Mary
November 1553

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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22-34

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'Mary: November 1553', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Mary: 1553-1558 (1861), pp. 22-34. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70401 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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November 1553

Nov. 3.
Venice.
62. Peter Vannes to the Council. It is needless by any kind of writing to rehearse the joy, gladness, and comfort, which it has been to him to receive her Majesty's and their Lordships' letter dated at Westminster, the 7th ult. Renders his due and humble thanks, and will endeavour during his life, with faith and diligence, somewhat to answer to the good opinion had of him. On the receipt of her Majesty's letter repaired to the Seigniory and declared his continuance as Ambassador. His re-appointment and her Majesty's assurance of friendship as in time of her predecessors, were thankfully and suitably received; they inquired of the qualities, degree, and estate, of each member of the Council who had subscribed the letter, whereunto he made answer accordingly. They also inquired the beginning of some accustomed rebellion stirred by the savage people of Ireland, which had been bruited here by some diligent writers to be of greater moment than it really was; and when he mentioned the good provision taken by her Majesty for quenching it, and that these tumults were founded upon no likelihood, strength, or power, they all said that it was but fuoco di paglia. All the Ambassadors with whom he had conversed of her Majesty's prosperous successes, and the great tranquillity of the kingdom, which was like to proceed from good to better, have showed to him that Princes had been very glad to be advertised thereof. Occurrents by sea and land seem rather inclined toward mischief and war than to peace and agreement. Repeats his former information as to Corsica and the assistance lent by the Duke of Florence to the Genoese. It is said that the Emperor will assist the Genoese in this matter as much as he may, for it is very necessary to all his affairs that Genoa, being the key of Italy, should continue in his friendship and devotion, for if Corsica should remain in the hands of the French, Genoa will be in a manner as a thing besieged, in which case by internal factions and banished men of great authority, some rebellion might easily come to the Emperor's hindrance. He has sent to valiant Captain Signor Ludovico Vistarino, to be master of the Genoese camp, and has commanded all his ministers and agents in Italy to aid them to the best of their power. The Vicerroys of Naples and Sicily also are to send to Corsica ten gallies and as many of those of Spain with a great band of Spaniards, which united force will amount to 50 gallies, three galeons, and 14 ships, under the command of Prince Doria and his lieutenant Augustine Spinola. Mentions, in addition to the French preparations in Corsica noticed in his previous letter, that they have sent a person to Algiers to hasten the coming of the army of Sala Reis. The Duke of Florence and the Siennese are very vigilant to take some advantage one against the other; and some small vessels of the Imperialists bringing succours to Orbitello, a fortress on the coast belonging to Sienna, have lately been taken and spoiled by the French. Begs to receive correct information from some one appointed by the Council for that purpose, of all that occurs in England, Scotland, and Ireland, and that the letters may be delivered at the dispatching of the ordinaries either to his assured friend Mr. Bartholomew Compagni, or be directed to her Majesty's Ambassador at the Emperor's Court, to be forwarded by one of the ordinary couriers who daily come hither from it. This he requests, the better to serve her Majesty by tempering such news, whether good, bad, or of the middle sort, as he may think to stand best with her honour in his communication with Ambassadors and others. [Seven pages. Indorsed by Petre.]
Nov. 4.
Neiss.
63. Sigismund Augustus, King of Poland, to Queen Mary. Congratulatory on her Majesty's coronation, and credentials of Jerome Makowieczki, his Majesty's Chamberlain. [Latin. Broadside.]
Nov. 4.
Neiss.
64. Catherine, Queen of Poland, to same. Had previously written to congratulate her Majesty upon her succession, and now does so upon her coronation. Expresses her warm sentiments of friendship and regard, arising both from consanguinity and similarity of disposition and pursuits. [Latin. Broadside.]
Nov. 4.
Neiss.
65. Same to same. Recommends to her Majesty Lawrence Fentzel, merchant of Datnzic, who goes to England with Jerome Makowieczki, of the chamber of the King her husband, to obtain justice in regard of some merchandise recklessly impledged there. [Latin. Broadside.]
Nov. 4.
La Ferté Milon.
