which had been redeemed by the Company had been carried; but no notice is now taken in the account of the land tax. If redeemed with the property of the charity it is immaterial, if with the property of the Company, the charity cannot of course complain of the omission.

The 300l. given by the founder for erecting the almshouses was no doubt (as the Commissioners observe, p. 231) expended, and probably a larger sum, in the erection of the old almshouses at Islington. The site of these houses is stated to have been and still is the property of the Company and not of the Charity.

Of the 570l. income produced by this estate, the proportion applicable to Heath's Trust is estimated at 112l. 13s. In 1853 the expenditure of the Company for the maintenance of the 10 Heath's almsmen was as follows:—

£s.d.
The almsmen at 20l. a piece20000
Medical attendance, coals, repairs, and rates21934
£41934
The same expenses in 1858 were,—
The almsmen20000
The other expenses as above139107
£339107

The excess of these payments beyond the 112l. 13s., and the 10l. under Aaron's endowment is therefore the bounty of the Company.

The 10 almsmen are poor freemen of the Company chosen by the court on petition. Their trades or businesses are miscellaneous. There are always more applicants for admission than there are persons to be admitted. (fn. 10)

Heath's Clothing Charity.

John Heath, by indenture of the 2nd December 1635, gave 1,000l. to the Clothworkers' Company, they agreeing to pay 50l. yearly for ever, viz., to a minister for a sermon on the day of his burial, 13s. 4d., also to purchase so much woollen cloth as would make 30 gowns for 30 poor men and women (26 whereof to be freemen or freemen's widows, and two men and two women should be inhabitants of the parish where he should be buried); also, to buy for the said men and women linen cloth for 30 shirts and smocks, 30 leather shoes, and 30 pair of stockings, to pay to the master and wardens 3s. 4d. each (16s. 8d.) and to every one of the livery present at the sermon 6d., to the clerk of the Company 3s. 4d., to the beadle of the livery 2s. 6d., to the beadle of the yeomanry 1s. 6d., to the clerk of the church 1s. 6d., and to the sexton 12d., and also to pay yearly to two poor scholars, one of Oxford and the other of Cambridge of the surname of Heath, 50s. a piece.

The King Street and Cheapside estate was applied by the Company to this and other charities (see Heath's almshouses). The sum appropriated to this charity as its proportion of the rent is 50l. a year.

The distribution of clothing annually made by the Company exceeds the amount of this and the other endowments for the purpose. (See Hobby's Charity).

The exhibitions are, like the others (see Pilsworth's Charity), increased to 20l. a year. They have not been usually held by persons of the name of Heath, but one is now claimed by a sizar of that name, of Trinity College, Cambridge. There are at the same time 12 applicants; all others, however, will be excluded in favour of Mr. Heath.

Heather's Charity.

Elizabeth Heather, by her will of the 4th January 1801, gave the annual inerest and dividends of the residue of her estate to be divided amongst six poor widows of decayed housekeepers to be annually nominated and chosen.

By a deed of the 2nd February 1842 between the Clothworkers' Company of the one part and Robert Joyce, Samuel Carter, and John Illidge, executors of Thomas Bailey, who was the surviving executor of the said Elizabeth Heather, of the other part. After reciting the said will and that by an order of Chancery of the 26th April 1839 in a suit in which the said Robert Joyce and Samuel Carter were plaintiffs, and the Attorney General and Henry John Fraser and the said John Illidge defendants, it was referred to the master to approve of a scheme for the application of so much of the residue of the said testatrix as should remain after the payments of the costs therein mentioned And that the said master had by his report of the 20th January 1841 found that the plaintiffs, considering that the trust funds (estimated at the annual sum of 60l.) would be too small for the foundation of an establishment for the relief of poor widows of deceased housekeepers, had proposed as a proper scheme for the application of the said testatrix's residuary estate that the sum should be transferred to the Clothworkers' Company, upon trusts there stated, and which scheme was approved by the master as being as near as might be to the charitable purposes expressed by the said will It was by the said deed declared that the Company should stand possessed of the funds to be so transferred upon the following trusts, viz.:—

1st. That the Company should in each year (after payment of the necessary charges of management) distribute the annual income among such six poor widows of deceased housekeepers as among the applicants conforming to the rules and regulations after contained, should appear to them to be most deserving and necessitous.

2nd. That a separate book should be kept relative to the management of the trust, in which an account should be entered of the name in which the said income was expended.

3rd. That the distribution should take place on the 1st December in each year, or within a week after that day.

4th. That to ensure a sufficient competition an advertisement should be inserted in three of the daily papers in the first and a like in the second week of each November.

5th. That such advertisement should state the amount to be distributed, the description of persons among whom the distribution is to take place, and to whom their applications were to be addressed, which must be received before the 23rd November. It may also state (if the Company think proper but not otherwise) what would be required under the next clause.

6th. Every candidate to produce certificate of marriage and of husband's death, and to state in writing at the time of such application, such particulars relative to herself, her condition, and circumstances as should be proper to be considered in deciding upon the respective claims with satisfactory references for information as to character and verification of statement.

7th. No application to be received or considered which should not be made previously to the 23rd November in the year in which distribution is to be made.

8th. All moneys paid to the Company under the before-mentioned order or under any other order in the suit to be invested in their names in the funds or on Government securities with liberty to alter and vary for other securities of like nature.

The fund is now 1,207l. 12s. 5d. Consols and 635l. 15s. 3d. 3 per Cent. Reduced Annuities, producing an income of 55l. 6s. 0d.

The applicants for participation in the gift are very numerous. There are always six pensioners of 8l. each. The expenses of advertising and of management amount to the balance of the fund after these payments. The administration of the trust is stated to be very troublesome and onerous. I annex the forms of application and a table of the names of applicants in the last year.

Petition for Mrs. Elizabeth Heather's Gift to Poor Widows of decayed housekeepers, distributed by the Clothworkers' Company, London.

To the Master, Wardens, and Court of Assistants of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers.

The humble petition of
Widow of
residing at
late a housekeeper

Here insert any other particulars.

Sheweth that the petitioner is years of age, and bears the character of being a sober and honest person of good morals, is in destitute circumstances, and Your petitioner therefore humbly prays to be admitted a partaker of the above bequest. Dated this day of 185.

Signature of applicant Residence.

I of in the Parish of housekeeper, do certify that of my own knowledge (except as to age) the above statement is strictly correct.

Signed

This petition, together with a certificate of marriage, and a certificate or proper proof of the death of the husband, must be left at the Company's offices, Clothworkers' Hall, London, previous to the 23rd November.

Heather's Trust.

List of Applicants, 1859.

Name.Age.Circumstances.No. of Application.Received Gift in.By whom introduced.
Bell, Elizabeth Farrell69Widow of Joseph, late of 4, Prince's Street, Rotherhithe, Ship and Insurance Broker; in reduced circumstances, in consequence of the death of her two sons.4thMr. A. Francis.
Birbeck, Mary53Widow of William, late of 12, Queen Street, timekeeper; in destitute circumstances, and suffering from nervous debility.2ndMr. Britten.
Boughey, Catherine66Widow of John, late of 68, Threadneedle Street; has only a pension of 7l. per annum from the Cordwainers Company; infirm state of health.16th1849 852Mr. Wheeler.
Brunswick, Mary Ann64Widow of Charles, late of 2, Mansion House Street, City, furrier; has for many years experienced great losses and misfortunes.2ndMr. Horne.
Cooke, Selby Ann74Widow of James William, late of 32, Arlington Street, Clerkenwell; nearly lost her sight; declining health.1stMr. Pritchard.
Crowder, Mary78Widow of William, late of 3, Ocean Street, Stepney, who was 50 years in the service of Grosvenor, Chater & Co.; owing to long and severe illness of her husband was left, in November 1857, totally unprovided for.2ndMr. Horne.
De la Hunt, Mary43Widow of Thomas, late a blind pensioner of the Company; left with two sons and two daughters, the eldest under 17.1stMr. Alderman Humphery.
Garner, Ann67Widow of Frederick, cooper, late of 10, Hosier Lane; suffering from nervous debility, and has lost the sight of an eye.7th1850 1855Mr. Gregory.
Hayman, Harriet87Widow of William, late of Summerfield, Kent; entirely dependent on friends; has a son incapacitated from earning his living.4th1852 1854 1857Mr. Falkener.
Herbert, Jane60Widow of Rev. William, late of 101, Great College Street, Camden Town, who lost his property in a Chancery suit caused by the neglect of executors.2nd1857Rev. E. J. Ward.
Hooper, Ann50Widow of Thomas, late of Middlesex Buildings, Hackney Road; is afflicted in her knees, and has a son totally blind to support.4thMr. Farnan. Mr. Atkins.
Lee, Mary81Widow of John, late of 5, Adam's Court, Old Broad Street6th1856Mr. Rutt.
Martin, Ann49Widow of Richard Joseph, late of 173, Fenchurch Street, and freeman of this Company; out of employment, and in arrear of rent.1stMr. Burnell.
Palin, Sarah64Widow of George, late of 10, Craven Buildings, Strand; very infirm; unable to work.1stThe Master. Mr. Falkener.
Pottle, Mary Ann69Widow of Arnold, late of 15, Church Row, Limehouse, engineer; unable to work from fractured arm; is asthmatical.4thMr. Burnell.
Rowles, Esther42Widow of Joseph, late of 53, Cornwall Road, Upper Stamford Street, grocer; has five children, four of whom she has to support by needlework; parted with all to pay late husband's medical expenses.1stMr. Horne.
Smith, Mary Ann68Widow of Joseph, late of Bridgwater Gardens, Cripplegate; afflicted with rheumatism; health very bad; nothing but needlework to depend on.5thMr. Pritchard.
Stretton, Clarissa70Widow of Charles, late of 5, Walsingham Place, Kennington, wine merchant; afflicted with rheumatic gout; unable to work.10th1846 1849 1851 1853 1855Mr. Evans.
Wetherall, Ann69Widow of Thomas, late of Beauchamp Lodge, Hammersmith, and Barbican; afflicted with rheumatic gout; her limbs have become totally useless, and her sight is fast failing.6thMr. Beachcroft.
Wratten, Mary72Widow of Joseph, late of 7, Allhallows Lane; has been blind for many years; a pensioner under the Company.1stMr. Davis.

Note.—The Persons nominated to be marked thus +.

Any List having more than six names so marked will be considered void.

Heron's Charity.

William Heron by his will of the 12th July 1580, made the following bequests:—

£
To Thomas Heron and his heirs for ever the yearly rent of5
University College, Oxford5
Peterhouse, Cambridge5
To the poor of St. Sepulchre's, London4
" Clerkenwell4
Reparation of St. Sepulchre's Church10
" Clerkenwell Church10
Islington highways8
51

And the testator directed his executors to convey his lands to the Clothworkers' Company to perform the several devises mentioned.

The property came into the possession of the Company under a deed of the 31st August 1580. (fn. 11)

By a decree of the Vice-Chancellor of England dated the 11th of June 1833, made at the hearing of a cause Attorney General at the relation of Thomas Spencer Hall against the Clothworkers' Company and the master and fellows of University College, Oxford, and the master, keeper, and fellows, scholars of Peterhouse, Cambridge, and the churchwardens of the parishes of Clerkenwell, St. Sepulchre, and Islington, and Stephen Simpson and Augustus Burney, the court declare that the lands and hereditaments devised to the defendants, the Clothworkers' Company, by the will of the testator and the rents and profits thereof from the time of the filing of the information and for the future, together with the 3,355l. 17s. Consols standing in the name of the said Company, and the dividends thereof from the time of filing the said information and for the future were devoted, and ought to be applied to the charitable purposes therein-after mentioned And it was ordered that the sum of 321l. 1s. cash in the hands of the Company which had arisen from the rents of the hereditaments and from the interest of the said 3,355l. 17s. Consols since the filing of the information be laid out in the purchase of bank three per cent. annuities in the names of the Company, and that interest thereafter to become due as well on the said 3,355l. 17s. as also on the bank annuities to be purchased as aforesaid, together with what should be received by the said Company in respect of future rents, be applied in the first place in payment of the specific sums in the said will mentioned, that was to say, 5l. per annum to the heir of the testator, 5l. per annum to Peterhouse, Cambridge, 5l. to University College, Oxford, 4l. to the poor of St. Sepulchre, 10l. towards the repairs of St. Sepulchre's Church, 4l. to the poor of Clerkenwell, 10l. to the repair of Clerkenwell Church, and 8l. towards the repair of the highways as in the bill mentioned And that the said Company should yearly retain and apply to their use one fourth part of the residue of the dividends and rents in full satisfaction of all their interests in the premises and of all trouble, costs, charges, and expenses to be incurred by them about the collection, receipts, and application of the said rents and interest And that the said defendants should annually distribute the other three fourth parts of such residue amongst the several charities and for the several purposes therein-before mentioned, and in aid of the several specific gifts or sums to them rateably, and in proportion to the amount thereof respectively, to wit, 5/46ths to Peter house College, 5/46ths to University College, Oxford, 4/46ths to the poor of St. Sepulchre's, 10/46ths to the repair of St. Sepulchre's Church, 4/46ths to the poor of Clerkenwell, 10/46ths to the repair of Clerkenwell Church, and 8/46ths towards the repairs of the highways aforesaid, such payments to be made on the 25th of March in every year.

The distribution of the estate has been subsequently according to the scheme above directed.

£s.d.
The property consists of 3,355l. 17s. Consols, paid in respect of a piece of ground at the north-west end of Cow Lane, taken in 1823 by the Commissioners of Sewers, standing in the name of the Accountant General of the Court of Chancery, in the matter of the Commissioners of Sewers of the city of London, and the master, wardens, and commonalty of the Company100136
The sum of 362l. 5s. 2d. Consols, purchased by 321l. 1s. cash (as above-mentioned) standing in the corporate name of the Company (part of a sum of 36,001l. 4s. 5d. like stock, partly belonging to charities and partly to the Company)10174
No. 90, West Smithfield, by lease of the 2nd February 1842, let to Thomas Russell for 44¾ years, expiring Midsummer 188511000
No. 91, West Smithfield, by lease of the 1st July 1824, let to the said Thomas Russell for a term expiring at the same time as the last-mentioned lease5000
No. 92, West Smithfield, by lease of the 1st July 1824, let to John Mayne for a term expiring at the same time as the foregoing4000
3111010

The premises Nos. 90 and 91, front in West Smithfield, and No. 92, partly in West Smithfield and partly in King Street (formerly Cow Lane), and form an area which may be represented for the purpose of description by the following sketch:—


West Smithfield.

The leases on which this property was let were leases involving large improvements, and by the effect of these improvements the sites of the houses which were formerly Nos. 93 and 94, Smithfield, and Nos. 28, 29, and 30, Cow Lane (except so much as was taken by the Commissioners of Sewers), have become absorbed in the premises above described as Nos. 90, 91, and 92, West Smithfield.

The distribution according to the decree is as follows:—

The specific gifts directed by the decree amounting to 51l., reduces the fund to the sum of—

£s.d.
2601010
The Company's proportion is ¼th6528
Leaving a surplus to be divided into 46 parts of19582

The division of the 46 parts is as follows:—

£s.d.
Parish of Clerkenwell, poor161910
Clerkenwell Church4297
St. Pancras highways33198
Peterhouse College, Cambridge21410
University College, Oxford21410
Parish of St. Sepulchre, poor161910
St. Sepulchre's Church4297
19582 (fn. 12)

Hewer's Gift.

William Hewer, by will of the 9th September 1715 gave to the Clothworkers 100l. for the use of the poor. With the interest of this sum the Company annually debits itself. The 5l. a year is carried to the account of the Company's poor and distributed with Watson's Gift.

Hewett's Charity.

William Hewett, by will of the 4th April 1599, gave 300l. to the Company to the intent that they should pay to Bartholomew's Hospital 5l. a year, to Christ's Hospital 5l. a year, and to St. Thomas's Hospital 5l. a year; and he also gave 110l. to the Company to the intent that they should allow yearly for ever 5l. to some poor honest scholar of Cambridge studying Divinity.

The 410l. formed part of the funds which the Company appropriated for the King Street and Cheapside property mentioned in the report on Heath's Almshouses; of the income of that estate the sum of 20l. is appropriated to this Charity.

The three hospitals receive the sums of 5l. a year a piece, and the Company have increased this exhibition to the sum of 20l. with the other exhibitions. (See Pilsworth's Gift.)

Heydon's Gift.

John Heydon, by his will of the 11th March 1573, gave 100l. to the Company to be lent out to two young men of the Company, and the interest thereon 3l. 6s. 8d. to be paid to the Mercer's Company.

