America and West Indies
April 1671

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1889

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189-209

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'America and West Indies: April 1671', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 7: 1669-1674 (1889), pp. 189-209. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70208 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


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Contents

April 1671

April 4.
Barbadoes.
482. A Committee of the Assembly of Barbadoes to Sir Peter Colleton and 11 others, Gentlemen Planters in London. Were appointed at the last sitting of the Assembly to give them thanks for their kindness expressed in theirs of the 14th December. Since theirs of the 7th March the Deputy-Governor, Council and Assembly have taken into consideration the present necessity of repairing the forts, platforms, and breastworks in and about the island, and have levied 200 lbs. sugar on every copper and still in all sugar works, and 18 lb. sugar per head on all negroes in plantations where there are no works, besides the proportionable tax on the towns and traders; which in their present condition will lie very heavy on them, but are willing to break through all obstacles to put the island in a good posture of defence, and that his Majesty may see their readiness to lay themselves out to the utmost for his honour and renown. This free act nothing but true principles of loyalty could have compelled them to, it being chiefly appropriated to those necessary uses the 4 1/2 Pr. Ct. was to perform; but present affairs requiring a more speedy remedy than they could expect by waiting an answer from England to that part of their addresses, and unwilling to force the Farmers to the performance of the conditions of the Act, have chosen this as a middle way. By the Act one quarter is reserved to their own use, a good part whereof is intended home to the Gentlemen Planters, for prosecuting their addresses before his Majesty, and satisfying their former disbursements about the island's concerns. Have concluded on a Bill to prevent depopulation, which they have good assurance will pass into an Act next sitting, in which, as also by another to encourage the making and wearing of the island's manufactures, provision is made suitable to their proposals. Ere long they may expect a fuller account from the House. Signed by Ralph Frettwell, Henry Odiarne, and Nicholas Prideaux. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 19–21.]
April 4. 483. "Copy of the relation of Wm. Fogg concerning the action of the privateers at Panama, taken the 4th of April 1671." Sailed 6th December from Cape Liburon for Providence, where they found 300 men in garrison, who yielded next day, but only 60 slaves and 500l. in plunder. In five days they sent Captain Bradley with 400 men to take Chagre Castle; where after nine days he landed. They fired a volley at the castle, and fell into the trench, which was 12 foot deep; that night they fired the castle, which made it so hot they could not enter, it being of double palissades and thatch, and lay under the walls the next day; the third day they fell on, but were beaten back, the enemy being 370 men, but they rallied, entered the castle, and put all to the sword, saving none but slaves and such as hid themselves. In this conflict they lost Captain Bradley, Lieutenant Powell, and 150 men. A week after Admiral Morgan came up, and at the entry over the bar the Admiral, which had been retarded by contrary winds, and six small vessels were cast away and 10 men drowned. Ten days after they went up the River Chagre in five vessels about five leagues, and put their necessaries in canoes, the men marching the other five leagues by the river side, cutting the path with difficulty and finding five breastworks which the enemy left; and so in five days they came to Venta de Crux, the landing place, where they found all burnt. Finding next morning that they were about 1,200 men they marched, and in the afternoon were ambuscaded by 1,000 Indians, but put them to flight, losing one man, whilst the Indians lost their commander, the Prince of the Indians, and about 30 men. Next day they marched about six miles, and the third the like, and found they were within three miles of the enemy's camp. Next morning they found the enemy ready to receive them, being about 2,000 foot and 700 horse. The horse in two divisions charged their "forlorn" and right wing, but having received much loss by our first volley fled, and their foot gave one volley and fled after them; they had the pursuit about three miles, in which the enemy lost 500 men, and they one Frenchman. That night they entered Panama, and found the houses fired by the enemy. They lodged in the churches and monasteries, which were of stone, and there lay a week; found plenty of victuals, but all the goods burnt, and the plate conveyed away. After this their men marched out in parties, sometimes 100, sometimes 40, and 10, and took prisoners every day, but never saw an enemy to face them, and after 28 days marched the way they came and returned to Chagre; whence a month since they sailed, "and three days after the said vessel came," left the Admiral about Puerto Bello, with three sail; and the rest, he supposes, made the best of their way for Jamaica. The party got but 101. per man in money and plate, besides negroes. 1 3/4 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXVII., 120–121.]
April 5.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
484. Draft patent for a Landgrave of Carolina to Sir John Yeamans. In the handwriting of John Locke, with corrections and additions. Latin, 2 pages and 3 lines. Endorsed. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 78.]
April 8.
Old Harbour,
Jamaica.
485. Major Jas. Banister to the King. Has brought away in performance of his charge as many as the two ships would carry, his own being wanting, and would have brought all his Majesty's subjects from Surinam had things been carried as they ought and he had had shipping; but by the perverseness of the Governor was forced to leave above half and they who had the best estates, of which his Majesty may be informed by the narrative of his daily proceedings. These people have presented the enclosed petition; begs leave to add, that without his Majesty's favour they will be undone and no way left them to get off the country, their masters well knowing that the colony is broke if all the English go off. Arrived at Jamaica 12th March and was received with all civility by Sir Thos. Modyford who hath a special care for the settlement of the people, and is very well satisfied with the fertility of the island, which he is confident will in a short time prove one of his Majesty's best plantations. Prays his Majesty's acceptance of the small presentment he has presumed to send, viz., two Indian swords, three lances which they mortally poison at their going to war, and one bow, made without any iron tool, the only instruments they ever knew being hare's teeth and sharp stones, with a snake's skin, two fowls called cusslisses, and a young fowl called a gallding, which when grown will be all of a perfect scarlet colour. Encloses,
485. I. Petition of his Majesty's loyal subjects now residing in Surinam under the Government of the United Netherlands, to the King. That depending upon the sudden return of Col. Jas. Banister with orders for their transportation, petitioners for several months kept themselves out of engagements that they might be in a posture to withdraw with their estates; but being wearied by delays, intelligence failing by the miscarriage or interception of letters, and the Dutch frequently suggesting that there would never be any such concession, many began anew, whereby they became so deeply indebted to the Dutch, that without apparent ruin it was at this time impossible to remove. Humbly request therefore a future conveniency by two other ships, with which the Dutch will never furnish them, being possessed that the welfare of the colony consists in detaining the intelligent and industrious planters, of whom they have few of their own nation, they being absolutely determined to sell their plantations, which, with the crop in the ground, they hope will not only disengage them from their creditors, but enable them to begin some considerable settlement in Jamaica. Signed by Thomas Scattergood, Oliver Hempson, and 54 others. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVII., 57–60.]
