America and West Indies
November 1670

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1889

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122-140

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'America and West Indies: November 1670', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 7: 1669-1674 (1889), pp. 122-140. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70201 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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November 1670

Nov. 1.
Westminster.
311. Grant to Christopher Duke of Albemarle, William Earl of Craven, John Lord Berkeley, Anthony Lord Ashley, Sir George Carteret, and Sir Peter Colleton, their heirs and assigns, of "all those islands called Bahama, Eleutheria, Ucanis (?), Providence, Inagua, and all other those islands lying in the degrees of 22 to 27 north lat., commonly known by the name of the Bahama Islands, or the Islands of the Lucayos."Constituting them absolute Lords and Proprietors, paying to his Majesty and his successors one fourth of all the gold and silver ore found, and also as often as he or they shall enter said islands one pound of fine silver. With power to establish counties, manors, &c, to make and administer laws, appoint magistrates, and to benefices, establish customs and ordinances as near as may be agreeable to those of England, transport people thither from England, or his Majesty's islands and colonies, and export goods from or import them into any of his Majesty's ports in England or elsewhere, paying the usual customs and duties. With license to export, custom free, all sorts of tools necessary for planters. Said grantees to enjoy all customs and subsidies assessed within said islands by consent of the freemen; and power to sell or dispose of any part of said islands; and to confer on any of the inhabitants marks and titles of honour, so as they be not the same as are conferred in England. Also power to build forts, castles, towers; appoint governors and other officers, civil and military; to muster and train men; make war and exercise martial law. Said islands not to be subject to or depending on any other Government or Colony, but immediately upon the Crown of England; with power to the grantees to grant indulgences and dispensations with regard to religious worship. 6 Membs. Patent Roll, 22 Car. II., pt. 9.]
1670 ? 312. "A short computation of expense in settling and improving the Bahama Islands for the first three years," vizt.: For transporting 300 families, or 1,000 persons, 12,000l.; subsistence, tools, and other necessaries for six months, 25,000l.; 600 slaves, 18,000l.; recruiting the settlement for three years, 27,500l.; 8,000 negroes to be delivered at Providence in two years before any returns can be expected, 200,000l.; the like value in British goods; wages and provisions for 200 workmen, 30,000l.; fortifications already made, 40,000l., and to be made, 50,000l.; besides agency, sloop hire, and additional subsistence to the King's garrison of 100 men; amounting in all to 633,000l. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 83.]
Nov. 1.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
313. Lord Ashley to Joseph West. Acknowledges receipt of his letter of 27 June last (see ante, No. 203). Doubts not that his care and prudence, which have so much contributed to the promising condition of the settlement in Carolina, will answer the expectation we all have of his management of this affair, and Lord Ashley himself very much relies upon him in it. Hears the Port Royal, which was thought to have foundered in the storm, was run on shore on the Bahamas. Begs that he take care to get as many of the men who were saved, which will be a good addition to his number and strength. For the well ordering the management of the provisions is informed that if a right course be taken in planting, the people may be maintained in future by the products of the country. The Spanish Ambassador has assured Lord Ashley that Mr. Rivers and the rest detained by the Spaniards at St. Katherine's shall be re-delivered. Is told that upwards of 2 cwt. of ambergris has been taken up at Ashley River, but neither West nor Governor Sayle have given any account. Desires he will diligently inquire into the matter. Does not expect that any of those who the Lords Proprietors have been at the charges of transporting and maintaining in a fruitful country would make their Lordships so ungrateful a return as to go about to defraud them of their just rights. And as they shall take care that nobody there shall be oppressed in his just rights and liberties, so they expect that nobody should offer to injure them by such fraud, as they will not suffer him to use to his neighbour. Looks to hear from him concerning this, and by every opportunity concerning the state and progress of affairs. And that he may not hereafter mistake the name of the place he is in, he is to take notice that the river was by Capt. Sandford long since named Ashley River, and is still to be called so, and the town he has now planted out he is to call Charles Town. His present palatine is Lord John Berkeley, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, who has succeeded the Duke of Albemarle, deceased. 1 1/2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 3, 5.]
Nov. 3.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
314. Release from Anthony Lord Ashley of his eighth part of the propriety of Carolina to Thomas Stringer of St. Clement Danes, co. Middlesex, upon trust for the benefit of the son and heir of the said Anthony Lord Ashley and his heirs male for ever. With power to said Lord Ashley to revoke and make void the same. Signed by Lord Ashley, with seal. Endorsed, "The release of Carolina to Mr. Stringer." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 43.]
Nov. 4.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
315. "Barbados Proclamation." Whereas certain intelligence is now come from Ashley River, in the province of Carolina, by the Carolina frigate, Capt. Henry Brayne, now riding in Carlisle Bay, that all those people who departed hence about 12 months past in said frigate for the settling of the province are in very good health and safely arrived at Ashley River, and settled in a very rich and fertile soil in 32° 45' N.L., the river convenient for ships of 100 to 400 tons, and which beyond all men's expectations produces all manner of plants which this island affords, of which experience has been had in planting sugar canes, cotton, ginger, tobacco, potatoes, yams, corn, &c., and that from this day forward there will be no need of supplies from hence, as what is planted will be sufficient to maintain them and to spare, the friendly Indians supplying them with deer, fish, and fowl in great abundance, as likewise assisting them to plant. For the better expedition in settling said province the Lords Proprietors have provided said Carolina frigate for the transportation of such people, with their servants, negroes, or utensils, as will be ready to depart within 30 days from the date hereof. All persons as formerly underwrote 1,000l. or more of muscovados sugar towards defraying the charge of setting forth Capt. Hilton on the discovery of said province of Carolina will have certain quantities of land allotted to them in consideration of their disbursements, according to the terms promised, said land to be run to every such person before 25th March next. As likewise those who are now minded to transport themselves for this present expedition in said frigate shall have the benefit of the ensuing articles for grants of land, &c. confirmed unto them at their arrival in Ashley River by the Governor and agents of the Lords Proprietors; those not able to pay for their own passage or furnish themselves with provisions shall for the same pay to said Lords Proprietors, within two years after their arrival at Ashley River, 500 lbs. merchantable tobacco, cotton, or ginger, or what they shall first produce; all persons willing to transport themselves on these terms to repair to John Strode, merchant, at St. Michael's Town, where Capt. Henry Brayne will confirm their agreement, Major Nath. Kingsland at Windward, Thos. Colleton at the Cleift, Sir John Yeamans at Leeward; these may also put names timely in the secretary's office, according to the custom of this place, to prevent the ship staying for their tickets. Annexed,
315. I. The conditions of the grants of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to those that settle therein. Endorsed by John Locke, as above. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 44.]
