Edward VI
May 1551

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

William B. Turnbull (editor)

Year published

1861

Pages

98-115

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Edward VI: May 1551', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Edward VI: 1547-1553 (1861), pp. 98-115. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70327 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

May 1551

May 1.
Greenwich.
335. Same to same. Informing him that on last St. George's day the French King had been elected a Knight of the Garter, and that on the 18th of the present month the Marquis of Northampton, the Bishop of Ely [Thomas Goodrich], and others are to go to France to invest his Majesty with the insignia of the Order, and requesting that he will remain to assist the deputation. [One page. Copy in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 1.
Greenwich.
336. King Edward VI. to Henry II., King of France. Intimating to his Majesty his election as Knight of the Garter. [One page. Copy in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 5.
Angsburg.
337. Sir Richard Morysine to the Council. News have come to this Court that Prince Doria, having learnt by spies the intention of Dragut Rey to pursue him, in hope either of lighting on a straggler, or cutting off a piece of his tail, made no great haste to be distant from Dragut, but gave orders to his fleet to be ready to turn when he should do so, and make all sail in giving chase. This they had done so well as to drive Dragut into a gulf near Zerbi, where, it is said, he must either fly to land and lose his galleys, or show fight, and be killed or taken. The Prince has 25 well-appointed galleys, Dragut only 18, neither so well manned nor armed as Doria's. The land being friendly to Dragut, Doria has sent to Genoa, Naples, and Sicily for more vessels; and if they arrive in time, Dragut will be dashed for ever. Some think that the pirate came out rather to delay than to fight Doria, and to entice him into this gulf, into which galleys can only go by one or two at the most at one time; and as Doria expects vessels from the places before named, so Dragut looks for the Turk's navy to arrive there before Doria's departure, which may be if he waits for other aid. These news have stayed the Prince of Spain, who, five or six days ago, had sent off many of his train, and was ready to leave on the 2d curt. News from Venice confirm the report as to the extent of the Turk's navy, of which 48 or 50 are already abroad; and the appointment by the Venetians of a Providetor or General for their navy is the best token that the Turk cometh. Signor John Gastaldo writes from Hungary that the Bassa of Buda has entered Transylvania with 8,000 horse, and looks for many thousands more. Fra Giorgio does what he can to defend the country. Gastaldo has also gone thither with 7,000 men. Great mustering of troops daily throughout Hungary to meet the Turk. Advices from Constantinople mention the making of 8,000 barrels of biscuit, and more in preparation in all parts of the Turk's dominions; and orders are given to all his sangiacchi and captains to have their troops ready at small warning to put foot in stirrup. He sent his standard to the new King of the Tartars, who, in return, sent him a present, estimated at 30,000 ducats, and richly rewarded the bearers. The Turk may himself march to Hungary about the end of this summer. The Bishop of Rome has sent a brief monitory, summoning Duke Octavio to appear at Rome within 30 days, under pain of being held rebel with forfeiture of lands, offices, and all. Not content with this, he will also do him a worse turn, that is, he curseth him with book, bell, and candle. It is said that, in the hopes of it being intercepted, Duke Octavio had sent a packet to Rome, containing letters written to divers Cardinals, and many of his friends, to entreat for him, offering a will content to do as much as he could to recover the favour of his Holiness; his object being to stay the Bishop until the corn that grows about Parma may be gathered into the town. Though Pietro Strozzi is not in Parma, as he last wrote to their Lordships, yet Mons. Sipier [St. Pierre], a man of no less, or rather of more, esteem in France than he, is there for the French King, and has paid the soldiers two pays, and taken their oath of faithful service to the French King. The Bishop has horsemen ready at Ancona, and also a good number of footmen at Bologna. It is thought he will require to occupy them or others about the sea-coast; and to this end has required the Venetian Ambassador to write to the Seigniory that their clergy may help him with tents, &c. It is also noised that Ferrante Gonzaga is secretly levying troops. Yesterday had merrily asked the French Ambassador how, since the Bishop of Rome had excommunicated Octavio, and all who give him aid, it fared with his master; was he, with all his, yea, and their horses, not excommunicated also? "Ma foy," saith he, "his words are very large, and perhaps he may stir hornets so long that the sting will stick when he shall not be well able to pull it out." Knows that the Ambassador understands the chief points of religion well, and thinks he would be glad it were lawful in France for bishops to be honest men. Is certain that he is not a little nettled that the Bishop should extend his excommunication so far. The French Ambassador in Flanders wrote hither how an English Protestant was taken in Flanders with books and letters, and that all the letters are sent hither to the Emperor. Cannot learn what there should be, but that there was a fardel of books, and many letters, with instructions to some in France. (A portion torn away.) Denmark begins to stir against Sweden, which was once parcel of Denmark, and perhaps may be again, if these fall out with Denmark and the Hanses. Hears that the Hanses are angry with the King of Sweden, for that he did last year practise with the King's Majesty to serve England with certain wares which were wont to be sold first to those of Lubeck, and afterwards to come to the English. Magdeburg still holds out, and is like enough to abide the worst that shall be done against it this summer. There is no certainty as to the General Council; none have gone thither from this town, nor have any as yet come to Trent; but letters from Rome state that even if war should break out of the affairs of Parma, the Council shall hold on. This is for many causes unlikely. A proclamation said to be issued in France that none shall speak evil of the English for their religion, and therefore many things may follow. "They, whose religion standeth only by sufferance and silence, cannot abide that it should come to the trial. Their doctrine hath no metal in it able long to abide the hammer of a learned disputation. God send it be as well meant in France, as it might do wonderful good to all Christendom! If any good be done there, as we call it, or evil as the Papists do misname it, your Lordships shall have the greatest part of the praise or blame thereof. If the French King may by any means be brought to the setting out of God's glory and to the licensing of true doctrine to be taught to the people, whether it be rightly meant or upon occasion done, yea, though it be to spite some others, as Paul sayeth he must rejoice and be glad, that Christ may, by any means, be set out to the people. The Papists are wonderfully afraid that their doctrine must come to the bar in France, and be as well there found guilty of a marvellous sort of crimes as it hath been in England. God send that the sessions may quickly be kept, and that French prelates may be hereafter as willing rightly to teach as they have been glad hitherto frowardly to seduce!" Whether their Lordships mean that he shall remain here or return home, his humble suit is that he may be able to pay what he owes here ere he parts, which is as much as his next half-year's diet cometh to, and will be a good deal more before he leaves. Begs their Lordships may be pleased to bestow upon him the licence for dickers, (fn. 1) which he had already moved to them. [Five pages.]