1670.
Nov. 15
to
1671,
April.
486."A narrative of the proceedings of Major Banister in the business of Surinam." Left London 15th November 1670; received Henry Ayler, master on board the America, at Dover, the 27th; kept company till 9th December, when falling foul of the Johanna in the night broke their head and "bole splitt," lost company of the other two ships; and arrived in Surinam 9th January, delivered to the Governor the States General's orders, and received the most kind and respectful show of civility to be imagined. Wrote to Lord Arlington, landed on the 12th with Captain Yates and Mr. Ayler, and found the Governor with others, who caused the following declaration to be read. Declaration of Governor Philip Julius Lichtenberghe:— That the English merchant ships were to stay but six weeks after Major Banister's arrival; that all the English inhabitants might transport themselves in the same, with their estates and slaves, except those bought of inhabitants of the colony since the surrender, and other goods, provided their debts are duly paid; that a court was appointed at Paramaribo on the 31 Jan./10 Feb. to decide controversies as to the price for which slaves purchased since the surrender shall be restored; all who intend to leave to give notice to the Governor in 10 days after the 16/26th January; that any English may remain without fear of his Majesty's displeasure; and may at all times transport themselves from the colony on the same conditions. That those departing shall not destroy anything they will not take with them, or cannot dispose of. Stated his objections to this declaration to the Governor, who would have had him sign it, which he denied to do, finding he could not have the States General's orders published, and was commanded not to speak to the people. This declaration was read to the people, who would have had some conference with Major Banister, but no opportunity presented, for he was guarded by two captains. That day and the next all the people of Paramaribo division (except one) gave in their names, which caused the Governor to put forth two notifications in the other divisions to prevent them declaring their intentions to remove by leaving them no way to pay their debts but in money or such goods as sugar or specklewood, which he knew few or none were masters of. Went up the river in the America to his plantation, accompanied by the Scakerlope ship of war, which placed a guard at the creek's mouth and another on the land side of his plantation, to prevent any English from coming to him till the 10 days for giving in their names were expired. The declaration was published at Toorarica on 18/28th, whither he sent Captain Ayler, who was commanded not to speak to the people. Knew the notifications would prevent many from giving in their names, and wrote to the Governor desiring a conference. His letter letter dated Occaribo 29th January 1671. Receiving no answer and hourly hearing what menaces and persuasions were used to prevent the English from removing, wrote again to the Governor desiring a conference, and not to persist in using threatenings or menaces. The Governor's reply, desiring him to come to Paramaribo the following Monday, which Banister knew was designed to spin out the little time he had to stay, he therefore wrote again to the Governor, that he desired to be present at the decision of debts, and requested that the removers might be first paid what was justly owing to them, that they might satisfy their creditors, and offering to charge bills on the Council for Foreign Plantations for what they have not wherewithal to satisfy. The Governor's answer: That the decision of the debts must be by the ordinary court of justice; that he would endeavour to compose the business, and be glad if the creditors would accept the bills he propounds, but cannot see how they can be forced; that he thinks it more convenient Banister should stay at his plantation to avoid all jealousies, but will confer with him after the court. Whereupon Major Banister wrote again complaining that as concerns debts the Governor was acting contrary to the Articles of Surrender by Colonel Byam and the States General's orders, him not to infringe; also desiring him to permit Captain Yates to acquaint those that have given in their names, what care his Majesty has taken for their transportation and settlement; or must protest against him for what he has done or shall do contrary to said Articles and orders. The Governor's reply: Is much surprised at his accusation, and will be glad to see by his protest how he has infringed his orders. Takes his letter to proceed from too much inflamed passion, which may be was kindled because some things here do not succeed according to his imagination, but will be glad to confer with him and the other Commissioners concerning debts and for the despatch of the departing people. At their coming the Governor was told he sent for them to confer about the debts of those that would remove, and that Major Banister should have the executions delivered to him for the debts owing to the removers, which the Marshal should serve according to his orders. His reasons for refusing the Governor's proffer, and that he would not concern himself in the business, but would receive on board all such as came within the time limited, and if the Governor did not grant this, he would take it as a breach of the orders and act accordingly. Next morning the Governor sent him a paper, which he ordered the secretary to read in Dutch in the presence of several Jews and Dutch, again presenting to the Commissioners the executions against the unwilling debtors of the departing English, and offering to command the Marshal to wait on them with strict order to execute the same without delay; and requesting the Commissioners, if they are of opinion that he has faltered in performing any part of the orders of the States General, that they will put the same in writing that all disputes may be debated and friendly annulled, otherwise he shall take no more notice of what has been complained of by word of mouth. By which paper their Lordships may perceive that the Governor's drift was to know whether Major Banister would protest, but was resolved to keep him in doubt. Ten days later the Commissioners wrote to the Governor that finding he would make believe by his fair pretences that his desire has always been to act according to the Articles, despatches, and orders passed in this business, and that notwithstanding they could not prevail with him to condescend to several things granted in favour of the English, nor to admit of a friendly debate before the court, nor to accept their reasonable propositions; but on the contrary that he has acted to the prejudice of those that would remove, contrary to said Articles, they have declared this in their protest which follows, and is dated 24th February/6th March 1671, and signed by Jas. Banister, Fras. Yates, Thos. Stantor, Hen. Massey, Ja. Maxwell, Tobias Bootman, Christ. Rendar, Hen. Ayler, and Rich. Covile. Caused this protest to be read in the presence of the Governor, Capt. Vorstarr, and his Secretary, Mr. Boll, with several of the Dutch nation, and besides themselves, Sam. Sleigh, Thos. Lambert, and John Yates. The Governor seemed much troubled at the reading yet could not contradict any one article, but importuned them to dine with him, after which he caused the enclosed paper to be read in the Dutch tongue, the contents of which Banister knew not. The Governor came aboard the America and Johanna and examined all the passengers the same evening, to see if there were any aboard contrary to the States Generals orders. They then weighed anchor, and were accompanied to the river's mouth by the Dutch ship of war, and most of his fellow subjects of any account in the Colony, with their wives; whom he entertained with the Governor, and sailed on the 28th February, the ship of war saluting them with seven guns. On 1st March the Johanna stood away for Barbadoes, to land three families there. On the 12th the America arrived at Port Royal in Jamaica, where Sir Thos. Modyford received him with all possible respect and friendship, and ordered shallops with provisions to carry the people to proper places of the island, with a surveyor to lay out their lands. The Johanna missing Barbadoes, arrived five days after in good condition. Begs their Lordships to take notice of the sad condition of his fellow subjects left in Surinam, most of whom are of good estates, yet entangled with debts to the Dutch, and by the unjust proceedings of the Governor made incapable of parting with anything to clear themselves till the Governor knew it was too late, thinking they would be persuaded to stay when Banister was gone; but in that they were much mistaken, for at his coming away the chiefest of them came under pretence of taking their leaves, and presented him with a letter to his Majesty begging him to send for them off, though at their own charges. Besides their utter ruin hangs on the Dutch having discovered this plot. Beseeches their Lordships therefore to solicit his Majesty's favour, without which it is impossible to obtain their enlargement; for their Lordships may judge what unreasonable terms will be exacted for transportation, if they demanded of Banister for the hire of a fly boat for a short trip to Barbadoes no less than 360l., when the Johanna was hired by his Majesty for 90l. per month. This caused him and others to sell their cattle for anything they could get, yet was he forced to leave goods behind to the value of 300l. or 400l., for he never heard of his own vessel since Capt. Covile left her. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVII., 33–56.]