Nov. 6. 316. Commission appointing Major James Bannister Major-General of all the forces in the island of Jamaica, under the orders of the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor. Also note of the provisions necessary for victualling his ship. Endorsed, Mr. Ranger's note for provisions and other necessaries for Major Bannister's vessel, and with notes by Williamson. 50l. or 60l.. given to Major Bannister for providing himself with these things. Two papers. 3 1/2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 84, 85.]
Nov. ? 317. Draft in Williamson's hand, with corrections, of the above commission to Major James Bannister. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 86.]
Nov. ? 318. Copy of commission to Maj. Bannister, not so full, but to the same effect as the above. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 27, p. 84.]
Nov. 6. 319. Names of the persons agreed unto to be inserted in the commission and instructions for fetching off the English from Surinam, viz., Major James Bannister, Capt. Francis Yates, Thomas Stanter, Lieut. Henry Masey, Capt. James Maxwell, Lieut. Tobias Bateman, Capt. Christopher Reader, Henry Ayler, Master of the America, Richard Colvile, Master of the Dutch Flyboat, and John Ranger, Master of Major Bannister's Flyboat; any three to be a quorum, of whom Bannister, Yates, or Ayler to be one; to whom only the additional instructions (after shipping the English from Surinam) are to be directed, impowering Bannister (and in case of death or absence, Yates and then Ayler) to give orders to the masters of the two merchant ships. Lord Arlington promised to speak to the Duke of York about the instructions to the masters of the hired merchant ships. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 90*.]
Nov. ? 320. Draft commission to Major James Bannister and others [names not given in this copy, see preceding] for removing the English and settling all disputes at Surinam. Refers to the Articles of Surrender of Surinam between Col. Wm. Byam and Admiral Abraham Crynsens, which were confirmed by the Treaty of Breda, and afterwards ratified by said Crynsens and others on 20/30 April 1668; also the orders of the States General of the 4th and 21st August past, to Commander Lichtenberge, Governor of Surinam [see ante, No. 219]. For the better execution whereof, and that all disputes may be fairly settled, his Majesty has appointed the aforesaid Commissioners to demand and treat with Commander Lichtenberge concerning the execution of all that has been agreed upon or granted to his Majesty's subjects in that Colony, particularly as to their liberty of departing thence with their slaves and goods. Draft, with corrections in the handwriting of Williamson, who has endorsed it, Minute, 1670. 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV ., No. 87.]
Oct. ? 321. Fair copy of the preceding. 5 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol., XXV., No. 88.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
322. Entry of the above commission to Major James Bannister, Captain Francis Yates, Thomas Stanter, Lieut. Henry Masey, Capt. James Maxwell, Lieut. Tobias Bateman, Capt. Christopher Reader, Henry Ayler, Richard Colvill, and John Ranger. [Col. Entry Bks., No. 77, pp. 26–28, No. 78, pp. 75–79, and No. 93, pp. 10–11.]
Nov. ? 323. Draft, in the handwriting of Williamson, of part of Commission for fetching off the English from Surinam. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 89.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
324. Instructions to Major James Bannister, Capt. Francis Yates, Thomas Santer, Lieut. Henry Masey, Capt. James Maxwell, Lieut. Tobias Bateman, Capt. Christopher Reader, Henry Ayler, Richard Colvill, and John Ranger, the King's Commissioners for bringing off from Surinam his Majesty's subjects, their families, and estates. Calendared ante, No. 304. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bks., No. 77, pp, 29–31, No. 78, pp. 80–84, and No. 93, pp. 11–12.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
325. Additional instructions to Major Jas. Bannister, Capt. Fras. Yates, and Henry Ayler. As soon as they are freed from Surinam to sail for Barbadoes, St. Kitts, or any of the Leeward Isles or Jamaica, and suffer such people as desire it to settle there. To send home an account of their proceedings, and whether the Articles for the first surrender of Surinam made by Col. Byam have been observed. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bks., No. 77, p. 32, No. 78, pp. 85–86, and No. 93, p. 13.]
Nov. 6.
Queen Street.
326. H. Slingesby, Secretary to the Council of Trade, to Joseph Williamson, Secretary to Lord Arlington, at his lodgings in Scotland Yard. Having notice that Sir Philip Frowde's son, one of his clerks, whom he ordered to call upon Williamson for copy of the Articles of Surinam had misbehaved himself, and left a note about said Articles in a slighting way, begs to have a copy of said paper, with an account of his clerk's carriage in the business. Yesterday, upon Major Bannister's motion for leaving out of his commission and instructions some of the English planters at Surinam, who might be unwilling to leave the place, it was ordered by the Council that Thomas Stanter and Lieut. Tobias Bateman be left out, and one Gerrard Marshall, Master Mate of the America, put in; which Williamson will be pleased to have done. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 90.]
Nov. 7.
London.
