America and West Indies
Addenda 1583

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1893

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17-24

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'America and West Indies: Addenda 1583', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9: 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674 (1893), pp. 17-24. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70027 Date accessed: 23 August 2014.


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Addenda 1583

1583.
Feb. 7.
From my house in Redcross St.
21. Sir Humphrey Gylberte to Sec. Sir Francis Walsingham. As it hath pleased his Honor to let Gylberte understand that her Majesty of her especial care had of his well doing and prosperous success, hath wished his stay at home from the personal execution of his intended discovery, as a man noted of no good hap by sea, for which he is much bound to her Majesty, and knows not how to deserve, but by continual prayers and his most faithful and forward service during life, to satisfy the objections of his stay, it may please his Honor to be advertised, that in his first enterprise he returned with great loss, because he would not himself do nor suffer any of his company to do anything contrary to his word given to her Majesty and Walsingham; for if he had not far preferred his credit before his gain, he need not to have returned so poor as then he did. This his last stay at Hampton, hath proceeded by south-west winds of God's making and sending, and therefore not his fank or negligence If guilty of delay the principal charge is his own, and no loss to any other, his adventures being for the most part in wares. The outrage of this winter hath been a common hindrance to all men of this realm, south ward bound: ships driven from the Azores to this coast, without spreading a sail—a thing never hearal of before; impossible for him to have performed his journey this winter. Seeing her Majesty is to have a fifth of all gold and silver to be gotten, without any charge to her Majesty, trusts her Highness will not deny him liberty to execute that which resteth in hope, so profitable to her Majesty and Crown. "The great desire I have to perform the same, hath cost me first and last, the selling and spending of a thousand marks land a year of my own getting, besides the scorn of all the world, for conceiving so well of a matter that others held so ridiculous, although now by my means better thought of. If the doubt be my want of skill to execute the same, I will offer myself to be opposed by all the best navigators and cosmographers within this realm. If it be cowardliness, I seek no other purgation thereof than my former service done to her Majesty. If it be the suspicion of daintiness of diet or sea sickness, in those both I will yield myself second to no man living, because that comparison is rather of hardiness of body than a boast of virtue. But how little account soever is made, either of the matter or of me, I trust her Majesty, with her favour for my 28 years' service, will allow me to get my living as well as I may honestly (which is every subject's right), and not to constrain me, by idle abode at home, to beg my bread with my wife and children, especially, seeing I have her Majesty's grant and license under the Great Seal of England for my departure, without the which I would not have spent a penny in this action; wherein I am most bound to her Majesty for her great favour, which of all things I most desire." Protests no man living shall serve her more faithfully. 2 pp. [Dom. Eliz., Vol. 158. No. 59.] There is a petition in this Volume [No. 50] from Lady Gylberte, touching the manor of Minster in the isle of Sheppeg perchased of Lord Cheney by Sir Humphrey Gylberte, and conceyed by him to Sir Edward Hobby, being "the only stay that is left her to live by in her husband's absence."
Feb. 28.22. Articles of Agreement between Sir Humphrey Gylberte, of Compton, co. Deven, and Sir George Peckham, of Denham, co. Bucks and George Peckham his second son. Whereas her Majesty by Letters Patent bearing date 11 June 1578, hath granted to said Sir Humphrey, his heirs and assigns for ever, free liberty to discover lands not possessed by any Christian Prince or people, and to occupy and enjoy the same with all commodities, jurisdictions, &c., said Sir Humphrey in consideration that said Sir George hath disbursed divers sums of money as a principal adventurer with said Sir Humphrey, as also for divers other good considerations, doth covenant with said Sir George Peckham and George his son, their heirs and assigns, that they shall for ever enjoy free liberty by virtue of said Letters Patent, to discover any lands, &c., not discovered, and inhabited by any Christian Prince or people by the assignment of said Sir Humphrey, &c., and also to enjoy to their own use all that river and port called by Master John Dee, Dee River, which river, by the description of John Verarzamus a Florentine, lyeth in septentrionall latitude about forty-two degrees, and hath his mouth lying open to the south, half a league broad or thereabouts, and entring within the said bay between the east and the north, encreaseth his breadth, and continueth twelve leagues or thereabouts, and then maketh a gulf of twenty leagues compass or thereabouts, and containeth in