By an Order of the Vice-Chancellor of England of the 21st March 1839 made upon the petition of the Company under Sir Samuel Romilly's Act, relating to the said charities, it was referred to the Master to inquire and state to the Court what sums of money had come to the hands of the Clothworkers' Company under the several donations mentioned in the said petition and to approve of a scheme for lending out the several sums given to the said Company and for the application of the interest, if any, to be paid by such loans; and the Master by his report of the 21st July 1840, settled and approved of the following scheme:—

1st. That the gift of 100l. under the will of John Heydon, of 100l. under the will of Alexandre Iverie, of 100l. under the will of John Burnell, of 100l. under the will of Samuel Lese, of 100l under the will of James Stoddart, of 120l. under the will of Roger Wilcocks, and of 26l. 13s. 14d. under the will of Katherine Hylson, amounting together to 646l. 13s. 4d., with such additions thereto as therein-after mentioned, should be united together in one separate sum; and that the residue of the several other charitable gifts in the report mentioned, which are to be lent out, without interest, amounting together to 1,496l. 13s. 4d., should be united into one other separate sum, and that so much of the said several sums of 646l. 13s. 4d. and 1,496l. 13s. 4d. as should remain after payment of the costs of the petition, should be set apart as two several funds, the said firstmentioned sum to be called "the Loan Fund bearing interest," and the other to be called "the Loan Fund not bearing interest," and that the management of the said respective funds and all matters incidental thereto should be vested in the Company and their successors.

2nd. That the said Fund to be constituted of the said 646l. 13s. 4d., be lent by way of loan to freemen or members of the Company in such sums as the said Company in their discretion should think fit, but not exceeding 300l. to any one freeman or member for a period of three years at such rate of interest as after mentioned.

3rd. That forasmuch as the sums payable, or which have been applied in respect of the interest of the said several sums constituting the said 646l. 13s. 4d. have amounted to the sum of 23l. 13s. 4d., and that as the said sum of 646l. 13s. 4d. will be reduced by the payment thereout of a proportion of the costs and expenses in this matter, it is proposed that in order to keep the rate of interest sufficiently low to afford an inducement to freemen to avail themselves of the intended accommodation and at the same time to provide for the said sum of 646l. 13s. 4d., together with so much of the said 1,496l. 13s. 4d. as would make up the principal sum of 800l., to be lent out in such manner and in such sums as in the preceding article mentioned at the rate of 3l. per cent. per annum.

4th. That the residue of such sum of 1,196l. 13s. 4d., after the making up the said 800l. as aforesaid, and paying the proportion of the costs, charges, and expenses in the matter in respect of the said first-mentioned sum, be also lent to the freemen of the said Company in such sums as the said Company in their discretion should think fit, but not exceeding 150l. to any one freeman for a period of three years and without any interest whatever in respect of such loans.

5th. That in regard to the persons to whom such loans respectively are to be made, and being such freemen or members as aforesaid, the same shall be at the discretion and nomination of the said Company.

6th. That from the advancement of each such sum by way of loan as aforesaid the freeman or member to whom the same should be made shall execute a bond with two or three sureties, as may be required, whereby he and they shall become jointly and severally bound unto the said Company in a penalty of double the amount of the sum so lent and advanced, conditioned for the repayment by the said obligors their heirs, executors, or administrators of the principal sum so lent, and either with or without interest, as the case may be within the aforesaid period of three years for which such loan is to be made.

7th. That the respective persons to whom such loans shall be made shall bear and pay all costs and charges attending the making and executing of the said bonds and sureties and all other matters and things relating thereto.

8th. That in a book, to be provided and kept for that purpose by the clerk of the said Company, shall be entered the names and residences of the respective borrowers and their respective sureties, the respective professions or business, the amount of the sums lent, the times of making such loans, and the times of the repayment of the same, and any other particulars which may be thought material or necessary.

9th. That when and as often as the said Company shall have in their hands any of the moneys aforesaid ready to be lent out by way of loan under the articles aforesaid, the said Company shall cause to be posted up in some conspicuous place in their common hall, and when such moneys shall amount to 500l. or upwards, shall also cause to be advertised in two of the London daily newspapers a Notice that such moneys are ready to be advanced in loans to freemen of the Company and in the manner therein-before mentioned.

10th. That until the said sum of 800l. shall have been lent out by way of loan under the aforesaid articles in that behalf, the said Company shall pay interest at the rate of 3l. per cent. per annum for the same, and of what shall from time to time remain thereof in their hands, and so from time to time whenever any part thereof, which shall have been lent out, shall be repaid, in order that the whole of the said fund may be productive and bear interest.

11th. That the interest to be paid or received by the said Company for or in respect of the said 800l., or every or any part thereof, shall from time to time be duly apportioned and divided between the said several donations respectively given by the said John Burwell, John Heydon, Katherine Hylson, Alexander Iverie, Samuel Lese, James Stoddart, and Roger Wilcocks respectively, in the proportion to the amount of such donations respectively, or of what has been received in respect thereof, and such interest and the respective appurtenances thereof shall be applied by the said Company, as far as the same will extend, towards the charitable purposes respectively declared concerning such interest, in and by the aforesaid respective wills or instruments in that behalf.

Under this scheme advertisements are published in the following form, and the freemen of the Company apply:—

"Loan trusts under the management of the Clothworkers' Company. The Company have in hand money to be lent to their freemen in sums not above 150l. without interest, or 300l. with interest at 3l. per cent. per annum, to any one person for a period not exceeding three years, the borrower entering into a bond to the Company with two or three sureties for repayment (at the end of the first year if required)". Applications to be addressed to,
"Robert B. Towse, Clerk, " Clothworkers' Hall, Mincing Lane, London, "January 1860."

Of the sum of 800l. to bear interest, there was at the 31st December 1858 250l. not lent, and 550l. lent to freemen in sums of 300l., 100l., and 150l.

Of the money not bearing interest there was on the 31st December 1858, 734l. 1s. 4d. not lent, and 225l. lent in sums of 25l., 50l., and 150l.

The Company requires a bond with two sureties conditioned on repayment at the end of the year, but the loans to those who are considered to continue respectable and solvent are allowed to remain for three years.

The Company notwithstanding their care have lost some of the loans by the failure of the sureties and have been obliged to sue for the recovery of some of the debts.

The sum of 3l. 6s. 8d. as the interest of the 100l. under this endowment, is paid every year to the Mercers' Company. (fn. 13)

Hilson's Gift.

Robert Hilson by his will appointed 1l. 6s. 8d. to be yearly paid for the relief of Great Stanmore, and by deed poll of the 25th January 1585, after reciting that Catherine Hilson his widow for better securing the payment of the said 1l. 6s. 8d., had paid to the Clothworkers' Company 40 marks (26l. 13s. 4d.) the Company bound themselves to pay yearly the said 1l. 6s. 8d. to the churchwardens of Great Stanmore, their executors, and administrators. It is stated that this sum of 40 marks the Company ordered to be lent out for three years to some honest man of the Company upon sufficient sureties for payment of the principal and interest, and at the three years end to be lent out again, and so on from three years to three years for ever. This sum is included in the order of the Court of Chancery of the 21st July 1840, made upon petition under Sir Samuel Romilly's Act for regulating the loan charities. (See Heydon's Charity.)

The sum of 1l. 6s. 8d. a year is paid annually to the churchwardens of the parish o Great Stanmore.

Hinde's Charity.

Lady or Mrs. Hinde by her will about the year 1569, bequeathed to the said Company, 20l., upon and for similar trusts to those declared in the will of Augustin Hynde.

This money is included in the Loan Fund, administered under the scheme settled in the master's report of the 21st July 1840, referred to in Heydon's Charity.

(fn. 14) Hitchins' Charity.

Robert Hitchins, by his will of the 24th June 1680, gave 1,500l. to the Company to purchase an estate and apply the rents as follows:—To 20 poor men and 20 poor women on St. Stephen's day yearly 3¼ yards of cloth at 6s. a yard, one pair of shoes, one pair of hose, and one shirt or smock, to a minister for a sermon 20s., to him who should read the Psalms 2s., to the clerk of the Company 5s., and to the beadle 2s. 6d. And he directed that six of the men and six of the women should be inhabitants of the freedom part of St. Giles, Cripplegate. (fn. 15)

The sum of 1,500l. is a part of the consideration of the King Street and Cheapside Estate, applied by the Company in 1734, to Heath's Almshouse (q.v.) and other charities. The portion of the rent of the estate attributed to this charity is 140l. 16s. 4d.

In 1858, the expenses of the estate preparatory to the building leases were—

£s.d.
To the surveyor18180
Law expenses in 1857 and 1858, in reference to the application to the Commissioners for their sanction7810
26610

Of these expenses—

£s.d.
Hitchins' provides6102
and 5l. per cent. on the share (140l. 16s. 4d.)709
Making expenses131011

This leaves a net sum of 127l. 5s. 5d.

The clothing purchased by the endowment is given away on St. Stephen's Day, the 26th December every year. The parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate, by their churchwardens, nominate six poor men and six poor women, and the other recipients are free of the Company and selected by the court. They all receive the same description of dress according to sex, and the suits and articles are the same as are described in the report of Hobby's Charity.

The sum expended in clothing in 1858 in respect of this charity was 139l. 1s. 7d.

(fn. 16) Hobby's Charity.

John Hobby, by his will of the 12th March 1674, gave 3,000l. India stock to his executors for the purchase of lands of the yearly value of 170l. to be conveyed to 14 trustees, seven of whom to be Governors of Christ's Hospital, and seven to be of the Clothworkers' Company; and he directed that 40l. a year should be paid to Christ's Hospital to be employed in apprenticing four Blue-coat boys, and 20l. more in raising stocks for setting up such boys; and he appointed that the said Company should have 60l. a year to be laid out in clothing for 30 poor ancient persons, 12 of whom to be free of the Haberdashers' Company, and the other 18 as the said Clothworkers' Company should think fit, the clothing to be delivered with 5s. in money to each poor person on the 1st December yearly, the master to have 10s., each warden 5s., and the clerk 5s., and the residue, 50l. a year, to be yearly employed towards the discharge of 25 poor prisoners for debt in London, such as lie in for their fees, seven out of each Compter and 11 out of Ludgate.

By an indenture of the 14th March 1677, between Mary Hobby, relict and surviving executrix of the said John Hobby, of the first part, the Clothworkers' Company of the second part, and the governors of Christ's Hospital of the third part, reciting that the said Mary Hobby had found a purchase of lands of 150l. a year, and that it had been agreed that the said lands should be settled on the Clothworkers' Company, and that they should yearly pay 60l. to Christ's Hospital and should stand entrusted with the other charity, which agreement was confirmed by a decree of the Court of Chancery of the 22nd February, 29 Charles II., and further reciting that she had completed the said purchase and had made another purchase of lands of 24l. a year; it was witnessed that she conveyed to the Clothworkers' Company, certain messuages, lands, and tenements in Plumstead and Woolwich, Kent, and at Watford, Herts.

An information was filed on the 6th June 1832 against the master, wardens, and commonalty of the Company at the relation of Thomas Spenser Hall and Effingham Wilson, praying that the defendants might answer the premises and that it might be declared that the said defendants were trustees of all the messuages, &c. which they were possessed of under the said will and deed for the benefit of the charities they founded, and that all the rents and profits thereof ought to be applied to the charitable purposes therein expressed, and that it might be referred to one of the masters of the said Court to take an account of all sums of money received by the said Company for rents and profits, and also for fines and premiums on making leases of the said messuages and hereditaments. And also to take an account of the sums properly paid and expended by the defendants about the charitable purposes aforesaid. And that the said master might be directed to ascertain the amount of the sums received by said defendants yearly and every year above the sums so paid and expended, and to ascertain the amount of such surplus. And that the said defendants might be ordered to answer and pay the same, and that the same, when paid, might be applied in an augmentation of the said charities. And that it might be referred to the master to approve of a proper scheme for the application of the amount so to be paid, and also of the future surplus rents of the estates for the benefit of the said charity.

A decree was pronounced on the 10th March 1834, whereby it was declared that the several objects or persons to whom the specific sums in the pleadings mentioned, amounting to 170l. a year, were given by the will of J. Hobby, were entitled to the surplus rents and profits of the charity estates after making the said specific payments rateably and in the same proportion respectively as they are respectively entitled to the said 170l. And the defendants, by their answer, admitting a sum of 753l. to be in their hands in respect of the rents of the estates in question received by them since filing the information, it was ordered that after payment thereout of the said specified sums or gifts amounting to 170l. a year, or such of them as since the filing of the information had become due and remained unpaid and of the costs therein-after directed to be paid, the residue (if any) should be apportioned among the said several objects rateably and in proportion as they were entitled to the said 170l., and it was ordered that the future surplus of the said charity estates to be received by the said defendants after payment of all proper expenses and of the specific sums of 170l. and of such costs as after mentioned (if any) be apportioned among the said several objects entitled to the said specific sums amounting to 170l. rateably and in proportion as they were respectively entitled to the said 170l. And that the costs, &c. of the relators and of the defendants be taxed by the master in rotation and that the same be paid by the defendants out of the surplus rents received since the filing of the information, and in case they should be insufficient for that purpose then out of any future surplus rents.

The property taken and now held by the Company under the conveyance of 1677 consists of the following particulars:—

Property.Tenancy.Rent.
£s.d.
Borstall Farm, Plumstead, consisting of a farmhouse, cottages, barn, and buildings, and 115a. 1r. 5p. of land.Let to George Russell on lease for 14 years from Michaelmas 1858. 200l. was the rent in the previous lease; the present tenant and his father are stated to have improved the farm since 1842 when it came into their occupation.25000
(The tenant rents the adjoining land from Queen's College, Oxford, and his dwelling-house is on that land, and is called the Manor House of Plumstead.)
The North Kent Railway took a small portion of this farm in respect of which 201l. 5s. 2d. Reduced Annuities is standing in the name of the Accountant-General of the Court of Chancery, dividends608
Six cottages in Plumstead and 1a. 2r. 14p. of land.Let to Thos. Edwd. Whiting for 21 years from Lady Day 1859.3500
A house and shop in Plumstead.W. Blackwell (lease expiring at Michaelmas 1861).2500
Four cottages and 1a. 2r. 17p. of land at Bird's Nest Hole in Plumstead.W. Harrison as tenant from year to year.2500
Giles squire and Little High Grove Woodland in Plumstead containing 29a. 1r. 6p.Lately held by Sir Lionel Goldsmid on lease, which expired Michaelmas 1858, at 21l. 10s. per annum, but at present in hand.
The old vicarage and about 3 acres of glebe land (which were taken in exchange for premises at Bramblesbury) let at the time of the former report to Butler Adams, such exchange being made under the sanction of the Inclosure Commissioners.In hand.
The vicarage was let to Mr. Brice for 61 years at 42l. a year, to be altered into two tenements and to build four cottages, and 2a. 2r. 15p. of glebe land was let to him also at 13l. a year for 7, 14, or 21 years. No rent being paid for the latter premises, they are now let to W. Jean from Lady Day 1859 for 7, 14, or 21 years at1500
(Mr. Brice built two carcases, but not having further completed his agreement, the Company is now in possession and is offered 25l. a year for the property.)2500
The sum of 1,665l. was received from the Rev. Wm. Acworth in consideration for 5a. 2r. 8p. of land (the residue of Bramblebury not included in the Exchange) under the authority of the Charity Commissioners of the 3rd July 1857 and invested in 1,822l. 3s. 2d. Consols.
A sum of 900l. 7s. 1d. had up to July 1857 been accumulated by the process of recouping at 10l. per cent. on the income of the charity, a disbursement of nearly the same amount (902l. 12s. 10d.) made in 1842 out of the charity funds for improving the Borstall farm, and the Company added the difference between the sum accumulated to 918l. 15s., the price of 1,000l. Consols, making together 2,822l. 3s. 2d. Consols, the dividends on which are84134
Houses Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4, Nightingale Lane, Woolwich, and a washing establishment and 6 acres of land.Let to G. T. Cann for 80 years from Midsummer 1859 at 230l. for the first four years, 240l. for the fifth year, and 250l. for the remainder of the term. (This was till lately let at 175l. a year.)25000
The Hamper Paper Mills at Watford, Herts, and 28a. 1r. 33p. of land abutting on the river Calne let at 250l. per annum, but of this the Company claim as their own property the Mill and about 8 acres of land.Let to James Smith on lease for 41 years, expiring at Midsummer 1874.5000
765140

It does not appear under what circumstances or by what means the Company became entitled to 200l. a year of the rent of the paper mills. I have not been able to ascertain whether they purchased or became owners of the property adjoining the charity estate, and the question does not appear to have been dealt with by the decree of 1834. It appears by the conveyance of March 1677 that the charity property did not include what was called Hamper's Mill, and applied only to property adjoining Hamper's Mill.

£s.d.
The outgoings of this estate, consisting of quitrents, repairs, surveys, wallscott (or a rate for keeping up a river wall) would amount to about8000
The Company charge for the expenses of the management of the charity 5l. per cent. on the gross amount received, which in 1858 was about37150
£117150

The property, according to the scheme of 1834, is divisible into 17 parts, 6/17ths to Christ's Hospital, 6/17ths to the Company's clothing fund, 5/17ths to poor prisoners.

In the year 1853 the sum of 192l. 10s. 7d., and in 1858 154l. 15s. 5d. were paid to Christ's Hospital. The same sums were in those years applied to the clothing fund; the income of Evans', Heath's, Hobby's, Lambe's, Lute's, Middlemore's, and Webb's Charities amounted together to about 700l.