327. Govr. Wm. Lord Willoughby to Col. Codrington, Deputy Governor of Barbadoes. Sends copy of. petition and reasons lately put to the Council for Foreign Plantations by some who pretend to be employed for the Leeward Isles, together with his own answer. If the Leeward Isles have the same desires with the petitioners, cannot but think they are acting the part of him that saws off the bough he sits on. What the result shall be neither knows, nor, for his own private interest, has he any reason to care, for he would be quitted of the troublesome and hazardous part of his Government, from which he could never aim to reap any pleasure, profit, or advantage; but cannot easily be persuaded that the projectors are in earnest. Holds it advisable that they immediately send copies of these papers to the Leeward Isles, that if parties in this project they may see how much they have mistaken their interest, and if not they may take the speediest course to vindicate themselves. Has it from very good hands that Sir Charles Wheler, one of the farmers of the 4 1/2 per cent., is to be the man, which may be worthy most serious consideration; and it is fit they should be acquainted that the building of forts and supply of soldiers and ammunition is what he has often pressed on his Majesty as absolutely necessary, and has always purposed to appoint a Lieutenant-General among them; so these things are only a blind by the petitioners, whilst they introduce their destructive dividing design, which must end either in the ruin of those islands, or in subjecting Barbadoes to a Lieutenant-General resident at St. Kitts. Has also sent a copy of the Council's letter, and inquiries, which they are requested to answer. If clipping his wings be for his Majesty's honour and the advantage of Barbadoes, though by misfortune a Leeward planter, he will never oppose it, but has given his reasons, as in duty bound, and let reason prevail. Encloses,
327. I. The Council for Foreign Plantations to himself, Lord Willoughby. His Majesty having constituted them a standing Council for all affairs concerning his foreign plantations, it is his Majesty's pleasure that all Governors give them frequent information of the condition of their Governments. Desire him to send a copy of his commission and instructions, and return answer in writing to the several heads of inquiries herewith sent with all convenient speed.
327 II. Inquiries to the Chief Governor of Caribbee Islands concerning their strength and condition. 1670. Sep. 29. Read at a meeting of the Assembly at Barbadoes April 19, 1671. Together 5 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 13, pp. 21–26.]
Nov. 7.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
328. Lord Ashley to Sir John Hayden. The courtesy where-with he entertained "our people" at their passage to Carolina, and the forwardness with which he hath assisted their new settlement there has obliged several persons of some consideration in England, whom he will not find unmindful of his favour. Has a particular sense of his kindness himself, and shall be very glad of an opportunity to repay him otherwise than by bare acknowledgments. Begs his favour to search into the truth of a matter of some moment in reference to 2 cwt. of ambergris, said to have been taken by some of "our people," a part whereof belongs to the Proprietors. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55,p 9.]
Nov. 9.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
329. Henry Brayne to Lord Ashley. Has written of all proceedings from Virginia and the hopes of their settlement if it be but well managed, for the coast and country will answer any man's expectations, both as to navigation and plantation, and the greatest of our wants is good men of reason, fit for a commonwealth, for though the Governor is ancient and crazy, yet if there was but a wise council of planters it would be for the good of the settlers and a great encouragement to lay out their money, but are now constrained to follow the rules of those who are ignorant, greatly to the ruin of the settlers. Assures his Lordship there are but four or five men of the Council that have any reason, viz :— Capt. West, Messrs. Bull, Scrivenor, Dun, and Dalton, who are good honest men but know nothing of planting; if there were more of the Council who did their grievances would soon be remedied. Complaints against Capt. O'Sullivan, Surveyor-General, for his rash and base dealings and abuse of the Governor, Council, and country; his surveying very irregular and gives no satisfaction. Suggest the appointment of a new surveyor. Has hitherto been as great an encourager as any one ordinary man to the design, and has the best stock of any three men in the Colony, but his grievance is that he has not as yet a convenient piece of land worth making a settlement upon, though Sir Peter Colleton promised he would get Brayne a patent for 5,000 acres of land for "the moneys, &c. I was out at Cape Faire (sic), and for my first discovery with Col. Sandford," which he begs his Lordship to grant to him, with liberty to take it up in any part of the province, and upon which he will put 30 hands and will get 60 more to settle by him on their own lands adjacent. Asks permission also to take three or four small guns out of the ship for the safety of said Settlement. Is heartily sorry that Mr. Rivers and the rest are detained by the Spaniard, and, as "I have the Portugal language," thinks he could procure their liberty the next summer if commanded by his Lordship. Mr. Colleton, and Mr. Strowd, the merchant, have furnished the ship with necessaries and provisions for passengers and seamen to 100l., and almost 20 servants betwixt himself and one Justice Harvey. We do dearly want another vessel that may sail at a small charge, which Brayne's mate is very fit to take charge of. If he is to be continued in the ship, desires a little better power, that "he may not be threatened by such of our Governor's Council to turn me out of the ship, or by any other men's humours for their own private interest." Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 45.]
