Mary
June 1554

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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89-101

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'Mary: June 1554', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Mary: 1553-1558 (1861), pp. 89-101. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70408 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Contents

June 1554

June 3.
Brussels.
213. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre. The French have made a road as far as Dinant in Liege, the castle of which is said to be strong and well furnished. The body of the army has still remained at Marienburg where the King arrived the last of May [in orig. June]. To-day they leave, but whither is unknown, so closely do they handle these matters. The Emperor's army is still within five leagues of this town; it increases daily and now amounts to 20,000 foot and 6,000 or 7,000 horse. The rest approaches by the way of Luxemburg and Namur; within a day or two they will begin to march, for which the places where they have been all this while will never a whit be sorry. Requests that on the first news of the Prince's arrival or approach he will cause Mr. Cliff to write three or four words, and deliver his letter to the Emperor's Ambassador, who, Petre knows, will dispatch out of hand as soon as he hears but half a word of that matter; and at convenience that he will think upon his commission, if any shall be required upon the marriage. The merchantadventurers would be glad to make some triumphs to declare their good will, but doubt whether to do this at the coming of the Prince, or upon his coronation, if there shall be any. [One page.]
June 3.
Brussels.
214. Same to the Council. As the Ambassador of Ferrara sent to her Majesty departs presently towards England, thinks good to advertise their Lordships of his coming. He is a gentleman of the Duke's house, and has the keeping of a fort not far from Ferrara; his name is Count Roderigo de Monte Cuculo. Gresham left here to-day with his full despatch; has written by him to the Queen and their Lordships, trusting that he will be in England before the bearer. He intends to remain all Monday at Antwerp, for the satisfaction, if it will be, of the merchants, touching the date of the bonds; and on Tuesday will finally depart homewards. [One page.]
June 4.
Brussels.
215. Same to Queen Mary. News having reached the Court of the Prince's departure from Valladolid on the 12th ult., and of the likelihood of his having reached Logrono before this time, there are great rejoicings thereat; and the Ambassadors of the King of the Romans and Bohemia, who have long been here, propose to go to England forthwith. The former Ambassador is Don Pedro Lesso de Castilla, Majordomo to his master, and a man of much reputation: the other is Don Hernando de Gamboa, one of Maximilian's chamber. The Ambassade is very honourable, the train being composed of nearly 70 persons, whereof a good number are gentlemen. To-day Ambassadors from the Dukes of Florence and Ferrara have arrived, also en route for England; and the Duke of Savoy, with others of the nobility of this Court, will not long be behind. Suggests the appointment of gentlemen to meet them at Dover and to instruct them for the rest of their journey. In the East countries had like to have been a stir by reason of a quarrel between the Duke of Brunswick and the town of Hamburg, for defence of which the King of Denmark, Duke of Holstein and others, had begun to levy troops; but by the wisdom of the Emperor there is great hope the thing is brought to a good end. The French King has written to the King of the Romans and others to stand upon their guard, as however the Emperor yet dissembles with them, he minds to declare his discontent with them, as they shall perceive soon after the Prince's arrival in England; and that this warning proceeds from friendship. These Princes have forwarded the letters to the Emperor, expressing their confidence in him and their knowledge of the French practices. A truce for five years is nearly concluded between the Turk and the King of the Romans: the latter wishes the term to be prolonged and is in some hope of obtaining it. Marquis Albert stirs from place to place poorly attended: he would fain be doing, but wants the instrument wherewith to work. The Bishops' and confederates' troops lie before his towns of Swainefort [Sueinfort] and Plassenberg, which are defended manfully but cannot long hold out. Sends herewith the capitulation between the Marquis and the French King (missing), whereby his meaning may appear, had not his falsehood been espied in time. The cause of Count Mansfeldt's coming here was to make his peace with the Emperor and desire his mediation in a dispute between him and the Duke of Brunswick, and to place himself at his Majesty's service. He hath not his answer yet. The siege of Sienna goes diligently on, and the besieged are in great straits, although the French make great brag to the contrary. The army of the Duke of Florence increases daily: 2,000 Germans have arrived before Sienna commanded by Madruccio, brother to the Cardinal of Trent. With these went 4,000 Italians, and 5,000 more Germans are ready near Augsburg to march into Italy. The Prior of Capua has been within the town, and is now attending to the fortification of Port Ercole. The Marquis