May 5.
Augsburg.
338. Sir Richard Morysine to Sir Nicholas Throgmorton, one of the gentlemen of his Majesty's privy chamber. His doings rightly reported can do him no harm, and he can in nowise warrant more than his doings. Pen and tongue are out of his reach, and may do as they are wont, and not as they ought. Minds to please in as many things as he safely may; farther he cannot vow. He will not willingly offend the bigger to please the meaner. Will do his best to do that he ought. More may be looked for, and he never a whit to blame, though they miss that they look for. Did little think some one would have made such a matter against him, but must plead guilty of no more than duty may well discharge him of. Entreats Throgmorton to cease not his labour for the leather licence. Such a licence given to the better service of the King needs be no precedent for others to challenge the like. It were evil done to give it him, if either he had of his own to help himself withal, or that there were not plenty of leather in England to serve his licence without loss to the commonwealth. Is about a couple of genetts, but he could have them in his stable if his leather would stretch so far. Knows where he is indebted, and it is some grief to him to be in such beggary, as he can make no demonstration thereof. His genetts must go towards England when he has leather to hide them in; for if they go in sight they may be stayed, unless leather jerkins, or some other things wringed forth of leather, entreat for the passage. Let Throgmorton make him able to come by genetts, and he shall see that Morysine knows whither to send them. Supposes that the French Ambassador here has been no evil mean of such news out of France as mentioned, but he likes not the coming hither of Dr. Wotton. For his own part, shall be very glad to return whosoever succeed him, and the sooner the better content. Knows Wotton to be a worthy man for wit, skill, and all the rest; yet perceives that it will breed some jealousy in France if he come to tarry. They have few less loved to the Frenchmen, therefore thinks he best served his country while he was there. Can but wonder at Lady Suffolk's heats. They have oft cumbered him, but never worse than at this time. It is a great pity that so goodly a wit waiteth upon so froward a will. Has often, but in vain, made the suit to her that will might wait upon wit another while. "Your brother needeth none of mine adhortations. I have, notwithstanding what I think, well said to him. To make an end, if my Lord Marquis and my Lord of Warwick do not all to leather me, my wife and I shall weep for bread, and so not get it neither. If you help not, think me marred." [Three pages. Conway Papers.]
May 6.
Greenwich.
339. The Earl of Warwick [John Dudley] to Sir John Masone. The delay in Sir William Pickering's return has been by occasion of this great Ambassade. Recommends his son Lord Lisle, who has been appointed Attaché to the Embassy. The Marquis of Northampton is to leave upon Monday in Whitsun-week. [One page. Copy in Sir John Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 7.
Greenwich.
340. The Council to Sir John Masone. Sending therewith his Majesty's letter to the French King of the 1st inst., desiring him to present it officially, and to mention the appointment of the Marquis of Northampton and the Bishop of Ely as Ambassadors extraordinary for the ceremony of investiture. [One page and a half. Draft.]
Eod. die.Copy of the preceding in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book. [Half a page.]
May 10.
Tours.
341. Sir John Masone to the Council. Eight days since Mons. St Pierre had come express from Rome and brought intelligence that the Bishop thereof had adjourned personally Sig. Octavio, and had levied troops towards an attempt to dispossess him of Parma. The French King immediately despatched troops to the frontiers, ordered his heavy horse to Paris and his light horse to Lyons, and made preparations with so much heat that it was currently rumoured he intended to take the field in person. Sig. Ascanio, nephew to the said Bishop, arrived yesterday, and was very well received. If the Bishop is obstinately in mind to recover the seigniory of Parma, war must ensue, "and in that case is the thing like to grow to a breach with other men; for all men may well know that the said Bishop is the poorest man that ever came into the place, and that of himself he is able to do nothing. So as it must be others that shall be the principal doers, albeit the said Bishop may have the open name thereof. Others think that this is but a colour of the said Bishop to blear the Emperor's eye, whereby he may be made believe that all this train was wrought without the said Bishop's advice." The excitement has somewhat abated; but meanwhile every man provides as if the war were proclaimed. "They have been so long in a readiness, and have their heads so full of hot young blood, as needs must they be doing, fall where it will." Immediately on these tidings Sig. Horatio, brother to the said Octavio, was affianced to the King's bastard daughter, and straightway with M. St. Pierre sent post into Italy. On Wednesday the 6th their Lordships' letters arrived by Francisco, who informed him that the reports which he had alluded to formerly were utterly false and in no part true. Believes that such arose of his own countrymen, who being a sort of vile runagates and desperate vagabonds, resort in numbers daily hither and make a place of receipt in the Vidame's house. Thinks he is now well harnessed for the defence and confutation of such speeches as before he wist not how to bear off. Yesterday communicated the coming Embassy to the Constable, who was much gratified thereby, and said that the King would probably be at Chateaubriand at the time of their arrival, and that it was intended to send Marshal St. André to England on a corresponding Embassy. This Marshal is held in great estimation, and is in such special credit with the King as very few or none are in the like. Of late has been much consultation touching the marriage of the Dauphin to the Scottish Queen, which the Constable and the Chancellor would in any case to be deferred; during this debate there were some words between M. de Guise and the Constable. If matters proceed in Italy, M. de Guise will go there as LieutenantGeneral. To-day they send despatches to their Ambassador, who will apprize their Lordships as to the receiving the Marquis of Northampton at Boulogne and other places. "The Dowager of Scotland maketh all this Court weary of her, from the high to the low, such an importunate beggar is she for herself and her chosen friends. The King would fain be rid of her, and she, as she pretendeth, would fain be gone." The "trucking" is