Nov. 9.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
330. Entry of the preceding in Carolina Letter Book. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 62–70.]
[Nov. 9.] 331. Petition of merchants and freeholders of Jamaica residing in London to the King. The Island of Jamaica has since 1664 been under the Government of Sir Thos. Modyford, whose prudent government hath not only exceedingly advanced the improvement of said island by the invitation of planters but hath also encouraged the old and attracted new merchants and planters to proceed vigorously in supplying those plantations with all things necessary, and that singly upon the advantages they have reaped from the prudent regulation and justice of the present Governor, as his Majesty will clearly understand from the annexed petition of the inhabitants of that island, which petitioners with all just confidence confirm. Pray that Sir Thos. Modyford may not be removed from said Government. Signed by J. Robinson, And. Riccard, Thomas Ducke, Nicolas Pennyng, Will. Bragg, Andrew Orgill, Sam. Bernard, Richard Ford, Fran. Chaplin, Jonathan Dawes, Andr. King, Jno. Kempthorne, John Buckworth, Richard Beckford, Ja. Lucie. Enclose,
331. I. Petition of officers, freeholders, and inhabitants of Jamaica to the King. That petitioners for several years lived in this island in very poor and unsettled estate, till it pleased his Majesty to send for their Governor Sir Thos. Modyford, who by the great encouragement he gave to planting (more especially by his own example, having brought and laid out a considerable stock) induced petitioners to betake themselves to a planting and settled condition, wherein he daily endeavours to oblige them by many wholesome laws, with a free and unbiassed administration of justice; and the loud fame hereof draws great numbers of his Majesty's subjects from all parts to settle amongst them, to the great benefit of this island, his Majesty's revenue, and the English nation. Now petitioners being jealous (by reason of various reports) that his Majesty may be persuaded to remove so good a Governor, pray him to continue Sir Thos. Modyford as Governor, unless his Majesty shall find very pregnant reasons to the contrary. Signed by Cols. Henry Morgan and Theodore Cary, Lieut.-Cols. John Cope, Robert Byndlos, Thomas Ballard, and William Ivye, seven sergeant-majors, 17 captains, and 13 lieutenants, 11 ensigns, 11 merchant freeholders, 22 merchant inhabitants, and 251 freeholders. Endorsed, Rejected. Endorsed, Read in Council Nov. 9th, 1670 and rejected. Together 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 91, 91 I.]
[Nov. 12.] 332. Petition of several planters belonging to his Majesty's sugar plantations to the Council for Plantations. That the growth of said plantations has diminished one fourth and the charge of making sugar has much increased by reason whereof the English planter finds little or no recompense for hazard and labour, pray their honours to represent to his Majesty how ruinous it will be to the plantations and to trade to have any further imposition upon the growth of said plantations. Annexed,
332. I. Reasons against such impositions. The English sugar plantations are stated to employ 10,000 seamen in their trade, and by the industry of 10,000 English planters is produced a native commodity of 800,000 l. per annum value. 2 1/2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, pp. 12–14.]
Nov. 12/22.
Westminster.
333. Memorial to the Dutch Ambassadors, Joh. Boreel and Van Brenningen, on the proposed commission concerning Surinam. Have examined the commission annexed, and earnestly desire that it may be amended according to the observations hereunder specified. These have reference to the obedience to be given to the Governor of Surinam and to other details in carrying out his Majesty's commission in Surinam so that a true report be made to his Majesty. French also English translation. French also English translation. Annexed,
333. I. Commission to Major Bannister and others, see Cal. ante, No. 320. Endorsed by Williamson. Together 3 papers. 18 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 92–94.]
Nov. 15. 334. Order of the Council for Foreign Plantations. The Lord President to move his Majesty that some discourse be had with the Spanish Ambassador how the 16th Article of the late treaty with Spain in relation to the West Indies may be published there. Annexed,
334. I. Article 16 of the treaty for the composing of differences, restraining of depredations, and the establishing of peace in America, between the Crowns of Great Britain and Spain. Within eight months from the exchange of ratifications they shall be published throughout the Dominions of both Confederates, as well in the West Indies as elsewhere. Together, 2pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., Nos. 95, 96.]
Nov. 15. 335. Copy of the above order. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, p. 3.]
Nov. 15.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
336. Sir John Yeamans to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Has formerly given account of their affairs at Port Royal to the time of the departure from hence of their fleet thitherwards through his great desire to serve their Lordships in a matter tending so much to the increase of the honour and benefit of the English dominion. Their fleet being dispersed by the violence of storms, he with much difficulty attained the harbour of "Burmoodoes," where refitting, took so much time he was of necessity engaged to return to Barbados to execute the King's commission for negotiation with the French commissioners in the affair of St. Christopher's. Before his departure and according to their Lordships' blank commission he "substituted" Col. Wm. Sayle, a Bermudian, the Governor, who, although a man of no great sufficiency, yet the ablest he could then meet with, and by whom he had great reason to hope many of that island would be the sooner invited to their Lordships' settlement. Arrival of the Carolina some few days past with intelligence of the welfare of the people there, the wholesomeness of the air, the fruitfulness of the earth even to admiration, the pleasant situation beyond expression, the friendliness and ready assistance of the natives, with whom they have contracted a perpetual peace and friendship by1670. articles ratified by their supreme Cassique. Account of the warlike posture of the Spaniards and their endeavours to stir up the Indians to prevent the English settlements, threatening destruction to those Indians who continued their friends. Complains of the poorness of spirit shown by Governor Sayle in this business, which may in the future cause greater inconveniences, to prevent which Sir John intends going thence the latter end of the coming summer, if possible. Will endeavour the speedy dispatch of their ship, with what passengers he can encourage to that design, the welfare of that Colony now principally depending upon the increase of their strength and numbers. Holds it his duty to give their Lordships notice that sundry gentlemen in these parts desirous to be concerned in their province are absolutely dissatisfied and discouraged upon consideration of the 10th article in the concessions in the charter, viz., That the lands appertaining to all Landgraves or Cassiques, with the dignities, shall go to the heir male, and for want of issue escheat to the Proprietors. Now they say that all such lands so assigned, being altogether without improvement and from whence no produce can be reaped without vast disbursements, nor advantage hoped for till the second generation, it will be an undertaking not warranted by discretion to hazard so great an estate upon such an uncertain limitation, and therefore they will by no means be induced to lay out their money in that settlement unless it may redound to them and their heirs for ever. But as to the bare title of honour, they are contented that in default of heirs male it may be in their Lordships' gift, if they will have it so. Further, they say they are not satisfied how inferior persons that hold under these Landgraves or Cassiques shall be dealt with in case of such an escheat as aforesaid, and whether they shall be put to compound with their Lordships in such case for their inheritances. There are some that take exception that their Lordships have not in their Concessions acquitted the produce of the country from customs and impositions answerable to his Majesty's grant to their Lordships, which they conceive their Lordships have omitted for their own advantage. If their Lordships will explain themselves in these particulars by some instrument as public as their Concessions, it will abundantly satisfy many here who are men of purse and parts to promote the settlement. In the meantime if their Lordships will send him a patent for a Landgrave, with directions for laying out the baronies belonging thereto, by a tenure free and unfettered, so that the estate he intends to bury there may in its resurrection become the benefit of his posterity, it will be a means the sooner to free those persons from their doubts and jealousies and to encourage them to go on cheerfully in the great work their Lordships have designed. 4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 46.]