of Marignano has devised about the beginning of this month to waste the country, in order, by destroying the crops, to deprive them of aid of victual. Although the Pope has ordered that no provisions shall pass through his dominions for either side, yet Bishop Tornabuoni, to whom the execution of such command is committed, being a Florentine, it is thought he will rather enforce it against the French than his own countrymen. The Pope has sent for the Duke of Urbino, Captain-General of the Church, to levy foot and horse for the protection of his states, in consequence of the proximity of the war thereto. Should the Turk's army come out this year, it will probaby not pass the Levant, their preparations being so slow. Arcanio de Cornea, the Pope's nephew, recently captured by the Siennese, has attempted to escape in the apparel of a man of that country; but being discovered by a confederate he is sent to Port Ercole in order to be conveyed to France. 4,000 Grisons and 2,000 Swiss, levied by the French King for relief of Sienna, are on their march thither: they are sought to be impeded by the 5,000 Germans previously mentioned, and others. "The French King, being half in a mistrust of the help of the coming of the great devil to his aid, hath bargained with a less devil for the navy of Argel [Algiers], amounting to the number of 20 vessels, whereof eight are gallies, and 12 foists and brigantines." The French army being now in Champagne, nothing as yet of the number reported attends the coming of the 6,000 Swiss who are ready to march to that service; and the Emperor being apprised of this by Martin Van Rosse, who lies in Luxemburg, has ordered 12,000 Germans to the frontiers of Liege and Luxemburg, 6,000 of whom are already in Triers or thereabouts. The Emperor is in very good estate of body, and is able to walk two or three hours daily. He has retired himself into a little house within a park, where he is not much seen of others than the Queen, the Council, and such as be privy about him, and where he dispatches such business as does not admit of delay. All other matters he defers till the coming of his son, which makes many suitors pray to God for his short arrival into England. [Four pages.]
June 5.
Santiago.
216. The Earl of Bedford and Viscount Fitzwalter to the Council. Inclose letter brought to them from the Prince of Spain by the Marquis de Sarria, who arrived at Betanzos, where they then were, on 20th May, having been detained on the road by a fall from his horse, whereby he hurt his leg. He feasted and banqueted them at his house near there; is a man of large property in Gallicia, and is to accompany the Prince to England, whence he will proceed to Rome in embassage from the Emperor. They arrived here on 30th May, and intend to reside till the Prince's coming, about the 15th. Mention the route to be taken by the Prince, and send schedule of names of those who are to accompany him (not with the letter).
P.S.—The Prince is wont to be very sick at sea; in case he should be desirous to land at the nearest point, suggest that preparations for his reception may be made at Plymouth and along the neighbouring coast, although they will do their best to bring him to Southampton, where all is ready for him. [Two pages. Printed by Tytler, Vol. ii., p. 408.] Incloses,
216. I. Credentials of Marquis de Sarria, Valladolid, 30th April. [Spanish. Half a page.]
June 11.
Brussels.
217. Sir John Masone to the Council. Thanks them for their letter, it being to him right great "newelty" to hear any thing from his country, especially from their Lordships; yet even in this his fortune has been so ill that the same, as he perceives, having been written on the 25th May, it remained so long after unsent that its keeper was fain to alter the date to make it seem fresh. Is glad to hear of the honourable entertainment of their Ambassadors in Spain; prays God send shortly a good wind whereby both they and their master may be blown safely into the realm. Will do what may conveniently be done in the matter of Mr. Clement. The English merchants at Antwerp are very much dismayed on understanding that it had been reported to the Council that some of them have lewdly demeaned their tongues in matters touching the state of the realm; they have made fruitless inquiries to discover the offenders, and humbly desire to be informed of such names as may have been mentioned to their Lordships. Must needs say that this last winter there were undoubtedly some of them that used great liberty of speech in matters above their reach, which then he signified to the Council; but since his last coming he has not heard of any such, although from time to time he has diligently inquired thereof. With respect to Hawes, who has obtained a letter from the Council to the merchants in his behalf, they have declared unto him the case, whereby it does both appear the matter to be very ill, and the man in the cloking thereof to have openly and wilfully perjured himself. This, at their request, he communicates to their Lordships, with their humble petition that their decree for the penalty of his misdoing, whereof more than the one half is diminished at his own suit, may take place: for so long as all men shall hope to have their punishment released by favourable letters of the Council, so long will they not care what good and wholesome orders they shall break. [One page.]
