Edward VI
June 1549

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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36-41

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'Edward VI: June 1549', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Edward VI: 1547-1553 (1861), pp. 36-41. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70304 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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Contents

June 1549

June 2.160. Instructions for Sir William Paget sent to the Emperor Charles V. With reference to continued amity, the marriage of the Lady Mary with the Infanta of Portugal, the proceedings with France, the Scottish war, &c. [Twelve pages. Draft.]
June 3.
Greenwich.
161. The Council to William Dansell. In reply to his letter of 29th May, touching the offer of Lazarus Tucker for money to be delivered at Frankfort, their meaning was not to pay him interest for the same, but to give him bell-metal or lead for it, if he would send word at what price he would take it. If he will not advance except upon interest, they are not minded so to bargain with him. Censure him at considerable length in reference to the bullion transaction, there seeming to be discrepancies between his statement and that of Gresham. Again press, that in his negotiations for silver he will endeavour to get it in exchange for lead or bell-metal. [Two pages.]
June 3.
Antwerp.
162. William Dansell to Sir Thomas Smith. Had on the 29th ult. communicated the offer of Lazarus Tucker, who will not deliver the money except here, or be repaid but in this town, and in ready money only, refusing all kinds of merchandise, as lead, tin, or such like. Desires to have a full answer thereon. Has this instant received a letter from his Grace, and another from Smith containing a cipher. His letter of the 2d of May relating to the bullion was delivered to his Grace on the 6th, and he learns that it is in the hands of Mr. Honyngs. To that letter, of which he had forwarded to him a copy, he refers for vindication of himself. Desires to know his Grace's pleasure as to the payment of Cooke for the saltpetre and harquebuses, which will amount to about 1,700l., whether by exchange or otherwise; also what order is to be taken for payment of the money due in September. Hears that two Cardinals are coming hither from Rome to the Emperor, and that two or three have gone, or will shortly go, to Rome from the French King. [Two pages.]
June 3.
Antwerp.
163. Same to the Lord Protector. Acknowledges his Grace's letter as to payment of Cooke for the saltpetre and harquebuses, and begs to be informed in what mode payment is to be made. He has lately received for the King's use by order of his Grace and the Council of the account of Sharrington 1,050l., and will receive more between this and August. Of this he has already made payments to Guevara, Schetz, &c., so that he has not above 200l. remaining; wherefore the more reason to know as to the payment of Cooke, and of the money due in September. [One page.]
June 11.
Richmond.
164. The Council to William Dansell. The greater part of his letter of the 3d has been answered in letters presumed by this time to have been received. If Lazarus Tucker will not let the King have money except upon interest, leave it alone. If he can repay the money due in September with the commodities of England, so that the King may save the interest, he will do right good service; but if he cannot, let him endeavour to prevail that the amount may remain for another year at the same interest. Should they refuse, let him borrow the amount required at as low a rate as he can against the time, that he may be able to repay the same to save his Majesty's credit. Cooke is content to receive his money in London, so that need not be cared for. Are surprised that he should now offer to supply at a lower price than Cooke; ought to have seen to this in the first instance; beg him henceforward to espy where the King can be best and most cheaply served, as he knows his Majesty has need. [One page. Draft.]
June 13.
Strasburg.
165. Christopher Mount to the Lord Protector. Since he wrote on the 16th of May has been informed by letters from Wittenberg, that, at a meeting of his own and his brother Augustus' subjects, Duke Maurice harangued the preachers, urging them to increased zeal in religion. His opinion of Maurice. Great anxiety in these parts as to the Emperor's movements. The Council of Mentz is ended, but its decisions are not yet published. Recently heard that the French King was pressing Count Christopher of Oldenburg for the transmission thither of 10,000 foot in defence of Scotland, on account of the facilities afforded by the Weser. The Count is a brave and veteran soldier, much hated by the Emperor, because in the war he led 20 companies of foot and 1,000 horse on the Protestant side. Does not think he would forfeit his reputation by any act against England; nevertheless, as that class of men are for the most part mercenary and greedy, he will, should the Protector wish it, visit the Count, accompanied by Bernard de Mela, who is the Count's most intimate friend, and do his utmost to dissuade him from such a step. The general opinion is that a league will be effected between the Swiss and the French, but the people of Zurich and Berne will not consent unless those who profess the same religion with them are protected against persecution. The French King will doubtless promise everything, but will perform according to the Pope's pleasure and discretion. The aforesaid people of Zurich and Berne openly declare that they will not fight against the English. Many Spaniards go to Italy through Switzerland, discharged, as they say, by the Emperor for eight months. [Two pages. Latin.]