Nov. 15.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
337. Sir John Yeamans to Lord Dudley. Refers to his preceding letter to the Proprietors of Carolina. Intends going in person thither this summer; his great ambition to serve his Lordship. Sends him 12 cedar planks as the firstfruits of that glorious province, which promises in abundance all those good things the heart of man can wish for. Encloses letter from Henry Woodward, who was left at Port Royal by Col. Robt. Sandford upon the first discovery, which letter Sir John desires may be imparted to the rest of the Lords Proprietors. Is informed that Woodward has made a very large discovery in the colony, but is much unwilling to declare it to the Government there, being desirous to be sent for to make it out to their Lordships, which, if granted, will redound much to the prejudice of that settlement, he being the only person by whose means they hold a fair and peaceable correspondence with the natives. Questions not at his own arrival there to have a full relation of all Woodward's proceedings, which he will send for their Lordships' consideration. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 72–74.] Encloses,
337. I. Henry Woodward to Sir John Yeamans. Has discovered that fruitful province of Chusytachyq, where the Emperor resides, a country so delicious, pleasant, and fruitful that were it cultivated doubtless it would prove a second paradise. It lies west by north from us 14 days' travel after the Indian manner of marching. There he contracted a league with the Emperor and all the petty cassekas, so that after his return by the help of (Owen) Jones they were able to procure provisions from the natives, without which it had gone very hard with them all. Attempts of the Spaniards and the Indians of St. Helens to starve them out and make them surrender frustrated by the arrival of the Carolina; her great guns made them retreat to St. Augustine. The Spaniards threaten to destroy the Indians of St. Helens, Cumbokee and Edisto, who are friendly to the English. Is more beholden to his agent than anything from the public. Will endeavour to send him some of their American rarities, their troubles at present not permitting him to travel the country, it being his business to wait in town and to give an account of what relations the natives bring from the southward or the northward. 1 1/2 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 33.]
Nov. 15.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
338. Sir John Yeamans to Sir Peter Colleton. Has received his letter of 28 August with copy of his of 30 May, but not the original. About six weeks since arrived Mr. Berrow who was in the Port Royal bound for Carolina, a person very industrious in taking an exact account of their unhappy voyage, which he brought Sir John, with plots of the Bahamas, copies of which his brother Thomas Colleton should give to him. Arrival of the Carolina frigate from Carolina a few days since with ample account of the people's arrival and good health, only their deficiency in strength and number of people. Has withdrawn several persons from their resolutions of other settlements, as Col. Sharpe from New York, who intended a large settlement there, but has suspended the same until a moderation be made to the several exceptions specified in his general letter enclosed to the Lords Proprietors. Presumes the Carolina may be ready in about three weeks to depart for said province, wherein by his persuasion go Capt. Godfrey and Thos. Gray, Sir John's chief agent here with a very considerable strength of servants, and many others unknown to Sir Peter, so needless to name. An Act lately passed in this island imposing great penalties upon those persuading any to go hence for other colonies which will be a great hindrance of supplies from hence. Desires his concurrence and urgency for a speedy answer to his general letter. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 47.]
Nov. 17. 339. Report of the Council of Plantations to the King on petition of planters and merchants of the Leeward Isles. That said islands might be under one Governor-in-Chief not subordinate to the Governor of Barbadoes, for the reasons annexed. Two papers, both signed by Sandwich, President; Rich. Gorges, W. Alington, Tho. Grey, H. Brouncker, Hum. Winche, S. Titus, Ed. Waller, and H. Slingesby, Secretary. See Cal. ante, No. 268, Enclosures I., II. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 97.]
Nov. 17. 340. Copies of the preceding report and enclosures. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 94, pp. 15–16.]
Nov. 17. 341. Journal of the Assembly of Barbadoes. Commission read, from Governor Lord Willoughby to Capt. Abraham Langford, dated 19th August 1670, appointing him Lord Willoughby's sole agent for inquiring into the collection and receipt of all revenues belonging to his Majesty in Barbadoes and the Caribbees. Answer and reason of Nathaniel Johnson why he did not pay the gunner and matrosses according to order.
Nov. 17.
Barbadoes.