June 11.
Brussels.
218. Same to Queen Mary. The Turk will condescend neither to a peace nor a truce with the King of the Romans, unless Queen Isabella and her son be admitted to the whole proportion of Transylvania, for restoring of whom by force, if by treaty the same cannot take place, he has taken order with such as are left to govern under him during his absence. Many wise men think, if these news be correct, that King Ferdinand were better upon an assured peace quite to give up Transylvania, than by endeavouring to keep it, of which the Turk has already a good part, put the rest of Hungary in hazard. That such is not his view appears by his having sent to levy 4,000 horse in Bohemia, and a number more in Hungary; the success being very doubtful, considering his own poverty and lack of friends, and that his brother's hands are already full. Enters at great length upon the many evils likely to befall Christendom in consequence of this, and impresses strongly upon her Majesty the propriety of her exerting herself to attempt the mediation of a peace both for the general interests of Europe and her own realm. If even for three or four years she may enjoy the commodity of such a peace, that peace which she has begun between the realm and God might in that time be brought to a full perfection. "The new and tender branch newly grafted, being subject yet to shaking and every little wagging of the wind, should be so fastened and grown into the whole tree as no danger of any blast were afterwards to be feared. The people which be yet diversely drawn, some by opinions and some by other means, may in that time grow to one conformity; and your empty coffers shall have something in them, to be able to strive with such storms as by any malicious enemy might fall unto the realm." Even though such effort should be unsuccessful, God shall the rather preserve her Majesty, "even like, as willing the Apostles entering into any house to say 'peace be here,' he promiseth, in case peace would not there take place, yet at the least reverteretur ad illos." The Emperor daily increases his army; his Germans and Frieslanders, consisting of 15,000 foot and 3,000 horse, are stationed on the frontiers of Triers and Liege, in such readiness that they may be here, if necessary, in six or seven days. He has also ten ensigns of Germans in Germany, in such sort that they could be here in twelve days or a fortnight. He has moreover furnished Thionville with 5,000 Germans, and all these frontiers are garrisoned; of Burgundians and others of the Low Countries, he has 3,000, and of Spaniards 2,500; so that when he pleases he may set on the field five or six and twenty thousand. He has ordered the Imperial ban to be put in execution against Marquis Albert; the effect of which is that his body, lands, and goods, are at the pleasure of any that will or can lay hands upon them. The Diet proceeds, notwithstanding the Princes' requests to the contrary, but none of the estates have yet resorted to it saving three or four bishops and the agent of the Duke of Cleves. To allure these Princes and estates nevertheless to repair there more willingly, the Emperor has authorized them to proceed and determine as freely and fully in all things as if he were present. The 400,000 crowns granted to the Emperor for Brabant, and the like amount for Flanders, are to be levied upon merchandise: in this Antwerp and Brussels have much and long sticked, with request that the same should be levied by acre upon the ground, alleging the hindrance of traffic that may ensue, seeing the whole wealth of the country depends upon trade. The inclosed abstracts of certain letters from the French Ambassador in Switzerland will show what bruits the French King sows in Germany to the disadvantage of the Emperor. No tidings of the coming of the Turk's army by sea; but the French King has bargained with Sala Reis, Governor of Algiers, for his navy, which is said to have already arrived at Marseilles. The Duke of Savoy is appointed to be general of the army in these parts; it was thought to have been assigned to John Baptista Castaldo. Castaldo has sent her Majesty a fair present, the parcels whereof are a cushion of purple satin perfumed and richly wrought, a pair of beads, made of perfumed matter and garnished with gold, and a great many boxes of sweet soap. These being consigned to Masone, he has sent them to Antwerp to be conveyed by sea to