In the year 1858 the amount expended in clothing (including Lambe's Charity, but exclusive of Hitchins') was 708l. 19s. In May Heath's and Hobby's Charities are given away; on the 5th of September Evans' and Webb's; on the 1st of October Middlemore's; and on the 18th of October Lute's Charity is given away. The freemen of the Company and their widows know that such gifts are to be distributed at such times, and that it is necessary for them to attend at the Clothworkers' Hall and put down their names during the previous month, when the cases are inquired into and their eligibility as objects of the charities considered. Every male recipient obtains a hat, a shirt, a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers of blue cloth, and stockings and boots. The cost of these suits in April 1859 was 3l. 14s. each. The women each receive a bonnet, shawl, merino gown, flannel petticoat, a serge petticoat, shift, stockings, and shoes. The cost of these articles in April 1859 was 2l. 0s. 5d. each. The clothes are supplied by contract, and when the names of the selected recipients are written off by a member of the Court of Assistants they are entitled to go to the tradesmen indicated and obtain the clothes.

With regard to the 5/17ths for poor prisoners, there is an accumulated balance. Applications are constantly received from the governor of Whitecross Street Prison. The ordinary sum required for the release of prisoners is 3l. It is said that the present governor, Col. Martyn Hicks, has employed a person to get the poor prisoners through the insolvent court, and the expense of doing so defrayed from these funds in 1858 was 6l., and in 1859, 75l. There is now an accumulated balance of 1,221l. 12s. 8d.

The abolition of the three prisons mentioned in this endowment and the great alterations which have taken place in the modern laws and remedies between debtor and creditor would appear to render it necessary to adopt some new method of distributing charitable funds applicable to the benefit of prisoners for debt. This, however, raises a very large question, owing to the number and magnitude of the gifts for distributions in money and kind to prisoners in the metropolis and elsewhere, and it is a question which it appears to me ought to be considered in a more extensive point of view than could be taken in settling a scheme for any single charity. Instead, therefore, of recommending in this and other like cases any application to the court for a new scheme, I have rather preferred to leave the disposition of the income as it may happen to be made in the exercise of the judgment of the administrators, the capital being secure and hereafter capable of being applied in some manner more extensively beneficial to the unfortunate persons for whom it is intended than the direction for any detached and fragmentary application of a particular fund is likely to be.

With reference to the administration of this and other charities by the Company, I may here observe that in those cases where the Company do not take any beneficial interest in the charity, it is their habit to charge 5l. per cent. as the expense of general management, exclusively of the actual charges for purely professional purposes.

In the other cases where the Company take a beneficial interest, no general per-centage is charged. If the gift be, as in many cases it is, to the poor of the Company, it is right to mention that the charge is not in substance deducted, as the gifts by the Company commonly exceed the amount derived from the original benefaction.

It will be observed that a large portion of the estate of this charity is situated in the parish of Plumstead. The parish is very populous, and its inhabitants are for the most part artizans, labourers, and poor. The incumbent of Plumstead, the Rev. Wm. Acworth, attended at my inquiry and stated the educational wants of the poorer classes in his parish and the efforts which have been made by benevolent persons and by Government assistance to supply them, and urged his claims on the trustees as the owners of large real estate in his district dedicated, moreover, to charitable purposes.

I stated to the Company and its officers, in the presence of the incumbent, the disposition of the Board to afford its sanction and aid to the trustees of charities in the performance of the duties admitted to attach to real estate with due liberality, and I assured them that they might rely on the support of the Board in any application of a proper portion of the income of the charity estate to the local objects referred to.

Holligrave's Charity.

Mrs. Margaret Holligrave, by indenture of the 12th November 1595, granted to the Clothworkers' Company all her messuages, &c. in East Smithfield, upon trust, to pay to the poor of St. Botolph's, Aldgate, 20s. a year; to the poor of St. Mary, Aldermary, 20s. a year; to the prisons of Newgate, Ludgate, and the two compters, 5s. a year each, and the residue of the rents to the said Company to be distributed as follows: to the master and wardens for their pains, 20s. yearly; and the residue for the poorer sort of clothworkers, and no others, at Christmas and Midsummer.

The whole of the premises comprised in this devise were sold under an Act of 6 Geo. 4. to the St. Katherine's Dock Company for 11,150l., laid out in the purchase of 12,773l. 12s. 2d. Consols. In 1839 premises in Moorgate Street, paying ground rents of the annual value of 363l. 3s. 9d. were purchased, the stock sold for such purpose being 12,649l. 15s. 9d., leaving 123l. 16s. 5d. stock still in the Court of Chancery.

Under this purchase the Company are proprietors of the following property in fee, subject to the leases subsisting thereon:—

£s.d.
The sum of 123l. 16s. 5d. Consols standing in the name of the Accountant-General to an account, "ex parte the St. Kathe"rine Dock Company"3142
No. 61, Moorgate Street, corner of Bell Alley, let to Riddall, on lease expiring Midsummer 19166339
No. 62, Moorgate Street, let to Riddall on lease, expiring Midsummer 191616000
No. 63, Moorgate Street, let to Riddall on lease, expiring Midsummer 191614000
£3661711

The charges as to the aforesaid gift are as follows:—

£s.d.
The master and wardens of the Company100
St. Botolph's, Aldgate parish, paid to churchwardens100
St. Mary, Aldermary, paid to churchwardens100
The Poultry, Giltspur, Ludgate, and Newgate prisons, 5s. each. This is paid to the receiver appointed by the Court of Aldermen (Joseph Temple)100
To the poor of the Company (in 1858) the sum distributed as pensions in the manner described in the report of Rogers' Gift3621711
£3661711

The pensions, which were formerly of sums of 4l., have been raised and classed in a different manner, as stated under Rogers' Gift. (fn. 17)

Hussey's Charity.

Thomas Hussey, by indentures of the 4th April 1622 and the 20th March 1623, gave to the Company 120l. to pay on the eve of St. Thomas, to 20 poor men of the Company 6s. a piece; to 20 poor women 12d.; and to the clerk, two beadles, butler, and porter 12d. a piece. This bequest is apportioned to the estate purchased as stated in my report of Heath's almshouses. The sum of 7l. 5s. 5d. attributed from the rents to this charity, and the distribution of this and other similar funds and charities is mentioned under Watson's Gift.

Hynde's Charity.

Augustin Hynde, by his will of the 23rd June 1556, gave to the said Company 100l., upon condition to deliver the same to four young men of the Company, to have the occupying thereof for three years, to each of them 25l., taking good securities for the same, and so from three years to three years for ever, the said 100l. to be delivered by the master and wardens and 12 of the assistants to four young men of the said Company to have the occupying thereof for three years.

The will was proved on the 16th August 1556, and the 100l. was paid to the Company.

This is one of the charities included in the loan funds, now administered according to the report of the Court of Chancery of the 21st July 1840 referred to under Heydon's Charity.

It forms part of the moneys comprised in the schedule to that report.

Iverie's Charity.

Alexander Iverie, by his will of the 25th December 1588 (31 Elizabeth), bequeathed to the Company of Clothworkers the sum of 100l. to be paid them by his executors, which money he willed might be employed towards the relief and better maintenance of the poor people of the said Company and that such small profits as they should make for the use of the said 100l., might for ever thereafter be employed towards the relief of the poor people free of the said Company.

This is one of the charities included in the loan fund now administered according to the report of the Court of Chancery referred to in Heydon's case. It forms a part of the money comprised in the schedule to that report. The Company charge themselves with an interest of 3l. a year, which they distribute to the poor of the Company, in the same manner as the other funds described under Rogers' Gift.

Countess of Kent's Almshouses.

The Right Honourable Margaret, Countess of Kent, by an indenture of 14th July 1538, reciting that she was seised in fee of four tenements at Queenhithe, and of one tenement in Fenchurch Street, and that she and the Clothworkers' Company were possessed of a lease of a garden ground in Whitefriars, with an almshouse built by the said countess for a term of 99 years, the said countess granted the residue of her part of the said lease to the said Company, and covenanted that she had by will devised the said five tenements to the Company, for which gift and for 350l. paid by the said countess to the Company, they covenanted to pay 18l. a year for ever for seven poor almswomen resident in the said almshouses.

And by her will of the 3rd December 1540, the said countess devised all her lands and tenements in London to the said Company, to the intent that seven poor women should be maintained continually by the said Company out of the rents of the property in Fenchurch Street and Queenhithe.

The Company take under the deed and by the will of the Countess of Kent property in Whitefriars and Fishmonger's Alley, Fenchurch Street. The houses in Queenhithe appear to have been sold by the Company in 1548 for the sum of 115l. 10s.

The Whitefriars estate of the Company consists of property derived from the countess, and also of the property purchased in 1654 of Daniel Potter at the north of the almshouse for 330l.; on these premises a building lease was afterwards granted.

The whole property of the Company in Whitefriars at present is,—

£s.d.
(1.) Part of Powell's Glassworks, let on lease at a rent of13000
(2.) No. 18, Temple Street4200
(3.) No. 17, Temple Street
(4.) Nos. 1 to 5, St. Andrew's Court, Whitefriars7000
£24200

It does not appear what portion of this property belongs to the almshouse and what to the Company. There appears to be no doubt that the only property belonging to the Company originally in Whitefriars was the almshouse, and if the subsequent purchase of the Company cannot be defined, it will be difficult for them, I apprehend, to assert their exclusive claim to any part of the property as against the charity.

£s.d.
The property of the Company in Fenchurch Street now consists of No. 118, Fenchurch Street and Fishmonger's Alley, let at a rent of12500
Two tenements, Nos. 4 and 5, Fishmonger's Alley, let for 61 years, from Midsummer 18144500
Nos. 1, 2, and 3, Fishmonger's Alley, let on a building lease for 61 years, from Midsummer 18161300
No. 7, let for 61 years, from Midsummer 181731100
£214100

It is probably now impossible to ascertain whether this was taken by the Company under the deed or the will of the countess, or whether it is charged with the 18l. a year or is to any extent an absolute devise for the benefit of the charity.

The Company in the year 1770 transferred the almshouses which were originally in Whitefriars to Islington, consisting of eight tenements, built by the Company on land of their own at that place, situated in the Lower Road. These houses were rebuilt nearly on the same spot about five or six years ago, and were increased to 11 in number, with a garden for the whole. On this erection the Company expended 3,359l. The almshouses are occupied by 11 freemen's widows or freemen. They are allowed 20l. a year each (in the whole, 220l.) and coals, medical attendance, wages of gardener, and repairs amounting in the year 1858 to 158l. 18s. 11d., and 10l. per cent. on the rebuildings which amounted to 335l. 19s. 9d., making a total expenditure in the year 1858 of 714l. 18s. 8d. (fn. 18)

(fn. 19) Lambe's Clothing Charity.

By an indenture of the 12th July 1568 between the Clothworkers' Company of the one part and the Corporation of London of the other part, reciting that William Lambe intended to bequeath certain premises in the parishes of St. James in the Wall, St. Stephen Coleman, and St. Olave, Silver Street, to the said Company, it was covenanted that the said Company should on the 1st of October, and on the feast days of St. Stephen, the Annunciation of the Virgin, and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, cause a sermon to be preached in the Church of St. James in the Wall, and that at every sermon four of the livery should be present and 6s. 8d. paid to the preacher of every sermon, and 13s. 4d. to the said four liverymen.

That the said Company should give 12 gowns to 12 men at the yearly expense of 6l. 9s., and 12 gowns to 12 women at the expense of 5l. 11s., and also 12 shirts to 12 men of the value of 1l. 10s., and 12 smocks to 12 women at the expense of 1l. 4s., and 24 pair of shoes for the said men and women, such distribution to be made on the 1st October in the chapel of St. James aforesaid, amongst 12 poor aged men and 12 women being impo tent and lame, such men and women to be present at every of the said four sermons. And it was further covenanted that if the chamberlain, town clerk, and under chamberlain of the said city, or any of them should on the 1st October be present at such sermon to see the premises duly executed, the Company should pay them 6s. 8d. a piece. And that the said Company should after the decease of the donor find a chaplain who should every Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday, say divine service in the said chapel, and should duly preserve the said chapel, with a proviso that if the said donor did not by will convey the said premises to the Company to their proper use and behoof for ever discharged of all incumbrances, the said covenants should be void.

And the said William Lambe, by his will of the 11th October 1574, gave all his messuages, &c. in the abovenamed parishes (subject to a yearly rent of 6l. 13s. 4d. to the Stationers' Company) to the said Clothworkers' Company for ever to the uses, intents, and purposes of the above-mentioned deed.

The dispositions thus directed are as follows:—

£s.d.
PreacherNot paid068
Four liverymen0134
12 gowns for men690
12 gowns for women5110
12 shirts to men1100
12 smocks to women140
24 pairs of shoes630
Chamberlain, town clerk, and under chamberlainNot paid.100
22170

The Company consider that notwithstanding there is no gift of the residue, the above payments are all that they are liable to make, inasmuch as it was only upon the condition of making them that the Company entered into the covenant, and it is to be observed, that by an ultimate provision in the will, if the donor did not by will convey the said premises to the Company discharged of all incumbrances that the said covenants should be void.

A tabular statement of the property comprised in this devise is given in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (p. 220). Assuming that the conclusion come to by the Commissioners is the correct one, as upon the above circumstances it probably is, that "Lambe's pensioners owe what they receive beyond the specified sums to the voluntary benevolence of the Company," it does not appear necessary to go into the specific rents and description of the property charged, which are stated in the accounts of the Company to have produced a rental as follows.—

£s.d.
In 1853873150
" 185493513
" 18551,02890
" 185699928
" 185799310
" 1858999124

The Company continued to make the distribution to Lambe's pensioners of sums of 4l. a year each for several years after the last report, but for many years past the Company have ceased to grant new pensions of 4l. a year, the applicants for such smaller pensions not having been considered proper objects, and instead of such smaller pensions, the number of larger pensions of 10l. a year was increased, which are limited to persons of either sex of the age of 60 years and upwards. There are only three 4l. a year pensioners remaining, and there are now 50 10l. a year pensioners, as stated under Rogers' Gift.

By a provision in the will it is declared that if the Company should be negligent in the performance of the trusts, so that the same be left undone for the space of a year, the testator willed that all bequests and devises so made to the Company should be void and then he gave and devised all the said lands and premises to St. John's College, Oxford, to the use of poor scholars of the said college for ever.

The Company only charge the trust with the actual sums specified in the deed, but they actually disburse in relation to this endowment the following sums, after paying the quitrent of 3s. 2d. and 6l. 13s. 4d. to the Stationers' Company.

£s.d.
Clothing to the 12 men and 12 women, including the shoes (1858), and including 10s. 6d. each to the members of the Company who attend, and who average from 15 to 208938
The chaplain of the Company (Rev. Chas. Perring) who attends on Sundays, Wednesdays, and Fridays in the forenoon at the chapel, and reads prayers and preaches the sermon in the chapel on the 1st October, or on the Monday following, if that be on Sunday8000
The clerk of the chapel3000

The chapel, which was the ancient chapel of St. James in the Wall in Lambe's Chapel Court and Monkwell Street, was entirely taken down in 1825 and rebuilt with 10 almshouses adjoining and the chapel keeper's house (see Heath's almshouses), at an expense to the Company of 6,600l. The annual expense of repairs, rates, taxes, coals, insurance, &c. amount to about 60l. a year.

(fn. 20) Lambe's Almshouses, at Sutton Valence, Kent.

William Lambe, by an indenture of the 6th April, 22nd Elizabeth, between himself of the one part and the said Company of the other part, reciting that he had granted to the Company a messuage and land in Abbey Warley, Essex, a tilekiln, house, and land in Upminster, Essex; and reciting that he had erected six almshouses in Sutton-Valence for 12 poor almspeople; it was agreed that out of the profits of the said lands there should be yearly paid to the said Company 4l. for an annual visitation to the free school. And the Company covenanted to pay 4l. a year towards the maintenance of the people in the almshouses; and further reciting that William Lambe had by indenture of the 20th August, 18th Elizabeth, granted to the corporation of London, governors of Christ's Hospital, a term of 500 years in a tenement, &c. in Mile End, Stepney, to the intent that the said governors should yearly pay to the said Company 6l. towards the maintenance of the poor people in the almshouses. Nothing has been received from this last named gift, which appears to have been the subject of a suit in the 42nd year of Elizabeth. (Reports, p. 398, vol. 30.)

There are now six almshouses at Sutton-Valence adjoining the school premises. They are six continuous tenements with two rooms and a wash-house in each. They are occupied by inhabitants of Sutton-Valence, aged persons, men and women and married persons. They are selected by the court out of names recommended by the master of the school, the rector of the parish or his curate, and the churchwardens.

The Company pay 10l. a year to the inmate nominated in each house, as well as occasional gifts of 10s. each on their visitation and a ton of coals to each house.

Two widows and four men are now in the almshouses.

The sum has been increased at different times, and since they have received 10l. a year half relief is allowed by the parish, viz., 1s, 3d. to 1s. 6d. a week.

Laws and Regulations of the Free Grammar School at Sutton Valence, in the county of Kent, founded by William Lambe, Esquire, and extended by the voluntary bounty of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers.

Introductory Address to the Court of Assistants of the Clothworkers' Company.

Gentlemen, 1st November 1841.

Having fulfilled the duty undertaken by us, of preparing a set of laws and regulations for the government of the Company's school at Sutton Valence, which laws and regulations have duly obtained your sanction, we have only to express our hope that they may prove useful and beneficial, and tend to raise and dignify the character of an institution, enlarged by you at a very considerable charge, derived from your own funds, and from which it is hoped that the Company, in their corporate character, will derive lasting credit hereafter.