April 8.
Old Harbour,
Jamaica.
487. Major James Banister to Sec. Lord Arlington. Thanks for his many exceeding kindnesses. Begs him to defend and assist the distressed condition of his Majesty's remaining subjects at Surinam, whom he left extremely desirous to remove from their subjection to such strange people's government but could not clear themselves in the time limited. Desires him to induce his Majesty to send them shipping, which they are ready to freight at their own cost, or they will be all ruined and never be able to get off As to his particular business at Surinam, refers to his narrative sent by Francis Wightwick. Sailing thence in 14 days they arrived at Jamaica, where he was courteously received by Sir Thos. Modyford, and his commission published with great respect. This island is very fertile, and questionless in a short time will be a flourishing settlement, but till Sir Thos. Modyford showed them the way, the very name of a planter was strange amongst them. Endorsed, Answered August 15th '71. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 46.]
April 10.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
488. Lord Ashley to Joseph Dalton. He is in so good esteem with all the Lords Proprietors [us] that he need not doubt those encouragements to which he may have any just pretences. Are all willing to continue him in the office of Secretary, as they have no complaints against him and hope he will so behave as to give them reason always to think of him as they do now, the fittest man for that place. He will by this ship receive a paper book as desired and all sent to him by friends freight free. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 13.]
April 10.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
489. Lord Ashley to Col, Wm. Sayle. The river he has chosen to plant on, though not that they (the Lords Proprietors) intended when their ships went out of England, yet is so much better and so well fitted to all the ends of their present design that they very much approve of his remove from Port Royal to Ashley River and think that Charles Town where settled is very convenient for their new settlement. Expect much good success from this hopeful beginning and from his integrity, experience, and careful management. Complain of his having refused observance to instructions because signed only by Sir Peter Colleton and himself, we two having the great care of this business left to them. They have been at great charges for supplying him with all necessaries, and they must expect from the people there and from him in particular to be careful of their interests. Is forced to remind him of this because the Carolina went away from Barbadoes in September last, not for their advantage but other men's, who loaded timber for themselves; some might have been taken in upon their own had their concerns been regarded. Recommend him to be very punctual in observing his instructions, and some are of more consequence for the security and thriving of their settlement than the planting of towns in which if men be not overruled their rashness and folly will expose the plantation to ruin; the difference whereof is apparent in New England and Virginia. To press this so absolutely on the people is for their safety and advantage. A bill of 20l. charged upon him by O'Sullivan for the use of passengers without authority, Mr. West being their agent. Desires to be informed about this. As to Col. Sayle's wishes concerning Mr. Sampson Bond, if he will go to Carolina he shall have 500 acres, 40l. per annum, and a house, but though allowed this to be Preacher among them, the Lords Proprietors give neither him nor Sayle authority to compel any one in matters of religion, having in their Fundamental Constitutions granted a freedom in that point which they resolve to keep inviolable. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 15, 17.]
April 10.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
490. Lord Ashley to Stephen Bull. His behaviour in their government very acceptable to the Lords Proprietors and to himself in particular, and he may be confident his Lordship will be careful of him. Is very well satisfied with the goodness of the climate and country he is pitched in, and thanks him for the account he has given of it and to continue his correspondence. They have now sent another ship fitted with people and design not to stop the supply until they are 1,000 strong. Only expect the people's carriage to be answerable to the care the Lords Proprietors have of them and intend to continue. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, p. 27.]
April 10.
Exeter House
Shaftesbury
Papers.
491. Lord Ashley to William Owen. Returns thanks for his letter (see ante, No. 261) and for his discreet and partial information of the state of affairs. The Lords Proprietors intend not to slacken their hands until they have brought such an addition of people as he has mentioned to be sufficient for the support and security of the plantation. As they are careful to supply their present necessities, hope they will not fail to answer the Lords Proprietors' expectations and be careful of their just interests there. Begs he will send notice what may be most advantageous for the settlement and of the condition of affairs. Particularly desires he will send word whether the Indian Cassiques, their neighbours, be absolute lords in their own territories, or else be tributary princes and pay subjection and homage to any greater King who is their Emperor. He need not doubt that the Lords Proprietors will be sparing of their encourgement to a man who shall contribute to the welfare of their people there. Have at his request granted freight free for things or persons his friends shall now send out of England. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 37, 39.]