Lord Paget, whom Castaldo has required to present them to her Majesty. When on the point of closing his letter, is informed that the King of the Romans has dismissed out of Hungary 7,000 Spaniards to serve the Emperor in Italy and elsewhere he may appoint; this, if true, gives better promise of peace between him and the Turk than seemed probable when he commenced writing. The matters of Sienna hang yet in balance. Last Friday, the Ambassadors of the Kings of Bohemia and the Romans left for England, intending to remain at Dunkirk or Gravelines until they hear of the Prince's landing or approaching the realm; but in the mean season they will pass their horses and the most part of their train. To-morrow departs towards her Majesty, Regente Figueroa, one of the Emperor's Privy Council. He is of a noble house, and a right wise and grave counsellor, whose errand is to attend for a time upon the Prince and advise him in such things as may tend to the demeaning of him and his to the contentation of the realm, and after a month or somewhat more to go to Spain. The Emperor is in right good plight, and was not more lusty these four years than he is at this present. [Four pages and a half.] Incloses,
218. I. Extracts of letters of 6th and 12th April from the French Ambassador in Switzerland, as to the Prince's voyage to England, Cardinal Pole's unsuccessful treating of peace in France, the Emperor's desire to coerce Germany, the movements of French troops, and reported death of the Duke of Prussia. [Latin. One page and a half.]
June 11.
Brussels.
219. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre. Castaldo had sent to him a fair present and relative letter for her Majesty, desiring the same should be presented to her by Lord Paget. Understanding that his Lordship has departed towards Hampton [Southampton], has forwarded them by Antwerp to the care of Petre, whom he requests to see them delivered to the Queen, and be the mean to her that the party may understand by three or four words that they came safe to her hands. Three or four of the merchants of Antwerp have been to him to purge themselves of the charges made against them; they suspect these have been falsely imputed to them by some such as, having forfeited certain sums of money for violent breaking of their honest orders here, think to shift off the payment by the discrediting of them at home. The case of Hawes is a bad one; leaves it in the hands of Petre, who has ever been wont to be a man of orders, and whom he has often heard find fault with these kinds of shifting by letters from the Council. The impropriety of such. Has written a babbling letter to her Majesty touching his wishes of a peace, induced by D'Arras having informed him that the French King had said to Wotton that he would sooner hearken to a mediation at her hands, than at those of any other prince this day living. [Three pages.]
June 12.220. Memorial by Queen Mary to Thomas Gresham, Esquire, her Majesty's agent in Flanders, for the purposes ensuing. After narrating the respective sums to be borrowed and the lenders thereof, he is desired,—
1. To embark from Dartmouth or Plymouth for Spain, taking with him this memorial and the Emperor's licence.
2. Before departing to commune with such merchants in London, English or foreign, as traffic with Spain, with a view to getting them to deliver here to the Queen's use the sums they shall have occasion to employ in Spain, which he shall there repay them out of the money to be received to her Majesty's use; provided always no loss of exchange or interest ensue.
3. If the Prince of Spain be not departed thence before the first payment, he is to confer with the Earl of Bedford, Keeper of the Privy Seal, and according to his advice distribute amongst the best and safest ships of the fleet that are to accompany the Prince the treasure which he has received, so as not to adventure more than 5,000l. in one bottom.
4. In case the Prince be come from thence before the receipt of the money, he is to send over by way of exchange, to be repaid at sight to the Queen here, or at Antwerp, as much of the money as he can.
5. He is to have the rest of the money sent over in ships, so that no more than 8,000l. be adventured on one bottom.
6. He is to furnish 10,000l. and send it to Ireland.
7. His diets, hitherto 20s. a day, are to be increased by 10s. a day until his return out of Spain. [Seven pages.]
June 14.
Soissons.