The instances are but few, in the history of the great civic companies, of an act so truly beneficent and disinterested as this, but we hope that the example, which you have herein given, will not be without its effect upon them, for the motives are undoubtedly of great weight, which should induce them to devote a portion of the wealth, derived from their ancestors, to the advancement of the sacred cause of Education, among the rising generation of the present day.

This is one of the results which eminent statesmen have had in view when the measure of a general investigation into the trusts and charities of the Livery Companies of London received the sanction of the Legislature; by anticipating that object, they will, therefore, at once create the strongest of claims, on their own behalf, to a lasting place among the great institutions of the country, and render a service to the rising generation, the importance of which our daily experience tends to elevate and exalt to the highest degree.

It is with pride and satisfaction we shall ever reflect on the part you have permitted us to take in the various measures for the improvement of the school at Sutton Valence.

William Horne, Chairman.
Huntley BaconMembers of the Committee of Record and Trusts.
T. M. Alsager
J. R. Bousfield

Preface.

A brief account of the early history and progress of Sutton Valence School, would appear to be a proper appendage to this publication.

It was founded in 1576, by William Lambe, Esq., a member of this Company, at whose death it devolved permanently upon the court as a trust, but so limited were the notions of the founder, in making a provision for its future execution, that besides assigning the house and garden in which the school was then conducted in perpetuity to the Company, the only endowment for its support was a rentcharge of 30l. a year, and even that was so irregularly collected, owing to the unsettled state of the country in the following century, that it was finally disposed of by the Company for somewhat less than 12 years' purchase.

Our predecessors did not, on that account, neglect the trust which they had undertaken. Indeed, there is no period of our history in which it cannot clearly be shown, that the Company expended much more upon the school than the original endowment, and they have incurred a very large outlay at various periods, in rebuilding and repairing the school-house. The court did, moreover, bestow a large share of their attention on the management of the school at all times, and a reference to the rules and orders will show that frequent reports of Committees were made, and that more space, perhaps, in those proceedings, is occupied by that subject, than by any other. But it must at the same time be admitted, that long periods of total neglect often succeeded to the energy thus displayed, and that the school never acquired much distinction, or was of any decided benefit to the district in which it was placed.

A new era in the Company's affairs began in the year 1837. The court had consented to the formation of various committees for the management of the general business, and the extension of the trusts and charities, and it was soon determined that the school at Sutton Valence should partake of the benefits of the improved system. The duty of reconstructing that seminary was confided to the committee of record and trusts, who applied themselves to it with so much assiduity, that by the autumn of 1838, the old school had been broken up, and all arrangements duly planned for re-opening it upon the present plan, which took place in January 1839, when a great number of the members of the court repaired to Sutton Valence to give due importance to that ceremony. Divine service was performed on the occasion in the church of Sutton Valence, and a sermon was preached by the Company's Chaplain, in which a pledge was given on their part, that they would carry out this undertaking by all the means in their power.

An examination of the scholars took place in June of the same year, which was attended by the master of the Company, the chairman of the committee of record and trusts, and several other members of the court, but was conducted privately, as in the short time since the school had been opened, it was not to be expected that any great proficiency could have been made.

The first public examination took place in June 1840, and afforded very gratifying proofs of the ability of the master, and of the industry and talent of his pupils. At the examination, however, in June 1841, the whole had assumed a greatly improved character, Edward Russell James Howe, one of the pupils, presented an essay on the effects of the Norman Conquest, so well written and so carefully reasoned, as to create the surprise of the examiner, Professor Hall, of King's College. It of course received the prize, as well as the high encomiums of all the company present. An order of the court was passed, on the report of the visitors, that Howe's essay should be printed; and it was further ordered, that in consideration of his extraordinary merit, and in the event of his becoming resident at one of the universities, he should receive 50l. annually from the Clothworkers' Company, during three years, to enable him to complete his education.

With such encouragement the school cannot fail to produce great and learned men, and to reflect great honour on those by whom it is supported.

1st November, 1841.

Laws and Regulations of Sutton Valence School as revised and adopted by court 1st November, 1848.

The Scholars.

1. Shall be of two classes.

First.—The sons of freemen of the Clothworkers' Company; and the sons of freewomen, born after the admission of their mother to the freedom, and after the death of their father; preference being given to those whose parents have filled a respectable rank, but who have been rendered unable by declining circumstances to give their children a good education.

Second.—The sons of inhabitants of Sutton Valence and its vicinity, (preference being given to those residing in that and the adjoining villages of Langley, Leeds, Chart, East Sutton, and Lenham, but the benefit, may extend, by the permission of the Company, to every part of Kent.

2. The Clothworkers' boys, six in number, to be boarded and educated at the expense of the Company.

3. No boy to be admitted under the age of nine years, nor continue in the school after the age of 16 years, unless by the special permission of the Company.

4. No boy to be admitted who has not previously received the first rudiments of education. A certificate of good health must be given, and an examination take place by a medical man, if required, previous to admission.

5. Sons of clothworkers who may be candidates, shall have their names inserted in a book to be kept for that purpose, and will then be furnished with the subjects they will be required to know; the candidates shall be examined at the hall in Mincing Lane, by the master of the school, in the presence of the master of the Company, and those who can read without hesitation, give a satisfactory answer to the leading questions in the Bible, to simple questions in geography and English history, work the first four rules in simple arithmetic, write a legible hand, and have a tolerable knowledge of the Church catechism, shall be considered as eligible for election on any vacancy occurring, when the court shall make its own selection from such names.

6. The Kent boys to receive education free of all expense, but not to be boarded at the cost of the Company; and both classes of scholars in addition to English, French, German, arithmetic, and writing, shall pursue some branch of classical or mathematical learning, and other subjects, qualifying the scholar, if required, for admission to either of the universities.

7. Application for the admission of the Kent boys to be in writing, addressed to the master of the school, accompanied by the recommendation of two respectable housekeepers, which applications are to be submitted for the approval of the court.

8. All boys not present at the opening of the school after the vacations, without a legitimate excuse, to be punished as the master may think fit; and if absent more than six days, to be subject to expulsion, at the discretion of the master and the trustees of the school.

9. The Clothworkers' boys, or any of the Kent boys, that may board with the master shall attend Divine service on the Sabbath at Sutton Valence parish church, or at any other church in the neighbourhood, attended by a master.

10. The name of each scholar, and in the case of a Kent boy the names of the persons by whom he was recommended, together with the date of his admission and of final departure from the school, shall be registered in a book kept for that purpose by the master, or by his usher under his direction, with a column for remarks by those members of the Company who may occasionally visit the school.

11. Every scholar shall wear a cap similar to that worn by boys on the foundation of other free grammar schools, to be provided annually at the expense of the Company; but in the event of its being lost or wilfully injured or damaged, his parents shall be at the expense of substituting another.

12. The school hours shall be as follows: from Lady Day to Michaelmas, in the morning from 7 to 8, and from half-past 9 till half-past 12; and from half-past 2 to half-past 4 in the afternoon. From Michaelmas to Lady Day: from 9 to 12 in the morning, and from 2 to 4 in the afternoon.

13. The holidays shall commence on the 30th June, and continue for six weeks; and on the 23rd December, and continue for five weeks; and 10 days at Easter from Maunday-Thursday, but it shall not be compulsory for the boys to leave school at the latter period.

14. An examination of the scholars shall take place previously to the Midsummer holidays every year by an examiner, to be approved by the Committee of Record and Trusts, and prizes shall be distributed to the most deserving by the master of the Company for the time being, accompanied by two of the wardens and the chairman of that committee; and the names of the scholars obtaining such prizes shall be recorded on boards to be affixed in the schoolroom for that purpose.

15. A copy of these laws and regulations shall be given to the parents immediately after election.

The Master.

1. He shall be a member of the Church of England, a graduate of one of the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge, in priest's orders, and not more than 35 years of age at the time of election.

2. He shall be allowed a salary of 120l. annually, and five tons of coals for the use of the schoolroom and establishment, and also occupy the school-house and garden adjoining, free of all rent and taxes.

3. He shall be allowed 30l. annually for the board, and all charges connected therewith of each of the six Clothworkers' boys, the Company reserving to themselves a discretionary power of increasing the number to 12 on the same terms.

4. He shall have the entire superintendence and government of the school.

5. He shall appoint, subject to the approbation of the Company, an usher or assistant master, for whom he shall be allowed 80l. annually. (fn. 21) In the event of the introduction of other masters into the school, similar allowances to be made, at the discretion of the Company as to their amount.

6. He shall appoint the books to be read in the several classes; and personally instruct the scholars, more especially the higher classes, in Latin and Greek.

7. He shall furnish to the Company at Midsummer and Christmas a report of the number of scholars during the preceding half year, distinguishing the classes, and setting forth the subjects taught in each, with such other information as he may consider expedient to communicate.

8. He shall read, or cause to be read, prayers twice a day in the school.

9. The religious instruction of the pupils shall be strictly in conformity with the doctrines and articles of the Established Church.

10. He shall not take upon himself any cure or other employment, without the previous consent of the Company.

11. He shall make the system of education the same for the foundation scholars as for those of the Clothworkers' Company. No distinction being made in the treatment of any of the boys.

12. He shall keep a register for the inspection of the members of the court, to contain a statement of the punishments inflicted from time to time, and for what cause they were inflicted.

13. He shall not inflict, unless for trivial faults, any personal chastisement at the time when the faults are committed, but carry them into effect when necessary to be inflicted on the following morning, immediately after prayers.

14. He shall take especial care that during the hours of play the boys shall not be allowed to ramble about the country, but he shall know where they are, that they may always feel under his control and observation whether present or not.

15. He shall give a bond to the Company engaging to resign his office when called upon to do so by them.

The Matron.

A house is rented in the village by the Company for boarding and lodging the day scholars on the foundation to which a matron has been appointed.

Visitors.

Besides the master and wardens of the Company who are visitors by virtue of office, the school shall be under the general superintendence of the Committee of Record and Trusts.

Exhibitions.

An exhibition of 20l. a year, applicable either to Oxford or Cambridge, has been specially created by the court for scholars on the foundation, on their becoming resident at either of those universities, but only to be bestowed on the recommendation and approbation of the master, in concurrence with the court. (fn. 22)

Two exhibitions of 10l. a year each, payable by St. John's College, Cambridge, to scholars of Sutton Valence School upon their entering the university, were founded by Mr. Francis Robins in the year 1721.

The National School of Sutton Valence.

The Company in November 1838 gave 50l. towards building the national school in the village, and 20l. subsequently towards erecting a house for the master and mistress, they have also since 1839 subscribed 24l. annually, in consideration whereof 24 boys are educated free of expense, and called "the Clothworkers' boys."

At the annual visit to Sutton Valence for the examination of the boys of the Clothworkers' school, a gratuity is given towards providing a dinner for the children of the national school.

The Free Grammar School at Sutton Valence, Kent.

By letters patent of the 9th February, 18th Elizabeth (1576), Her Majesty, at the instance of William Lambe, ordained that there should be one grammar school at Sutton Valence to be called "The Free Grammar School of William Lambe" for the education of boys and youths in grammar for all time to come; and that after the death of the said William Lambe, the Clothworkers' Company should be the governors of the said school, and they were incorporated as such governors.

And by a deed of the 10th February following, 30l. a year was made payable out of certain messuages and lands in Kent to the said Company for the maintenance of the said school, 20l. thereof for the schoolmaster, and 10l. for the usher.

And John Maplisden by his will dated the 20th June 1713, gave a rentcharge of 5l. a year issuing out of property in the parish of Ullcombe for the usher of the said school; and Francis Robins by his will of the 7th July 1720 gave 600l. to St. John's College, Cambridge, to found two exhibitions of 10l. a year a piece, to be paid to two poor deserving lads of the name or kindred of Robins or Sabb, born in Kent; and for want of such to two poor and apt lads born in Chart, Sutton, Leeds, Langley, or Lenham, and educated at Sutton school. As to this latter part of the endowment there was a boy sent from the school to Cambridge in 1854 and who remained there till 1858; and there is at the present time a boy in the school who is ready for Cambridge.

The founder, William Lambe, also charged his estates in Essex (which now belong to the Company) with 4l. to the master and four wardens for a visitation of the Sutton Valence school, which money is carried to the credit of the school.

In an account of the school, printed by authority of the Company in 1848 and which I append, it is stated that "besides assigning the houses and gardens in which the school then was conducted in perpetuity to the Company, the only endowment for its support was a rentcharge of 30l. a year, and even that was so irregularly collected, owing to the unsettled state of the country in the following century, that it was finally disposed of by the Company for somewhat less than 12 years' purchase."

In Stowe's Chronicle (edition of 1598, p. 349) it is said that "William Lambe erected a free school and six almshouses at Sutton Valence, where he was born, and appointed for the master 20l. and the usher 10l. yearly for ever, and to the six almshouses 10l. a year with an orchard and garden."

The records of the Company show that in 1594 "a convenient lodging or chamber was ordered to be made for the master over the schoolhouse."

It is not certainly ascertained whether the buildings at present existing stand on the property of the charity or on land which has been purchased by the Company. The schoolhouse was built about 1840 at an expense of 800l. It communicates with the master's house by a covered way and has dormitories over it. It was originally built for a dining room, the old schoolroom then remaining but which has since been pulled down.

It appeared at the last inquiry, that from 1760 to 1818 the sum of 2,220l. 4s. 9d. was expended in repairs of the school, dwelling and almshouses; and very large sums have since been expended on the same objects. The premises consist of the schoolmaster's house and a schoolroom detached, and these with a garden and yard and the almshouses and small gardens stand upon somewhat more than an acre of ground.

The rentcharge of 30l. was, by a deed of the 10th February 1605, sold for 360l. This money is stated not to have been re-invested and to form part of the capital funds of the Company. There is no record at least of the re-investment of the 360l., nor is there any record of the manner in which it was disposed of. There is no evidence that it has been kept in money or in any manner ear-marked. Lands or real estate have been purchased by the Company subsequently to the sale of the rentcharge from time to time; and the Company claims to be entitled to say that such purchases were made exclusively with their own money and not with the money of this charity.

The gift of John Maplisden of 5l. a year was charged on property in Ulcombe. Of this 50s. a year was paid in respect of a small farm in Ulcombe occupied by a man of the name of Bates. The farm has been recently sold, having been purchased by a gentleman named Whittich of Tenterden. The other 50s. is paid to Mr. Milligan (the master not to the usher) from a house in the village of Sutton Valence, occupied by William Higgins, formerly belonging to William Cotton Shirley and now to Sir Edward Filmer. It is supposed to be transferred in exchange for an estate called Buckhurst.

The annual expenditure of the Company on the school for several years past is exhibited in the following tabular statement:—

1852.1853.1854.1855.1856.1857.
£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.
Master's salary1465014312019360193601920019310
Board195003000024000215002100019500
Usher's salary800080008000800080008000
Books and prizes770101365189774753840
Visitation expenses238422461813025171029432210
Repairs to schoolhouse8816194130132131071732483666104
Rent and taxes4917559274452581315615116640
Exhibitions to scholars12100500050005000
Sundries1519221801419164610502621
Member of court (fees)110110110110
National school240024002400240031702400
New building, 10 per cent on outlay461110461110461110461110461110
Law expenses211531407911
Seymour and Mrs. Goodchild for books left at school.131211
630130805171082618829121096928778153

The master's house and premises over the school afford accommodation for about 12 or 13 boarders, besides the two assistant masters. It appears that in 1818 the then master had 23 boarders and had accommodation for 30; and since that time the old schoolroom was taken down.

The Company considers that at the present time 24 boys are admissible on the Kent foundation, including the parishes of Sutton Valence, East Sutton, Chard, Leeds, and Langley. This was adopted under the ordinances of November 1786. Each boy is admitted on the certificate of the master that he has received the first rudiments of education, and a certificate of good health must be given, and an examination take place by a medical man if required previously to admission.

The present master is the Rev. Henry Mawson Milligan, who was appointed in 1848. About the year 1837 or 1838, the Company began to nominate six boys, the sons of freemen, as boarders, for each of whom the Company at first paid 30l. a year, and subsequently 40l. a year. There are at the present time six Clothworkers' sons and 15 day boys on the Kent foundation, and one day boy not on the foundation. The master also has four private pupils in the house: he was not at the time of his appointment allowed to take such boarders, but he has since been permitted to do so.

The present master's salary is 180l. a year, and the usher is appointed by the master at a salary of 80l. a year. The Company subscribe 24l. annually to the Sutton Valence national school for boys and girls, which is supported by voluntary subscriptions and the payments of the children. There is also a British and Foreign school in the parish.

The master of this school has furnished me with an account of his income and expenditure (Appendix A), which does not appear in any respect exaggerated, for the purpose of showing that the receipts barely meet the expenditure and allow but very little for the restoration of furniture, wear and tear, &c. It appears that if the school is to be continued in its present form that a large sum of money must be expended by the Company in repair or rebuilding, not less than 2,000l. and upwards. The Company are under no recognised obligation to make the expenditure nor to sustain the school at any expenditure beyond the income with which it may be chargeable in respect of the 360l.