66. Dr. Wotton to the Council. On the 28th October had received their letter of the 28th, but in consequence of the King's absence at Chantilly on a visit to the Constable, could not have audience of him till the 31st. Had then declared all the points of their letter, to all which things the King made a very short answer; expressed his pleasure that her Majesty desired a continuance of amity, and as the Queen of Scots was of the same mind, he trusted that much good would ensue from the meeting of the Commissioners. His Majesty did not speak of the Scottish complaints, or the Lord Hume's matter, but remarked of the Border custom as to the trespass of cattle, that he thought it was very good, and none could be more reasonable. As to the taking of the Flying Hart of Ostend, said, if any of his men had done so, they had not done well, and desired him to deliver a remembrance of it to Cardinal Lorraine. Did not make a direct reply to the question whether, when the offenders were discovered, he would cause restitution to be made of the ship as it was when taken; but said, when he knew who had done it, he would inquire into the truth of the matter, and do as reason should require in it. With reference to the impeaching of passengers between Dover and Calais, his Majesty said that, if his men had taken any Portuguese, they had done wrong, and ought not to have done it; and that he thought it very good and reasonable that the passage should be free for all nations, and if the Emperor would consent that it should be free, he was well content to agree to the same. As for the incursions of the Scots into Ire land, and the report spread that he incited them thereto, he took God to witness that he never thought of such a thing. For knowing her Majesty's desire of peace with her neighbours, he should do all he could to assist her against such as might go about to molest her. The Queen Dowager of Scotland is as glad of her Majesty's accession as any may be, and equally desirous of peace. Had informed the King that her Majesty did not believe that these disturbances were done by the privy maintenance of the Scottish rulers, but reckoned such a report to be untruly spread by those light savage people. His Majesty will earnestly write to the Queen of Scots to see redress made. Hears that Messire Luigi Alemanni, an Italian, one of the French Queen's maitres d'hotel, is going to England with a present to her Majesty; and now remembers that when the Queen was at St. Germain, Cardinal Tournon told him that she and her gentlewomen were occupied in working certain fair works and gay gear, which she was to send to her Majesty. Pietro Strozzi left on the 1st inst., riding in post to Marseilles, to embark there for Corsica: the Duke of Soma and most of the other Italians left on the following day. It is reported that M. de Thermes is revoked, and to be succeeded by Strozzi; also that the Genoese have sent 14,000 men into Corsica, which island if the French lose again, their own proverb will be verified: qui trop embrace, mal estreint. The Constable is well amended, and the King intends to visit him soon again, when, if he is strong enough, his Majesty will take him with him to Fontainebleau, where it seems he will lie the rest of this winter. Sends his further proceedings in the affairs of the English merchants, and begs their Lordships will cause the Council's answers to be considered, because in some points they appear to him to vary both from the law and previous agreement; but for lack of books of law, and that he has so long discontinued that study, he is the less able to stand with them in these matters. Hopes the affair of Winter will be ended very shortly. Has received their letters concerning the causes of Mr. Maynard, Mr. Calthorpe, and other merchants; will do the best he can, but questions whether these can be brought to a conclusion so speedily as the parties look for, seeing they expect them to be dispatched in post-haste. Hints as to the law's delays. [Six pages.] Inclosing,
66. I. "What hath been done in our merchants' matters here at the Court sith the 14th of October 1553." [Correspondence, claims, and replies, principally in French. Twelve pages.]
Nov. 5.
Valladolid.
67. Regulations for the conduct of vessels and the pay of mariners. [Spanish. Four pages.]
Nov. 5.
Calais.
68. Thomas Pettyt, Surveyor of Calais, to the Council. As the season will enforce them to desist proceeding with the works this year, and the new work adjoining to Purton's bulwark at Guisnes is 20 feet above the water, it is proposed to discharge all the labourers employed thereon, and therefore requests that payment may be made to the men. It is also intended to discharge all at Calais, except forty whom they shall require to keep all winter for filling the jetties and repairing the sea-banks and sea-heads. [One page. Indorsed by Petre.]
Nov. 10.
Antwerp.