April 10.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
492. Lord Ashley to Sir John Yeamans. Is very pleased to receive the first fruits of their plantation at Ashley river from his hands, who has been so forward to promote their settlement there. Sends herewith a patent for Landgrave in acknowledgment of his assistance to the design in which his exceptions to the descent have been considered according to his desire, so that it shall not be in any danger of going out of the family. The Lords Proprietors have no other aim in framing their laws than to make every one as safe and as happy as possible, and to order every one's condition so that all together may make up a quiet equal and lasting government, wherein every man's right, property, and welfare may be so fenced in and secured that the preservation of the government may be every one's interest. Recommends to him as very necessary the planting of people in towns, the chief thing that hath given New England so much advantage over Virginia. Desires therefore that when he goes to Carolina this summer he gives direction and assistance in it and put them in such a way of settling in towns as may be most equal and convenient for the planters and so order the home lots in every colony, the Lords Proprietors requiring that all the inhabitants of every colony should set their houses together in one place, which place is left to the choice of the inhabitants themselves, so that those who come after may share in the conveniency of the town and have an equal proportion of home lots left them. Has moved the rest of the Lords Proprietors in the behalf of Mr. Woodward who have sent him 100l., besides which Lord Ashley has sent him 20l. which is not all they intend to do for him. Desire that while his stay is necessary to maintain correspondence between our people and the Indians that he would be persuaded to stay where they will be sure to be mindful of him. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, pp. 73, 75.]
April 10.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
493. Lord Ashley to Woodward. Thinks himself obliged to take care of him and his concernments, and he shall have no reason to repent the pains he has taken and the ventures he has run in Carolina. Has recommended his services to the rest of the Lords Proprietors, who have, out of their public stock, ordered him 100l., so he may take up either part or the whole in servants or goods out of their stores at Charles Town, or in commodities, as he desires, from England, Barbadoes, Virginia, or any other place Sends him, besides, 20l. as a particular gratuity from himself. Hears that besides the correspondence he manages with the neighbour Indians he has been 14 days' journey up the country with a great Emperor there, with whom he has made a league, and where he has discovered things he thinks not fit to reveal to any but themselves, in which he has done very discretely. Wishes the condition of their people there did not yet awhile need his stay among them for keeping up the friendship and commerce with those language and customs he is so well acquainted with that nobody can be so helpful to their settlements. Their planters too, till they have learnt the natives' language and got a better knowledge of them, cannot, his Lordship fears, well do without him. The Lords Proprietors must, therefore, for some time deny themselves the satisfaction of those discoveries he reserves for them till he comes to England, and Lord Ashley desires he will not leave their plantation till the Indians and their people are grown into so good an acquaintance one with another as not to need an interpreter between them. Earnestly desires him not to give the least hint to anybody if he have any knowledge or conjecture of mines, for fear the people, tempted by hopes of present gain, should forsake their plantations and so run into certain ruin, which has followed those who have formerly marched into this country in search of gold and silver. Begs him therefore to keep any such thing secret, but if convenient to give any hint in letters to call gold antimony and silver iron, in case his letters fall into other hands. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 77, 79.]
April 11.
Jamaica.
494. Sir James Modyford to Joseph Williamson. Has not written to or heard from him for a long time, nor has he ever had a word from Lord Arlington, notwithstanding his many large epistles from Barbadoes since leaving England, though he pressed for his Majesty's commands whether to stay or return, Providence being retaken before his arrival; which island, being again possessed by the privateers, on their way to Panama, who carried off all Spaniards, thinks himself bound to go and take possession thereof for his Majesty. His setting out from England and stay at Barbadoes, with all his people, cost him 1,000l., if not more, whereof he is never like to have a farthing. His resolution is to send over a party with a Deputy Governor to take possession, and follow himself with such force as he can get. Endorsed, R., 29 June 1671. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 47.]
April 11. 495. Copy of preceding. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 48.]
April 12.
Jamaica.
496. Sir James Modyford to Joseph Williamson. This addition is to beg that he will assist his cousin Charles Modyford towards obtaining as much as possible of all sorts of ammunition, there being nothing left from our people's plundering, to the very great guns, which they threw into the sea or spiked. Received 5th July 1671. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 49.]
April 11–12. 497. Copies of preceding letters. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI.,No. 50.]
April 12.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
498. Lord Ashley to Hugh Wentworth, Governor of the Bahamas Islands. He will receive with this the King's Patent for Providence and the rest of the Bahamas, wherein he will find some other considerable Lords Proprietors, with Lord Ashley, in this grant of Wentworth's islands, of which he has procured a commission for him to be Governor. Will readily do anything for him as an acknowledgment "for the beginning of this and putting of it into my hands." The Lords Proprietors intend as soon as they are informed of the extent of his island and the quantity of good plantable land in it to establish a lasting, fair, and equal form of government for all sorts of people. It is designed to keep 1/5 for the Lords Proprietors, 1/5 for the nobility, and 3/5 for the people. Looks upon him as a man who hath so much contributed to the planting of this island that he shall not find himself neglected when by the settlement of the Government the nobility shall be named. Intends that he and his posterity shall, by the shares he shall have among the nobility, reap the benefit of having led a colony of English there. Nor shall he be unmindful of Mr. Dorrell, who has a good share in this undertaking, and has laid out money and pains in transporting people thither. Desires him to take care of his instructions to govern the people with equal justice, and to allow them proportions of land advantageous to the settlement. Begs him to write often, and so let him know if there be a great deal of land fit for cocoa nuts, which he hears grow well in Providence. Also as to the quantity of brazilletto, and what worth per ton. 2 pp. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bundle 48, No. 55, pp. 85, 87.]
April 18.
Barbadoes.
499. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Present, the Deputy Governor and four of the Council. Demand made on Robert Parker, Commissioner of the Customs of 4 1/2 per cent., for necessary repairs of the fortifications as by the Act he ought to do. Answered that they could not pay anything without particular order from his Majesty or the Farmers of said Customs.1/2 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XI., 189–190.]
April 19. 500. Minutes of the Assembly of Barbadoes. This day was communicated to the Assembly by the Deputy Governor a letter from his Excellency, dated Nov. 7 last, together with copies of a letter and inquiries from the Commissioners for Foreign Plantations to his Excellency, dated 29th Sept. last (see ante, Nos. 327, 327. I., II.) 5 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 21–26.]
April 20.
Barbadoes.
501. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Sir Peter Colleton and ten other Gentlemen Planters in London. Refer to their Committee's letter of 4th inst., and the levy therein mentioned which may amount to 1,000,000 lb. sugar, and have appointed their Treasurer forthwith to ship 100,000 lb. to them, not doubting they will manage whatever shall come to their hands to the best advantage of this place. And for the better method in carrying on their addresses, have chosen Ferdinando Gorges to be their solicitor at all times before the King, Council, and committees, upon such instructions as the Gentlemen Planters shall give him, allowing him for his pains 100l. for one year. The five heads which they lately desired might be presented by Lord Willoughby, with one more, all which are enclosed, are what at present they suppose necessary to be addressed to his Majesty. Hear his Majesty was displeased with those heads, and supposing the manner rather than the matter might be the cause, give all their other heads of addresses sent home by his Excellency, all or any of which they may with caution petition his Majesty for. But as to the 4 1/2 per cent. the most material are these six. Desire that the first may be principally insisted upon, and it is the earnest request of the Assembly that they use their utmost endeavour to give his Majesty a true relation for what uses and ends said imposition was granted, when the Assembly is confident his Majesty will grant the condition expressed in the Act. Instructions as to the second head, in relation to free trade with Scotland, unless merchants from Scotland may make return thither of the produce of their cargoes, they will in a short time be left destitute of Christian servants, few or more coming from other parts; as to the third, their desire is to obtain leave to send their produce to any nation in amity with England, first paying custom in Barbadoes or well securing it to be paid in England; as to the fourth head, to answer any complaints in England, desire them to lay before his Majesty the great prejudice if not utter ruin to any person of the island to be compelled to do so; as to the fifth, that if Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment be disbanded, it would redound to the advantage of the island, to represent to his Majesty their great burden and how useless being fully officered, but the soldiers few and many of them islanders, so that the island would be weakened by their going hence; as to the sixth head, heartily thank them for their endeavours to prevent the laying on a new imposition on sugar; have nothing to add to their reasons, but desire they may be more vigorously pressed, and if the imposition cannot be prevented, then that it be doubled on foreign sugars. Enclose copy of the refusal of the Commissioner for receiving the duty of 4 1/2 per cent. to pay anything for the uses expressed in the Act without special order from his Majesty or his employers. It is generally rumoured that they lie something under his Majesty's displeasure, but know not for what cause, having ever showed their readiness in his Majesty's service, though to their own impoverishment, which are evidenced by the several Acts for raising sugar for their defence in the last war, amounting to 4,869,571 lb., besides the labour of 232,972 hands, amounting at 10 lb. per day to 2,329,700 lb. sugar. This last levy on coppers, stills and negroes, copy of which Act is enclosed, are all besides what has been given to defray the charge of government. To use their diligence to endeavour their re-establishment in his Majesty's favour, and to inform the Committee of their requests, lest others take advantage to present such glosses as may cause more trouble to remove than the obtaining of the addresses themselves. Signed by Henry Walrond, Speaker. Enclose,
501. I. A paper containing the heads of addresses sent by his Excellency in Nov. 1668, with the six heads mentioned in the above letter, viz. :—(1) To represent to his Majesty their sense of and hearty thanks for his care, &c.; (2) the abuses and heavy taxes in the Customs, and mistakes of sugars; (3) that they may transport produce to any place in amity with England, the duties to his Majesty first secured; (4) to be permitted to set up a mint; (5) the great inconvenience of patents; (6) that all custom be taken off goods transported from England; (7) that customs laid on strong liquors in England may not extend to those made here and transported thence; (8) for procuring a charter, making them a body corporate with all powers formerly granted to the Earl of Carlisle. These not yet granted. The following to be now presented, (1) about the 4 1/2 per cent. being appropriated to other uses than intended; (2) the grievance of want of free trade with Scotland for supply of servants; (3) that they may enjoy the same privileges of trade as Tangier; (4) that none be compelled off the island to answer any complaint in England; (5) about disbanding Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment; (6) to use their utmost endeavour to prevent a new imposition on sugar.
501. II. Extract from the Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes of the 19th (sic. 18th) April (which see). Refusal of Robert Parker, Commissioner of the Customs of the 4 1/2 per cent., to pay anything out of that duty without order from his Majesty or the Farmers. Together 6 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII. 26–31.]
April 20.
Barbadoes.
502. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Governor Wm. Lord Willoughby. Return hearty thanks for his Excellency's care in their behalf, especially in presenting their late addresses to his Majesty, the success of which they have not yet been informed of, but do not doubt so soon as his Majesty shall be rightly informed of the state of Barbadoes; and, being informed (by the last ships) that his Excellency was required by his Majesty to repair to his Government here, have solely empowered some Gentlemen Planters in London to do their utmost for the accomplishment of their desires, and the rather because his Excellency declared before going that some of them could not properly be presented by him for reasons best known to himself, but that he would not hinder their prosecution by others. Signed by Henry Walrond, junior, Speaker. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 32.]
April 20.
Barbadoes.
503. The Assembly of Barbadoes to Ferd. Gorges in London. Having some time since received friendly advice from their fellow Planters in England as to how they may most aptly proceed for the interests of his Majesty and this place, desire him to solicit before his Majesty, the Council, and all Committees concerned, what they shall give him in charge, returning account thereof on all opportunities, and that he apply himself from time to time to the Planters in London for their advice, to whom they have also written. Have ordered 100l. to be paid to him for his pains herein for one year, besides all his other necessary charges. Signed by Henry Walrond, junior, Speaker. 1/2 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 32–33.]