221. Dr. Wotton to Sir William Petre. Although Petre takes it that great suit was made for audience to open very little matter; yet, as it was handled, matter enough might come of it. Nevertheless believes the person came for another purpose, and rather to see than to speak, for it was commonly noised here that her Majesty was departed. As the Prince will shortly be in England, desires to be informed how he shall use himself in his writings after the Prince's arrival. [One page.]
July 14.
Rheims.
222. Same to Queen Mary. The French Queen and divers of the Council are here, as also the different Ambassadors: being far from the King's camp it is late before they hear any news, and then only such as the Council pleases to publish. Since the King went to the camp, on its march towards the Meuse they sacked and burned Chimay, Beaumont, and Gienez, places without defence; but they were subsequently obliged to make a small fortification round the latter place for the surer conducting of their provisions down the Meuse. For some time they lacked bread and wine; especially bread, which was exceeding dear: wherefore all the bakers in this town and those of the borders have been ordered to the camp, except such as are absolutely necessary for the towns; also all the masons that can be found, as well as all the cart-horses, for conveying provisions and ammunition; which is a great displeasure to the husbandmen, who at this time have most need of them at home. On the surrender of Marienburg the Captain was not permitted to depart with the soldiers, but was brought prisoner to Paris, which is thought to imply his complicity with the French. The camp have since taken Bouvines in Namur: the defenders of this small and unimportant town resisted two assaults with great loss to the enemy, but on its being taken they were all either slain or hanged. The town and castle of Dinant, belonging to the Bishop of Luyke [Liege] have been taken: the former surrendered by composition, without loss of goods; the latter, wherein were some Spaniards, of whom Captain Julian who formerly served in England was one, made a gallant resistance, but by weight of superior artillery at last held parliament and yielded, the soldiers departing with their swords by their sides. The French were more glad to accept these compositions, as 12 ensigns have entered Namur, the next town on the Meuse, and about 10,000 or 12,000 men are encamped in the neighbourhood, whom the King intends to visit, to offer them fair play if they intend to make any sport. The Queen received these news on Friday morning about 2 o'clock, and attended by all the Court, went on foot from the Abbey of St. Remy, where she lodges, to Nôtre Dame, the chief church here, to hear mass, and return thanks to God for the good tidings. Thence also went some of the greatest ladies, as the Duchesses of Guise and Valentinois, on foot to divers other churches, for prayer and thanksgiving. It is reported that part of the army has returned to besiege Avesnes; but, if well manned and provisioned, it will likely stay them awhile. The King has with him in camp one of the house of De la Marck, to whom he has given the Abbey of Beaulieu and other promotions. It is said he was once chosen to be Bishop of Luyke, but the Emperor would not suffer him to enjoy it; but it is said the King will now put him in possession of the see, driving out George of Austria, the Emperor's uncle, who now is Bishop. It is said that the Prince de la Roche sur Yonne and M. de Villebon command 10,000 men, wherewith they intend to besiege Renti. Is credibly informed that Peter Carew is determined to leave France and go to Italy, relying upon her Majesty's mercy; but expects to be more certainly informed of this by Edward Randal, who will be here in a day or two. [Two pages. The portion relating to Carew in cipher, deciphered.]
July 14.
Rheims.
223. Dr. Wotton to Sir William Petre. Has not yet received her Majesty's pleasure concerning Throckmorton, who, he is informed, continues his suit still to be received to mercy, and is now driven to such extremity that he must needs serve in these wars, having no other means whereby to live. But he will not, he understands, serve with the rebels, and labours to be employed with the Gascons. Would be glad to learn what answer to make concerning him. Yesterday Cardinal Tournon told one of the Ambassadors that it is understood the Prince of Spain has returned from the sea-coast, because of the mortality among the soldiers that should come with him: wherefore it is thought he will not be in England so soon as expected. The siege of Sienna is said to be raised; save that the Florentines have left 5,000 men in the forts near the town, and that Pietro Strozzi is joined with the French aid of Italians and others who were at Mirandola, so that he now seems to be strong enough to resist the Duke of Florence. The latter is said, however, to expect great succour shortly from Milan and Naples. The French have embarked in their own navy a number of troops for Sienna; and they say that the navy of Algiers joins that of France to conduct it safely, but it is thought Prince Doria is ready to meet them by the way, as strong, or stronger than they are. [One page. The first portion, relating to Throckmorton, in cipher, deciphered.]
