America and West Indies
Addenda 1617

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1893

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54-55

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'America and West Indies: Addenda 1617', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9: 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674 (1893), pp. 54-55. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70043 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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Addenda 1617

1617.
March 31.
St. Bartholomews.
89. See Sir Raphe Winwood to Sir Dudley Carleton. Sir Thomas Dale having for many years together resided in Virginia as you know, about the service of this kingdom, is now returning into those Provinces to his charge; from whence, altho' he hath been longer absent than he had the license of the States for his Warrant, yet, being a principal man in an employment of such consequence as that was, I assure myself you will labour so effectually for him there that he shall be no way prejudiced thereby. If in any other occasions of his he shall stand in need of your Lordship's favour, I pray you afford it him with much readiness, and give him at all times such countenance and good respect as you shall think fit for a man of his quality and merit; whereby you shall not only engage a well deserving gentleman to your service, but purchase the thanks of many others in this State, who hold themselves much interested in his future well doing and advancement. This license to go to Virginia was procured by myself, at my being in Holland [see ante, No. 51] upon a letter from the late Prince Henry. [Correspondence, Holland.]
Oct. 18.90. Sir Thomas Dale to Sir Dudley Carleton. His absence out of those parts (the United Provinces) has made him destitute of acquaintance and friends. It is some six years since it pleased the then Lord Treasurer (Salisbury) to embark him for the plantation in Virginia, who used both his power and Prince Henry's for Dale's leave of the States for six years, which was granted, but his entertainment to be detained till his return. At his departure he married a wife, not expecting his journey to have been so long, and since his coming home has "borrowed six months after my travels for her sake," who hath continued sickly, and now he is afraid to lose her, which is the reason of his so long stay here (in England) after his arrival, "which may pass for current with good and honest husbands, though not with my Lords the States in matter of service." Makes bold to send this letter by the bearer, the writer's brother, and to entreat Carleton's favor and assistance with the States for excuse of his long absence. Is given to understand that his Lieutenant, "who is not the honestest there," doth make means for his Company underhand, alleging that Dale will come no more. His Company much in debt, which his Lieutenant has rather augmented, and gives out that solicitors have leave of the States to arrest Dale at his arrival, "which is strange to me." Entreats him in the interim of the writer's coming (he hopes in 20 days) to make the States acquainted with his case. The King has promised to write concerning his business, to procure his pay. Requests his advice herein, and to take his business into his favorable protection. Indorsed by Carleton, "The answer to be sent to his house at Woollage (Woolwich) or at Sir. Thos. Smith's house." 3 pp [Correspondence, Holland.]
Nov. 6.91. Sir Thomas Dale to [Sir Dudley Carleton]. Death of Mr. Secretary [Sir Ralph Winwood]. Has, since his death, spoken with his Majesty concerning his own business in those parts (the United Provinces); who hath given order to Mr. Secretary Lake to commend Dale's business to Carleton, but as yet Dale has not his dispatch. Now if it shall please you to give me any advice for any means else from hence, I know my friends are such as I shall procure it to second your Lordship in my behalf. I must confess my acquaintance is but small with your Lordship, and my deserts less, yet if it shall please your Lordship to favour me and my cause, which is just and honest, you shall not only bind a poor gentleman unto you, but noble friends of mine here will give your Lordship thanks. [Correspondence, Holland.]
Nov. 11.
Theobalds.
92. King James to Sir Dudley Carleton, Our Ambassador with the States General of the United Provinces. Sir Thomas Dale, sometime servant to the Pince Henry, Our son deceased, having a Company in the Low Countries, was by him commanded to attend the Plantation of Virginia; and that he might be at liberty so to do, at the request of Our said son, the States General gave him leave to be absent, and that notwithstanding his absence he should enjoy fully his pay; and thereof, as he informeth Us, there is an "apostell" extant. Having now left that service he returneth to his charge; and because he is a gentleman of good merit, both in that service of Virginia while he attended it, and before in the service of the United Provinces, We have thought it reasonable to call upon the States for the performance of that promise, which in his favor they made to Our said son, and do therefore require you to deal therein effectually, both with the Prince Maurice and with the States General, and to procure for his satisfaction the arrearages of the time past, and continuance in the said pay and favor with them, as he was before his going to Virginia Wherein We hope the better of success, because there is so good reason for the ground of Our request, as is a promise made to a person of such quality as was the said Prince. [Correspondence, Holland.]