America and West Indies
July 1670

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1889

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73-78

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'America and West Indies: July 1670', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 7: 1669-1674 (1889), pp. 73-78. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70196 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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Contents

July 1670

July 2.
Jamaica.
211. Commission from Sir Thos. Modyford to Admiral Henry Morgan. Whereas the Queen Regent of Spain has, by her royal schedula dated 20th April 1669, commanded her Governors in the Indies to make open war against the subjects of his Majesty; and Col. Pedro Bayona y Villa Nueba, Captain-General of Paraguay and Governor of St. Jago of Cuba, has executed the same, and in most barbarous manner landed his men on the north side of Jamaica, firing all the houses and killing and taking all the inhabitants prisoners they could meet with; and the rest of the Governors are diligently gathering forces to be sent to St. Jago, their rendezvous and magazine, for invasion and conquest of this island; by virtue of full power from his Majesty and by advice of Council, Gov. Modyford hereby appoints Henry Morgan commander-in-chief of all the ships fitted or to be fitted for defence of this island, and of the officers, soldiers, and seamen upon the same, and commands him to get said vessels into one fleet, well manned, armed, and victualled, and by the first opportunity to put to sea for defence of this island, and to use his best endeavour to surprise, take, sink, disperse or destroy the enemy's vessels, and, in case he finds it feasible, to land and attack St. Jago or any other place where he shall be informed are stores for this war or a rendezvous for their forces, and to use his best endeavours to seize the stores and take, kill, or disperse the forces. And all officers, soldiers, and seamen upon said vessels are strictly enjoined both by sea and by land to obey said Henry Morgan as their Admiral, and himself to follow such orders as he shall from time to time receive from his Majesty, the Duke of York, or the Governor. 1 1/2pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 45.]
July 2.
St. Jago de
la Vega.
212. Gov. Modyford's instructions to Admiral Henry Morgan. With all expedition to publish and put in execution his commission. To inform the Governor of his probable strength and wants. To advise his fleet and soldiers that they are upon the old pleasing account of no purchase no pay, and therefore that all which is got shall be divided amongst them, according to the accustomed rules. In case he attacks and takes St. Jago of Cuba, to keep that place and country until he has received the Governor's further orders. And in order to this, to proclaim mercy and enjoyment of estates and liberty of conscience to all Spaniards that will submit to his Majesty, and liberty to all the slaves that shall come in, and to such as may deserve the same to give their fugitive masters' estates, reserving to the crown of England one fourth of the produce, for the maintenance of forces for defence. If he finds that course take good effect, then to preserve the houses, sugar works, and canes; but if he cannot make good the place, and the Spaniards and slaves are deaf to his proposals, then with all expedition to destroy and burn and leave it a wilderness, putting the men slaves to the sword and sending the women slaves hither to be sold for account of his fleet; such of the men slaves also as cannot speak Spanish or are new negroes he may preserve for the same account; or if any ships present, to send them on same account for New England or Virginia. To inquire what usage our prisoners have had, and what quarter has been given to ours, and give the same, or rather, as our custom is, to exceed them in civility and humanity, endeavouring to make all people sensible of his moderation and good nature and his inaptitude and loathness to spill the blood of man. To execute martial law for government of the fleet. In case any ships have not Gov. Modyford's commission, to grant commissions to them, according to same form, taking security of 1,000l. bond for performance. Ships taken in this expedition to be disposed of for the best improvement of this service, not suffering any to sell them till they come to the commission port. All matters not provided for in these instructions are left to his well-known prudence and good conduct. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 46.]
July 4.
Albemarle
Point.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
213. " Mr. Owen's Parliament's return." The freeholders of Albemarle Point have, by virtue of the Governor's order and summons, elected and chosen the persons hereafter named in order to the establishment of laws for the present and better government of the people within this Province, who, being added to the five persons already in the Council, complete the number of 20, as is by the Lords Proprietors institutions warranted and directed, viz.:— Maurice Mathews, Henry Hughes, John Jones, Tho. Smith, Henry Symons, Henry Woodward, Hugh Carteret, James Marscall, Anthony Charne, Will. Kennis, George Beadon, Jonathan Barker, Thomas Ingram, Thomas Norris, and Will. Owen. 1 p. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 26.]
July 6.
Jamaica.
214. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. He will find by the enclosed Order of Council that the Spaniard has made sharp war on them, which occasioned the same, and which they have no other way to justify, but by his Majesty's last instruction therein recited. Desires his favour in procuring his Majesty's ratification of what is done, as by said instruction is promised. Sends also copy of the commissions granted against them, in which is observable that the Queen's shedula was dated 20th April 1669, and they would not yet have had knowledge of it had not the good Governor of Curaçao sent it. Has often hinted to the late Lord General that it is the interest of the Spaniards and whenever they are able they will endeavour to defeat this Colony. It is possible the Spaniards with their great ships of 40 to 60 guns may be masters of the sea and impede their trade, in which case they must implore the assistance of his Majesty's frigates; but on shore they fear them not, but hope in time to fix the war in their own country, to which his Lordship's advice and favour would infinitely encourage. Encloses,
214. I. Minutes of Council held at St. Jago de la Vega, 29th June 1670. Cal., see ante No. 209.
214. II. Commission of war by the Spaniard against the English in the West Indies. St. Jago de Cuba, 1670, Jan. 26–Feb. 5. Spanish. See Cal., ante, No. 149. Together 3 1/2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 47, 47 I. II.]
July 6.
Jamaica.
215. Copy of preceding letter without the enclosures. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, p. 43.]
July 6.
Jamaica.
216. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Lord Ashley. Having formerly received his Lordship's commands, and heard that he has very affectionately inquired after him, and having few friends at court, and knowing the great respect his Lordship hath always borne to righteous causes and his great integrity and resolution in defending them, in this his own great undertaking implores his Lordship's countenance and assistance. His son will present papers in which are many reasons for the present justice of their arms against the Spaniard; yet because it may be looked on as a fond rash action for a petty Governor without money to make war with the richest, and not long since the powerfullest, Prince of Europe, has thought it reasonable to give his Lordship a short and true view of their affairs here. The Spanish possessions are very large, but the possessors very few, and much the major part Indians, negroes and other slaves, to whom it is indifferent who is their master; for example, Cuba is in length 600 miles, and not above six towns on it, and those so far distant from each other that they cannot be any relief to themselves; the country abounds with cattle, hogs, &c., and by this means our private men-of-war careen, refit, and victual, without more charge than a gang of hunters and dogs, and expect no other pay than what they get from the enemy. These men, who may make about 1500, and never will be planters, he has employed to keep the war in their own country, "and judge you, my Lord, in this exigent, what course could be more frugal, more prudential, more hopeful—the men volunteers, the ships, arms, ammunition their own, their victuals and pay the enemy's, and such enemies as they have always beaten." The enemy, as appears by the Queen's schedula, have been providing for this war since April 1669, and probably longer; their rendezvous is appointed, and their ships have come upon our coast with fire and sword, challenging us out to them; so that should we have delayed for orders from his Majesty, which must be six months at least, " that nation would, if possible, be heightened above its native pride and ours perhaps as much cowed, all their designs perfected, and the gross of their intended forces embodied; whereas by this more speedy course we shall in all probability quell their pride and so amuse them in their own quarters as that they shall never be able very considerably to join against us." Has reason to hope that this war, thus unreasonably begun by them, will so heighten the reputation of his Majesty's forces here that there will be a good foundation laid for the great increase of his Majesty's dominions in these parts; yet far more dreads the censure of his friends and countrymen on this occasion than the sword of the enemy, such has been his hard fortune formerly on like occasions to have been misrepresented; and therefore begs his Lordship so to mediate with his Majesty as that according to his instruction this proceeding may have its due ratification. 1 1/2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, pp. 49–51.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
217. Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General. Whereas Henry Edlyne, sometime of the parish of St. George's in Barbadoes, planter, was executed for murdering his wife, and his estate became forfeited to his Majesty, and whereas Gov. Wm. Lord Willoughby has, by an instrument under the seal of Barbadoes, dated 11th March 1668, granted to Francis Raynes and his heirs said estate, consisting of 35 acres of land in said parish of St. George's, bounded east and south by the lands of Catherine Thompson, west by the lands of Wm. Martin, and north by the lands of William Butledge and John Horne, together with 10 negro slaves, and all houses, &c. thereto belonging, it is his Majesty's pleasure that a Bill be prepared to pass the great seal containing a grant and confirmation of the same. 2 pp. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 25, p. 171đ–172.]
July 15. 218. The King to the Duke of York. Directing him forthwith to give order for equipping a sixth-rate frigate to attend his Majesty's service at Barbadoes and the Caribbees, and to carry down the Commissioners who are to demand of the French that part of St. Christopher's which the English formerly enjoyed. 3/4 p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 31, p. 55.]
July 25/Aug. 4
and
Aug. 11/21.