itself five small islands, newly named the Cinq Isles, and the said gulf and five isles, and all other isles lying within said river or gulf, together with fifteen hundred thousand acres of ground within the supposed continent, lying next adjoining upon said river, gulf, and five isles, at the choice of said Peckham, &c., to hold the same for ever by soccage tenure of said Sir Humphrey so as the said fifteen hundred thousand acres extend not along the sea coast westward towards the River of Norumbeage above three score English miles at the most, with full power to people and manure the same, with all jurisdictions, privileges, &c., both by land and sea, paying to said Sir Humphrey, &c., for every 1,000 acres after the first seven years, which the same shall be actually manured, five shillings and two-fifths of all gold, &c. Said Peckham and George his son not to be charged with any contribution towards any wars, other than defences, and that only by Act of Parliament, of which assembly said Peckham, and all who bear the name of an associate with him, shall be as principal members, and said Sir Humphrey doth covenant and grant to and with said Peckham, &c., free liberty to trade in said lands, to have the execution of all laws, and to save them harmless concerning the payment of gold and silver ore and other duties to her Majesty, her heirs and successors, by said Letters Patents reserved, and to finish assurance of the premises unto said Peckham, &c., for ever within three months after the first return of said Sir Humphrey or his assigns, consorts, adventurers, or associates from said voyage of discovery now intended. Said Peckham and George his son covenant that they shall do their best endeavour to obtain her Majesty's leave, that all who adventure with them to said countries, and whose names shall be entered in a register book, may freely pass, there to remain or to return at their pleasure. And that they will not defer the execution of justice within their liberties, against any who conspire against the person of said Sir Humphrey, &c., or commit any capital offence, or protect from justice any person, his lands or goods, contrary to the laws to be established in said countries. Also that if they shall do any manner of act whereby said Sir Humphrey, his heirs, &c., shal lose the benefit of his said Letters Patent, or publicly maintain any person as shall go about to destroy the right or person of said Sir Humphrey, &c., or seek the subversion of the Commonwealth of said Sir Humphrey his heirs or successors, their countries or territories that from thenceforth these presents to become void and of none effect. [Close Roll, 25 Elizabeth, Part 8.]
April.23. "A Discourse upon the intended voyage to the hithermost parts of America written for the better instruction of the merchants in the same by Capt. Carleill." After touching upon the early voyages to Muscovy and other parts he says, but who shall look into the quality of this voyage to the hithermost parts of America shall find it hath as many points of good moment as may almost be wished for, it is not any long course for it may be performed to and fro in four months after the first discovery, that one wind sufficeth to make the passage which is upon the high sea without danger on any other coasts and the outward or homeward voyages very well stored with goodly harbours, and as the bordering neighbours are commonly the aptest to fall out with us so these parts being somewhat further remote are the liker to take or give less occasion of disquiet. [In margin. This is spoken upon the opinion which by some is conceived that Ireland is not suffered to grow to that perfection which it might be least one day revolting by chance from the Crown, it might prove an overstrong party to be so near an enemy.] But when it is considered that they are our own kindred and esteemed our own country nation which have the government, meaning by those who shall be there planted who can look for any other than the dealing of most loving and most assured friends. Two points of importance concerning the matter of trade. Answer to the objection that it is not for the merchants' purse to continue the charges of transporting and planting, and that since these hundred men which are now to be planted cost 4,000l. it is then to be thought that the charge of a far greater number will be also a far greater sum of money. In the margin. The ore of metal brought by Mr. Frobisher caused a great supply to be furnished the year following. Sir Francis Drake's only passage thro' the islands of Molucca was the chiefest occasion of the preparation thither which cost not less than thirteen or fifteen thousand pounds. The right examination of this point must be the contrary sequel of the common proverb "Nothing venture. nothing have," so, on the other side by venturing many great good profits are found out to the wonderful benefit of the Commonwealth, therefore would wish that those who are well able to spare what is required of each one towards the undertaking of this adventure be willing to employ the same. Instances the voyages of Jaques Cartier and others and that it is credibly reported that the French by last year's voyage got fourteen or fifteen hundred for every one hundred. 11 pp. [Dom. Eliz., Vol. 155, No 87.] Printed in Haklayt III., 228–234., but with many variations.