It becomes an important question in what way the duties of the Company and the educational claims of the locality and the public can be reconciled.

The present measure of usefulness of the institution appears to be small; whether the changes in local circumstances and in the increase of the opportunities of education generally are such as to impede or advance the condition of the school are matters on which I cannot form any opinion. I append to the report a copy of an address, signed by many respectable inhabitants of the district, who conclude that a school of the highest class would flourish in Sutton Valence, but at the same time appear to think that it requires considerable support from the Company, and that it should afford a commercial education. I do not see that any public object is gained by the application of large funds to sustain a grammar or middle-class school where the upper or middle classes would do nothing to support it without that expenditure. I think if the Company were to appoint a master and permit him to have the use of the school-house and premises free of rent and taxes, the school, if really necessary to the inhabitants, should he a self-sustaining establishment. The present master is desirous of resigning his appointment, and it may be more useful that his successor should be a certificated master, able to give a good commercial education and depending on his own exertions for his success. (fn. 23)

A.£s.d.
The residence, free of rent, taxes, and repairs
A garden of about half an acre
Stipend17000
Board of six boys24000
Coals750
Maplisden rentcharge2100
Salary of second master8000
499150
£s.d.
Board of six clothworkers' sons12000
Salary of second master6000
Board and lodging of ditto3000
Salary of third master5000
Coals5000
Candles and soap3000
Servants' wages9000
43000
£69150

The Sutton Valence Grammar School.

The undersigned, being the parish officers of the several parishes of Sutton Valence, East Sutton, Chart Sutton, Leeds, and Langley, beg leave to submit the following observations for the consideration of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers, trustees of the above school.

That it is within the knowledge of some of those whose names are hereunto attached that previous to the year 1838, the school, on the whole, was very well attended, both by pupils resident in the neighbourhood as well as by boarders from other parts of the county.

That subsequent to the year 1838, when a system of education of a higher class was introduced into the school until a year or two previous to the death of the Rev. Mr. Goodchild, and also during the first few years of the present master's engagement, the school appeared to go on very satisfactorily; but that the last few years it has gradually declined, and from the small number of pupils now attending it is evident that, as now conducted, the school has become of very little use to the neighbourhood.

That the undersigned can conscientiously bear witness to the great liberality shown by the Clothworkers' Company in appropriating considerable sums annually from their own funds for the purposes of the school, and they highly appreciate the views expressed by the Company in 1838 and in 1848, with the object of improving the character and value of the establishment.

That it is the opinion of the undersigned that the success of all schools of that high order contemplated by the Company can only be secured by superior talents on the part of the head master, who should be a man who has distinguished himself at one of the universities in such a manner as to be able by his own abilities and judgment to command the respect and attention of the public, and also to merit the continued support and good opinion of those who may have placed pupils under his charge.

That the undersigned feel it to be their duty to state that in their opinion the present master of the school is not well adapted to fill the office which he now holds, and in respectfully submitting that opinion for the consideration of the Company, the undersigned believe that they are only giving expression to the general feeling of the majority of the respectable residents of the parishes which they represent.

That it is the opinion of the undersigned that the healthy character of the locality in which the school is situate, its accessibility from the metropolis, its nearness to the county town, and the support and countenance which it would receive from the Clothworkers' Company are advantages of the greatest importance, and afford such inducements as without doubt would command the services of a first-class man as master of the school. In support of the opinion they entertain, that a firstclass school would meet with ample support from the neighbourhood and from the county of Kent generally, they would point out the success which has gradually attended the grammar school at Cranbrook, especially the great increase in the number of pupils at the grammar school at Maidstone, which within these two years, under the management of a new master of known ability and discretion, has risen from a state of decay, and is now a most flourishing school; and in both these cases the only limit to the number of boarders appears to be the want of adequate accommodation.

Many rumours have been circulated as to the future intentions of the trustees of the school, and it is evident that the time has arrived when same alterations must be effected in order to make the establishment of any use, either to the neighbourhood, to the Clothworkers' Company, or to the public generally.

The undersigned venture respectfully to recall the attention of the Company to the address which they issued in 1838, and especially to the memorandum prepared by them and dated the 27th of July 1848, which contain statements and suggestions of a most valuable character, and the undersigned beg leave to express their decided conviction that with masters competent by ability, discretion, and right temperament to carry out the views therein set forth, the school would become one of the first establishments of the country.

The undersigned are of opinion that it is most desirable that the school should be continued on such a footing that all the higher branches of knowledge may be there obtained which would qualify the scholars to avail themselves of the great advantages which are open to cultivated talent in this free country. They would, however, most respectfully submit for the consideration of the Company that it would be very advisable and also advantageous to many of the inhabitants of the neighbourhood that the higher course of education carried on in the school should admit of such a modification in practice that those who might desire their sons to receive a course of education there more especially adapted to the ordinary commercial and other practical business pursuits of life might have the option of availing themselves of the advantages of a good school without their children being required to go through the whole of the extended course of education hitherto contemplated by the Company.

Charles Chambers. Richard Henry. John Newman. William Farmer. John Edmed. Thomas Alfred Woollett. Edwin James Godden. William Hadley. Richard Fitch Spicer. Wm. E. Long, junr. Thomas Joy. Thomas Chambers. Thomas Avery. P. S. Punnett. Thomas Foster. John Betts. D. A. Minor. Richard Bentley. Robert Jordan.

At a meeting held at the "Bell Inn," Maidstone, on the 19th of January 1860, it was resolved unanimously: "That the chairman of the meeting be deputed to attend at Clothworkers' Hall on Tuesday the 24th instant and hand in the before-written paper; to give any evidence in support of the same; and also to hand in a copy of the same to the Inspector under the Charity Commission."