69. Christopher Dawntesey to the Council. The Fuggers, in consequence of having lately furnished the Emperor with 100,000 ducats, are unprovided with funds for the Queen's purpose until their letters, with bills of exchange from Spain, daily expected, arrive. Meanwhile he has taken up, for the Queen's use, of Lazarus Tucker 50,000 ducats, that is, 100,000 guilders, to be repaid 1st Nov. next, at the rate of 13 per cent. Tucker has promised, conditionally on his having no other commission out of Dutchland, to furnish him with 100,000 guilders more within eight days. If he fails, doubts not to have it. Desires to know how the money is to be applied. Has sent the usual copy for the bonds for the sum aforesaid to Sir Wm. Petre, her Majesty's Secretary. [One page and a half. Indorsed by Petre.]
Eod. die.
Antwerp.
70. Same to Sir William Petre. Repeats the information given in his previous letter to the Council. There are large quantities of Spanish rials here, and all payments are made in them: if they were current in England for sevenpence, and French and Emperor's crowns at a noble of 6s. 8d., he could advantage her Majesty a good piece of money. Could supply her Majesty with good portions of bullion or silver in reasonable time. [Three pages. These two letters abstracted by Mr. Burgon, "Life of Gresham," Vol. i., p. 128.]
Nov. 11.
Venice.
71. Peter Vannes to Francis Yaxley. Thanks him for his letter of the 11th ult. Expresses the great affection and regard which he has for him, and his delight at the prosperity of the Queen and her realm. Occurrents here are few and of little importance, except that warlike preparations go on. Sienna stands well on its defence, and the Cardinal of Ferrara and other French agents daily fortify it and its vicinity. All friends at Padua are well. [Italian. Two pages. Indorsed by Yaxley.]
Nov. 11.
Venice.
72. Same to the Council. Few occurrents since his last letter of the 3d, and these not greatly worthy of advertisement. The last letters from Constantinople signify that the Turk followed his journey to Aleppo, in the confines of Persia, with a great army; and the Persians having foreseen his coming against them, had already wasted and burned the greater part of the country through which he had to pass, so that the lack of victuals was very serious to him and his army. They had also taken a large number of the Turk's ships laden with spices and rich wares, to the great loss of divers merchants. The Turk had distributed among his troops, according to their degrees, 600,000 crowns, to the intent that they might the better endure the hardness and scarcity of their voyage; and many suppose that this enterprise against the Persians shall somewhat profit King Ferdinand in the matters of Hungary. Corsican affairs remain in the same state. It is strongly reported that Pietro Strozzi is appointed General at Sienna, in room of De Thermes: being a valiant captain and in high favour with all soldiers, his coming with a sufficient furniture of money so nigh a neighbour to the Duke of Florence, will cause the latter to look well about him, and make him less able to assist the Genoese with men and money as he has begun. The Cardinal of Ferrara and other French agents in Sienna daily fortify that town and the adjacent places, and have in daily wages 4,000 labourers and nine ensigns of soldiers. It is also reported that the French King has dispatched the Prince of Salerno and the Duke of Sulmo upon some other enterprise in Italy; likewise that the Prior of Capua, a very witty and valiant man both by sea and land, is reconciled to the French King, and, if so, men think him a very meet man for that King's service. The Imperialists in Piedmont are so strong in the field that the French shall be fain to keep good garrisons there, and rather to augment than to diminish the number of their troops. Deems it his duty to mention that he understands, partly by his own knowledge and partly by hearsay, that several people here in various ways promise themselves of her Majesty's liberality to attain many things to their own use and benefit, and some have even inquired of him what they should ask? Has replied to such that he knows nothing except that her Majesty's discretion is equal to her liberality, and that she knows how to consider any man's deserts. Further, that suitors ought to be circumspect and temperate, especially at the commencement of her reign, the country having been by evil ministers very much indebted, and her treasures greatly wasted and spoiled, besides her great liberality towards her subjects, in pardoning of the large subsidy lately granted to her brother, the which of duty was her own; all which requires her ministers to look well to her rights and revenues. Perceives that many mind to ask licences, some that they may be free of London, and may custom both English and strange ware as freemen there, and others that they may have long days of payment for their gabelles and customs. Had shown those persons that nothing is so untouched and entirely kept as the safety of customs. Repeats his request to be supplied regularly with information of what passes in England. [Six pages. Indorsed by Petre.]