Symon Lambert, Speaker on behalf of the Assembly, to Gov. Lord Willoughby, in answer to his of 20th August last [see ante No. 236]. Thank him for his great care and pains which they well hoped might have proved more effectual; but they cannot despair, since his Majesty promised in his letter of 6th April to take their addresses into consideration. Cannot judge their opposers, but that his Excellency will deem them the representatives of the island as best knowing their own wants. Have contracted their addresses into the fewer and the most necessary heads to be prosecuted. Might with more reason complain of the Royal Company, who have not complied with their proclamation to furnish negroes at 17l. or 2,400 lb. sugar per head, but have sold the best to the Spaniard, and the refuse here at near double that sum. The laws every way effectual and speedy for the recovery of debts as the laws of England. The chief consideration now before them whether the planters shall have credit from the merchant or purchase for ready payment, which will encourage the planter to the utmost to make good sugar, and if after all their care they come short of the goodness of Jamaica sugar they must impute it to the unfitness of their land; but if his Majesty will grant them a mint, ready payment will be made and the complaints of merchants be answered. Through the unseasonableness of last year the sugar proved worse than ordinary. Take notice of his Majesty's great care in appointing the committee, before whom they hope his Excellency will at all times appear on their behalf. As to the 4 1/2 per cent., they have thought it not impertinent to acquaint him, that it was given for maintaining the dignity of his Majesty's authority here, the public meeting of the sessions, the often attendance of the council, the reparation of the forts, the building a sessions house and a prison, and all other public charges, and therefore suppose the charge on Nathaniel Johnson for payment of matrosses was just and warrantable, and cannot but hope his Majesty's favour therein; which they desire he will speedily represent in regard the prison is utterly decayed, and the forts soon will be the like. Have requested some gentlemen in London to afford their utmost assistance to his Lordship in accomplishing their desires to his Majesty, and defending their rights; which they desire his Excellency to take in good part, for they neither doubt nor fear his prudence or care, but desire him to be their director. 17th November, 1670.
Nov. 17.
Barbadoes.
Symon Lambert, Speaker of the Assembly, to the Gentlemen Planters in London, viz., Sir Peter Colleton, Sir Paul Painter, Henry Drax, Philip Bell, Constant Sylvester, Edward Pye, Thomas Wardall, Col. Thomas Middleton, Jacob Lucy, John Bawden, Major John Gregory, and Ferdinando Gorges. Refer to addresses to his Majesty delivered to Governor Willoughby on leaving the island in 1668, to his Excellency's letters of 20th May and 20th August 1669. Taking his Excellency's advice have lately sent him a petition to his Majesty with fewer heads, begging his prosecution thereof; which letter, petition, and addresses are herewith enclosed; and for that his Excellency's great concerns may not permit his often attendance, desires them, as greatly concerned in the welfare of this place, to apply to his Excellency to enforce their last addresses; assist at all times before his Majesty and all Committees, in asserting their wants and preventing anything that may be prejudicial; and let them know how all things move. His Excellency is acquainted with these their desires; and what charge may be expended will be discharged out of the first goods raised for any public use. Refer to the charge for the matrosses being denied by the Receiver here of his Majesty's revenue by his Excellency's order, and his commission to Capt. Langford. Heads of addresses sent by his Excellency in November 1668, to be presented to his Majesty. 1. To represent their sense of his Majesty's care. 2. The abuses in the Customs and mistakes of sugars. 3. Liberty to transport commodities to any place in amity with England, upon security given for payment of duties. 4. To set up a mint. 5. The great inconvenience of patents. 6. Customs on goods from England to be taken off. 7. The customs on strong liquors in England to extend to those made here. 8. For procuring a charter to be made a body corporate, and to have all the powers formerly granted to the Earl of Carlisle. Also those to be now presented [see ante, No. 299]. Together 8 1/2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 13, pp. 6–14.]
Nov. 18. 342. Warrant to the Attorney-General. Whereas his Majesty by Commission under the Great Seal of 30th July last constituted Edward Earl of Sandwich, Richard Lord Gorges, Wm. Lord Allington, Thomas Grey and Henry Brounker, Sir Humphrey Winch, Sir John Finch, Silas Titus, Edmond Waller, and Henry Slingesby his Majesty's Council for Foreign Plantations, and granted them certain yearly salaries, viz., to the Earl of Sandwich, as President of said Council, the sum of 700l., and to each of the Council 500l.; his Majesty's pleasure is that the Attorney-General prepare a Bill to pass the Great Seal authorising the Commissioners of the Treasury to pay said salaries to said Earl of Sandwich, &c., so long as they shall serve as members of said Council, quarterly at the four usual feasts, to commence from Midsummer last; and also to said Henry Slingesby or his assigns the further sum of 1,000l. by the year to be employed for incidental charges relating to that service, according to such warrants as he shall receive from said Council. Mem. This warrant was signed anew the 2nd Dec 1670, with the addition of a grant to Dr. Benjamin. Worsley of 300l. by the year, in consideration of the assistance he has already given and shall hereafter give in matters relating to his Majesty's Plantations. 1 p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 33, p. 59 đ.]