24. Points set down by the Committees appointed in the behalf of the Company to confer with Mr. Carleill upon his intended discovery and attempt in the northern parts of America. This document has been erroneonsly assgned to the year 1574? in the first volume of this Calendar. It is printed in Haklag III. 234–5. but with considerable variations. [Col. Papers, Vol. I., No. 1.]
1583?25. Certain questions to be demanded of Davy Ingram, sailor, dwelling at Barking, co. Essex. What he observed in his travels on the north side of the River of May, where he remained three months or thereabouts. How long he travelled there. Whether that country be fruitful and what kind of fruit there be. What kind of beasts and cattle he saw. What kind of people and how apparelled. The buildings. Whether any quantity of gold, silver, pearl, or other jewels, and whether he saw a beast far exceeding an ox in bigness. Ingram's answers to these questions are the same in substance as those contained in his examination in the "Reports of the country Sir Humphrey Gylberte goes to discover." He sayeth that upon his life he offereth to go to the place to approve the same true. With marginal notes that Sir H. Gylberte's man reports their houses to be built in like manner, and brought hides of the beast above referred to from the place he discovered. Endorsed, "Questions to be asked of David Ingram concerning his knowledge of a discovery." 2 pp. [Dom. Eliz., Vol. 175, No. 95.]
26. "Reports of the country Sir Humphrey Gylberte goes to discover." Since the "fragment" of this Report was abstracted in the first volume of this Calender, the missing portion has been discovered bound up erroncously in Dom. Elis., Vol. 185, No. 88, which has been restored to this document to which it belongs. The date is most probably 1583 instead of 1580 and it is entitled as above. It will be seen that the first part of these "Reports" are David Ingram's Answers to the Questions demanded of him in the preceding Abstract. [Col. Papers, Vol. I., No. 2.]
15 May.27. Indenture between Sir George Peckham of Denham, co. Bucks, and William Rowsswell of Forde, co. Devon., Sir Humphrey Gylberte's Letters Patent of 11 June 1578, and the Indenture between Sir Humphrey and Sir George Peckham of 6 June 1582 (see ante, No. 15) are recited. Said Sir George in consideration of a sum of money with him adventured by said Rowsswell as a principal Adventurer in said voyage [now intended by said Sir Humphrey], and for other considerations, doth covenant with said Rowsswell, his heirs and assigns, that they shall for ever enjoy full power and free liberty, by virtue of said Letters Patent and assignment of the premises, to hold and enjoy one hundred thousand acres of ground, parcell of said five hundred thousand acres of ground to said Sir George granted as aforesaid, with power to make choice of the same, before any other that shall adventure with said Sir George under said Grant, as also to inhabit, people, and manure the same, together with all prerogatives, &c., in as ample manner as said Sir George might have enjoyed the same, holding the same by soccage tenure, and paying to her Majesty and said patentee in all things as Sir George payeth rateably. And turther paying to said Sir George yearly on first of January one steel target, and one good arming sword in the name of a Chiefage only. And grants to said Rowsswell and to his heirs, and to ten of his assigns and factors serving with him or them, and to their heirs males for ever, free liberty to trade to and from any of the said countries to be discovered by said Patentee or said Sir George, their heirs, deputies, or assigns. [Close Roll, 25 Eliz., Part 8.]