about money matters: the King wishes her to go upon a promise of payment, but she wishes to have the money with her. Was yesterday informed by the Receiver General of Brittany, who wished that Scotland were in a fish-pool, that since the beginning 1,900,000 francs had been sent there out of his receipt and of the receipt of Guienne, and how much else had passed he knew not. Andrew Doria has driven Dragut Rey into a river on the coast of Gernes in Africa, and blockades its mouth, so that Dragut must either break through by force, or else escape by land, losing his galleys. Is informed that one Higgins, formerly servant to Sir John Luttrell, has become a spy for the French, and is at present here; his informant having once been a spy he knows not what to think, but recommends inquiry to be made of Sir John Luttrell. The Irishmen have not yet gone; they are much favoured by the Vidame, who had offered to take the island himself with a very small force; for this offer he is much laughed at and scorned by some wise men of the Court, he being but a young man of war. The King and Court leave to-morrow for Angers, and will take 14 or 15 days in the way. The Marshal St. André's coming will be notified to their Lordships by the Ambassador. Entreats them to take order for the payment of his diets, they being now two whole months due. "The Treasurer maketh none other answer but that he hath no money. I would to God I could be excused with the like answer to any steward here! Receive them when I shall, they are spent already." [Six pages.]
Eod. die.Copy of the preceding in Sir John Masone's Letter-Book. [Four pages and a half.]
May 12.342. Commission from King Edward VI. to William, Marquis of Northampton, to invest Henry II., King of France, with the Order of the Garter. [Two pages. Indorsed by Cecil. Draft.]
May 12.
Augsburg.
343. Sir Richard Morysine to Cecil. According to their instructions of 18th April, received on the 8th inst., had offered to visit Mons. D'Arras, partly being glad that Joannes Leonis Nardi had the whole blame of the book, letters, and other devices taken in Flanders, and partly because M. D'Arras had expressed a wish to see him in reference to the complaints made against him. An interview had been appointed for one o'clock, prior to which hour the French Ambassador called, and told him he had delivered the said book and letters to Mons. D'Arras, so that Morysine might peruse them when he would, and that he expected to have commission to burn both book and letters, having besought the Constable he might do so, because the one was nought, and for the sake of the gentlemen to whom the others were addressed. On coming to Mons. D'Arras, was met by him a chamber farther than wont, and conducted by him to his bed-chamber. Said to M. D'Arras, that he had heard what business Joannes Leonis Asini had made in Flanders, by sending letters and other fond writings, as he meant, into France, and as it happened into Flanders. Told him of the letters from their Lordships, wherein the man and his fond conditions were so set out, as if his doings were anything like himself, or like unto such copies as were found at home, there was no doubt but the readers might both have what to laught at, and what worthily to lament in him. Mentioned that he sometimes wrote himself Servus Dei, and sometimes was so familiar with God, and had such plenty of instructions from heaven, that he was altogether in his revelations a companion for angels, and but of his gentleness conversant with men. That he had large promises made unto him, but in the dark, such as to convert the Turk, bring all the infidels to the true Christian faith, and cause Jews be christened by his preaching. Morysine farther said, the person might be thought worthy much blame, that being in such favour with God, he made no suit that his man might go whither he sent him; and it was some loss of his credit that his man being sent into France, should be taken in Flanders, and so the purpose of the Holy Ghost be disappointed. If it were by force of wind, God being Lord of wind and weather may seem not to favour the purpose; if, for want of wit, the man sent is not so worthy to be blamed as he is that sent him. On this Mons. D'Arras was very merry, and added, "When God sendeth fools of his errand, yet he doth order the matter so, as they speed that He sendeth them for. If others serve Joannes Leonis' turn no better than this his apostle is like to do whom we have in Flanders, he must take a pain himself." Perceives that they take the matter as it is, and lay the blame only upon them that made the fault. Mons. D'Arras had said that if he or any other had gathered but the shadow of any suspicious practice on part of any of the English, he would have sent for Morysine; but finding no such matter, he had delivered the book and letters to the French Ambassador to be forwarded where they were meant. Notwithstanding, he said, Morysine might see, how the English jarring in religion with others brought such men into their country, where they dare be bolder than elsewhere. May not be bold to say much while Mr. Wotton has catechised him, but had replied, that if the man were not mad indeed, and so more deserving of pity than of punishment, he had by this time learned that the magistrates in England were as ready to punish strangers that do amiss, as they are ready to show favour to those who do well. Mons. D'Arras said, the book was full of heresies, and the man rather to be thought a counterfeit varlet than a fool indeed, as the book had shrewd matters in it and unhappily gathered together. Replied, that he had only heard of the book, but knowing the man, could think him able to do but small harm, and that also must be to fools; for whoso buildeth upon revelations, that he winneth among the simple he loseth among the witty, with large usury. The man that brought the fardel into Flanders has been examined and the examinations sent hither, but M. D'Arras says, he was not so well handled as he should have been, and letters are gone to give him the rack if the Council there shall think anything hid in him that may by pain be brought to light. Mons. D'Arras took his coming in very good part, escorting him where his men tarried for him, which was farther than his wont, by a chamber. "I suppose he reckoneth I have but a while to be where he may bestow his gentleness upon me, and therefore he will for this little season cumber me with kindness." News have been received that Dragut has escaped without the loss of galleys or anything. As Doria has not written, it is thought that the worst of the tale is behind. They say that a great storm arose, and that Doria, seeking shelter for his navy, did harbour where hope appointed him, and in the mean season Dragut