Nov. 13.73. Instructions to Thomas Gresham to proceed to Flanders to negotiate for the loan to her Majesty of 50,000l., or as much of it as he can obtain for one year, at 11, or at the most 12, per cent.; also to take up money by exchange to his own credit in Flanders for the Queen's use. [Draft, revised by Petre. Four pages. Printed by Burgon, "Life of Gresham," Vol. i., p. 471.]
Nov. 13.74. "A memoriall gyven by Thomas Gresham unto the Quene's Mate."
1. The Queen to give her bonds, and those of the city of London as usual, for all such sums as he shall take upon interest.
2. He shall not give more than 12l. or 13l. per cent. for the sums so taken.
3. The sums shall be sent home very secretly, in such coins as he shall think best, to be laden in Antwerp to London or Ipswich, at the Queen's risk.
4. He may take up money by exchange on his own credit in Flanders, to be sent to London at the Queen's risk.
5. He shall be allowed the usual charges for diet as in the time of Edw. VI., and also expenses of posting, &c.
6. He begs the appointment of persons to take account of the sums which he has received in the time of King Edw. VI. and her Majesty, for which he has not yet made account. [One page. Indorsed by Petre.]
Nov. 14.
Calais.
75. Lord William Howard, Lord Deputy of Calais, to Queen Mary. Had lately received a letter from the Council informing him that her Majesty has appointed him her Admiral, and requiring him to return to England immediately upon the arrival in Calais of Lord Wentworth, whom her Majesty has appointed to be her Deputy there. Whereupon he has not only sent away the most part of his staff, but has caused to be laid out a great part of his present half-year's rents for his provision in England. But he has this day received a letter from Lord Clinton, specifying that he thinks not to depart from the office; this letter he has sent to the Council, and begs her Majesty will call for it, as it is very strange to him that he should have been appointed to the office by her Majesty before Clinton had been discharged from it. Begs that the one office may not be taken from him without he shall enjoy the other. Lord Wentworth has already sent his steward hither to make his provision. Her Majesty may remember that upon his humble suit she gave him one of the chains that Henry Dudley had at his apprehension, which chain had belonged to the late King, her brother, so that neither the Lady Jane, taking upon her most wrongfully the name of Queen, nor yet her husband, could give that which was of right the property of her Majesty. Nevertheless, receiving a letter from the Council in her Majesty's name, desiring him to deliver it to Mr. Dudley, he has obeyed, and would have done so had it been worth 1,000l.; but he thinks surely their Lordships did not know that the chain was her Majesty's. Desires to know her Majesty's pleasure. [Holograph. Two pages.]
Nov. 14.
Calais.
76. Lord William Howard to the Council. Incloses letter received from Lord Clinton, referred to in the preceding; mentions the preparations which he made and the arrival of Lord Wentworth's steward. Trusts that his long services may be recognized by the holding of one or other of the appointments, and that they will take order for the payment of the wages due to him here for a year and a fortnight, and have his poor retinue in remembrance. [Holograph. One page.] Incloses,
76. I. Letter from Edward, Lord Clinton, London, 11th November. Had received on the 10th his letter of the 3d inst. If he shall depart from his office, there is no man in England that he would so gladly should have it as Howard; but he has not yet been desired by her Majesty or the Council to forego his office. However, he must say, that when the Queen and Council know that he has a sure and lawful patent of the office for the term of his life, he trusts he may be allowed to enjoy it; for he is very sure that since the granting to him of her Majesty's most gracious pardon, he has done no fault whereby he ought to forfeit or lose either that or any other thing that he has. Hears that the Queen and Council think the office is merely held during pleasure, but this shall otherwise appear by his humble suit addressed to her Majesty. [Two pages.]
Nov. 18.
Antwerp.