July 7.28. Articles of Agreement between Sir Humphrey Gylberte of Compton, co. Devon, and Sir Philip Sydney of Penshurst, co. Kent. Whereas her Majesty by Letters Patents, bearing date 11 June 1578, hath granted to said Sir Humphrey, his heirs and assigns for ever, free liberty to discover lands not possessed by any Christian Prince or People, and to occupy and enjoy the same with all commodities, jurisdictions &c. Said Sir Humphrey for the more speedy execution of Her Majesty's said grant, the enlargement of Her Dominions, and the better encouragement of said Sydney and his associates, doth covenant with said Sydney, his heirs and assigns, that said Sydney, his heirs, assigns, associates, adventurers, and people shall for ever enjoy free liberty to discover anything not before discovered or inhabited by said Sir Humphrey, his heirs or assigns, and to enjoy to their own use such lands so discovered as shall amount unto thirty hundred thousand acres, with power to inhabit, people, and manure the same, together with all jurisdictions, privileges, and emoluments whatsoever for governing, peopling, &c., the same, holding same of said Sir Humphrey, his heirs, and assigns in free soccage, paying for every thousand acres after the first seven years which the same shall be actually possessed and manured, fifteen pence and two-fifths of gold, silver, pearl, and precious stones, also one halfpenny sterling yearly to be levied for ever out of every acre after the first ten years that any one farm shall be possessed and manured, which money shall be yearly employed towards the maintenance of a Navy and Soldiers for the general defence of those countries, said moneys to be kept in a treasure house appointed for that purpose, and to be employed by the consent of the Chiefest Governor and of the more part of thirteen Councillors, for martial and marine causes to be chosen by the people. Also that the sixtieth part of all lands of every temporal man and the fortieth part of the lands and revenues of every spiritual person be yearly allowed for the maintenance of maimed soldiers, and learning, and to such other uses as the Chief Governor and Councillors shall think meet. Also the said Sydney, &c., to enjoy free liberty to trade, to have the execution of all laws within the precinct of thirty hundred thousand neres of ground, as also upon the sea coasts so far as said land shall extend, said Sir Humphrey to save said Sydney harmless concerning payment of the ore of gold and silver and all other duties, services, and demands by said Letters Patent reserved, and to finish further assurance of the premises within three months next after the next return of said Sir Humphrey or his assigns, consorts, adventurers, or associates from the said voyage of discovery. Said Sydney covenants that he shall do his best endeavour to obtain her Majesty's leave that all who adventure with said Sir Humphrey, Sir Thomas Gerrard, Sir George Peckham, the said Philip Sydney, or any of them, unto said countries, whose names shall be entered in a register book, and shall be willing to travel into any of the said remote countries, may freely pass there to remain or return at their pleasure. And said Sydney covenants that he and his heirs, &c., shall not defer the execution of justice within their liberties, against any conspiring against Sir Humphrey, or committing any capital offence, or protect from justice any person, his lands or goods, contrary to the laws to be established in the before mentioned remote countries. Also that if said Sydney, or his heirs, &c., do anything tending to the subversion of said Sir Humphrey, his heirs, principal Governor, &c., or commit piracy, or open hostility against any Christian Prince or People whereby said Letters Patents be made void, or maintain any person as shall openly go about to destroy the right, title, or person of said Sir Humphrey, his heirs, &c., or the subversion of his Commonwealth, that then this present grant, and all covenants therein contained, to become void and of none effect. [Close Roll, 25 Elizabeth, Part 7, No. 1153.]
July.29. Articles indented between Sir Philip Sidney, of Penshurst, co. Kent, and Sir George Peckham, of Denham, co. Bucks. Whereas Sir Philip Sidney, by Letters Patent enrolled in Chancery [see preceding Number], is authorised to discover and inhabit certain parts of America not yet discovered, and out of those countries to have and enjoy for ever thirty hundred thousand acres of ground, with all commodities, &c., &c., both by sea and land, with power to lead in the said voyage, to travel thitherward or to inhabit there. Now said Sir Philip Sidney, for the more speedy execution of her Majesty's said grant, the enlargement of her dominions, and the encouragement of said Sir George Peckham and his associates in so worthy and commendable an enterprise, doth covenant with said Peckham that he will make good and sufficient assurance in the law of the said xxxm [should be xxxcm, i.e., 3,000,000] acres to said Peckham, his heirs or assigns, as he can or may convey, with all privileges thereunto belonging. And said Sir Philip is contented that all sums of money and commodities received of any adventuring towards said discovery shall be paid to said Peckham, his heirs or assigns, towards furnishing a supply of shipping and other necessaries without account. 12 pp. [Dom. Eliz., Vol. 161, No. 44.]
Nov.?30. Minute of a letter touching the discovery in America, for Mr. Secretary. "Is informed by Anthony Brigham of a very good inclination in Mr. Secretary to the Western discoveries if he may be sufficiently authorized, and have a Society without joining with any other than he makes choice of. Is of opinion he will do well to hearken to such offer as Sir Philip Sidney and Sir Geo. Peckham will make, who have sufficient authority under her Majesty's Letters Patent to perform the effect of his desire, no whit mistrusting but that this voyage will prove profitable to the adventurers in particular and generally beneficial to the whole realm. 1 p. [Dom Eliz., Vol. 165, No. 35.]