June 15.
Antwerp.
166. William Dansell to Sir Thomas Smith. Having received no answer to his letters touching the offer by Lazarus Tucker and the payment of the money in September, is desirous of knowing the Lord Protector's pleasure thereon, especially as the time draweth on. The troops raised by Captain Hugford [Hackford] and Guevara have four days since been arrested at Bruges by command of the Emperor and the Queen. Those of Hugford are released, or shortly will be; but doubts as to those of Guevara, the matter being taken very grievously, because as he is informed, Guevara, who is presently in prison at Bruges, had allured some of the Emperor's retinue here, as well as five or six of the guard of the Duke of Saxony and other such, without licence, whereat the Emperor and Queen are much offended. Mr. Hoby has probably already advised more fully of this matter. Desires to know the Lord Protector's pleasure whether he shall forthwith call upon Guevara's securities for the 800 crowns advanced to him, or wait to see how they intend to proceed with him. [Two pages.]
June 23.
Brussels.
167. Sir William Paget to the Lord Protector. Acknowledges the letters from his Grace and the Council, and, as instructed, will set forth that the French King reserves the greatest part of his forces at home in expectation of the Emperor's death, and will attend to the matter of the Count Rangone. [One page.]
June 24.
Brussels.
168. Same to Sir William Petre, and in his absence to Sir Thomas Smith, the King's Majesty's two principal Secretaries. Requests minute and explicit directions on several points of the instructions given to him in regard of the confirmation of treaties with the States. Desires to have "a quick despatch for these folks here; as they use no delays, so they look for speedy answers." [Two pages.]
Copy of the preceding in modern hand.
June 24.
Brussels.
169. Same and Sir Philip Hoby to the Lord Protector. The Comptroller (Paget) arrived on Wednesday the 19th. His agree able reception by the officers of state. Had with Hoby audience of the Emperor on Saturday the 22d, being escorted to Court by Mons. de Bossut, le Grand Ecuyer, with a large retinue. Details their conference with the Emperor, and that of the following day with Granvelle, at both of which many professions of continued amity; and gives very ample particulars of the conversation between Granvelle and Paget as to the suggested marriage between the Princess Mary and the Infanta of Portugal. Had also been with the Queen of Hungary and been equally well received. [Sixteen pages. Autograph of Paget.]
June 25.
Copenhagen.
170. Francis Wegener, a native of Flensburger-Wick, to Christian King of Denmark. Complains that on three successive occasions he has been robbed by the English. First, a week before the Feast of St. John in 1548, his ship had been plundered of all its freight and provisions by the English at Rye, who treated his Majesty's letters of safe-conduct with contempt. Secondly, in the same year, a week before Michaelmas, when conveying some English soldiers from Hamburg to London, he requested from them permission to trade in England, and the English captain, Demack [Dymock], informed him and his crew that they might go whither they pleased. With this permission, and the safe-conduct of his Majesty, he sailed to Daveren and Boen [Dover and Boulogne?], and on his arriving there, his ship was thoroughly plundered by the Dover men, and one of his comrades slain by a gun-shot. Thirdly, after Whitsunday this year, being shipwrecked off Scotland, he purchased there a ship of a hundred lasts, as they term it, and making for Dantzic was a third time attacked by the English, who took the vessel and all its contents, together with his letters of safe-conduct, and more than fifty pieces of gold, turning him and his crew adrift almost naked. Implores his Majesty for assistance to obtain redress, without which he and his will be reduced to complete beggary. [Latin. Two pages.]
June 26.
Brussels.
171. Sir William Paget to Sir Thomas Smith. William Dansell has been with him, much dismayed by the letters sent to him from England. Has thoroughly vindicated himself in the matter of the bullion. Much injustice has been done to him by the Council; such a letter as that written to Dansell was the death of one of the properest men that ever served the King abroad, as Lord Southampton knows right well, namely Hutton, whom the Lord Cromwell upon an untrue information stroke to the heart and killed him, that he lived not three days merrily after. Admonishes them to better treatment of their agents. "A kind heart meaning truly, is easily with unkindness undeserved soon despatched. Wherefore when Princes be in sudden heats, and specially without certain ground, we Secretaries must temporize the matter with terms convenient, for else no man can be able to serve abroad." [Two pages.]