Nov. 20.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
343. Henry Brayne to Lords Proprietors of Carolina. His last was dated from Virginia, 12 June, wherein he rendered a full account of all proceedings from Bermuda to Port Royal and from thence to Ashley River, before called Keywahah. Death of Mr. Burgh, so applied to Maj.-Gen. Bennett and Capt. Godwin, who had their Lordship's goods in possession, and were very ready to assist, as was also Sir Wm. Berkeley. Sailed on 4th August, met with a hurricane, but saved his ship, though a great deal of damage was done to the planters' crops and houses (in Virginia) so that tobacco will be extraordinarily dear. Anchored at the mouth of Ashley River 22 Aug., and seeing Indians ashore, went in his boat with Mr. Carteret and two Indians of our country; account of their adventures with some Spanish Indians or Westoes, who fired upon them as they rowed off. Found all the Colony in arms, the Governor having been told by our Indians that Brayne's ship was one of the Spanish ships. Acquainted the Governor and Capt. West with what had passed, and desired that a party might be sent out against the Indians who opposed them, but nothing was done, tho' all the seamen were willing to go. Is certain that if the Indians find they are let alone in their roguery it will increase their boldness and animate them on to more mischief. Through the ill-contriving of the Governor and Council, as Brayne understood by Messrs. Bull and Owen, neither Mr. Rivers nor the rest have been brought away [from St. Augustine], but Capt. Bayly has been left in the friar's hands, he being a person of very good worth and a good linguist. Consulted the Governor and Capt. West as to lading his ship with timber for Barbadoes or what else they could think on, but they answered that all the time Capt. Brayne was absent they were fain to put the people to a pint of peas a day, which sharp allowance was the cause of their having done little work and of no timber being ready to be shipped, as the distraction they were in about those Spaniards made them think it better to fortify themselves as strongly as they could, and to send Brayne away to Barbadoes before the foul weather set in. Fell down to the river's mouth, and met the sloop that was hired in Barbadoes, when we went down to Port Royal, deeply laden with corn, but not above two passengers, being afraid to venture because of the Spaniards, and of their dislike to the Governor, which Brayne read in some letters from Bermuda to some of our gentlemen that came out of England. Set sail for Barbadoes 23 Sept, where he arrived 31 Oct., being becalmed 12 or 14 days, and finds abundance of people making ready to go down with him, from the good reports they hear of our country, assuring themselves that in one, two, or three years they will live there very happily and comfortably; the seamen have also a great fancy to settle there, and are going to apply for their wages to fit themselves out, he could not any longer keep them off their pay. Capt. Godfrey and five hands go with him, also Mr. Gray, overseer to Sir John Yeamans, and 10 able men, most of them carpenters and sawyers. Mr. Stroud, the merchant, and Justice Harvy is sending down his son with 10 or ']2 more hands. Sir John Yeamans has many more, who will in a short time be ready, and himself and friends will get about 10 hands, so shall be forced to get another vessel, and hopes to sail in about a month and touch at the Leeward Isles, especially at Antigua, where are abundant [persons] ready to desert, being a mere grave, and will never advance the King's interest, and where terrible hurricanes destroy their crops and houses every year. As our design is so likely to be prosperous they dearly want another vessel, either a pink of 70 or 80 tons or a ketch of 50 or 60 tons, which their Lordships would find both useful to their own interests and that of the country's. The Port Royal was cast away upon the Bahamas by the master's own wilfulness, and there is only Brayne's ship to depend upon, and she has been a long time off the ground and will want sheathing; the necessity of another vessel. Supposes he shall carry down 150 or 200 people more, besides those who will come in the spring from other places when the country will be safely settled. Will then load with timber for Barbadoes, and with sugar from thence as deeply as she can swim to arrive in the Thames about the end of July, which freight will pay the seamen's wages and then fit her out again for our country, when he makes no question of having 200 or 300 people out of London. Recommends his mate, John Coming, a very honest, trusty, and able man to command said vessel, he having already an interest in our country, and knowing our coast and rivers, &c., and the bearer of this letter. 4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 48.]
Nov. 20.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
344. Henry Brayne to Lord Ashley. Understands that Capt. Gilbert, the bearer, hath a great inclination to our country, and believes if his Lordship gives Capt. Gilbert any encouragement he can get abundance of his sect or friends to settle, he having a very good ship for that purpose. Has heard Gilbert say he would come and see us if he could have encouragement as to a freight that might be worth his time. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 50.]
Nov. 20.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
345. Henry Brayne to [Sir Peter Colleton]. Received his letter at Virginia advising Brayne to take in cattle, hogs, and provisions for our colony and to follow his former instructions to take the goods brought from Port Royal to Mr. Hallett and his brother Thomas Colleton and take their advice how to proceed. Thinks Mr. Stroud a more convenient man for that purpose who is a great settler and promoter of our design having with Justice Harvy got almost 20 people to send down. Stroud and Thos. Colleton have taken up about 100l. to furnish our ship with necessaries and provisions for carrying on our designs. Hopes to have a quick passage being so late in the year. Complains of having only heard from Sir Peter once and of the want of stores for his ship which has been almost 18 months off the ground. About the account of the ship's stores and men to Thos. Colleton which he was ordered to give and which he has faithfully done. Her gains but little at present, only 2,400 lbs. of sugar for the passage of a young man and 13 hogsheads of tobacco from Virginia to Barbadoes. Could not take in a freight of timber at our colony, being tied by his instructions to follow the orders of the Governor and Captain West who said the safest way was to send Brayne for more people. Hopes now by the going down of Captain Godfrey, Mr. Gray and other ingenious planters that things will be better carried in future. If it be not convenient for Brayne to come home in the spring begs Sir Peter will send him to the value of 50l. in commodities fit for New York as shoes, stockings, hats, blue linen, &c., with which it will be very useful to pay the carpenters and seamen. Proposes to fit his ship at New York, and as to the management of all things hopes power will be given to Thos. Colleton, Stroud, Sir John Yeamans, Major Kingsland, and himself. Our Governor is not fit, being very aged and feeble and having gone through a great deal of sickness of late, inclining much to the lethargy dropsy and other diseases, that what small reason he had is almost taken from him insomuch that he is hardly "compas montes," and Brayne wishes him safe to his own house again at Bermudas. It is much doubted whether he can live, for Brayne left him sick and does not know whether he has recovered. Will pawn his own life that Sayle is one of the unfittest men in the world for his place and his being Governor keeps our settlement very much back and very chargeable to their Lordships. But though the Governor is crazy, yet if there were a wise council or three or four men of reason, planters who knew what did belong to settle such a country it would be to the good of the country and their Lordships' interest. Brayne has himself the greatest interest of any one particular man in the country. As to the accuracy of his account has not charged one shilling more than his just right, which he desires may be paid to Peter Jones, Sir Peter Colleton's Secretary, if living. Wishes a commission from the Duke of York for the command of his ship and men, &c. There are only himself, 15 men and one boy in the ship, which is as little as possible he can sail her with safety. Has sent by Mr. Gilbert eight barrels of powder which were damnified in the storm and he desires may be changed. Will keep three barrels and deliver five barrels to Captain West. 4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 49.]