219. Extracts out of the Register of the resolutions of the High and Mighty Lords States General of the United Netherlands. On the report of the Lords Schimmelpening and others appointed Commissioners for the affairs of Surinam concerning the letter of Heer Van Benningen, Minister Extraordinary in England, of the 9/19th July, and the draught of a letter to be sent by him to Governor Lichtenberge of Surinam, it was resolved that said letter be sent, viz. :—The States-General to Governor Lichtenberge. By letters and papers enclosed he will understand that the States-General have agreed with the King of Great Britain for removing of all complaints of the English inhabitants of Surinam; but as their former orders differ in several things, these are to serve for an explanation. The English are to enjoy all that is contained in said despatches and in the capitulations, particularly the 5th and 19th articles concerning liberty of departing at pleasure with their persons and transportable goods; and if they are not inclined to sell such things as serve for making sugar, they may likewise carry them away, as also all their slaves, except such as were bought since the surrender. Not to exact anything for transportation. And in regard they have accorded to said King freedom to send two merchantmen to make said transportation and to continue in the Colony six weeks, and to Major Bannister to go with a flyboat to fetch his family, slaves, and goods, the merchantmen are to carry no cannon, and when arrived at the fort he is without delay to make known that all those English who will, may go with said ships, with their transportable goods, provided they give in their names within 10 days, and such as shall not so give in their names to have liberty to depart at any time. Major Bannister may go to his plantation in case the Governor does not judge his presence may occasion any disorder. His Majesty's Commissioners have no other authority than to see that all is duly executed, but Gov. Lichtenberge is to take care that the English Commissioners do not use any persuasions or threats to induce any to depart. His power to prolong the time of six weeks he will make use of as becomes an honest man. Hague, 26th July–4th August 1670. "Extract." August 11–21, 1670. Having received a letter from the Sieur Van Benningen of 6–16th inst., importing that Sir John Trevor considered it most unreasonable that what is fastened in the ground or nailed fast, such as great kettles and the like, should not be included as transportable goods, it was declared that kettles fastened by people upon their own grounds and the like, which they can carry away, are to be included. "This agreeth with the said register. N. Ruysch, Secretary." Two copies. 9 1/2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 48, 49.]
July 25–Aug. 4
and
Aug. 11–21.
220. Copies of the preceding resolutions of the States General concerning Surinam. 4 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 77, pp. 20– 25.]
July 29. 221. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet. To prepare a Bill making Abraham de Soza Mondes, an inhabitant of Jamaica, a free denizen of England, but with a clause that he shall not enjoy the benefit thereof until he has taken the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before the Governor of the island. 1/2 p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas..II., Vol. 25, p. 176.]
July 30.
Jamaica.
222. Gov. Sir Thos. Modyford to Sec. Lord Arlington. Has proceeded to give the Admiral mentioned in the Order of Council [see ante, No. 209,] his commission, and also commissions to 10 others to be of his fleet, which is already so considerable that he will take the sea in 14 days, having appointed a rendezvous for divers others; of whose actions his Lordship shall have a speedy account. Has obeyed his Majesty's despatch of 30th March last (see ante, No. 165), and according to Mr. Povey's desire placed Mr. Joachim Haines his deputy (as secretary). 1/2 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XX V., No. 47.]
July 30.
Jamaica.
223. Copy of the preceding letter. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, p. 44.]
July 30.
Nansamund
River,
Virginia.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
224. Henry Brayne to [Sir Peter Colleton ?]. That he has drawn a bill of exchange payable at sight upon him for 80l. 15s. 6d. sterling for goods shipped and moneys disbursed for his ship the Carolina in furnishing her with a supply for his plantation at Keyawah or Port Royal, which Mij.-Gen. Bennett has laid out more than came to his hands from Sir Wm. Berkeley and Capt. Godwin; also 10s. more for a boar delivered aboard and 10s. for a bond for clearing the ship. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 27.]
July ? 225. The King's instructions to Edward Earl of Sandwich, president, Richard Lord Gorges, William Lord Allington, Thos. Grey, and Henry Brouncker, Sir Humphrey Winch, Sir John Finch, Henry Slingesby, secretary, Silas Titus and Edmund Waller, Commissioners for Foreign Plantations. To take minute information of the state and government of the several Colonies, how the commissions given have been carried out, the number of parishes and of the planters and servants in each, and if any be overstocked with servants or slaves to consider the best means of conveying them, to enforce justice without provocation to the neighbouring Indians, receive any that desire into protection, have persons to learn their languages; to order pains to be taken in the produce of the best native goods and in their manufacture, in the breeding of cattle, and in the growth of materials for shipbuilding. See Warrant dated 18th Nov. 1670. 5 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 93, pp. 3–5.].