stole away. The vessels that left Italy in expectation of finding Doria dragging Dragut after him as a prisoner, will now meet Doria scarce able to hold up his head for shame, not of his evil government, but of his misfortune. Some also report that he comes home with fewer galleys than he carried out, the tempest having taken a double tithe of his vessels. Others says that Dragut has his part of them, and that Doria is either hardly escaped, or not escaped. Inclines to believe the worst, as the Imperialists themselves want countenance to forge good news at present. That that shall not be, will not be; thinks this is not the year in which the Imperialists have to triumph. Dragut is gone towards the Turk's navy, which meets him half way, and is, as the Venetian Ambassador has declared to the Emperor, a great and puissant army. The Venetians, who are but lookers on, arm 70 galleys. The Turk is not thought to be so fond as to mean but the enterprise of the town Africa. Spain, Sicily, and Italy lie in his way, and he is the liker to rove at some one of them, for that there may be good help promised him. All this year France has been suspected, but never so much as now, for every day casteth some new increase to this suspicion. The French lately practised to have taken a fair town in Piedmont, not far from Vercelli, called Ivrea, but failed; three hours more leisure might have put them in possession of it. It is reported that the King of Navarre is dead, and that Mons. Vendôme, husband to the daughter and heir of Navarre, means to seek possession of the whole kingdom, his father-in-law, during all his life, having had only a portion of it. The French Ambassador says that he has not heard of the King's death; but if he is, M. de Vendôme has as good title to the whole kingdom as the Emperor has to Flanders. Because, the King of Spain has no other title to Navarre, except that when the Bishop of Rome had excommunicated the King thereof, the King of Spain, as Rex Catholicus, entered upon the realm, which now, by curse of the Bishop, is not his that was the right owner, but his that by violence could catch it. Thus the old doctrine serves well, that a realm may be kept from the right owner, and no grudge of conscience in the matter. Cannot see what kind of robbery can carry men to hell, if it be lawful for any to steal kingdoms. This talk may be spread, to see what will be said of it, and perhaps if the King be not dead, things upon occasion may be attempted, which now break out in talk. The castle of Brescello, belonging to the Cardinal of Ferrara, taken by Giovanni Castellan of Cremona, is being fortified; men suppose it may help much to annoy Parma. Ferrante Gonzaga, it is said, has made great provision for scythes, meaning to mow the corn about Parma. If he can do so, the soldiers within are like to want bread, but there is likely to be breaking of heads ere harvest be all had into the barn. The Bishop has sent Cardinal Medicis to Parma to spend the last and peremptory talk with Octavio. His bull monitory is abroad, eternally cursing him, if he do not as the Bishop bids him. Sends copy of it (missing). On the 16th of April the French Ambassador's letters were taken from the post at Constance, looked in, and returned to the post. The King, not a little offended, has sent a new cypher to the Ambassador. It is said to have been done without authority, and if the persons are discovered they will be punished. Yesterday came letters from Rome to the Emperor, who thereupon sent for the French Ambassador. Has been unable to extract the subject from the Ambassador, who is not so cheerful as he was wont to be. The other Ambassadors have a great advantage over Morysine, since they may freely talk with the Bishop's Nuncio, of whom more is for the most part to be learned than of all the rest of this Court. The Bishop sails in all ships, and must warrant and assure his wares at all hands, else he may chance one day to make bankrupt. Supposes the disadvantage small, for if he might go to the Nuncio, he were like to have as little help at his hands as any that served here these 20 years. The French Ambassador in Flanders wrote to M. Marsillac that Sir Geoffrey Pole was practising sedition and stir in England; had informed Marsillac the rumour must be false, because Sir Geoffrey Pole was with the Bishop of Liege in Germany, and was not gone into England, so far as he knew. Trusts they have some abroad to hearken and advertise them if any such mischief be meant. The Protestants here say that the King of the Romans suffers the gospel to be preached in certain churches of Vienna: this is not likely, yet not impossible to be true. Maximilian knows there is no way so good to make him great, nor no such mean to keep the Prince from the Coadjutoria. Many of the King's Council daily went to the Protestants' churches here, and communicated in both kinds. Men suppose the Emperor will do what he can so to abase the King as he may work his will for the Coadjutoria. The Prince is still going, and men may think him already gone, for after Maximilian went, he came never out of his lodgings, but when he went with the Queen to christen the Duke of Bavaria's child. "As touching the General Council, it is begun thus: A few Italian Bishops were there, and invited the Holy Ghost to a mass, which done, he had leave to go whither he would. Wise men say the Holy Ghost knew they meant either no Council, or one to oppugn the truth and to establish wickedness and error, and therefore he came no more to mass than he meaneth to be at their Council. It had been much to have brought him to mass, that never was at none since he was the Holy Ghost, more to have made him wait upon Bishops that send him away ere he be come to them." The Council is prorogued to September, and so he thinks it will begin the day after Nevermass. "France may be some impediment, scarcity of victuals some let; the business of Parma is of more importance than the Council; better a good many in this blind Interim lose their souls than the Bishop his town of Parma." Has just been informed that the Emperor has given notice to the gentlemen of his chamber to be in readiness for his leaving on the 28th of this month for Flanders, meaning not to tarry much by the way till he reaches Brussels. It is thought he has some suspicion of France. Thanks their Lordships that his diets are ready to make hitherwards: shall but receive them to pay them, and so be driven to borrow anew; but there are thanks behind, which he trusts they will shortly force him to give to them: he means, for his licence of dickers, which once obtained, he will cumber them with no more suits, till either he may bear no longer, or they shall think somewhat not amiss bestowed upon him. [Seven pages.]