Nov. 22.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
346. [N. Carteret] to [Sir George Carteret]. Arrival of the ship (Carolina) on the coast [of Carolina] 22 August when Captain Brayne, himself with two others and an Indian went ashore; a flag of truce, which proved to be a white handkerchief, displayed by some Indians who turned out to be Westoes, but seeing a great number in ambush caused them to row off again. Account of the efforts of the Westoes to surprise and take them and of their firing upon them before they could get to their boat. Arrival in Ashley River where they were received joyfully. How Captain Bayly and the Marshal of Key-awah who went to St. Augustine in a sloop commanded by the Governor Sayle's son went ashore with letters to the friar and the Governor of St. Augustine, and were detained as pirates for want of credentials. 3 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. "N. Carteret to Sir G. Carteret, 22 Nov.'70." [Shaftesbury Papers, Vol. IX., No. 51.]
Nov. 23.
Barbadoes.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
347. Thos. Colleton to [Sir Peter Colleton]. Concerning bills given to various persons for payment for negroes for the Windward Plantation; also Capt. Brayne's account. Sir Peter ought to take care to have things better ordered at Carolina, for not a stick came away from there in the ship, and 100 men upon the place, and all for fear of two or three Spaniards and a few Indians. The people mind solely their own interest, and not the Proprietors, who they think are bound to maintain them. About freight of cattle and goods. Begs instructions may be sent to the Governor and Capt. West to follow Colleton's orders as to the loading and sailing of the Carolina, by which means his vessel will do a great deal more. Looks upon the present Governor as very unfit, and if the Bermudians do not come to him this year he ought to be changed for a more active, prudent man; but if he had a good Council he would do well enough. Suggests his having a blank commission empowering himself and others to appoint a new Governor in a case of necessity, for Sir Peter is so remote and it is so long before he can hear from hence that all may be lost before he can remedy it. Capt. Brayne has reduced the number of his seamen from 20 to 16; two or three have settled in the country, and others are going home to bring their families to do so; a cargo of commodities for seamen's apparel very necessary. Capt. Brayne wishes Colleton to write in his favour. New York a better place for cattle and horses than Virginia, the former about 50s. a head at New York and provisions cheaper; so is clearly of opinion that Carolina should be stocked from thence and not from Virginia. Business matters; shipping of molasses, rum, and tobacco; the best way to employ the Carolina. Doubts not that 80 people will settle from Barbadoes, besides what may be expected from the Leeward Islands. Indeed the Proprietors are much obliged to John Stroud, who could not have done more to promote the design had he been their agent, and has engaged several of his own relations to go, and is a copartner himself. Thinks about 150 will go by the next shipping and upon the John and Thomas, a ship of our own. Entreats the Proprietors to thank Stroud for his kindness and to grant him a considerable parcel of land. Both himself and Capt. Brayne believe J. Stroud will be fitter for his concernments than Capt. Hallet, who is, as it were, strange to them all. Has been constrained to take up bills on account of fittings and provisions for the Carolina; remarks thereon; the difference of taking up of sugar for bills of exchange is 30 per cent. 4 pp. Endorsed by John Locke, "Mr. T. Colleton to Sir Peter Colleton. 23 Nov. 70." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 52.]
Nov. 28.
Jamaica.
348. Tho. Bromhall, junr., to Williamson. Is safely arrived at Jamaica. Called in at Montserat and Nevis, which are both much ruined by hurricanes, and doubtless this is the best place in the West Indies. Is but a week since arrived, but was loth to omit any opportunity of making his acknowledgments for all favours, especially in recommending him to Col. Lynch. One Mr. Rookes will wait on him about the encouragement of the Trade Mercury, which, if he be pleased to join to the Gazette, it will be to his advantage; doubts not that when he has considered how public a good it will be and how great a security to the peace of the nation, he will encourage it and further oblige Bromhall. Endorsed, Rec. Feb. 1670–1. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 98.]
Nov. 29.
Barbadoes.
349. Order of the Deputy Governor and Council of Barbadoes. On a writ of error brought by William White, father-in-law and guardian of James White, executor of James White, late of this island, deceased, to reverse a judgment, dated the 28th April 1670, obtained against him at the suit of Segar de Hem (?), attorney of Sir John Maynard, knt., for the sum of 2,000l. and 418. costs. The board found error in the judgment and ordered it to be reversed. Then follow a declaration of the state of the case, and reasons why the judgment was in error, signed Sam. Williams and Wm. Carpenter; and mem. that petitioner conceives that the proceedings there ought to be summary, and not according to formalities of courts, but the substance and truth, else all their proceedings in English are error, it being impossible that proceedings there should be the same as in England. Endorsed, "Read June 5, '72." 3 1/2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 98*.]
Sept.–Nov.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
350. Extracts in the handwriting of John Locke of letters from Carolina to Lord Ashley, viz. from—
William Owen, Sept. 15 (calendared No. 261).
Stephen Bull, Sept. 12 ( cal. No. 259).
Henry Brayne, Nov. 9 (cal. No. 329).
Joseph West, Sept. (cal. No. 257).
William Sayle (cal. No. 253).
Sir John Yeamans, Nov. 15 (cal. No. 336).
Joseph Dalton, Sept 9 (cal. No. 248).
5 pp. [ Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 39.]
Nov.
Shaftesbury.
Papers.
351. Extracts, in the handwriting of John Locke, of letters from Carolina from the Governor and Council, Sir John Yeamans, Thos. Colleton, Hen. Woodward, Jos. Dalton, Jos. West, Henry Brayne, &c. (already calendared). Arranged under the following heads, viz.: Proposals and wants; Governor and Government; Information; Provisions and stores; Chusytachyque; Indians; Spaniards; Town; Country; Ship Carolina; Planters going. 8 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 53.]