77. Thomas Gresham to the Council. Arrived in Antwerp on the 17th inst. at 8 p.m. Next day saw Lazarus Tucker with reference to his offer of 200,000 carolines for a year at 13 per cent. In consequence of Gresham's delay in answering him he said he had concluded with Christopher Dawntesey at the same rate and must pay the money by 30th November. The Queen will thus have by his reckoning 11 months instead of 12; and the money will stand her in more than 14 per cent. The matter has been so much talked about that he dare not ask any man to take up money at interest until their pleasure be further known. If the bargain be struck the Queen will get no money under 13 or 14 per cent., whereas by politic handling it might have been had for 11 or 12. Advises them to wait a month and not proceed at present. It will be best that he should have a commission for borrowing money at a rate not exceeding 12 per cent. Then if Dawntesey's bargain be not concluded, they will want to see this commission and the Queen will save 1,000l. in 50,000l. Before Dawnstesey came money was to be had for 10l. per cent., which is no small grief to him. Saw the Fuggers' agent, who showed him a letter from the Council, by which it appears that Dawntesey offered 100,000 crowns from him to the Queen, an offer he utterly denies having ever made. Delivered at 11 o'clock to-day the Queen's letter to Dawntesey, who departed suddenly upon the sight thereof. Thinks he has done his best and therefore requests they will bear with him, not being used to the handling of such weighty affairs. The Emperor takes up all the money he can get. The French King is very strong upon the borders. The Emperor expects 40 ships out of Spain with treasure, which Schetz, the Emperor's factor, tells him amounts to 300,000l., besides the treasure which the merchants will convey, and which will be as much. Money scarce, because the Germans take up all the gold for Germany, while the great towns pay 12 per cent. for it upon their bonds for repayment; so that it is thought there will be much ado next summer. [Three pages. Indorsed by Petre.]
Nov. 21.
Guisnes.
78. Lord Grey to Queen Mary. Presumes to trouble her Majesty, as his case touches his poor credit and honesty. Of late a little discord has arisen between him and the Bailiff of Guisnes, who has not only written against him to her Majesty and the Council, but has without leave gone to England to prefer his complaint in person to heap and aggravate the matter more than either is true or can be proved. Requests to be heard in self defence, and if ought can be shown against him will willingly submit to correction. Beseeches that the Bailiff for his contumacy and disobedience may be rewarded accordingly, and refers it to her Majesty whether, being so necessary an officer here, he has done his duty in thus secretly departing without licence. As it would be too tedious to discourse the occasions of this variance, has sent his servant and attorney to open the truth in every point to the Council. [One page and a quarter. Indorsed by Petre.]
Eod. die.79. Lord Grey to the Council. Whereas the Bailiff of Guisnes, and by his only procurement the freemen of the law there, have not only of late complained against him by their letters to her Majesty and their Lordships, but since then the Bailiff, in way of further vehemence and for his better prevaluation, has repaired to England meaning most sinisterly to allege to his discredit, although in the matter shall appear no cause of truth; requests they will examine the bearer his servant, together with his attorney, a man seen in the laws here and who can enlarge the certainty in this behalf, and that his answer may be heard to the Bailiffs objection and indifferent justice administered to both. [One page. Indorsed by Petre.]
Nov. 24.
Venice.
80. Peter Vannes to same. The fleet conveying the Genoese troops and supplies for the recovery of Corsica had been detained for some days by tempest and contrary winds, but sailed with favourable weather on the 10th inst. in good hope, the rather that Calvi still holds out, notwithstanding its being hardly besieged by the French. On the other side, M. de Thermes writes that he has well fortified all the places he intends to keep, and has 10,000 men ready to encounter the Genoese in plain field, seeming to have a certain hope to conquer Calvi, if it be not shortly succoured, and that the inhabitants there are most assured on the French King's side. Also that much diligence is used at Marseilles, in increasing the number of gallies by ten; but it is supposed they will scantly be ready to assist this enterprise of Corsica unless they are already prepared. These continuous preparations of gallies will at length make the French independent of the Turks, from whom they have for many years received small furtherance, notwithstanding the very great charge for entertaining them. Besides, the Turks are of a proud and suspicious nature, and not easy to be commanded or employed as the French would and the occasion of wars so require. The French also are said to have got much evil will of the inhabitants of all the sea-coasts for bringing into Christendom the Turk's army, which is very cruel and fearful wheresoever they come. It is said that the French King is greatly offended with the Duke of Florence for assisting the Genoese, and therefore to have sent Pietro Strozzi, his great enemy, to Sienna so near his nose to do him whatsoever displeasure he can from time to time. Of Strozzi's arrival there is yet no certainty. On the 17th M. Brissac, having an intelligence with the inhabitants of Vercelli, on pretence of going against Ferrante, 40 miles from thence, took out of his company 500 horse and foot and sent them with diligence to Vercelli, which, with the aid of the townsmen, he took, and slew a number of the Imperialists. But Ferrante and his lieutenant at Milan, called Capitano di Giustizia, being advertised thereof, went suddenly in haste with 100 horse and entered the fortress, of which the French had not yet got possession. Meanwhile 1,000 horse sent by Ferrante made their appearance, whereupon the French, being fewer in number, abandoned the enterprise and the Imperialists easily recovered the town. Vercelli belonged to the Duke of Savoy, and is a noble, strong, and plentiful city, of a good largeness, situate in the confines of Lombardy, 30 miles from Milan, on the very high way thither from Piedmont, and not far from the French frontiers; wherein if they had been able to establish themselves they should have been most hurtful to the state of Milan and the Emperor's affairs. The French deny the recovery, and the Imperialists affirm it; but the truth will be known shortly. [Three pages.]