[April 20.] 504. A true account and relation [by Henry Morgan] of this my last expedition against the Spaniards by virtue of a commission from Sir Thos. Modyford, Governor of Jamaica with the advice of his Council [see ante, No. 209]. In order to the execution of his commission [see ante, No. 211], sailed from Port Royal, 14th August, with 11 vessels and 600 men for the Isle of Ash, the rendezvous, and on September 6th despatched Vice-Admiral Collier with six sail to the main for intelligence. September 30th arrived Captain John Morris, with Emanuel Rivero's vessel (who burnt the coast of Jamaica), which he had taken, and in her three original commissions. In October arrived three French vessels, and in November seven more sail from Jamaica; but upon examination of some of their own men and some Spanish prisoners, the time of the year, and but one landing place strongly fortified, it was impossible to attempt the place without the hazard of the whole party and the certain loss of most if not all our vessels. On 28th October Vice-Admiral Collier returned with two of the enemy's vessels, one of which, the Gallardee, was assisting to Rivero in burning the coast of Jamaica. In her were 38 prisoners, who were examined, and what was said by two of the most sensible was reduced to writing. Marcus Delubra, master, deposed, That he saw the people at Carthagena "listed and all in arms offensive against the English"; that several Spanish ships have commissions from the President of Panama, Don Juan Peres De Gusman, and have taken several Englishmen, and that they have great encouragement against Jamaica by reason of a fleet out now from old Spain under one Don Alonzo. Lucas Perez also deposed to the same effect. On 2nd December the captains, 37 in number, unanimously resolved, "that it stands most for the good of Jamaica and safety of us all to take Panama, the President thereof having granted several commissions against the English." Signed by said captains. Whereupon on December 8th they sailed, and on the 14th arrived at Old Providence, and on the 15th the Governor submitted and was transported with his men to the main, but four of his soldiers became guides to the English. Understanding that the Castle of Chagraw blocked the way, it was determined to attack it, which was done by Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bradley with 470 men, who after fighting in the trenches from 3 o'clock till 8 the next morning, stormed the place. The enemy refused quarter, which cost them 360 men, while ours lost 30 killed and 76 wounded, whereof the brave Bradley was one, who died 10 days after. Leaving 300 men to guard the castle and ships under Major Richard Norman, they started on 9th January 1671, with 1,400 men in seven ships and 36 boats up the river. The enemy had basely quitted the first entrenchment and set all on fire, as they did all the rest, without striking a stroke. Was forced there to leave his ships and boats with 200 men to guard them, under command of Captain Robert Delander, and betook themselves to the wild woods. Routed the enemy by the forlorn commanded by Captain Thomas Rogers two miles from Venta Cruse, where they arrived on 15th. It is a very fine village where they land and embark all goods for Panama, but they found it as the rest all on fire and the enemy fled. Began their march next day, the enemy constantly galling them with ambuscades and small parties. Had to march four abreast, the enemy laying over their heads to get to the Savanas; losses on both sides. On 17th they saw the desired place, the south seas and a good parcel of cattle and horses, which served all their men, and came in sight of the enemy in Batalia with 2,100 foot and 600 horse. Next morning drew up his men in the form of a tertia, the vanguard led by Lieutenant-Colonel Lawrence Prince and Major John Morris, in number 300, the main body 600, the right wing led by himself, the left by Colonel Edw. Collyer, and the rear guard of 300 commanded by Colonel Bledry Morgan. Account of the manoeuvres which forced the enemy to change their ground. One Francesco de Harro charged with the horse upon the vanguard so furiously that he could not be stopped till he lost his life; upon which the horse wheeled off and the foot advanced, but met with such a warm welcome and were pursued so close that the enemies' retreat came to plain running, though they did work such a stratagem as has been seldom heard of, viz., attempting to drive two droves of 1,500 cattle into their rear. In the city they had 200 fresh men, two forts, all the streets barricaded, and great guns in every street, which in all amounted to 32 brass guns, but instead of fighting commanded it to be fired, and blew up the chief fort, which was done in such haste that 40 of their own soldiers were blown up. In the market place some resistance was made, but at 3 o'clock they had quiet possession of the city, although on fire, with no more loss in this day's work than five killed and 10 wounded, and of the enemy about 400. They endeavoured to put out the fire, but in vain, for all was consumed by 12 at night, but two churches and 300 houses in the suburbs. Thus was consumed the famous and ancient city of Panama, which is the greatest mart for silver and gold in the whole world, for it receives all the goods that come from Spain in the King's great fleet, and delivers all the gold and silver that comes from the mines of Peru and Potozi. Here they stayed 28 days, making daily incursions on the enemy for 20 leagues without having one gun fired at them "in anger," though they took 3,000 prisoners, and kept "dargues" in the south seas cruising and fetching prisoners who had fled to the islands. February 14th. Began their march to Venta Cruse with all their prisoners, where they stayed and refreshed till 24th, and on 26th came to Changraw, where the plunder (amounting to about 30,000l.) was divided and the castle fired and the guns spiked. March 6th. Began their voyage for Jamaica, where some are arrived and the rest daily expected. Had it from the prisoners that the reason there was no more wealth was because they had two months' notice, and laded two great ships of 350 and 700 tons with money, plate, gold, and jewels. Signed by Henry Morgan. 8 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 51.]
April 20. 505. "The relation of Admiral Henry Morgan touching the service done his Majesty in the late expedition against the Spaniards, by virtue of an Order of Council [of Jamaica] and a commission given him accordingly." Copy of the Minute of Council of June 29, 1670 [see ante, No. 209], and of the preceding account and relation of Sir Henry Morgan. 4 1/2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXVII., pp. 121–128.]
April 20. 506. Another copy of the Order of Council of Jamaica of 29 June 1670, mentioned above, with the heading only, "The Relation of Admiral Henry Morgan." 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 26, No. 52.]
1671 ? 507. Capt. James Hayes to Col. Christopher Codrington, Deputy Governor of Barbadoes. Bound from Virginia to Barbadoes 19th March 1671, in the Hope pink, of London, Capt. Thomas Blackman, commander, fell in the night amongst the breakers on the windward side of Martinique, and having put her through at great hazard came to anchor at Portagalloone, where their captain gave account of the distress they were in to the chief in power for that side of the island, who cleared them; but, forced to tarry two days for wind, the French general sent a company of soldiers, who surprised them, took the ship, and brought them about to Backstar; where the French general, after examination, said he believed they were about their lawful employ, but a Jamaica privateer had taken a French sloop, valued at 54,000 lb. sugar, which he was resolved they should pay, being subjects to the same crown; and without any legal proceeding he took both ship and goods, bidding Hayes address himself to the King of England for satisfaction. Prays his honour's favourable representation of their cause to his Majesty. Endorsed, "Copy of a letter to Coll. Christopher Codrington, Deputy Governor of Barbadoes, from Captain James Hayes." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXVI., No. 53.]
1670?
(Antigua.)