May 14.344. King Edward VI. to Henry II., King of France, accrediting the Marquis of Northampton and Bishop of Ely for the investiture of his Majesty with the Order of the Garter. [Two pages. Draft.]
May 14.
Tours.
345. Sir John Masone to the Constable Montmorency. Acquaints him that he has received letters for the King of France, which by some great carelessness had been left out of his last packet, delivered eight or nine days ago, and requests to know when he may have audience to present them to his Majesty. [Half a page. Copy in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 15.
Chinon.
346. The Constable Montmorency to Sir John Masone. In reply to the preceding, informs him that the King goes on the following day to Champigny, two leagues and a half from Chinon, where Masone can have access when he pleases. [Half a page. Copy in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 19.
Chinon.
347. Sir John Masone to the Council. Had received their letters of the 7th upon Thursday the 14th inst., and had ascribed the blame of their late despatch to the negligence of the courier or some inferior minister. On Monday, in Whitsun week, he waited upon the King, and presented the letter from the King his master. The French King was exceedingly delighted. "I have not seen him more jocund, neither at any other time have I noted in him either a more pleasant or gentle countenance, either friendlier or more amiable words, which I could not guess but that they proceeded even from the bottom of his stomach." Marshal St. André seems to rejoice very much of these outward signs of the increase of this amity. Is informed that he takes with him either two or three ships laden with wheat, and intends not to make too much haste to return, being desirous to have some experience of the English hunting, wherein they do exceed other nations. He also, it is said, brings with him a great number of the young gentlemen of the French Court. If so, their Lordships doubtless will not let them lack convenient entertainment. Signor Ascanio has returned with certain overtures devised for the pacification of the matter of Parma, which it is thought will not take effect so soon, the less because that Don Fernando, on hearing of the revolt of Parma, had seized a town called Bozzelis [Bossolo], not far from thence, belonging to the Cardinal of Ferrara, and is now fortifying it. Its position being such as to impede supplies from Mirandola, marvellously troubles the French. The Emperor is again reported to be dying. Has seen a letter from Rome, in which it is said that the Bishop of Armachan is thoroughly and very well despatched touching the matters of Ireland. What this may be he can rather conjecture than know certainly, but either is it some cursing, or giving the said realm in predam, or some mischief or other, which he trusts shall take the same effect as have other malicious practices which have hitherto been meant against England from that see. The French King's ordinance, that all ecclesiastics shall reside half the year on their benefices, has given much offence to the Bishop of Rome. Monluc is likely to be sent thither concerning this. Congratulates them on their taking measures for the reformation of the coinage in England, which will be gladly appreciated both at home and abroad. Marshal St. André will not leave until he hears that the Marquis of Northampton has crossed the sea. [Three pages.]
Eod. die.Copy of the preceding in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book. [Four pages.]
May 20.
Brussels.
348. Dr. Wotton to the Council. Arrived at Brussels on Monday in Whitsun-week, having tarried some days at Antwerp for sundry preparations necessary. Next morning Sir Thomas Chaloner and he sent notice of his arrival to the President de Mombarry, otherwise called de Saint Maurice, desiring audience of the Queen Regent. Her Majesty did not return from hunting until late, but to-day (Wednesday), about 10 a.m., the President came and brought them to the Queen, to whom Wotton delivered the King's letter. She used herself gently enough, made much expression of amity, and mentioned that the Emperor would leave Augsburg in the beginning of next month to come downwards. After leaving her they waited upon the French Queen, and did like commendations from the King to her; who also seemed to take it very well and used very gentle words to them. Intends to depart to-morrow, thinking to find the Emperor at Worms, where it is understood his Majesty will only wait for ships and boats convenient for him and his train. Wherefore, had he not feared to offend the King, he could have been content to spare this journey to Augsburg or Worms, and have tarried for the Emperor here, knowing how little pleasure it is for strangers to travel in that barbarous country of Germany. "As I passed through Mechlin a servant of mine told me that one in a velvet coat asked him whether he were an Englishman? My man said, 'Yea,' The t'other asked him whether he were my servant? My man said, 'Yea.' 'Then,' quod the t'other, 'I pray you show your master that I would fain speak with him.' 'What is your name?' quod my man. 'Marry, Geoffrey Pole,' quod the other. When I heard this I told my man I would not speak with him, he having used himself as he had done. Likewise here at Brussels, two gentlemen, the one called Kempe, the other Walgrave, would fain have spoken with me. I caused answer to be made to them that if they could make it appear to me that they had leave either to come out of England or to tarry here, I would be glad to speak with them, and else not. And so they went their ways." Desires to know his Majesty's pleasure whether he should have any communication with them, or other persons, if again sued for an interview. [Two pages.]
May 20.
Greenwich.
349. Commission from King Edward VI. to William Marquis of Northampton, Thomas Bishop of Ely, Sir John Masone, Sir Philip Hoby, Sir William Pickering, Sir Thomas Smith, and Dr. John Oliver, to conclude a treaty of marriage between his Majesty and the Princess Elizabeth, daughter of Henry II., King of France. [Three pages. Latin. Copy in Sir John Masone's Letter-Book.]
Eod. die.First draught (entirely autograph of Sir William Cecil) of the preceding commission. [Six pages. Printed by Rymer, Vol. xv., p. 279, 2d edition, 1728.]
May 20.
Greenwich.
350. Commission from King Edward VI. to the same Commissioners to arrange a treaty of strict alliance and defence between France and England. [Three pages. Latin. Copy in Sir John Masone's Letter-Book.]
Eod. die.Copy of the preceding commission, corrected by Cecil. [Six pages and a half. Indorsed by Cecil.]
May 20.
Greenwich.