Nov. 25.81. Names of persons, chiefly merchants, who have agreed, out of good will to her Majesty, though to their own great detriment and damage, to receive the sums lent by them to the Queen in Antwerp, provided payment be made at sight of their bills by her agent there, at the rate of 22 shillings Flemish for every pound sterling. The amount so consented to be received by these loyal subjects (108 in number) is 15,426l. 19s. 1d. sterling, equal in Flemish money at the rate aforesaid to 16,969l. 12s. 11d. Among these names occurs that of the father of Thomas Lodge the dramatist. [Three pages and a half.]
Nov. 25.
Guisnes.
82. Lord Grey to the Council. Has received their letter of the 20th mentioning that the French Ambassador had, on the information of M. de Senarpont, complained that some of the English soldiers here had lately fought with some Frenchmen in a wood near Guisnes or Sandingfeld, and seemed to lay the blame on the English. Has not heard of such fight or anything tending to the matter. But he remembers that when commanded by her Majesty to send over some wild boars, knowing that he could neither take them on English ground, nor make so great a hunting there but that the hounds should fly upon the French pale and they be forced to follow, and considering the relative position of the French and the Imperialists, he thought some disquiet might ensue to either unless they had foreknowledge that he would hunt. He therefore, by writing, communicated his intention to Senarpont, the Captain of Ardres, and the Captain of Gravelines, also requesting permission to hunt on their pale if necessary. This they all willingly granted, praying him not to spare, as the letter from Senarpont's lieutenant, which he has, can testify. In this case he hunting several times without prevailing, the captains and gentlemen here eftsoons following the game were fired upon sundry times by some French peasants lying in the woods, who chased his hunts and killed certain of his hounds. This continuing, it fortuned the said captains, as they were one day hunting in the same place and in like doings, to take half a dozen of these peasants, dealing more like thieves and murderers than honest men, and cut off a piece of the ear of one who was the ringleader, on consideration that they having licence so to hunt were thus vilely used and put in danger by the peasants. Of this Senarpont's lieutenant writing to him a month ago, had replied so reasonably as he reckoned to have satisfied him: nevertheless, on Senarpont's coming home, he had written on the same matter and received an equally reasonable reply as might has satisfied him also. Incloses copies of Senarpont's letter and his reply. This is all that has happened on the English part since he came here, and yet this of which they complain is not to be compared to the least of a number of the acts done by the French and by no means redressed by Senarpont or others. Since his coming he has frequently complained to him of most notable murders, probable thefts and intolerable injuries done by the French most audaciously to the subjects here, even at home at their own doors. Among others, of a murder committed by 20 or 25 of them upon a substantial farmer dwelling at Caussey, whom they murdered within a flight shot of his house, and would have slain some of his neighbours if they had not fled. After that they killed three Englishmen in the woods. Then they came in plain day to a subject at Scales [Calais], and beating him took away a number of his sheep. Also they beat another at Sandingfeld, threatening on him that he had cut the woods there, with which they had nothing