508. William Byam, Governor of Antigua, to William Lord Willoughby, Governor of Barbadoes. Sent his Excellency the sad news of the death of the Lieutenant-General, and of the manner of the death of James Willoughby in this island, together with an account of the state of affairs, and would have written as conveyances presented, but for advice that his Excellency was daily expected in Barbadoes. Renders humble thanks for his Excellency's commission for the government of this island and Barbuda, received 21st May last; and that this honour may not consume his estate, which is low, as the gout does his body, hopes his Excellency will mind his Majesty that there may be an establishment for its support, and if not speedily done the favour intended may prove his ruin. The French are rampant among these islands, having two men-of-war of 70 and 40 guns at St. Kitts, and a frigate of 14 guns at Sta Cruce, commanded by M. La Barett, and all these to secure their trade from the Dutch, whom they handle with severity. Cannot omit one ignoble passage of the Governor of the Grenadoes. A Dutchman from Guinea falling in with the island with 200 negroes, was invited by the Governor to trade, and security assured him, but no sooner were the negroes landed, but the Governor dispatched a shallop to La Barett, who sent up his Vice Admiral and immediately seized poor Hans, suspecting no danger, being of 24 guns, carried him to St. Kitts, and keeps him as a prize till the business be decided in France. Hears his Lordship's choleric enemy, M. St. Laurence, is to go home, and a new Governor expected. The Proprietor of Guadaloupe, who sold his right to the Royal Company of France, but are unable to pay his 200,000 crowns, is returning over. M. St. Leon continues Governor there; and M. La Biere [sic La Barre] of Martinique. M. De Baas, their general, continues rigid to them all. Has a friendly correspondence unless in two passages. One occasioned by a privateer taking a French, or rather a Spanish, shallop on the main, bringing her to Nevis; the French demanded the shallop and justice on him that took her; upon which the captain of the privateer was imprisoned and the French desired to come and prosecute, but after long imprisonment and none appearing the captain was enlarged: on this, or before, an English ship, bound from Virginia, was seized at Martinique, and thinks is still detained there. The other passage savoured of hostility; a French man-of-war sloop, coming off from St. Kitts with a trading sloop of ours, commanded the English sloop to strike, which the master refusing to do to any but his own sovereign's flag, the French fired, wounding the master, who shortly after died. But though they thus huff it for the present at sea, on shore the planter lives miserable through the tyrannical taxations of the R. C. The Dutch are more fortunate in their trade than in their colonies: if not weary of Surinam, they shortly will be; they are no planters, sad souls for suffering any hardship. They have called off their small colonies at Banrooma and other places to reinforce Surinam; but fever and ague, belly-ache and yawes, disable or destroy them, especially their new comers; so that many are returned and more will follow. The Jews seem now highly dissatisfied with the country; if those and the English withdraw it will be but a sad colony. Heard very lately thence; Major Bannister was not then arrived; most of the English would gladly withdraw could they disentangle themselves of the debts, which the policy of the Dutch has noosed them withall. They are still sickly; great supplies of negroes and no whites, so that if once the blacks get a head they will make the colony theirs; really believes that will be the end of it. They expect a new Governor, the present one, Captain Lichtenberg, being very ill, and 'tis thought will hardly go alive out of the country. Their colony of Tobago has lately received a great blow by the invasion of the Island Indians. But they thrive in their trade, for at Curacoa they vend a vast quantity of negroes to the Spaniard, and of late four ships from Jamaica for ready pieces of eight carried thence great store. They intend to settle a mart for negroes at Tortola to engross the trade of Porto Rico. This advice Finsly brought, who by his Excellency's order was employed thither to bring off the English, most of whom were gone, and of the few there none would come off. The natives of the islands still punctually observe the articles agreed with his Excellency, often inquiring when he will give them a visit. Nevis lately presented the Governor of Dominica with the liquor they love to be distributed amongst them, and other acceptable gifts, and several Indians went with the sloop to Nevis. Has now brought his Lordship to Antigua, the island of greatest consequence, though least spoken of and regarded, unless by his Excellency; did his Majesty understand its invaluable convenience for situation and unparalleled harbours, whereby lying to windward it might be a curb to the French and Dutch on any breach. Their present condition is sadly deplorable, all his Majesty's islands supplied with negroes except poor Antigua, not but that they can have them if they act as some do, the Dutch would supply them, but they dare not embrace it; they languish and decline for want of hands, and it is his Majesty will feel it in the end; the strength of the planters consists in single men, who have neither servant nor slave. A great drought has rendered the crops backward and bad, and brought the planters in debt, and, if the rigour of the law be used, they fear a general desertion of the land, and nothing will stay the planters or increase the settlement but a free trade or supply of slaves, which, if his Majesty would connive at for a time, the island were made, otherwise utterly ruined. Barbuda is thriving; is now despatching a commission to Captain Campbell, Governor there. All at Parham are well; the windmill does exceedingly well. The canes are very old and bad: 40,000 lb. has been made of them: none of the new yet ground: Tom Garret has been overseer there four or five months: he is careful and just, and is passed his trial and now recovered. The Amity, of Bristol, bound for Nevis with wines, was taken accidentally by a Spaniard, near Deseada, which la`nded the men at Curacoa. They had positive orders to heave all privateers overboard. This letter was probably written in 1670. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 28*.]