351. Instructions from King Edward VI. to the Marquis of Northampton and the other Commissioners aforesaid,—proceeding to France to invest Henry II. with the Order of the Garter,—to demand the Queen of Scots in marriage with the King of England; and in the event of that being refused, to solicit the hand of the Princess Elizabeth, daughter of the French monarch. With the various stipulations as to dowry, time for solemnization of the marriage, &c. [Nine pages. Copy in Sir John Masone's LetterBook.]
The treaty of marriage following upon the preceding commission has been printed by Rymer, Vol. xv., p. 273, 2d edition, 1728.
First draft of the preceding (Eighteen pages), and fair copy thereof (Eight pages, indorsed by Cecil), without the three additional clauses contained in Masone's copy.
May 20.352. "A memoriall of such things as be to be considered for the instructions of the Lord Marquis" (Northampton). "An estimat of the enterteynement of the Lords that went over with my Lord Marquis." "A memorie for the enterteynement of my Lord Marquis and his treyne." In the first of these documents it is settled that there shall be no book of statutes (of the Order of the Garter), as hath been accustomed. [Five pages.]
May c. 20 or 21.
Greenwich.
353. King Edward VI. to Henry II., King of France. Informs him of the appointment of Commissioners to meet M. Lansac for settling the question of the Scottish boundaries, and giving credence to Sir William Pickering, who has been appointed resident Ambassador in France. [One page. Indorsed by Cecil. French. Copy.]
May 23.
Venice.
354. Peter Vannes to the Council. Acknowledges receipt of their letter of the 19th ult. from Greenwich, and congratulates them on the prosperous estate of his Majesty and the realm as therein set forth. Had communicated its contents to the Seigniory and the other Ambassadors, and especially declared the friendship with France and other continental powers, which kind of communication he did somewhat extend of himself, the rather for to quench a certain suspicious and untrue rumour here that in England should be little agreement amongst noblemen, and likelihood of war from outward parts, and seditions within the realm. The French Ambassador had previously in his master's name affirmed the Seigniory of the amity, and the exchange of the Orders of the Garter and of St. Michael. Trusts they will be nothing aggrieved by his going to solemn places when formally invited. Little news here in addition to what he had before written to them. Matters are in the same state in regard to Parma, likely to end in words merely. The Bishop of Rome is reckoned of a wavering mind, for the French, beside the unkindness, do judge and openly speak of his unfriendly doings. The Imperialists have him in a jealousy, and that he does nothing but for fear of the Emperor; and so sitting between two stools, he is not long like to sit upright. For if by any chance he should lose the friendship of France, he shall lose the best flower of his garland; and on the other side, if he doth displease the Emperor, undoubtedly he shall put his temporal estate in danger. The Duke of Ferrara makes precautionary defences: many suppose he has a leaning towards France. Nothing is spoken of the Council, or any good expected from it. The second session is put off till September, and many judge it is rather appointed for the advancing of Princes' affairs, than for any good order to be established in religion, according to God's law and his honour. The news in his last letter of the victories of Andrew Doria over Dragut Rey, as set forth by the Imperialists, prove to be clean contrary to the truth; since, notwithstanding Doria's force, he has got safely away with all his own vessels, and has taken one of Doria's best galleys, called the Corona, and two other ships laden with biscuits; while Doria was going towards Naples somewhat sick in body and mind, being a man of great age and well wearied in worldly labour. A seditious treatise had lately been discovered at Genoa, and a gentleman of the family of Spinola, keeping a great bank at Lyons, has been imprisoned for the same. As he hears nothing of Horsmonden in Rome or Italy, supposes that he went to Barbary as formerly mentioned. Four Englishmen have come to Rome. Two of these, Thomas Crew, a Cheshire man, and John Badger, a native of Worcestershire, naming themselves gentlemen of a low degree (as he supposes), have got into the service of Cardinal Pole. The other two are placed at Sienna as soldiers, with two ducats and a half per month. One of them is a son of Winslow the Cornish traitor; and what with his playing upon his harp, they wander their lives without any superfluity of victuals or ease. An English gentleman, George Throgmorton, has arrived here, for the purpose of learning the language and gaining worldly experience. As his uncle is chief man about Cardinal Pole, Vannes has given him advice how to comfort himself; he seems of a very gentle nature and honest conditions, and of a true heart towards his country, willing to do well and haunt honest company. Since writing thus far has heard from a friend at Naples, to whom he had written about William Hors monden, that the latter bore a true heart to England, and that his sudden and suspicious departure only proceeded from necessity and from no other cause. Incloses three letters. Perceives that betwixt the Imperialists and Frenchmen here there are burning hearts; each side watching time and opportunity. For further news refers to writing inclosed. [Five pages.] Annexed,
354. I. Some notes of foreign intelligence, containing news of the capture of Duke Horatio, the Prior of Lombardy, and others, whose vessels had been driven by stress of weather into Pietra Santa, within the territory of the Duke of Florence, and their friendly treatment and liberation by the Duke. [Italian. Four pages. See Morysine's letter of May 26, postea.]
May 23.
Venice.
355. Peter Vannes to Sir William Petre and Cecil. A note of complimentary courtesy, inclosing the preceding letter for the Council. [Half a page.]
May 25.
Greenwich.
356. The Council to Sir John Masone. The French Ambassador has this day informed them that the French Commissioners in Scotland complain that the English ones are very strait, and allege lack of instructions to accord what Pickering and Masone had agreed to the French King. They have now received full instructions. A dispute has again arisen in regard to the French boundaries, Senarpont having caused to be impounded 60 English cattle which were pasturing upon Sandingfeld, called by them St. Engelbert's, and notwithstanding the Ambassador had written to him, he yet, as it were to maintain the pique, retains one cow, and very quickly has both written to Lord Willoughby, and also sent him answer by a trumpeter. Desire him to see the Constable as to this. They have also heard that Senarpont has obtained the lands of Sandingfeld to his own use, which is not to be liked, since being a man of charge upon the frontier, he may thereby be the rather provoked to pick a quarrel for his own commodity. The Marquis of Northampton has left, and will probably be at Calais to-morrow. [One page and a half. Copy in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 26.