to do. Recently they passed over her Majesty's ground here, and most cruelly beat another whom they found and would have had him prisoner. Another time a band of them on the same ground took from two of her Majesty's subjects a horse and a mare, the former of which by earnest pursuit of its owner they were forced to leave, but the latter was carried to Boulogne and it cannot be recovered. Finally, finding a partridge-taker of his to whom at his, Lord Grey's, request the Captain of Ardres had given passport to take partridges on the ground of his government, exercising this occupation on Madame de Riesque's ground, they took from him (notwithstanding his passport, which they rent) his nets, worth a dozen crowns, his purse and his coat, at the same time cruelly beating him, and had undoubtedly cut his throat if the people of the village had not seen them. These, and many more cases which it were tedious to relate, are continually used by the French of their own naughtiness and without occasion; yet although such and the perpetrators have been denounced, no justice has ever yet been done by Senarpont, with whom some of the offenders are even in good credit with him, and are daily in his presence bearing themselves as though they had done no such things, or else were supported in their doings, as it really would seem they are. Is glad to have this opportunity of mentioning these proceedings, wherewith had been unwilling to trouble their Lordships, having already notified these outrages when they occurred. That of which they now complain appears, upon strict inquiry, to be the only matter of offence on part of the English since his coming hither. [Three pages and a half. Indorsed by Petre.] Incloses,
82. I. Copy letter from Senarpont to Lord Grey, Boulogne, 16th November. [French. One page.]
82. II. Same from Lord Grey to Senarpont, Calais, 20th November. [French. One page and a half.]
Nov. 26.83. Gresham to the Council. Refers to his letter of the 18th inst. Assures the Council that the Queen had better have given Dawntesey 10,000l. than have proceeded in this matter. Dawntesey has been trying to buy up all the crowns he can get, and has offered one upon the hundred. This has raised a suspicion among the foreign and English merchants that the money was to be sent to England, of which Gresham has disabused them. Lazarus Tucker met him this day on the Bourse, when Gresham expressed his astonishment at Dawntesey's offer of interest at so high a rate, as the Queen's commission did not extend so far, and plenty of money could be had at 10 and 11 per cent. Tucker replied that he had made a bargain and wished to keep it, for he knew the Council had written to Fugger for money, that he had advanced only 100,000 florins at first to Dawntesey, and that Dawntesey prayed him to make a further advance of the same amount, which he was forced to borrow. If the bargain be concluded, no money will be got under 13 per cent. Some merchants are willing to lend for six months at six per cent. Desires to know what he shall do. (fn. 1) As the payments will be made to the Queen in Spanish rials, which are very massive, it will be necessary to provide for their secure conveyance. Wishes he had a commission to buy pepper, as it would be a good mode of conveying some of the money in the bags. It would be well to send some money over by Sir John Masone, who is going home, the Bishop of Norwich coming over. (fn. 2) The Queen should get a passport of the Emperor for conveying 10,000 marks weight of fine silver. [Four pages. Indorsed by Petre. Partly printed by Burgon, "Life of Gresham," Vol. i., p. 136.]
Nov. 28.
Brussels.