P. S. Punnett,
Chairman.

Footnotes

1 Mrs. Hannah Acton's Charity.
10th August.
Under an order of the Board of this date the abovementioned sum of 1,082l. 11s. Consols, was transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
2 John Bayworth's Gift.
25th Feb. 1862.
By an order of the Board of this date the Company were authorised to grant a lease of the abovemen tioned property for 61 years from Christmas 1860, at the rent of 30l., up to 25th March 1861, the yearly rent of 136l. 12s. 8d. up to 24th June 1864, and the yearly rent of 366l. 12s. 8d. during the remainder of the term
3 Peter Blundell's Charity.
18th July 1876.
By an Order of the Board of this date this charge of 40s. was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the official trustees of charitable funds of the sum of 66l. 13s. 4d. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
4 John Brykles' Charity.
By an order of the Board of this date this charge of 3l. 6s. 8d. was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds, of the sum of 120l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
The dividends on the stock are remitted by the Official Trustees direct to the rector and churchwardens of the Parish of Allhallows the Great.
5 Oliver Claymond's Charity.
20th Jan. 1874.
By an Order of the Board of this date the payment of 20s. to the churchwardens of the parish of Allhallows Staining was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the official trustees of charitable funds of the sum of 50l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
The dividends on the stock are remitted by the official trustees direct to the vestry clerk of the parish of Allhallows Staining.
6 George Cornell's Charity.
22nd 1878.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to apply the produce of the sale of the above-mentioned sum of 2,000l. Reduced, in the purchase of freehold ground rents at Shacklewell Lane, West Hackney, producing 79l. per annum.
7 Thomasine Evans's Gift.
12th May 1876.
By an order of the Board of this date these charges were redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 1,200l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
8 James Finch's Charity.
12th May 1876.
By an order of the Board of this date this charge of 10l. was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 350l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
9 William Frankland's Gift.
18th July 1876.
By an order of the Board of this date these charges of 1l. and 3l. were redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 133l. 6s. 8d. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
10 John Heath's Almshouses.
Of the income produced by the above-mentioned estate the proportion now applicable to Heath's Trust is estimated at 258l. 15s. 9d.
The almshouses have been removed to Islington. The site in Essex Road, Islington, valued at 3,000l. and upwards, was presented and formally dedicated by the Company to the Charity in 1873, and new almshouse buildings were erected out of the corporate as distinguished from the trust funds at a cost of 5,309l. 15s. 10d.
11 Elizabeth Heather's Charity.
Under two orders of the Board of this date the above-mentioned sums of 1,207l. 12s. 5d. Consols and 635l. 15s. 3d. Reduced were transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
12 William Heron's Charity.
The Smithfield property was taken by the Corporation of the city of London in 1876 for 21,000l. under compulsory powers, and the proceeds re-invested under an Order of the Court of Chancery, in freehold ground rents at West Hackney, producing 967l. 13s. per annum by way of rental.
The above-mentioned sums of 3,355l. 17s. and 362l. 5s. 2d. Consols were sold in 1875 and re-invested under an Order of the Court of Chancery in freehold ground rents at West Hackney, producing 139l. per annum.
22nd March 1878.
By an Order of the Board of this date, the Company were authorised to grant a lease of two pieces of land situate at the rear of "The Cedars" at Clapton, containing 15½ perches (which were acquired as part of the purchases before mentioned), for the term of 85 years from Lady-day 1877, at the annual rent of 7l.
The ground rents yield a total of 1,113l. 13s. per annum.
13 John Heydon's Gift.
The charities of John Heydon and others are now regulated by a scheme framed under the Endowed Schools Acts, 1869, 1873, and 1874, which was approved by Her Majesty in Council on 26th March 1878.
A copy of the scheme is annexed.
CHARITY COMMISSION.
In the matter of the Master, Wardens, and Commonalty of Freemen of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers of the city of London; and In the matter of the donations of Augustin Hynde, Thomas Ormston, John Mackell, Dame Elizabeth Lyon, Sir Thomas Rowe, Lady Hinde, John Halse, William Armer, John Haydon, William Lambe, Peter Shales, John Lute, Alexander Iverie, John Southall, William Blount, John Burnell, James Stoddard, Samuel Lese, James Burkin, Richard Farrington, Sir William Stone, Ralph Harmer, Roger Wilcockes, and Katherine Hylson; and
In the matter of the Endowed Schools Acts, 1869, 1873, and 1874.
Scheme for the Application of the above-named Donations.
Recital of Order in Chancery.
Whereas by an order of the High Court of Chancery, dated the 31st July 1840, and made in the matter of the Clothworkers' Company (being the above-named master, wardens, and commonalty), and of the Act of Parliament 52 George III. cap. 101, it was ordered that the sum of 2,143l. 0s. 8d. therein mentioned (being the amount of the above-named donations in the hands of the said Company), should, after deducting therefrom the costs of obtaining the said order, be lent, advanced, and disposed of as by the report of the Master in the said matter was approved and certified, that is to say, that the said sum, subject to the payment of the costs aforesaid, should be divided into two several funds to be called respectively "The Loan Fund bearing interest" and " The Loan Fund not bearing interest," and that the management of the said funds should be vested in the Clothworkers' Company, and be lent or advanced, by way of loan, to freemen or members of the said Company, in such sums and on such terms as was therein provided concerning the said funds respectively, and that the interest of the said loan fund bearing interest should from time to time be duly apportioned and divided between the several donations given by the above-named John Burnell, John Haydon, Katherine Hylson, Alexander Iverie, Samuel Lese, James Stoddard, and Roger Wilcockes respectively, in proportion to the amount of such donations respectively, or of what had been received in respect thereof, and such interest and the respective apportionments thereof should be applied by the said Company as far as the same would extend for or towards the charitable purposes respectively declared of and concerning such interest in and by the respective wills or instruments relating thereto.
Recital of application of funds under Order.
And whereas the costs of obtaining the said Order amounted to the sum of 124l. 17s. 2d., which was duly paid out of the said sum of 2,143l. 0s. 8d., whereby the same was reduced to the sum of 2,018l. 9s. 6d, which said sum, in pursuance of the said Order, was divided into two several funds, and the sum of 800l. part thereof was appropriated to the Loan Fund bearing interest, and the sum of 1,218l. 9s. 6d. to the Loan Fund not bearing interest.
Recital of loss of funds.
And whereas from time to time, since the date of the said Order, sums, amounting in all to the sum of 301l. 15s. 2d., parts of the Loan Fund not bearing interest have been lost and become irrecoverable owing to the default of borrowers and their sureties, whereby the said Loan Fund not bearing interest has become reduced to the sum of 916l. 14s. 4d.
Recital of provisions as to application of interest.
And whereas the said Order and certain of the wills and instruments therein referred to sums forming part of the annual interest of the Loan Fund bearing interest are applicable in manner following, that is to say:—
£s.d.
To the Mercers' Company368
Doles for poor of the parish of St. Michael, Crooked Lane2120
Doles for poor of the parish of Great Stanmore2128
Doles for poor of the parish of St. Martin, Ironmonger Lane2100
Doles for poor of the parish of St. Olave, Jewry1100
Doles for poor of the Clothworkers' Company1120
Recital as to apprehended further losses.
And whereas it is apprehended that, besides the said sum of 301l. 15s. 2d., other parts of the said Loan Funds, or one or other of them, amounting in all to the sum of 1,000l., or thereabouts, may in fact, on being called in, prove to be irrecoverable, owing to the default of borrowers and their sureties, but the nominal sums standing to the credit of the said Loan Funds respectively in the books of the Clothworkers' Company are as follows, that is to say:—
£s.d.
The Loan Fund bearing interest80000
The Loan Fund not bearing interest916144
Making together the sum of1,716144
Recital of desire of Clothworkers' Company to apply funds to education.
And whereas the Clothworkers' Company are desirons that the said Loan Funds, or so much of the same respectively as is now recoverable, but subject to the payment of the said several annual sums payable to the Mercers' Company and to the poor of the said parishes of St. Michael, Crooked Lane, Great Stanmore, St. Martin, Ironmonger Lane, and St. Olave, Jewry, amounting in all to the annual sum of 12l. 11s. 4d. (herein-after called the external charges), and also that the said sums hitherto applicable to doles payable out of interest of the Loan Fund bearing interest to poor of the Clothworkers' Company, amounting in all to the annual sum of 11l. 2s. 0d., should be applied for the advancement of education in manner herein-after appearing.
Recital of proposed gift by Clothworkers' Company.
And whereas the Clothworkers' Company, with a view to the further advancement of education, have offered to make up out of their corporate funds all the actual and apprehended deficiency of the said Loan Funds respectively, so as to complete the full sum of 2,018l. 9s. 6d. (being the said sum of 2,143l. 0s. 8d. in the hands of the Clothworkers' Company at the date of the said Order, less the costs of obtaining the same), as the sum to be made applicable to the advancement of education as aforesaid:
Declaration under Endowed Schools Act, 1869, § 30.
Now it is hereby declared by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, with the consent of the Clothworkers' Company, that it is desirable to apply for the advancement of education the said several Loan Funds, subject to the payment of the external charges, and also the said sums hitherto applicable to doles payable out of interest of the Loan Fund bearing interest to the poor of the Clothworkers' Company.
Future adminstration.
And the said Loan Funds (subject as aforesaid), and also the said sums applicable to doles to poor of the Clothworkers' Company, shall henceforth be administered in accordance with the following provisions of this scheme:
Payment to North London Schools for girls on certain terms.
1. As soon as conveniently may be, the Clothworkers Company shall pay to the governing body of the trust for carrying on the North London Collegiate and Camden Schools for Girls the said full sum of 2,018l. 9s. 6d. (including therein the said several Loan Funds, or so much thereof as may now be recoverable), to be held by the said governing body in trust to apply the same in the erection of school buildings in accordance with the provisions of the subsisting scheme for the management of the said trust, and in addition to the moneys by the said scheme authorised to be applied in like manner. Provided that such buildings shall comprise a principal hall, to be called the Clothworkers' Hall, for the assembly of the girls attending the collegiate school of the said trust, and for other purposes of the said trust: Provided also, that the said governing body shall in every year, if required so to do by the Clothworkers' Company during such year or within reasonable time afterwards, pay to the said Company the said sum of 12l. 11s. 4d. in respect of the external charges: Provided lastly, that the said governing body, in the management of the said trust, shall comply with the provisions of this scheme, so far as the said trust may be affected thereby.
Provision for external charges.
2. From and after the date of this scheme the Clothworkers' Company shall pay and distribute the external charges as heretofore, by means of the said annual sum of 12l. 11s. 4d., or otherwise, as they think fit.
Regard to freemen and members of Clothworkers' Company.
3. Daughters of poor freemen or members of the Clothworkers' Company recommended as meritorious to the said governing body by the master, wardens, and court of assistants of the said Company, by writing under the hand of the master, or the hands of any two of the wardens, shall, on being found fit in accordance with the provisions of the scheme for the management of the said trust, and on payment of the entrance and tuition fees payable by candidates for admission for the time being, be admitted to the schools of the said trust in preference to other candidates for admission; provided, that whenever 10 scholars having had the benefit of such preference, are attending the schools, no further such recommendation as aforesaid shall be made by the said master and wardens until at least one of such scholars shall have ceased to attend the schools.
Charity Commissioners to make new schemes.
4. The Charity Commissioners may from time to time, in the exercise of their ordinary jurisdiction, frame schemes for the alteration of any portions of this scheme, provided that such schemes be not inconsistent with anything contained in the Endowed Schools Acts, 1869, 1873, and 1874.
Loan Funds to be governed exclusively by this scheme.
5. From and after the date of this scheme the said Loan Funds and premises shall for every purpose, except as herein provided, be administered and governed wholly and exclusively in accordance with the provisions of the same scheme, notwithstanding any former or other scheme, Act of Parliament, charter or letters patent, statute, or instrument relating to the same premises.
Scheme to be printed and sold.
6. The Clothworkers' Company shall cause this scheme to be printed, and a copy to be given to every master and warden of the Company, and to every chairman of the said trust for carrying on the North London Collegiate and Camden Schools for Girls upon their respective appointments, and copies may be sold at a reasonable price to all persons applying for the same.
Date of scheme.
7. The date of this scheme shall be the day on which Her Majesty by Order in Council declares her approbation of it.
14 Robert Hitchins' Charity.
This charity is now regulated by a scheme framed under the Endowed Schools Act, 1869 and amending Acts, which was approved by Her Majesty in Council on 20th November 1880.
A copy of the scheme is annexed.
The portion of the rent of the estate attributed to this charity is now 323l. 9s. 9d.
CHARITY COMMISSION.
In the matter of the Charity under the management of the Clothworkers' Company of the city of London known as Hitchins' Charity, established by the will of Robert Hitchins; and
In the matter of the Endowed Schools Act, 1869, and amending Acts.
Scheme for applying for the advancement of Education the endowment of the above-mentioned charity, subject as in this scheme mentioned.
Advancement of education.
1. It is hereby declared, with the consent of the governing body, that it is desirable to apply for the advancement of education the endowment of this charity, subject to a yearly payment of 3l. 9s. 9d. to be made thereout, as heretofore, for a sermon on St. Stephen's Day and for expenses incidental thereto.
The endowment shall henceforth be administered in accordance with the provisions of this scheme under the name of the Hitchins Foundation, herein-after called the foundation.
Governing body.
2. Subject as herein provided, the governing body of the foundation shall be the master, wardens, and commonalty of freemen of the art and mystery of Clothworkers of the city of London, being the above-named Company, and, as such governing body, herein-after called the governors.
Religious opinions no disqualification for membership of governing bodies.
3. Religious opinions, or attendance or non-attendance at any particular form of religious worship, shall not in any way affect the qualification of any person for being one of any governing body under this scheme.
Vesting property.
4. From and after the date of this scheme, all stock in the public funds and other securities belonging to the foundation, and not hereby required or directed to be otherwise applied or disposed of, shall be transferred to the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in trust for the foundation.
Management of property.
5. The estates and property of the foundation shall be managed by the governors according to the general law applicable to the management of property by trustees of charitable foundations.
Accounts.
6. The accounts of the governors in respect of the foundation shall be made up and balanced to the 31st day of December in every year. The accounts shall be examined by the governors and signed by their clerk, if any, or other officer, within three calendar months after the day to which they are made up. As soon as practicable after the accounts are so signed they shall be audited in accordance with regulations to be approved by the Charity Commissioners.
Statement of accounts.
7. The governors shall cause a statement showing their receipts and expenditure in respect of the foundation to be printed in such form and with such particulars as may be from time to time prescribed by the Charity Commissioners, and shall send the same within 30 days after the audit to the managers hereinafter mentioned and to the Charity Commissioners, and publish an abstract thereof in one or more newspapers. Such abstract shall be in the form given in Part I. of the schedule hereto, unless some other form is allowed by the Charity Commissioners, in which case the form so allowed shall be followed,
Apportionment of income.
8. The income of the foundation, subject as aforesaid, after payment of the expenses of management of property and business and any other necessary or proper outgoings, shall be divided into 40 equal shares. Of such shares 12 shall be a separate branch to be called the parochial branch of the foundation, and shall be paid to the governing body thereof herein-after mentioned, to be by them applied in accordance with the provisions in that behalf herein-after contained.
Educational trusts for benefit of children of free men or women of Company.
9. Out of the remaining 28 shares the governors shall apply the sum of 100l. yearly for the education of the sons or daughters of free men or women of the Clothworkers' Company, in accordance with any rules or regulations of the said Company in that behalf for the time being in force, not being inconsistent with anything contained in the Endowed Schools Act, 1869, and amending Acts.
Residue for Exhibitions.
10. The residue of the said 28 shares shall, after providing for expenses, if any, of examinations, be applied in maintaining exhibitions, each of a yearly value of not more than 30l., tenable at any place of education higher than elementary to be approved by the governors. These exhibitions shall be competed for by girls who have for three years at least attended any of the public elementary schools within the school district of the metropolis, and have passed in one or more subjects in one of the two highest standards of examination for the time being recognised by the regulations of the Education Department, or in an equivalent examination; but shall in other respects be subject to such conditions of award and tenure not inconsistent with the provisions of this scheme as the governors may fix. Any such exhibition for which there is no duly qualified candidate of sufficient merit shall for that occasion not be awarded, and any amounts so left not disposed of shall be accumulated for the like purposes.
Parochial Branch.
Governing body of parochial branch.
11. The governing body of the parochial branch of the foundation, herein-after called the managers, shall be the following persons, that is to say:—
The master and the two senior wardens of the Clothworkers' Company for the time being; and
The two churchwardens for the time being of the parish of St. Giles-without-Cripplegate in the city of London, if they shall respectively be willing to accept the office.
Declaration by managers on entry into office.
12. Every manager shall, at or before the first meeting which he attends upon his first or any subsequent entry into office, sign a memorandum declaring his acceptance of the office of manager, and his willingness to act in the trusts of this scheme. And until he has signed such a memorandum he shall not be entitled to discharge the functions of a manager.
Meetings of managers.
13. The managers shall hold meetings in the hall of the Clothworkers' Company, or in some convenient place in the parish of St. Giles-without-Cripplegate, or elsewhere in the city of London, as often as may be found necessary or desirable, and at least twice in each year, on and at convenient days and at times to be appointed by themselves, and to be notified to each manager by the clerk, if any, or by some other person acting under the direction of the managers, at least seven days previously to every meeting.
Preliminary meeting.
14. A preliminary meeting for the arrangement of the conduct of the business shall be held upon the summons of the master of the Clothworkers' Company upon some day to be fixed by him, being within one calendar month after the date of the scheme.
Chairman.
15. The master of the Clothworkers' Company for the time being shall be the chairman of the meetings of the managers, and the managers shall make regulations for supplying his place in case of his absence.
Quorum and voting.
16. A quorum shall be constituted when three managers are present at a meeting. All matters and questions shall be determined by the majority of the managers present at a duly constituted meeting; and in case of equality of votes the chairman shall have a second or casting vote.
Special meetings.
17. The chairman or any two managers may at any time summon a special meeting for any cause that seems to him or them sufficient. All special meetings shall be convened by or under the direction of the person or persons summoning the meeting by notice in writing delivered or sent by post to each manager, specifying the object of the meeting. And it shall be the duty of the clerk, if any, to give such notice when required by the chairman or by any managers having a right to summon such meeting.
Minutes.
18. A minute book and proper books of account shall be provided by the managers, and kept in some convenient and secure place of deposit to be provided or appointed by them for that purpose, and minutes of the entry into office of every new manager and of all proceedings of the managers shall be entered in such minute book.
Accounts.
19. The managers shall cause full accounts to be kept of their receipts and expenditure, and such accounts shall be stated for each year, and examined and passed annually by the managers at the first meeting in the ensuing year, unless some other meeting shall be appointed for the purpose with the approval of the Charity Commissioners. Every such account shall be signed by the managers present at the meeting at which it shall be passed.
The managers shall cause sufficient abstracts of their accounts to be published annually for general information. Such abstracts shall be in the form given in Part II. of the schedule hereto, unless some other form is allowed by the Charity Commissioners, in which case the form so allowed shall be followed.
Managers may act although body not full.
20. The managers for the time being, if a quorum is constituted, shall have power to act for all the purposes of this scheme, although the number of managers as herein-before constituted is not full.
Application of income.
21. The managers shall apply the yearly amount to be paid to them as aforesaid in gifts of money or clothing, of such amount or value respectively as they shall fix, to girls under the age of seven years in the elementary school of the foundation of Lady Eleanor Holles in the said parish of St. Giles-without-Cripplegate otherwise St. Giles, Cripplegate, who have for not less than twelve calendar months attended that school, and who are certified by the principal teacher of that school as having been regular in attendance and diligent in their studies.
General.
Religious exemptions.
22. No boy or girl shall by reason of any exemption from attending prayer or religious worship, or from any lesson or series of lessons on a religious subject be deprived of any advantage or emolument under this foundation to which he or she would otherwise have been entitled.
Further endowments.
23. The governors and the managers may respectively receive any additional donations or endowments for the general purposes of their respective trusts. They may also respectively receive donations or endowments for any special objects connected with such trusts, which shall not be inconsistent with or calculated to impede the due working of the provisions of this scheme. Any question arising upon this last point shall be referred to the Charity Commissioners for decision.
General power of governing.
Bodies to make regulations.
24. Within the limits prescribed by this scheme each governing body shall have full power from time to time to make regulations for the conduct of their business and for the management of the foundation so far as relates to such governing body, and such regulations shall be binding on all persons affected thereby.
Question of proceedings under scheme.
25. Any question affecting the regularity or the validity of any proceeding under this scheme shall be determined conclusively by the Charity Commissioners upon such application made to them for the purpose as they think sufficient.
Construction of scheme.
26. If any doubt or question arises in either governing body as to the proper construction or application of any of the provisions of this scheme, such governing body shall apply to the Charity Commissioners for their opinion and advice thereon, which opinion and advice when given shall be binding on such governing body and all persons claiming under the foundation who shall be affected by the question so decided.
Jurisdiction of ordinary abolished.
27. From the date of this scheme all jurisdiction of the ordinary relating to or arising from the licensing of any master under the foundation shall be abolished.
Charity Commissioners may make new schemes.