April 24. 509. Lords Proprietors of -the Bahama Islands to Gov. Hugh Wentworth, and the Councillors and Assistants. Commission granting power and authority with consent of not less than six of the Council, whereof three at least to be their Lordships' Deputies, to lett, sett, convey, and assure lands in said islands with the conditions and limitations set forth in their Lordships' instructions and concessions herewith sent. Also, to execute all powers and authorities in relation to the Government, both civil and military, according to instructions sent herewith. In case of absence power to appoint a deputy. Mem. John Wentworth commissioned in the same form 26 December 1671. All in Locke's handwriting. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., pp. 56–57.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
510. Lords Proprietors' instructions in sixteen articles to the Governor and Council of Providence:—To summon all freeholders, inhabitants of Providence and Eleutheria and the rest of the Bahamas, to elect twenty freeholders who with the Governor, the deputies as their Lordships' representatives, and five other councillors as the nobility, are to be their Parliament to make necessary laws, which, ratified under the hands and seals of any three of the deputies, shall be in force for two years unless their Lordships' pleasure to the contrary be declared in the meantime. To send copies of all laws enacted, which when approved and ratified by the Lords Proprietors, shall remain in force three years from the time of being enacted. The Parliament to choose five freeholders, who joined with the five deputies are to be the Grand Council, with whose consent or the consent of six of them whereof three to be deputies shall hear and determine all controversies and judge all civil and criminal causes. The deputies and councillors to take the oath of allegiance or to subscribe promise of allegiance, fidelity, and submission in a book for that use provided. To enact a law that every ship carrying guns upon her arrival pay one pound of gunpowder per tun for the supply of ammunition of the islands. To call a Parliament in November of every second year and oftener if there be occasion. To take notice the Lords Proprietors grant to every free person inhabiting any of the Bahamas before 26th March 1671 [? 1672] fifty acres, and the like for each servant they bring, and thirty acres to each servant so brought when out of his time, paying yearly from the year 1690 a penny per acre as a chief rent for ever; also to all free persons who arrive after 26th March 1672 thirty acres, and the like number for each servant they bring, and to each servant who shall arrive before that time 30 acres when out of his time to him and his heirs for ever, and the same conditions to all who arrive after 26th March 1672 until further instructions be received. To all such as by these concessions have right to land having sworn or subscribed allegiance this grant shall be passed which follows, to be signed by the Governor and three deputies and recorded in the Registrar's office appointed for the purpose. Every lot to be set out in one entire piece, and that the front of his land abutting upon the sea or any swamp be but one fifth part of the length running upwards into the country. To take care that two fifths of all the land respectively of equal goodness with what the people plant be reserved for the Lords Proprietors and such as they constitute the nobility. The land to be laid out in squares of 1,200 acres to be bounded by limits running directly from east to west and from north to south, and are to be called colonies. When any of the Council dissent from any act or resolve of the Council they are to send their reasons and the others the reasons of their proceeding. One square of 1,200 acres to be set apart for the use of the Governor in perpetuity. One third of all ambergris found to be reserved to the Proprietors, of which part they bestow a third upon the Governor. Prohibition to cut any brazilletto wood except upon his own plantation without leave. Signed by Albemarle, Craven, Ashley, G. Carteret, and P. Colleton. The first article and a few corrections in Locke's hand. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., pp. 58–60.]
April 27.
Exeter House.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
511. Lord Ashley to Joseph West. The plantation he manages is no more upon the private account of Sir G. Carteret, Sir P. Colleton, and himself, but upon account of all the Lords Proprietors, so that cattle or anything else out of the stores is not to be satisfied for to the public stock. Is somewhat unsatisfied that the Carolina had no timber aboard for Barbadoes upon the Lords Proprietors' account, though a great deal upon private men's. But is not satisfied with any of Brayne's voyages, and thinks it necessary to say that the Lords Proprietors are apprehensive that Sir Peter Colleton may have advantage of them by mingling trade with Barbadoes. "I expect you make no words of this," but not to suffer Sir Peter an advantage beyond the rest of the Lords Proprietors to their prejudice. Expects an account to be kept of their stores, to whom delivered, and at what rates, that so they may be repaid in work, timber, or goods as may best consist with the ease of the planters. Confesses freely he has not been a little unsatisfied, and if they have not fair dealing they will stop their supplies. Desires an exact account by every ship. Did not think the Governor would have disputed any instructions signed by Lord Ashley and Sir Peter Colleton, and cannot imagine he should deviate from the rules set down for him unless to order the disposal of the stores more to the Lords Proprietors' advantage in some things which at this distance they could not see. Approve his taking Capt. Bayley's four servants into employ until they can return to their master. In Locke's handwriting. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., Bdle. 48, No. 55, pp. 88–89.]
1671.
April 27
to May 10,
1672.
512. "New England affairs before the Council of Plantations," 1671, April 27. Ferdinando Gorges petitions the Council. May 22 Robert Mason's first petition to the Council; divers relations concerning New England, with observations of the Commissioners lately employed there, read. June 16, Col. Cartwright's papers concerning the New England colonies read. June 19, the patent of the Massachusetts read. June 21, commission and instructions of Col. Nicolls, Col. Cartwright, and others employed by the King in New England read: Colonel Cartwright informed the Council that he believed that the ministers of New England would be contented that the government might be changed. June 26, the papers given into the Council by Lord Arlington but the same that had been taken from copies of Col. Cartwright's papers. July 24, Robert Mason's second petition to the Council read. Aug. 3, the Council agreed to present an address to the King about sending Commissioners to New England to examine differences touching boundaries and compose them amicably, if they could, if not to state the case to the King for his determination. Aug. 12, report concerning New England, a representation of the present state of New England and sending over Commissioners. Signed by E. of Sandwich, E. Lauderdale, E. Arlington, Lord Clifford, Lord Gorges, Tho. Grey, H. Brouncker, Jno. Finch, Ed. Waller. Sept. 19, Lord Arlington informed the Council that the King had agreed to send Commissioners to New England, and desired that instructions might be prepared against spring. Nov. 13, Mr. Slingsby informed the Council that he had spoken to Lord Arlington concerning the King's sending Commissioners to New England, and the Council to treat with Mr. Mason and Gorges about sale of their estates in New England, the Council expected that they should not sell their interests in New England without the King's leave, which they promised. 1672, Jan. 22, the Council ordered that the King should be moved for sending Commissioners for New England, the season of the year now approaching. Feb. 13, Lord Arlington moved to the Council to proceed in preparing commissions and instructions. April 30, the Council informed by Lord Culpepper that the King had named Commissioners. Mr. Slingsby desired to cause a draught to be made out of the late reports to the King. May 10, the Council agreed that the commission for New England should be expedited in drawing up. Mr. Slingsby desired to advise with the Attorney-General. 1 p. Two copies. [Col. Papers, Vol. 26,Nos. 55, 56.]
April 30. 513. (Don Gasparo de Arteaga), Governor of St. John de Puerto Rico to Sir Thomas Modyford. The Queen Regent was pleased to send him the Treaty of peace, concerning a good correspondency between the two nations within the seas and ports of America; and to command him to agree with Modyford and the neighbouring Governors for publication of them at the same time. Has sent the orders of his Majesty to the President of Hispaniola, San Domingo, and the Governors of Caraccas, Cumana and Margarita, leaving to Modyford's pleasure the day, but has proposed that of the Vespers of St. John. If there should be any inconvenience in this, will do it the day that Modyford shall appoint: and if advice from him should be retarded, the publication shall be celebrated on said festival, and will repeat it on the day Modyford assigns, "because good news doth never weary." The Governor of Antigua sent him notice of the peace some months before, demanding the English prisoners on the island, but because it did not come authorised from his master could not agree to deliver them; now, if any ships come from English islands will embark them with all speed, and if none come will furnish them with ships; not failing in anything on his part towards fulfilling said articles of Peace. 1 1/4 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXVII., 129–130.]