Saumur.
357. Henry II., King of France, to the Marquis of Northampton. Congratulates him on his arrival, and sends the bearer, the Sieur de Mandosse, gentleman of the chamber, to escort him to the Court. [One page. Countersigned by De l'Aubespine, and indorsed by Cecil. Addressed "A Mons. le Marquis de Noranthon." French.]
May 26.
Augsburg.
358. Sir Richard Morysine to the Council. Signor Ascanio della Cornia having returned to Rome with a flat answer from the French King that he will not cast off those whom with gage of his honour he has taken into his protection, makes men think that the next letters will show whether large sayings and lusty doings dwell together, or whether the hollow Father can chide a good, and after do but a little harm. The person who brought the last letters states that 2,000 guastatori, with horse and foot, are ready to go to Parma, and mean, the Bishop having a mind still to mar that which God makes, to destroy such corn as else might do good. His curse is running in great storm; would God his soldiers' swords could do no more hurt to bodies than this his excommunication will do harm to souls! It is said the Emperor has sent 12 captains from Milan and elsewhere in Italy to levy men against Octavio; and that Signor Giovan Baptista de Monte, nephew to the Bishop, and like to be confaloniere of the Church in room of Octavio, if he behaves stoutly in the enterprise, is ready to do the Bishop's business at Parma when ordered thereto. The French, on their part, are not idle, but labour as men who mean; the more earnestly, perhaps, of a report that their king was like to lay the whole family of the Farneses in the dust. Pietro Strozzi, with 12 others, is levying men throughout Italy, and is said to be now in Parma; he and Duke Horatio will probably keep abroad, to be the rescue of such as else may be mured up. Letters from Florence confirm the news that Duke Horatio with some French gentlemen, coming from France with two galleys, had by stress of weather been driven to land at Pietra Santa, a haven of the Duke of Florence, whose officers, aware of the little good will between their master and the house of Farnese, had stayed the galleys, and fell to rifling of them. But the Duke hearing of this, sent orders that they should be honourably entertained, and their property restored to them. Others say that Horatio made shift and escaped, untalked with and unseen. Some think that if he could help himself otherwise, though with some peril, he would rather give the adventure thereof than come into the hands of the Duke of Florence. Paul III. did Cosmo de Medicis many displeasures, at which time the Farneses, his nephews, thought it their part to show enmity where their grandfather had so bestowed his hatred. Besides, as the Emperor had made him Duke of Florence, men think that where he might have gratified the Emperor and the Bishop of Rome by the stay of his own enemy, whom God had put in his hands unsought for, he would not so suddenly have let him away. Had he been kept, war might have been stayed. Others say the Duke acted wisely, both from a desire to be neutral, and because of the intermarriage of the French King with the house of Medicis. Horatio is said to be now safe in Parma. The best of the house of Bentivoglio, who long were Lords of Bologna till Julius II. drove them out, have come to Italy, practising to see what they may do against Julius III., with small hope of recovering what they have lost, but some pleasure to annoy him whom they would fain undo. Shartley is looked for; if he come, Germans will swarm towards Italy, if the French King have his troops got ready made for them. Men of experience think that war has got full possession of Italy for a year or two, if want of victuals breed not the atonement a long while before good will make them friends. The French seek as many delays as they can, in order to have their naval and military operations in hand at once. Octavio has requested of the Bishop of Rome,—1, that he may give up the captainship of the Church; 2, that he may serve what and whom he listeth; 3, that the Bishop will stay his excommunication. The Bishop replies to the first, it should have been granted without suit; to the second, he has acted without licence; to the third, he must look for it, unless he comes home to his mother Church. The Turk's armata is already about Negroponte. The French say the Turk cannot be long of coming; the Imperialists that the Sophy will find enough of work for him at home: but those who have been in these countries assert that the Sophy can better withstand the Turk in his own country than by invading him. The son of Barbarossa. King of Algiers, has been busy with Hereph, King of Tremecen, and has killed one of his sons, and taken another prisoner. Duke Maurice's agent here gives out that those of Magdeburg desire to be reconciled, making much suit for peace, and ask but any reasonable conditions, willing to bear some pain for their stubborn withstanding of the Emperor; also that conferences are being held to that end. On the other hand, it is said that they are perfectly indifferent to peace or war, being determined to maintain liberty of conscience; and that the sea cities, Hamburg, Bremen, Lunenburg, and others have sent them great supplies of provisions, and by this open show of their friendship have so increased these men's hearts that they can no skill of fear. Some suppose Duke Maurice is at this Diet, endeavouring by his clergy to win back to him the foolish Protestants; a sort of men as apt to be deceived, as the others be glad when they are so. Duke John Frederick's son may, in this time of his father's captivity, be persuaded to do many things that, as he may be made to believe, will do his father good. Whatsoever the Assembly means, if the sea cities have gone thus far, it is like they will need small entreaty to go farther. France has his practices in all places. Yesterday at eight o'clock, before dinner, the Prince of Spain left this for Genoa. The Prince of Piedmont on his right hand, and the Duke of Holstein on his left, almost cheek by cheek, escorted him out of the town. The Duke of Alva and Mons. D'Arras brought his Highness a mile or two of his way, and at parting both dismounted, and kissing his hand, with great reverence and much ceremony, took their leave on foot. About 2 p.m. on same day, the Emperor left for Monaco, either to essay himself how he might abide his horse, or that he felt as fathers do, and would be away from that house a season, where his son and he had been so long and now were sundered. His Majesty chose the hottest of the day to travel in, gladdest to be abroad when the sun heateth most. Both Prince and Emperor went by the Duke of Saxony, who bareheaded made low obeisance to them. The Prince put off his cap; the Emperor cast up his eye, and put his hand towards his cap. The Court, that is, Foulkers' [Fugger's] house and all Ambassadors, remain until his Majesty's return, about 10 days hence, when, if there be no let or change of will he proceeds to Flanders. His greatest errand is to make France not too lusty in Italy, and send too many from home, lest he be doing with him whilst his captains be elsewhere occupied. Will say little of his own troubles occasioned by this removing, as their Lordships can guess them by his wants, and the place in which they have put him. He is beholden to the Schores, who lend him a good deal more money than he wots where to borrow at home.