28. The Charity Commissioners may from time to time, in the exercise of their ordinary jurisdiction, frame schemes for the alteration of any portions of this scheme, provided that such schemes be not inconsistent with anything contained in the Endowed Schools Act, 1869, and amending Acts.
Foundation to be governed exclusively by this scheme.
29. From and after the date of this scheme the foundation shall for every purpose, except as herein provided, be administered and governed wholly and exclusively in accordance with the provisions of this scheme, notwithstanding any former or other scheme, Act of Parliament, charter, or letters patent, statute, or instrument relating to the subject matter of this scheme.
Scheme to be printed and sold.
30. The governors shall cause this scheme to be printed, and a copy to be given to every manager, and copies may be sold at a reasonable price to all persons applying for the same.
Date of scheme.
31. The date of this scheme shall be the day on which Her Majesty by Order in Council declares Her approbation of it.
THE SCHEDULE.
The Hitchins Foundation.
PART I.
Abstract of Governor's Accounts for year ending—
N.B.—Receipts or expenses not falling under any specific heads should be inserted separately in an appropriate place under one of the more general heads.
Annual Income Receivable.
£s.d.
Houses or land lent on lease for 21 years or less, gross rental
Houses or land let on lease for more than 21 years, gross rental
Houses or land annual tenancies, gross rental Rentcharges
Mineral rent
Interest on unpaid purchase moneys of lands taken or sold
Government stock, annual dividends
Interest or dividends on other investments (to be set out separately)
Special or casual receipts
Total gross annual income£
Receipts for Year ending—
From Endowment.
£s.d.£s.d.
*Rents for the year received
Arrears of rent received
£s.d.£sd.
Sales of timber, or profits of woods
Minerals
Specify whether sale, rent, or royalties.
Dividends on Government stock
Interest or dividends on other investments (to be set out separately)
Interest on cash at bankers
Special or casual receipts
2. Incidentals.
Property tax returned
Total receipts£
Expenses.
1. Management of Business.
£s.d.£s.d.
Salary of clerk or other officers Postage, stationery, stamps, &c.
Law expenses (ordinary)
2. Charges on the Foundation.
Specify in detail.
3. Expenses on Property.
Repairs
Rates and taxes (excluding Property tax)
Insurance
Land tax, &c.
4. Temporary annual Payments.
Property tax
5. Payment to Managers of Parochial Branch.
6. Payment for educational purposes in accordance with the Company's regulations.
7. Exhibitions.
Expenses, if any, of examination
Payments to Exhibitioners
8. Investments made during the year.
Total expenses£
PART II.
Parochial Branch.
Abstract of Managers' Accounts for Year ending—
Receipts.
1. From Endowment.
£s.d.£s.d.
Received from Governors
Interest on investments
Interest on cash at bankers
Balance at commencement of account
Total£
Expenses.
£s.d.£s.d.
1. Management of Business.
£s.d.
* Arrears of rent still due for current year
" " previous years
£s.d.£s.d.
2. For Children in Lady Eleanor Holles' School.
Gifts in money
Expenditure on clothing
Total expenditure
Unapplied surplus (less current balance)
Balance in hand at close of account
Total£
15 He directed that six of the poor men and six of the poor women should be natives and inhabitants of the said freedom part of the parish of St. Giles without Cripplegate aforesaid, if so many were to be annually found, but if not to be found then to such six poor men and six poor women, inhabitants of the said part of the said parish as the churchwardens of the said freedom part of the parish for the time being should think the fittest objects of charity to receive the same.
16 John Hobby's Charity.
2nd July 1867.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of a piece of ground at Plumstead on the south side of the high road leading from Woolwich to Erith with the messuage then lately known as the Vicarage house, but since converted into two tenements, that to the westward being a beershop called "The Volunteer," and that to the eastward being in the occupation of Harding; and of pieces of ground adjoining eastward of the herein-before described premises, with the four newly-erected messuages fronting the said high road, for 60 years from Midsummer 1860, at the annual rent of 40l.
4th Nov. 1867.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to grant a lease to the personal representatives of the late G. T. Cann, of pieces of land at Woolwich containing 3a. 1r. 4p., bounded on the north by Nightingale Lane, and on the south in part by James' Lane, together with the three messuages numbered 1, 2, and 3, Prospect Place, Nightingale Lane, and the two cottages numbered 4 and 5, and stable in Prospect Place; also the two newly-erected messuages opposite Nightingale Lane, and the messuages, shed, and drying-houses adjoining Jackson's Lane, for 80 years from Midsummer 1859, at the annual rent of 200l.
The lease was accordingly granted by the trustees on the 6th November 1867.
12th June 1868.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to sell a piece of land then or lately used as a reed bed, containing 2a. 3r. 6p., lying next the River Thames at Plumstead Marshes, and then or lately let on lease to Mr. George Russell as portion of Borstal Farm.
The purchase money, 437l. 13s. 5d., was invested in the name of the official trustees in the purchase of 461l. 18s. 6d. Consols.
1st Dec. 1868.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to grant leases of a piece of land fronting Nightingale Lane and Nightingale Vale, Woolwich, containing 3a. 1r. 13p. for 80 years from Michaelmas 1868, at the aggregate rent of 80l.
1st March 1870.
By an order of the Board of this date the following scheme was established for the future regulation of John Hobby's Charity for Imprisoned Debtors.
Scheme.
1. The income of the charity shall be received by the Clothworkers' Company of the city of London, and shall be applied by them in manner herein-after provided.
2. The Company shall immediately after the passing of this scheme apply the sum of 1,942l. 4s. 4d., being the balance of surplus income now in their hands, in manner following, that is to say, they shall pay 500l. to themselves in aid of the funds for the improvement of the Grammar School at Sutton Valence in the county of Kent, and the residue they shall pay to the treasurer of the Corporation for Middle Class Education in the metropolis and suburbs thereof, to be applied by that corporation to the purposes of their schools, with a special view to the advancement of technical instruction in connexion therewith.
3. The Company shall be at liberty out of the income of the charity to apply yearly sums not exceeding the amounts herein-after mentioned in aid of any school or schools established for the education of the poor of the several parishes herein-after named and conducted under such regulations as will not operate to exclude any persons on account only of their religious creed or persuasion, that is to say:—
£
In the parish of Plumstead, not exceeding48 yearly.
" Woolwich "30 "
" Watford "6 "
" Sutton Valence "24 "
4. The remainder of the income of the charity shall be applied at the discretion of the Clothworkers' Company in aid of such sick or convalescent hospitals or dispensaries, or reformatory, industrial, or other schools, or such other institutions for the cure or relief of the physical maladies or the moral or social evils affecting the poorer or industrial classes of London and its neighbourhood, or providing for the instruction of the same classes as shall from time to time appear to the Company most in want of support and most calculated to effect the objects of restoring the physical strength or developing and improving the mental and moral habits which are necessary to make useful, selfsupporting, and efficient members of society.
6th August 1875.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to apply the proceeds of the sale of the above-mentioned sums of 1,822l. 3s. 2d. and 1,000l. consols, in and towards the purchase of freehold ground rents at West Hackney yielding 119l. 17s. 1d. per annum.
6th August 1875.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to apply the proceeds of the sale of the above-mentioned sum of 461l. 18s. 6d. Consols towards the purchase of a piece of land situate at West Hackney with four private dwelling houses thereon known as numbers 24, 25, 26, and 27, St. Mark's Villas, then demised for terms of 96 years from Lady Day 1870, at rents amounting in the whole to 26l.
The purchase money for the above, amounting to 650l., was proposed to be provided in part by the sale to be effected under an order of the High Court of Chancery of the above-mentioned sum of 201l. 5s. 2d. Reduced.
28th Jan. 1879.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to sell two cottages at Plumstead opposite to the "Volunteer" beershop in the high road, with the appurtenances containing in the whole 509 square yards, for 450l.
10th June 1879.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to apply the sum of 325l., part of the said sum of 450l., in effecting the purchase in fee in trust for the charity of a piece of land situate in Hancock Street, Woolwich, with three dwelling houses thereon known as numbers 13, 14, and 15, Hancock Street, and formerly known as numbers 9, 11, and 13, and to provide the costs and expenses of and incident to the purchase out of the balance of the said sum of 450l., and to apply the residue thereof towards the payment of any sums owing by the Charity in respect of the purchase of ground rents amounting to 119l. 17s. 1d., authorised by the said first order of 6th August 1875.
9th March 1880.
By four orders of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to sell the hereditaments under mentioned, at the prices set opposite to each lot.
No. of Lot.Description.Price.
£
1A plot of freehold land containing 1a. 1r. 31p., situate at Plumstead, having a frontage of 235 feet on the south to the high road leading from Woolwich to Erith and bounded on the north by the Southeastern Railway and then in the occupation of Mr. Goodhugh.790
2A plot of freehold land, situate at Plumstead, having a frontage of 86 feet to the high road leading from Woolwich to Erith containing 35 poles with four brick built cottages standing thereon formerly known as Burrows Row, and then in the occupation of Mr. Goodhugh.530
3A plot of freehold ground containing 2a. 0r. 35p., situate on the east and north sides of Skittles Lane, Plumstead, having a frontage thereto of 560 feet, and then in the occupation of Mr. Jeans.980
4A plot of freehold ground containing 1r. 37p., situate on the south side of Skittles Lane, Plumstead, having a frontage of 194 feet thereto and then in the occupation of Mr. Jeans.250
Total2,550
The sum of 2,000l., part of the purchase moneys, amounting to 2,550l., was invested in the name of the official trustees in the purchase of 1,939l. 7s. 10d. Metropolitan Consolidated 3l. 10s. per Centum Stock.
The remainder of the purchase moneys (namely 550l.) will be dealt with under a further order of the Board, partly in payment to Mr. Lonergan of 350l. as hereafter mentioned, and partly in payment of the expenses attending the sales and the surrender hereafter mentioned.
20th March 1880.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were advised that they might accept the surrender of certain hereditaments at Woolwich comprised in the above-mentioned lease of 6th November 1867.
By another order of the same date the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of a piece of ground situate on the south side of Nightingale Lane, Woolwich, with the two messuages thereon known as Nos. 6 and 7, Yorke Crescent, Nightingale Lane, for 59¼ years from Lady Day 1880, at the annual rent of 20l.
Nos. 6 and 7, Yorke Crescent, formed part of the hereditaments comprised in the surrendered lease of 6th November 1867.
28th July 1882.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to sell a piece of meadow land, containing 5a. 0r. 4p., situate at Plumstead Common, subject to a subsisting lease for 14 years expiring at Michaelmas 1886, at a rent of 20l. for 1,025l. sterling.
By another order of the same date the trustees were authorised to effect the purchase in trust for the charity of the hereditaments mentioned in the schedule hereto, at the price of 3,200l. sterling, to be provided in part by the appropriation of the said sum of 1,025l., and in further part by the sale of the said sum of 1,939l. 7s. 10d. Metropolitan Consolidated 3l. 10s. per Centum Stock, and as to the residue by means of a loan from the Company, not bearing interest and repayable within seven years.
SCHEDULE.
Description of Property.Term of Existing Leases.Total Ground Rents.
£s.d.
The sites and appurtenances of messuages, situate at West Hackney, and being,—
I. "The Manor Tavern," and Nos. 13, 15, 17, and 19, Rectory Road.99 years from Christmas 1862.5000
II. Nos. 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, and 33, Rectory Road.99 years from Christmas 1877.7300
12300
The Board have provisionally approved the grant of building leases of (1) a piece of land lying between Nightingale Lane and Nightingale Place, Woolwich, containing, exclusive of roads intended to be formed at the cost of the lessee, 2a. 1r. 13p.; (2) a piece of land adjoining that last mentioned, containing 2r. 36p.; and (3) three cottages numbered 13, 14, and 15, Hancock Street, Woolwich, for the term of 68½ years from Lady Day 1880, at rents amounting in the whole to 222l. per annum.
Property (1) formed the remainder of the hereditaments comprised in the surrendered lease of 6th November 1867.
Property (2) formed part of the hereditaments comprised in the building agreement with Mr. Lonergan authorised by the order of 1st December 1868, who has surrendered this property in consideration of the payment to him of 350l.
Property (3) was acquired under the order of 10th June 1879.
31st Oct. 1882.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of five houses in Milward Street, Nightingale Vale, at the total annual rent of 11l. 5s.
3rd April 1883.
By an order of this date, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of three houses in Milward Street, at the total annual rent of 6l. 15s.
17 Margaret Holligrave's Charity.
The above-mentioned sum of 123l. 16s. 5d. Consols was sold in 1876 and re-invested, under an order of the Court of Chancery, in freehold ground rents at West Hackney, producing 4l. 10s. 2d. per annum.
18 Countess of Kent's Almshouses.
28th March 1876.
By an order of the Board of this date, the charge of 15l. 5s., part of the above-mentioned sum of 18l. (whereof 2l. 15s. given for superstitious uses, was purchased of the Crown by the Company in 1551) was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 600l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
24th July 1879.
By an order of the Inclosure Commissioners of this date an exchange was effected between the Company as trustees of the charity and the Company in their corporate right of certain lands and buildings in Temple Street.
30th June 1882.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of the "White Swan" public-house (which includes the site of Nos. 17 and 18, Temple Street) for 80 years, from Christmas 1880, at the annual rent of 250l.
19 William Lambe's Clothing Charity.
This charity is now governed by an Act of Parliament known as William Lambe's Chapel and Estate Act, 1872.
A copy of the Act is annexed.
Chapter Cliv.
A.D. 1872.
An Act to provide for the building and endowment by the Clothworkers' Company of a new Church in lieu of Lambe's Chapel, Cripplegate, for the disposal of the Site of such Chapel, and of other property comprised in the Will of William Lambe, citizen and clothworker of London, deceased, and for the variation of certain charitable gifts; and for other purposes. [25th July 1872.]
Indenture, dated 12th July, 10th Eliz.
Whereas by an indenture executed in duplicate, and made the twelfth day of July, in the tenth year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, between the master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London on the one part, and the mayor and commonalty and citizens of the said city of London of the other part, it was witnessed as follows; (that is to say,) "That whereas William Lambe of London, gentleman, by writing sufficient in the law intended to declare his last will and testament concerning the disposition of the messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments which then he had set and being in the parish of Saint James in the Wall nigh Cripplegate, of London, Saint Stephen in Coleman Street, of London, and of Saint Olave in Silver Street, within the city of London, and by the same to give and bequeath the premises to the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London, and to their successors for ever: Now for furtherance of the good intent and purposes for which chiefly the said William Lambe intended to make and declare his said last will touching the premises in manner and form aforesaid, it is covenanted, granted, and agreed by and between the parties to these presents, at the special instance of the said William Lambe, in manner and form following; that is to say, the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London for them and their successors do covenant and grant to and with the said mayor and commonalty and citizens of the city of London and their successors by these presents, that they, the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London and their successors, from the day of the decease of the said William Lambe for evermore shall and will yearly, on the first day of October and on every of the feast days of Saint Stephen, the Annunciation of Saint Mary the Virgin, and of the Nativity of Saint John Baptist, cause some godly learned man to make one sermon within the chapel or church of St. James in the Wall aforesaid, in the forenoon of every of the said days, the first of the said sermons to be made at that day or feast of the day or feasts aforesaid that first shall come after the decease of the said William Lambe, and that at every of the said sermons there shall be present in the chapel or church aforesaid four of the livery of the said Company of Clothworkers, to see such things as by these presents are there appointed to be done duly executed, and that the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London and their successors shall pay to the preacher of every such sermon, immediately after the making thereof, six shillings and eightpence of lawful money of England, for his pains taken therein, and on every such day to the said four clothworkers that shall be there present thirteen shillings and fourpence for their pains taken touching the premises; and furthermore that the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London and their successors shall and will yearly, after the decease of the said William Lambe, for evermore cause twelve gowns meet for 12 men to be new made of good new frieze, every gown to contain six and a half yards of frieze, (if so be that twelve such gowns may yearly be conveniently bought and made ready to be worn with the yearly expense of six pounds nine shillings of lawful money of England,) or else, in case the said sum of six pounds nine shillings will not suffice thereunto, then shall and will yearly, after the decease of the said William Lambe, for evermore cause twelve gowns to be made for twelve men such as may conveniently be bought and made ready to be worn with the expense of six pounds nine shillings yearly, and furthermore shall and will yearly, after the decease of the said William Lambe, for evermore cause twelve gowns meet for twelve women to be new made of good new frieze, every gown to contain five and a half yards of frieze, (if so be that twelve such gowns may yearly be conveniently bought and made ready to be worn with the expense of five pounds eleven shillings of lawful money of England yearly,) or else, in case the said sum of five pounds eleven shillings will not suffice thereunto, then shall and will yearly, after the decease of the said William Lambe, for evermore cause twelve gowns to be made for twelve women such as may conveniently be bought and made ready to be worn with the said expense of five pounds eleven shillings yearly; and furthermore shall and will yearly, after the decease of the said William Lambe, for evermore cause twelve shirts meet for twelve men to be made of canvas or lockram, every shirt to contain two and a half ells apiece, the price of every ell twelvepence of lawful English money, and also twelve smocks meet for twelve women to be made of canvas or lockram, every smock to contain two ells, the price of every ell twelvepence, and also shall provide and buy yearly from thenceforth for ever twelve pair of new strong winter shoes meet for twelve men, and twelve pair of strong winter shoes meet for twelve women, and the same gowns, shirts, smocks, and shoes shall yearly, on the first day of October, give and distribute in the chapel or church of Saint James aforesaid to and amongst twelve poor aged men, being impotent or lame, and amongst twelve poor aged women, being impotent or lame, in manner and form following; that is to say, to every such poor man one man's gown, one shirt, and one pair of shoes, and to every such poor woman one woman's gown, one smock, and one pair of shoes, and shall also cause every of the said poor men and women to be present at every of the four sermons aforesaid that shall be made in the year when they shall receive the said gowns and other alms aforesaid; and over this, that if the chamberlain of the city of London for the time being, the town clerk of the said city for the time being, and the under chamberlain of the said city for the time being, or any of them, shall, on the first day of October yearly, or in any year or years after the decease of the said William Lambe, be present in the chapel or church of Saint James aforesaid at the sermon or sermons there to be made, and to see the premises duly and truly executed, that then the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London and their successors shall and will yearly, on the first day of October, pay to every of the said chamberlain, town clerk, and under chamberlain so then present the sum of six shillings and eightpence for his pains to be taken in the premises; and lastly, shall, after the decease of the said William Lambe, from time to time for evermore find an honest, virtuous, and sad chaplain that shall in the forenoon of every Wednesday, every Friday, and every Sunday say divine service in the said chapel or church to all persons that will then come to hear or be present at the same, and shall duly and decently keep and preserve the said chapel or church to serve to the intent and purpose aforesaid from the day of the decease of the said William Lambe for evermore: Provided always, and it is nevertheless agreed by and between the said parties to these presents, that if it so be that the said William Lambe, upon reasonable request therefore to be made, do not, by his last will and testament hereafter to be made concerning the premises, sufficiently convey and assure the premises, with the appurtenances, to the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London and their successors to their own proper use and behoof, for ever discharged of all estate, charges, and incumbrances hereafter to be committed or done by the said William Lambe, as shall be reasonably devised or advised by the counsel learned in the laws of this realm, of the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London or their successors, (all leases for term of forty years or under from the making thereof to be made by the said William Lambe of the premises set and being in the said parish of Saint James or of any part or parts thereof (the said church only excepted), by indenture or indentures, whereupon as much rent as now is paid for the premises so to be demised shall be reserved, payable during every such lease to the said William Lambe, his heirs and assigns only excepted and foreprized), and then and from thenceforth the covenants, grants, and agreements in these presents contained, on the part of the said master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London or their successors, shall be utterly void and of none effect, anything in these presents contained to the contrary thereof in anywise notwithstanding:"
Will of William Lambe dated 11th Oct., 16th Eliz.