June 16.
Venice.
224. Peter Vannes to Queen Mary. Prays for her success. Since she has overcome her enemies she will be the more likely to bear more equably, even to hold in contempt the few words which he shall write. About a month ago a servant of his, one William Page, native of London, whom he employed at the recommendation of others, and of whose assistance he has availed himself both as a domestic and in writing English letters for the last two years and a half, but who is also a headstrong and obstinate youth, most atrociously beat, in Vannes' absence, a boy whom he had left at home. Upon his return had inquired both of the English and Italians the cause of this. These all agreed in saying that nothing had been either said or done by the boy which could by rights offend, and that a gentle admonition would have sufficed. Next day when his anger had somewhat subsided, Vannes privately inquired of his godson Peter Oviat [Wyat ?], an Englishman, (a youth of rather a simple character, servant of Wm. Patten, well-known in the Royal Household,) whether he had perceived any previous disagreement between Page and the boy. Oviat replied that he had frequently heard Page admonishing the other English servants to beware of what they said before the boy, as he was a spy of Vannes; and then tremblingly advised him to be careful of Page because he saw from his frequent disrespectful speeches that he was very ill-disposed towards his master. Had treated these remarks with contempt, having already discovered Page's evil mind from certain letters of his which had been intercepted by an enemy, but had pardoned him at his own petition, because he was English and in hopes of his reformation. Incloses a schedule (lost), containing in Oviat's own hand the atrocious remarks of Page, which he has kept a secret. Meanwhile, after observing as far as he could with whom Page was chiefly intimate, he applied to the chief magistrates, explaining the matter in general terms, and asking for the apprehension of the offender, with a view to his public examination. They postponed their reply for a more careful investigation, and at length answered that the matter was one of great moment, quietly refusing to grant the request. Cannot divine the cause of this, Page being unknown, and of no influence; but thinks the Seigniory chiefly desire that good and bad shall have equal liberty of living and impunity of wickedness in matters that do not touch the Republic itself. Will do all to compass his object, even if he have to proceed to Mantua, Ferrara, or the dominions of the Emperor for a time. If her Majesty desires to write to the Venetians let her send secret letters to him, so that he may execute her commands privily with the many English who daily flock hither. Meanwhile he intends to try if the Duke of Ferrara or of Mantua will grant what the Venetians have refused; but reminds her that those robbers who rage with hunger and madness should be rather rejected and despised. Advises her to command one of her councillors to summon Francis Donato, a Venetian merchant who, he thinks, has lately arrived in England, and ask him a friendly manner what he heard from any Englishman of words similar to those in the schedule, with whom of those in Vannes' suite he had words before he left Venice, his informant, and what were the words of the conversation. Of the author's name Vannes could elicit from his informant no more, as he feared perhaps to injure one who had spoken to him in confidence. [Latin. Three pages.]
June 16.
Venice.
225. Peter Vannes to Queen Mary. As he was at the point of packing his letters, being somewhat sick in bed, the Secretary of the new Duke of Venice, Signor Francisco Venerio, came to him. The Duke is a man of great virtue and estimation in the state, lusty, and of no decrepit age, knows well England, where he has resided as a merchant, and has always, as occasion served, exalted that country highly, praising especially Kings Henry the Seventh and Eighth, and her Majesty's self. He has sent to Vannes his letter to her Majesty declaring his election, with loving offers of service, which she will receive herewith. Prays her to command answer to be made to it with a loving letter much praising his virtuous qualities, for such kind of proceeding is here well and honourably taken; it is to be sent to Vannes to be delivered, and besides being read openly with much honour will serve sometime some good purpose. The letter to the Duke to be in Latin. His other letters give advertisement of the great preparations for the war in Tuscany. Will not fail to give attention to the business of Sir John Leigh which her Majesty recommends to him. [Two pages. Indorsed by Petre.]
June 20.