June 27.
Antwerp.
172. William Dansell to same. By order of his Grace has paid 250 French crowns of six shillings and fourpence each to Garret Fitzgarret, who says he will leave this for Calais next morning. Not having received the kerseys, lead, and bell-metal for which he had written, has been unable to bargain with them for the 9,000l., but shall in default of other remedy take it up for another year as profitably as possible. Complains energetically and at much length of the letters which he has received in regard to the bullion, giving very ample explanations thereon. Can have 120,000l. Flemish for 12 per cent., taking with it 30,000 ballets of wood and other merchandise. If informed what munitions and artillery are wanted, doubts not to be able to supply his Majesty on as favourable terms as any other can do. [Three pages and a half.]
June 27.
Paris.
173. Dr. Wotton to the Lord Protector. On Wednesday the 26th, dining with the other Ambassadors at the Duc d'Aumale's, had met the Constable who informed him that the King his master had appointed as commissioners for the conservation of amity Mons. de la Rochfort, M. de la Chastillon, and M. du Mortiers. Told the Constable that as the King of England would not nominate any of his ministers of the frontiers, he hoped the French King would in like manner name indifferent people. Details their conversation at length. Does not for certainty know the fate of M. du Biez, who has been taken back to Melun; some say he was brought to Paris to be degraded from the order, and that done, death to be commuted for perpetual imprisonment; others, that sentence is not yet given. [Two pages and a half.]
June 28.
Copenhagen.
174. Christian King of Denmark to King Edward VI. Incloses the letter and complaint of Francis Wegener, and requests that justice may be done in his regard. Besides the losses specified by Wegener, the greater part of the property stolen belonged to George Rantzow, his Majesty's principal Sewer (aulœ architrinus). Remonstrates with dignity on the treatment experienced by his subjects and the contemptuous indifference shown to his letters of safeconduct. [Latin. Broadside.]
June 30.
Brussels.
175. Sir William Paget to Sir William Petre, or, in his absence, to Sir Thomas Smith. Requests their good services in procuring him speedy and certain replies from the Protector, and that they will return to him by the bearer (whose expenses to and fro are paid), a copy of his letter of the 24th inst. Has had news by Antwerp of great masteries by the English troops in Scotland, and from France, that Vervins has been beheaded and De Biez sentenced to be drawn in four quarters, but a pardon is hoped for. Also that 16,000 Swiss are being brought into France. The cipher wherein he writes is that of Hoby. [One page.]
June 30.
Brussels.
176. Same to the Lord Protector. Desires to know his Grace's pleasure as to his manner of proceeding in his mission to the Emperor, which is divisible into two branches; the first to have the former treaty confirmed, the second to engage him with them in war with France. If the Emperor agrees to the former, his friendship may be relied upon; and if he will accept Boulogne into defence, as offered on terms of reasonable reciprocity, then, considering its present doubtful position in regard to an attack, and as he is apparently determined to fall out with the French in regard of his own affairs, he is sure to do so though England should not move therein. According to his conduct his Grace will know how to act. It is enough if he agrees to defend Boulogne; there will be no need for moving a mutual invasion; but if he will not except upon condition of mutual invasion, rather consent than let slip the anchor hold. Desires to know his Grace's pleasure as to the matter of the marriage, since he notes "that hitherto they have given us leave to make all overtures in all points, and they only give never." As the Emperor is advancing now in age and desires to ride easily, suggests that his Grace should, by the Lord Cobham, present him on his coming to Gravelines with six hackneys of mean stature going safely, four in the King's name and four in that of his Grace, which will be very kindly taken. "Sometimes such trifles stir more occasions of friendships than greater matters or practices do." [Three pages. Partly cipher, deciphered.]
June 30.
Brussels.
177. Sir William Paget and Sir Philip Hoby to the Lord Protector. Give an account of their conference on the 26th with Mons. d'Arras and S. Maurice and Viglius, the two Presidents of the Council, when they partly considered the former treaty and had animated discussion on several of the Articles, particularly in relation to the jurisdiction of the Privy Council and the Admiralty, and the ratification of treaties by Parliaments. [Seven pages and a half.]
Copy of the preceding in modern hand. [Seven pages.]
Another copy in the same hand. [Six pages.]