P.S. At the sealing of this a friend brought him letters from Trent, which he sends herewith (missing). [Six pages.]
May 28.
Angers.
359. Sir John Masone to the Marquis of Northampton. Congratulates him on his arrival in France. The King is at present within three leagues of Angers. Recommends his Lordship for the more ease to come by water from Orleans, as the Loire is much greater than in times past at this season it hath been wont to be. M. de Boisdaulphin, a gentleman of much estimation and chief maître d'hôtel to the King, is to accompany M. de St. André to England and remain as Ambassador there. Has just been informed that the King will be here on Tuesday next, will not remain beyond three days, but will go to Chateaubriand, 15 or 16 leagues hence. [One page. Copy in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 31.
Paris.
360. The Marquis of Northampton to Sir John Masone. Thanks him for his letter, and informs him that his entertainment hitherto by the way has been so gentle and friendly that he is put out of care for needing of anything while he shall be in these parts. M. de Mandosse had met him at Boulogne, and M. de Villebon at Montreuil, and made him right good cheer, continuing their escort of him hither. Had been visited by the Mayor and principal men of every town through which he passed, with such presents as they use. If Masone sees the King or the Constable, requests that he will express the Marquis's grateful sense of the attentions paid to him and his suite. Was informed yesterday by M. de Mandosse that the King would receive him at Nantes. Will leave Paris about Wednesday next, and spend three days in journey between that city and Orleans, whence he will take the water as Masone recommends him. Sends his compliments to Lady Masone. [One page and a half. Copy in Sir J. Masone's Letter-Book.]
May 31.
Venice.
361. Peter Vannes to the Council. The Seigniory have delayed sending their General, in daily expectation of some certain intelligence of the Turk's army. A rumour of the Turk's death had spread in Constantinople, and the people being almost in a tumult, the Ambassadors and Christians there were in some danger and prevented from sending any despatches. The report had been quenched by the Turk's very solemn and pompous entry into that city from Adrianople, to the great comfort of his subjects. Letters from thence of the 28th ult. state that the whole Turkish fleet does not exceed 110 galleys, besides several pirates, and 50 of them provided with all things necessary were ready to sail. Whereupon on the 26th curt. the Seigniory solemnly delivered his standard to their General, in token of absolute authority, his power being so great that he can do and undo all things, and so cannot the Duke. Describes the ceremonial of the delivery of the standard to Maestro Stephano Teypolo the General, a man of the age of 70 years, goodly, grave, and witty, in presence of the Duke and about 300 gentlemen of Venice, all clothed in crimson velvet, damask, and satin, together with the Ambassadors. The General was clothed with a train of crimson velvet to the ground, and his under garment down to his foot was of crimson satin, his uppermost garment being open on the right side, with buttons of gold on his shoulder as big as hens' eggs, much after the Parliament robes. After a solemn mass of the Holy Ghost the same great standard, as peradventure some men thought rather for the alluring of the rude people, not without suspicion of superstition, was consecrated there even with like ceremonies as the font and paschal was wont to be hallowed on Easter-even, and then delivered by the Duke to the General kneeling. The standard being carried by his Admiral, the General was accompanied to his galley by the Duke and the rest of the company, with trumpets, drums, and shot of ordnance. This galley was gorgeously appointed, having on each side 25 banks, every bank of four oars, and a piece of ordnance between every bank, beside other great pieces couched in the fore part and other places, bravely furnished with all things thereunto belonging. Supposes about 20,000 people were present, whose respectful and cheerful demeanour towards their superiors was chiefly to be noted, which, as the General informs him, is to be ascribed to their education when young, and by reason thereof all the Government here proceeds with an incredible quiet and good order. The General told him that Dragut Rey had in the Gulf of Venice attacked two of their vessels laden with troops, provisions, and arms for Corfu; but they were so gallantly defended, that they saved all things, save that one of the ships was so sore bowged with Dragut's ordnance, that she sank immediately after the discharge of her burden. The Providetor being 10 miles off, and hearing the gunshot, immediately directed sail towards them with a good wind, and chased Dragut into a strait. The Emperor's Ambassador tells him that the Viceroy of Naples has already furnished certain places upon the sea coast in these quarters with 10,500 horse and foot, sufficient ordnance, munitions, and victual. There is a rumour, which he believes to be absurd, that certain gentlemen of good families of Genoa are cited there to answer upon a practice detected, with agreement of the Prince of Spain, for the destruction of Andrew Doria and to bring the city unto the Imperial satisfaction. Cannot suppose that a Prince of such honour would in anywise consent thereto. Conflicting reports of the proceedings of Parma are daily spread, as their Lordships will perceive by the inclosed news received from Rome of the 21st curt. (missing.) [Four pages. Much defaced by damp.]
May.
Greenwich.
362. King Edward VI. to Henry II., King of France. Informing him of his election to the Order of the Garter at a Chapter held at Greenwich on the 24th of April last. [French. One page. Copy.]

Footnotes

1 Dicker, a quantity of 10 hides of leather. Vide Cowel in voce.