Brussels.
226. Sir John Masone to same. Had received the Council's letter of 8th ult., with that of her Majesty to the Emperor, touching a licence for bringing 3,000,000 crowns out of Spain. Although he perceives that her Grace at that time was not aware that a great piece of the matter was before dispatched by a safe conduct delivered to Mr. Gresham, wherewith he was departed into England, yet he repaired to the Emperor and delivered her letter. After some talk as to the discontent which might be bred in Spain by the bringing out of such great sums, and the difficulty he had found in the drawing of money thence for his own service, the Emperor said he would talk thereon with such as had to do with the finances of Spain, and should give him his answer in a day or two. Has not yet received such reply, but supposes, as immediately after leaving the Emperor a post had been dispatched into England, that her Majesty has been answered by the Ambassador there. Meantime he has received a passport for 600 barrels of powder, which he has sent to Gresham's factor at Antwerp. The Emperor's army will be in the field on the 24th, about Namur. If the French advance to Bapaume or Cambray, as the bruit is they will, then the army will move in that direction: if they do not, then it is said they shall be sought near home, and that Ardres shall be assailed. The army is in number about 34,000 or 35,000 foot, and 6,000 horse; in addition to which 10,000 foot and 4,000 or 5,000 horse are being prepared. The Captain-General is the Duke of Savoy; his assistants and councillors, John Baptista Castaldo and Signor Anthony Doria, two such personages as the like were hard to be found either in this Court or elsewhere. The Master of the Camp is M. de Benincourt, and when the whole army is assembled it will be one of the fairest these many years levied by the Emperor. God send money enough! Last Monday, the 9th, there was a great fire in Luxemburg, taking in four quarters of the town at one time, whereby the substance thereof is quite brent, with great part of the munition for defence. A large portion of the artillery is so parched that it is past service. The origin of the fire is unknown, but it is thought to have been by treason of the enemy, and Marquis Albert is not out of suspect of the compassing thereof, who having no safe dwelling in his own country, has lately retired to Metz. Regente Figueroa, who departed yesterday, is the bearer to her Majesty from hence of the story of the taking of Tunis, made in tapestry, which, as she will see, is one of the fairest pieces of work that has been made in these times. If the subjects of the Duke of Florence are true to their allegiance, though the contrary is to be feared, his success is likely to be good, as the Pope inclines indirectly to his favour. [Two pages.]
June 20.
Brussels.
227. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre. Acknowledges his letter of the 7th, received on the 11th. Sir Philip Hoby arrived here on the 14th, and still remains with him, waiting the Emperor's pleasure for the delivery of her Majesty's letter; in the mean season he passes his time amongst physicians and chirurgeons, communing with them touching the recovery of his health. Their advice is, that he shall first essay what success he shall find with the drinking of the water at Liege, and in case he find not there such help as he desires, then to repair to the bains of Pau, and to use the commodity of them in the month of September, as he mindeth to do, unless her Majesty commands him to make a shorter return, which he is most ready to do on her pleasure being known, health and all other respects set aside. Has written to Lord Paget to help him to one that has the French language, whom he may use as his secretary in his business with this Court. Hears one Peyto much commended; if he is disposed to go abroad, and not otherwise employed, would be glad of him. [One page.]
June 22.
Naples.
228. The Cardinal of Burgos [Pacheco de Ceralbo] to Queen Mary. Being unable to pay his respects in person to her Majesty, sends his nephew, Pedro Pacheco, to do so. [Spanish. One page.]
June 26.
Brussels.