And whereas the said William Lambe (who was a citizen and clothworker of London), by his will dated the eleventh day of October, in the sixteenth year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and which will is expressed to be made according to the advice and device of the counsel learned in the laws of this realm of the master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London, and to be his last will and testament concerning only the disposition of the messuages, lands, and tenements thereafter mentioned in manner and form therein following, after recitals referring to his messuages, lands, tenements, gardens, and other hereditaments, situate in the parish of Saint James in the Wall, and in the parish of Saint Stephen in Coleman Street, and after a recital whereby it appeared that such parcels of the premises as were set and being in the said parish of Saint James were, by an indenture bearing date the seventh day of July, in the ninth year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, charged with an annuity or yearly rent of six pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, granted to the master, keepers, or wardens and commonalty of the Mystery or Art of Stationers of the city of London, he the said William Lambe being sole seised of the premises in his demesne as of fee charged with the yearly rentcharge aforesaid, and being a freeman of the city of London of the Mystery of Clothworkers in the said city, did first will that the said annuity or yearly rent of six pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence should be from the day of his decease for ever well and truly paid to the said master, keepers, or wardens and commonalty of the Mystery or Art of the Stationers of the city of London and their successors for ever, according to the purport of the said last-mentioned indenture, to be employed to such uses as were therefore expressed in the said indenture; and furthermore he willed, gave, and bequeathed by that his last will all his messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments whatsoever, with their appurtenances, set, lying, and being in the parishes of Saint James in the Wall nigh Cripplegate, of London, Saint Stephen in Coleman Street, of London, and of Saint Olave's in Silver Street, within the city of London, and all and singular other the premises with their appurtenances, in as large and ample manner as he the said William Lambe ever had or enjoyed the same premises, or any of them, to the master and four wardens and commonalty of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London, and to their successors for ever, and to their own proper use and behoof for ever, to the several uses, intents, and purposes mentioned, declared, and expressed in a pair of indentures bearing date the twelfth day of July, in the tenth year of the reign of Her then Majesty Queen Elizabeth, made between the master and four wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London on the one part, and the mayor and commonalty and citizens of the said city of London on the other part: Provided always, and his (the said testator's) will and mind was that if it should fortune the corporation of the said Company of Clothworkers to be by any ways or means at any time thereafter seised into the Prince's hands whereby the said Company might not enjoy and have the use of the said lands and tenements to perform the intents and purposes in the said indenture mentioned and expressed, then he willed and his mind was that the rents and yearly profits coming and growing of the said lands and tenements, during all the time that the said Corporation should remain so seised into the Prince's hands, should be paid by the occupiers or tenants of the said lands and tenements to the president and fellows, by what name or title soever they be incorporated or called, of the college then lately erected and founded by Sir Thomas White, knight, and alderman of the city of London, to the use of the poor scholars of the same college so long as the said Corporation should remain seised and holden in the Queen's Majesty's hands, her heirs and successors, and no longer, and after and immediately the said Queen's Majesty, her heirs or successors, should oute her or their hands of the said seizure of the said Corporation, and restore the same again to the said Company of Clothworkers, that then he (the said testator) willed and his mind was that the said lands and tenements, with all and singular their appurtenances, should be and remain to the said master and four wardens and commonalty of the Guild or Fraternity of the Assumption of Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Art or Mystery of Clothworkers in the city of London aforesaid, and to their successors for ever, and to their own proper use and behoof for ever, to the said several uses and intents in the said indenture mentioned and declared: And further he willed and his mind was that if it should fortune at any time thereafter that the master and wardens of the said Company of Clothworkers for the time being to be remiss and negligent in doing, performing, and distributing such sums of money and other devises and bequests before by him devised and appointed, mentioned, and expressed in the said indentures, so that the said devises or any of them be left undone and not paid and given to the poor in form aforesaid, by the space of one whole year, then he, the said testator, willed that all such gifts and devises whatsoever by him before made and devised to the said master, wardens, and commonalty of Clothworkers should be utterly void, frustrated, and of none effect to all intents and purposes; and then he willed, gave, and devised all the said lands and tenements, with all and singular their appurtenances, to the president and fellows of Saint John's College of Oxford, to the use of the poor scholars of the said college for ever:
And whereas under and by virtue of the said indenture and will of the said William Lambe, and of a license from Queen Elizabeth dated the sixth day of November one thousand five hundred and eighty-seven, the messuages and hereditaments therein mentioned, including the said chapel or church of Saint James and the new chapel built in place thereof as hereinafter mentioned, have ever since the death of the said William Lambe, (except only as to a house forming part of the said premises in the parish of Saint Stephen, Coleman Street, and which was in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four taken by the corporation of the city of London, as herein-after mentioned,) been held by the said master, wardens, and commonalty of freemen of the Art and Mystery of Clothworkers of the city of London, herein-after called "the Clothworkers' Company:"
And whereas in or about the years one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, and one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six the old chapel of Saint James having fallen into decay was pulled down and a new chapel was erected by the said Clothworkers' Company, which chapel is situate in Wood Street Square, formerly Lambe's Court, adjoining to Monkwell Street near Cripplegate in the city of London, and is hereinafter called "Lambe's Chapel," and the sermons and services in the said indenture mentioned have been from time to time preached and performed in the said chapel by such chaplain or other minister who has been and is appointed and paid by the Clothworkers' Company, and the said Company have from time to time carried into effect the charitable intentions and objects of the said William Lambe:
And whereas in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four the corporation of the city of London required and took for the purposes of an Act of Parliament passed for improving the approaches to London Bridge one of the houses forming part of the said premises in the parish of Saint Stephen, Coleman Street, and then known as No. 6, Great Bell Alley, and the moneys paid by them in respect thereof, which amounted (together with the profit arising from an interim investment thereof in bank annuities), to the sum of eight hundred and forty-two pounds sixteen shillings and sevenpence, have been as to six hundred and ninety-eight pounds eleven shillings and sixpence, part thereof, in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty-one invested as part of a sum of five thousand seven hundred and fifty pounds in the purchase of four pieces of ground with the four messuages thereon erected, situate in Moorgate Street, in the city of London, which messuages are now five messuages and known as Nos. 48a, 48, 49, 53, 54 in the said street, and one hundred and forty-four pounds five shillings and one penny, the residue thereof, have been invested as part of a sum of three thousand three hundred pounds in the purchase of freehold houses known as No. 43, Mincing Lane, and No. 43, Fenchurch Street, in the city of London, which property so purchased was duly conveyed to and is now vested in the Clothworkers' Company:
And whereas the property given and bequeathed to the Clothworkers' Company by the will of the said William Lambe consists now of the particulars set forth in the schedule hereto, and of certain other hereditaments and premises situate in the parish of Saint Stephen, Coleman Street, aforesaid, and of an undivided part or share of and in the said messuages and houses in Moorgate Street, Mincing Lane, and Fenchurch Street, by reason of the investment therein of the purchase money arising from the sale of No. 6, Great Bell Alley, as lastly herein-before recited:
And whereas by reason of the changes which have taken place in the city of London, there is no longer a resident population in the neighbourhood of Lambe's Chapel capable of receiving the benefits contemplated by the said William Lambe, and the intentions of the said William Lambe in regard to the said chapel are at present frustrated, and the expense of keeping up the said chapel and paying a chaplain to perform divine service therein is in fact uselessly incurred:
And whereas, having regard to the spiritual destitution of many of the suburbs of London, it would be of great public advantage, and in accordance as near as may be with the pious and charitable intentions of the said William Lambe, that instead of the said Lambe's Chapel as now existing, a church should be built and endowed in one of such suburbs as aforesaid:
And whereas it has been proposed by the Clothworkers' Company at once to discharge and fulfil the obligations so as aforesaid imposed on them by the said indenture and will of the said William Lambe, by building and endowing in perpetuity a church within the limits of the ancient parish of Saint Mary, Islington, and to endow at Saint John's College, Oxford, a scholarship to be accepted by the said college as an equivalent for all their claim and interest under the said will, and that Lambe's Chapel and the site thereof, and all other the messuages, hereditaments, and property devised by the said will of William Lambe to the Clothworkers' Company, shall be held by the Company discharged from the obligations imposed by the said indenture and will, but subject, nevertheless, as to the messuages and hereditaments in the parish of Saint Olave's in Silver Street, (and which messuages and hereditaments are in the said indenture and will referred to as being situate in the parish of Saint James in the Wall, and in the parish of Saint Olave's in Silver Street, and are mentioned and described in the said schedule hereto,) to the charges and obligations herein-after mentioned:
And whereas the messuages and hereditaments mentioned and described in the said schedule hereto are of ample value to secure the charges and obligations imposed by this Act:
And whereas it is desirable and expedient that the said proposal should be carried into effect, and further that some modification should be made or permitted in the description of articles to be given from time to time in the nature of alms, as provided by the said indenture, but such objects cannot be attained without the aid and authority of Parliament.
May it therefore please Your Majesty that it may be enacted; and be it enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same as follows:
Short title.
1. This Act may be cited for all purposes as "William Lambe's Chapel and Estate Act. 1872."
New church to be built by Clothworkers' Company.
2. The Clothworkers' Company shall, at their own expense, build upon a site to be provided by them, situate within the limits of the ancient parish of Saint Mary, Islington, and fit up for the performance of divine service according to the rites of the Church of England, a church to be dedicated to the service of Almighty God, by the name of Saint James the Apostle, and to be called "the Church of Saint James, of the Foundation of William Lambe, Citizen and Clothworker of London." The site of such church shall be selected by the Clothworkers' Company, subject to the approval of the bishop of the diocese.
Residence for minister.
3. The Clothworkers' Company shall also, at their own expense, provide a residence for the minister or incumbent for the time being of the said church, at a distance not exceeding eight hundred and eighty yards therefrom.
Sittings in church.
4. The church shall contain five hundred sittings at the least, all of which shall be free sittings, subject, nevertheless, to such appropriation of part thereof as herein-after mentioned.
Money to be expended on church.; Plans, &c. to be approved of by the bishop of the diocese and Ecclesiastical Commissioners.
5. The Clothworkers' Company shall expend upon the erection and fitting up of the said church, in addition to providing the site thereof, the sum of four thousand pounds at the least, and the said church shall be built according to such plans, elevations, and specifications as shall be approved by the bishop of the diocese and by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England, for which purpose plans, elevations, and specifications shall be with all convenient speed prepared by the Clothworkers Company and submitted to the said bishop and Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The said church shall be finished and fitted up ready for consecration within two years after the approval of the bishop and the said commissioners to such plans, elevations, and specifications shall have been obtained.
Clothworkers' Company to nominate minister.
6. The right of patronage and nomination from time to time of a minister or incumbent to the said church, after the same shall have been duly consecrated according to the rites and ceremonies of the Church of England, shall be and the same is hereby vested in perpetuity in the Clothworkers' Company, their successors and assigns, but no sale or disposition of such patronage or nomination for any valuable consideration whatever shall be made until thirty years next after the passing of this Act, unless the entire proceeds be legally secured to the permanent augmentation of the benefice, but every such sale or disposition made before the expiration of the period of thirty years, except as aforesaid, shall be illegal, and every presentation, admission, institution, or induction thereupon shall be void, and the right of patronage shall thereupon for that time lapse to the bishop.
Church to be kept in repair by the Clothworkers' Company.
7. The Clothworkers' Company shall, at any and every time when the said church or the fittings thereof shall require to be repaired, maintained, or upheld, upon receiving notice to that effect from the bishop of the diocese for the time being, do or cause to be done in a convenient manner and at a convenient time or times all such works of reparation and maintenance as shall be requisite, and the expense of executing such works shall be a charge, and the same is hereby charged upon the messuages and hereditaments described in the schedule hereto.
District or parish to be assigned to church by Ecclesiastical Commissioners.
8. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England shall upon the application of the Clothworkers' Company apply and put in force all or any of the powers and authorities vested in them by the "New Parishes Acts, 1843, 1844, or 1856," (but subject to such consent as is thereby in that behalf required,) for the purpose of constituting a separate district for spiritual purposes to be assigned to the said church, and for the purpose of causing such district to become a new parish, and such church when consecrated shall be the church thereof, and such district or parish may be constituted either before or after the consecration of the same church, and thenceforward the said district or parish (as the case may be) shall be deemed and taken to be a district or parish created under the New Parishes Acts: Provided always, that nothing contained in such last-mentioned Acts, or any of them, shall alter or affect the express provisions herein contained, but such last-mentioned Acts, or any of them, shall only apply if and so far as they shall be applicable consistently with the provisions of this Act.
Endowment of church by Clothworkers' Company.
9. The Clothworkers' Company shall by way of endowment pay to the minister or incumbent of the said church for the time being the annual sum or stipend of three hundred pounds for ever, such annual sum or stipend to be paid on the usual quarter days in each year, commencing from the quarter day immediately preceding his appointment, and to be charged and the same is hereby charged upon the messuages and hereditaments mentioned and described in the said schedule.
Services to be performed.
10. The minister or incumbent of the said church shall, in addition to or as part of the duties and offices which he shall be legally authorised to perform, duly perform in the said church the services on Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday, by the said indenture directed to be performed in Lambe's Chapel, and the quarterly sermons on the first day of October and the three feast days in every year in the said indenture mentioned shall also be preached in the said church by a minister to be designated and paid from time to time for that duty by the Clothworkers' Company: Provided always, that it shall be lawful for the Clothworkers' Company from time to time to appoint for such purpose, instead of the first day of October and the said three feast days respectively, such other days within seven days respectively thereafter as shall coincide with the days appointed by them for the distribution of the articles of clothing next herein-after mentioned and the said quarterly sermons.
Variation by way of substitution of charitable gifts under William Lambe's will.
11. The charitable gifts directed to be made by the said indenture to poor aged men and women being impotent or lame shall continue to be made and provided by the Clothworkers' Company, but with the following modifications; that is to say, from the date of the assignment of a district or parish to the said church, the objects shall be selected by the Clothworkers' Company out of the inhabitants of such district or parish. The Clothworkers' Company shall have the option of substituting blankets or other articles of warmth and comfort for the articles other than shoes directed to be given by the said indenture, so nevertheless, that the full sum of fourteen pounds fourteen shillings shall be expended annually by the Clothworkers' Company in such substituted articles. The said articles and the said shoes shall on the first day of October in every year, or within seven days thereafter, be distributed in the said church, or in such other place in the district or parish as the Clothworkers' Company shall from time to time for that purpose appoint.
Provisions of indenture of 12th July, 10th Elizabeth, to apply to new church.
12. The provisions in the said indenture contained as to attendances at divine service, or at the preaching of sermons in the chapel therein mentioned, and all payments thereby directed to be made in respect thereof, shall apply to the new church so to be built as aforesaid, and to the services and sermons to be performed and preached at the said church as hereby provided.
Seats to be retained by Clothworkers' Company for poor men and women and others.
13. For the purpose of providing special accommodation for the poor aged men and women herein-before mentioned, and for such members of the Clothworkers' Company and others as under the provisions of the said indenture are expected to attend the said church, the Clothworkers' Company shall be entitled to select and retain pews or seats therein capable of accommodating fifty persons in the whole, which pews or seats shall be thenceforward appropriated to the Clothworkers' Company or their nominees for ever.
Establishment of Lambe's Scholarship at St. John's College, Oxford.
14. The Clothworkers' Company shall pay to the said president and scholars of Saint John the Baptist College in the University of Oxford the clear net annual sum of eighty pounds for ever, the same to be paid on the usual quarter days in each year (free from all deductions, except only in respect of income tax), the first quarterly payment thereof to be payable on Christmas-day one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, and the said annual sum to be charged and the same is hereby charged on the messuages and hereditaments described in the schedule to this Act next after the annual sum or stipend of three hundred pounds for the minister or incumbent of the said church, and the other obligations by this Act charged thereon; and the said annual sum of eighty pounds shall be held by the said college as the endowment of an open scholarship in the said college to be called "William Lambe's Scholarship," and to be obtained and held in such manner and for such time and generally on such terms as may from time to time be made by the governing body of the said college at any stated general meeting thereof; and the obligation by this present section imposed upon the Clothworkers' Company shall be deemed and taken to be in full release and satisfaction of and for all estate, right, title, interest, or possibility present or future which the said president and scholars or the said college have or has, or might but for this Act at any time hereafter have, in, to, or out of the messuages, hereditaments, and property devised by the said will of the said William Lambe to the Clothworkers' Company.
Provisions of this Act to be in discharge of obligations under said indenture and will.
15. The obligations herein-before by this Act imposed upon the Clothworkers' Company shall be deemed and taken to be an equivalent for, and in substitution for and in discharge of, the obligations and duties imposed on them by the said indenture and the will of the said William Lambe, and the Clothworkers' Company shall be and they are hereby discharged of and from all such last-mentioned obligations and duties.
All property devised by will of William Lamle discharged from trusts of indenture and will.
16. All the messuages and hereditaments devised by the said will of the said William Lambe to the Clothworkers' Company are hereby expressly exonerated and discharged from every obligation, trust, or condition imposed or declared by the said indenture of the 12th July, tenth Elizabeth, or by the said will.
Clothworkers Company to pull down Lambe's Chapel and (subject to this Act) Company empowered to dispose of property left by Lambe.
17. The Clothworkers' Company shall forthwith pull down Lambe's Chapel, with all outbuildings and appurtenances thereof, and sell or dispose of for their own purposes the materials, furniture, and fittings thereof. The site of the said Lambe's Chapel, and also of the former church or chapel of Saint James in the Wall respectively, and of all outbuildings and appurtenances thereof respectively, shall henceforth, as from the passing of this Act, be divested and discharged of and from all sacred or ecclesiastical uses, purposes, and character, so that the same may be used for any secular purpose whatsoever, and the Clothworkers' Company shall, within two years from the passing of this Act, erect upon the site of Lambe's Chapel, or upon other land comprised in the said schedule, substantial buildings of the value of two thousand five hundred pounds at the least, in addition to any moneys which have been already expended thereon by the Company or their lessees.
Trusts of property comprised in schedule.
18. The Clothworkers' Company shall hold the messuages and hereditaments mentioned in the said schedule, and all buildings now or hereafter to be erected on the said hereditaments or on any part thereof, upon trust to keep the same in repair, and to apply the rents and profits thereof, so far as may be necessary, in discharge of the obligations hereby imposed, and as to the residue or surplus thereof for their own proper use and benefit.
Release of residue of property.
19. The messuages and hereditaments devised to the Clothworkers' Company by the will of the said William Lambe (other than those comprised in the said schedule) shall be and the same are hereby declared to be the property of the Clothworkers' Company absolutely for their own use and benefit, as if the same had been so devised to them by the said will.
Interment of bodies.
20. If it shall appear that any bodies are interred in or under the site of the said chapel or its outbuildings or appurtenances, such bodies shall be properly removed by and at the cost of the Clothworkers' Company into such duly consecrated burial ground or cemetery as they shall select for that purpose.
Saving of rentcharge to Stationers' Company.
21. Provided always that nothing herein contained shall prejudice or affect the annuity or yearly rent of six pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence granted to the master, keepers, or wardens and commonalty of the Mystery or Art of Stationers recited or referred to in the will of the said William Lambe.
The Schedule before referred to.
All that piece of ground containing one thousand and sixty-two square yards or thereabouts situate and being on the north-west corner of Monkwell Street in the parish of Saint Olave's, Silver Street, aforesaid, with the eight messuages or warehouses recently erected and standing and being thereon or on some part thereof, and which said piece of ground and premises have, with the sanction of the Charity Commissioners, by an agreement bearing date the fourth day of January one thousand eight hundred and seventy-one, made between the said Clothworkers' Company of the one part, and Thomas Loveridge therein described of the other part, been agreed to be demised to the said Thomas Loveridge, his executors, administrators, and assigns, for the term of eighty years from the twenty-ninth day of September one thousand eight hundred and seventy.
All that other piece of ground (adjoining to and partly bounded by the said last-mentioned piece of ground), and upon which Lambe's Chapel now stands, together with the said chapel, vestry room, and appurtenances thereto belonging.
And also the vacant space, square, or court formerly known as Lambe's Court, but now known or distinguished as Wood Street Square, Monkwell Street, aforesaid.
All which pieces of ground and square are delineated on duplicate plans, signed by the Right Honourable Baron Redesdale, the Chairman of Committees of the House of Lords, one of such plans being deposited in the office of the clerk of the Parliaments, and the other of such plans being in the possession of the Clothworkers' Company.
20 William Lambe's Almshouses at Sutton Valence, Kent.
18th 1876.
By an order of the Board of this date, the two abovementioned yearly payments of 4l. each were redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 400l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
21 George Maplisden, of Sutton Valence, by will, dated 20th June 1713, gave 5l. annually in augmentation of the usher's ancient salary, chargeable upon estates, in the parish of Ulcomb, and now paid by Sir Edmund Filmer, Bt., and Mr. Shirley.
22 Besides this, the Company may be induced to grant additional assistance at the universities to those scholars who may in any remarkable manner distinguish themselves.
23 The Free Grammar School at Sutton Valence, Kent.
The above-mentioned yearly payment of 4l. for a visitation of the school has been redeemed. (See William Lambe's Almshouses.)
7th Dec. 1877.
By an order of the Board of this date, the abovementioned yearly payment of 30l. to the school-master and usher was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 1,000l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to effect the purchase in trust for the charities known as "The School Visitation" and "The Free "Grammar School of William Lambe," of a piece of pasture land containing 10a. 1r. 2p. situate at Sutton Valence, having a frontage on the west to the road leading from Maidstone to Headcorn of 470 yards, and on the east to the road leading from Headcorn to Sutton Valence, of 135 yards, lately in the occupation of Isaac Edmed, but then of George Gilbert, and then belonging to the said Company, in consideration of the transfer of the sum of 200l. Consols (part of the said sum of 400l Consols), and of the said sum of 1,000l. Consols, then standing in the name of the official trustees to the account of "the master wardens, and commonalty of freemen of the art or mystery of clothworkers."