84. Sir John Masone to the Council. It is now settled that the Count of Egmont, M. Lalaing (elder brother to M. de Hochstraet), M. de Courrieres and Nigri, Chancellor of the Order, are to go as Ambassadors to England. The Prince of Orange, M. de Bures and M. de Hochstraet had been in the election, but the preceding were nominated, yet both those that tarry and the Duke of Savoy merely say that those shall be the avant couriers, and they will follow in the bataille. The wife of the Prince of Orange is brought abed, and Hochstraet has charge of the finances of these Low Countries, which are the causes of their stay. The Ambassadors will leave seven or eight days hence, very honourably accompanied by many gentlemen, and, as he is informed, by not much under 200 horses. M. de Bossut, Master of the Horse, and M. de Bures, are likely soon to go to England, not to join the others, but to pass the seas into Spain, and to conduct the Prince hither. Hears in different ways that the young English at Antwerp use their talk very wildly, both in showing their dislike of the proceedings in matters of religion at home, and of the other great matter which at this Court is taken as a thing utterly concluded. They have lately had a bickering with the Spaniards, which has so tickled them that they hesitate not everywhere to express their discontentation with the whole nation. Thinks the Council should speedily send some at whose hands they might receive some such threatening lesson as should teach them hereafter how to temper their tongues. There are news here of five millions of gold having arrived at Seville; prays God it be half so much, but whatever it be it makes them all merry in the mean season while the certainty is a learning. The Duke of Florence having sent a force for the recovery of Corsica induces the French King to make account as if he had declared himself against him, and therefore he has sent the Duke's mortal enemy, Pietro Strozzi, into Italy, while M. de Thermes shall remain in Corsica, and has sent to Algiers to hire 20 gallies. Knows that if the Devil were to be treated with he would entertain him. Prays that the Lord may put into him a better and more Christian mind. It is reported that the Sophi has met with a flote of the Turk laden with spice. From Hungary are uncertain reports of a great overthrow of the Turks by the Christians. God send the said Turk ill luck against the Persians, else the matters of Hungary will soon be revenged ! Count Egmont wishing to have some English gentlemen in his company for divers services, has desired Mr. Drury to take that place. Drury is loth to refuse this request, but being so behindhand with his creditors is afraid of their rigorous dealing with him when in England, and has requested Masone to solicit their Lordships' protection for him, as going in the capacity of the Queen's servant he may be saved from being impeached of them, minding before it be very long to satisfy them all accordingly. [Two pages.]
Nov. 28.
Guildhall.
85. Bond by the City of London to Lazarus Tucker for repayment of 56,000 florins, altered from 113,000. [Copy. Three pages. Indorsed by Petre.]
Nov. 29.
Calais.
86. Lord William Howard, Deputy of Calais, to the Council. To-day there has arrived here an Ambassador from the King of Portugal to her Majesty, who brings a letter from Masone specifying that he is in great estimation both with his master and the Emperor, with whom he had formerly been Ambassador, and desiring he should be used accordingly. This trusts to have fully accomplished. In the evening has received another letter from Masone declaring what other Ambassadors were coming and their trains, and who would leave for England in six or seven days. As they will be here shortly, requests with all speed to know after what sort he shall entertain them, for it is possible that the wind and weather may be such as they shall be forced to remain here a good space. Is sorry that he shall not be able to entertain them as he would, because his plate and the most part of his best stuff is already sent into England. However he will show them as much courtesy and attention as lies in his power. [One page. Indorsed by Petre.]
[Nov. 30.]
[Westminster.]
87. Queen Mary to Thomas Gresham. He is appointed to receive the money from Lazarus Tucker, which the said Lazarus has agreed with Christopher Dawntesey to advance to her Majesty's use, and out of this he is to make payment to the merchants adventurers who are named in the bill herewith sent [No. 83, antea], as being willing to receive the amount of her debts to them at Antwerp. The residue of the debt to the remaining merchants, who desire to be paid in London, is to stand over and to be received from Tucker. [Minute, autograph of Petre. One page and a quarter.]
Nov. [30.]
Westminster.
88. The Council to Thomas Gresham. Have received his letter of the [26th inst.] with regard to the bargain between Tucker and Dawntesey. Though the interest is higher than was expected or will be allowed in future, it is to proceed, both for saving of his credit and other considerations. Send her Majesty's assurance and the bond of London to be delivered to Tucker, from whom Gresham will receive the money. [Minute, autograph of Petre. One page.]
Nov. 30.
Westminster.
89. Bond by Queen Mary to Lazarus Tucker for repayment of 113,000 florins. [Draft. Indorsed by Petre. Three pages.]
Nov. 30.
Westminster.
90. The Council to same. Her Majesty accepts the loan of 113,000 florins negotiated by Christopher Dawntesey, although the sum might have been obtained elsewhere at a lower rate of interest. [French. Copy. Half a page.]
Nov. 30.
Brussels.
91. John Scheyfue to the Lord Great Master of the Household. Requests a passport for his friend the bearer. [Latin. Half a page. Indorsed by Petre.]

Footnotes

1 [In margin, autograph of Petre, "to take of this 1,000 crowns, if he cannot furnish otherwise."]
2 [In margin, "Agreed."]


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October 1553