229. Sir John Masone to same. On Tuesday the 19th, the Duke of Savoy, Castaldo, and Doria entered into Cambray by post, because the French were said to be not far off from that town, and because a practice had been discovered for delivery of it and its castle to the French King. The chief deviser of this practice was the engineer who had constructed that and other fortresses in those parts; he has been sent prisoner to Valenciennes. The hope of so obtaining these was probably the cause of the French King setting himself to the field at that time; but seeing the plot has come to light, he has retired with no great company, minding, nevertheless, to seek advantage at Avesnes, or some other piece where train or sudden force may take place. After the Duke and the others have seen to the safety of Cambray, and made full examination into the details of the treason, they will return to the army, which is not yet in the field, but so posted that they can be assembled in a few hours. Such is the poverty of the frontiers, especially for horse-meat, that it is impossible to keep the field but with such provision as must for the time be brought out of the under parts of the country. Wherefore the Emperor intends, after he has mustered the troops which are in readiness, to distribute them in different quarters, whence they may be easily called at short warning, until he perceives the full meaning of the enemy. The French King is not in such force that he can attempt any great enterprise; his Swiss, who are the great strength of his infantry, being not yet come to him, for lack of money, as is supposed. His horsemen have run up and down the country between St. Quentin and Cambray, as far as Cambresis; which quarter is so spoiled, as their overcoming it now neither has made nor could have made it much worse. Marquis Albert having provided himself with 200 horses out of Metz, and made shift for 300 more among his friends, entered lately with them into Sueinfort, an imperial town usurped by him three years past, and which for the last three or four months has been besieged by the Bishops and confederates. But finding all things desperate there, after setting the munition and such things as pleased him on fire, he left during night, with the 500 horse and 1,500 foot who have so long endured the siege, so secretly that it was not known till next morning that the town was abandoned On his way towards Thuringia he was encountered by the Duke of Brunswick, who defeated and slew the substance of his band; and he himself escaped by flight, with only seven or eight horses in his company. So often down and so often up again, thinks there was never none; but now there is nothing to fear at his hand, since the only poor castle belonging to him, Plassenberg, cannot longer hold out. Had his plans not been detected in the beginning of the year, the Emperor had at one time between him and the French King been assailed in Friesland, Utrecht, Guelderland, Luxemburg, and Thionville. Another treason has very lately been brought to light: there had been a plan to set the munition in the Castle of Naples on fire, when, the soldiers being engaged in its suppression, the castle should have been surprised by men ready for that purpose. This much increases the suspicion that the fire in Luxemburg had been devised by the French, who build a good piece of the foundation of their successes on such practices. No certain news from Hungary of truce or peace. The Emperor has offered Africa, which three years ago he won from the Moors, to the Knights of the Order, with 20,000 crowns a year towards keeping it; but the Religion, after consultation, have humbly declined it, on the ground that they are far unable to maintain a piece of such charges as that requires. This refusal is ascribed to the French King's persuasion of the Grand Master of the Order, being desirous to see the Emperor's charges augmented rather than diminished. It is now believed for certain that the Turk's navy comes forward to the number of between 50 and 60 sail, to be joined by Sala Reis, with 30 vessels and 20 gallies of the French King. This will much hinder the affairs of Florence and Corsica. The Emperor is now in so good case that he is able to arm himself, and is on horseback in his park sometimes three hours together. In consequence of the Duke of Savoy being sent to the field sooner than he expected, is obliged to send an Ambassador to her Majesty, instead of visiting her personally, as he would gladly have done. [Two pages and a half.]
June 26.
Brussels.
230. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre. Is written to from a sort of poor men serving in England painfully for the conveyance of letters, to help them to some money. The passengers with letters between Dover and Calais having long time been unpaid, let not also to put him in remembrance of such money as is due to them. Beseeches Petre, as the time will serve, to put his aiding hand to the helping of so poor a company; and for the passengers, thinks it well if they might be paid out of the treasury of Calais. The Emperor and Court here hang in the same expectations that he is sure they do in England, and a great piece of their passengers is to inquire one of the other which way the wind doth blow. If the French were so puissant as they have bragged they would have been by this time, the occasion of the Prince's long tarrying might have served them to some purpose. Here are plenty of troops to beard the enemy without hazard; but money lacks, which detains John of Nassau with his bands in Germany, as also those of the Truchses, cousins to the Cardinal of Augsburg, and the forces of the Duke of Brunswick. The help of this matter is looked for out of the navy of Spain, besides the number of soldiers, whereof is here made a great account. God hold them at the least one year in peace, being so unmeet for the wars as Vœ illis! whensoever they enter thereunto. [One page.]


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