Mary
May 1555

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Institute of Historical Research

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William B. Turnbull (editor)

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1861

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165-173

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'Mary: May 1555', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Mary: 1553-1558 (1861), pp. 165-173. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70419 Date accessed: 23 September 2014.


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May 1555

[Before May.]351. Christiana, Duchess of Lorraine, to Queen Mary. Recommends to her Majesty the captain of the vessel in which she had been conveyed and wishes her a fine boy. [French. Holograph. Two pages.]
May 1.
Reggio.
352. The Citizens of Reggio to same. Their unfortunate city has been of late years so destroyed by the Turks, who have burnt their houses, churches, and monasteries, and have reduced to misery its inhabitants, that they send Camillo Dediano, Doctor of Laws, and Bernardo Mosolino, Ambassadors to his Catholic Majesty, for assistance, and beseech her Majesty favourably to intercede for them. [Italian. One page.]
May 3.
Brussels.
353. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre. Sends the articles of accord between the Emperor and the Siennese. The Duke of Savoy has departed in post towards Italy, with one attendant and his guide. The rest of his train, 12 in number, follow to-day, expecting to overtake him at Augsburg. He has promised to be here again on the 20th. Yesterday arrived the news of her Majesty being delivered of a Prince. Doubts as to the certainty of this. [One page and a half. Printed by Tytler, Vol. ii., p. 469, where he misreads Genoeses and Genes instead of Seneses and Senes.] Incloses,
353. I. "Articles of accord between the Emperor and the Seneses." [One page and a half.]
May 4.
Antwerp.
354. Thomas Gresham to the Council. On the 2d inst. news came along the seas by men of this country that the Queen was brought to bed of a young Prince on 30th April; on the 3d, the Regent, being at Antwerp, about seven o'clock p.m. caused the great bell to ring to give all men to understand that the news was true. On the first arrival of the news the English merchants caused all the English ships to make themselves in a readiness to show some worthy triumph upon the water. And when the great bell had been rung, they caused them to shoot off with such joy and triumph as by man's heart and policy could be devised, in the presence of the Regent and all her nobles and gentlewomen. The Regent presently sent the English mariners 100 crowns to drink. Trusts in God the news is true, for no one of the English has any certain writing of it. The Governor has called a general assembly of the merchants, where it has been concluded that they will allow the Queen 21 s. for every 1l. of the 18,000l. which was to be paid on the 15th May, and to pay it on the 15th June next, for the receipt of which he must give his acquittance and will send home those bonds and all others together. [One page. Indorsed by Petre. Mostly printed by Burgon, Vol. i., p. 168.]
May 6.
Guisnes.
355. Lord Grey to the Council. Has this day been credibly informed that the Constable of France, with 400 men of arms and eight or ten thousand foot, will be at Ardres within six or seven days, and that he left Fontainebleau on the 30th ult. The rumour of peace is so certain among the French that they hold it to be already concluded. [One page and a half. Indorsed by Petre.]
May 7.
Guisnes.
356. Lord Grey to same. Hears from some persons out of France that if peace is concluded the Cardinal of Lorraine is appointed to go through England into Scotland, to conclude with the nobles there upon the marriage of the young Queen of Scots with the Dauphin, and to establish all French officers there, of whom part have already gone there. Also that the town of Berwick is like to be attempted upon the discharge of the soldiers there. His informant there says that too many Scots are suffered to pass through England. The bearer, Mr. Clybberie, who has been a long time in France and has frequently furnished information, has now brought him some intelligence, of which, considering Clybberie can make more ample relation, he has sent him to their Lordships. [One page. Indorsed by Petre.] Incloses,
356. I. Note of the information above mentioned, with the addition that on the 3d of April six ensigns of Germans and three ensigns of French were going to Scotland, and that all the ports and havens in that north part are known to the French. [One page.]
May 8.
Brussels.
357. Mary. Duchess of Alva, to Queen Mary. Recommending the bearer Thomas Denis. [Spanish. One page. Indorsed by Petre.]
May 11.
Brussels.
358. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre. On receipt of her Majesty's letter of the 6th had audience of the Emperor; what then occurred will be seen in his letter to her Majesty. The Emperor had been apprized of the matter previously, but took the communication in very good part. The disposition of both Princes is good towards a peace, but the points between them shall with difficulty be handled. On this side of the mountains things might be easily compounded, but the French King has such a footing in Italy that he sees not how they can be brought to frame without the immediate help of God. The death of the Pope will not further the matter, since if Ferrara can leap into his place, as he is like to make a great shift for it, they shall see much business will follow. The giving up of Milan would help all, though the Emperor did bestow it on some one of whom he might make as assured account as of himself; but that will not be heard of. Thanks him for his gentle procuring of a letter to the Lord Treasurer; prays God some fruit may come thereof; the like thanks for the cramprings. The mediators appointed on the Queen's behalf are very well liked. [One page.]
May 19.
Brussels.
359. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre. The Emperor's mother being departed, it were well to consider whether (as such is used in like cases between Princes in amity), a message of condolence on part of the Queen should be conveyed by special messenger or by letters of credit. Trusts some occasion will shortly come for sending some man to signify more pleasant matter, who may do both errands at once if it so be thought requisite. Duke Augustus has required investiture of his estate at the Emperor's hands. The King of the Romans has prayed the Emperor to refer the executing of the ceremony to him as Vicar of the Empire, whereby the Duke may be driven to resort to Augsburg, where the King has so long remained without any fruit of his travail by reason of the absence of the Princes of Germany. He has also besought the Emperor, in event of either peace or a truce, (which he wishes most heartily), that they may have an interview; for which purpose he will come here, unless the Emperor in going to Spain should travel by Germany and Italy, in which case he will attend him by the way. It is the general opinion that if any agreement of peace ensues, the Emperor and both Queens will go to Spain and the Duke of Savoy remain here as Governor. Much marvel that there are no news from Rome; fear that Ferrara, qui demonium habet, will carry the matter away, in which case the wars are not yet ended. The Earl of Bedford has departed for Italy, having been very well entertained by the Emperor, from whom he has received both gentle words and right good advice; besides his other great bonds to her Majesty, he counts this occasion to the Emperor not to be the least. The Earl of Devon arrived on Thursday, and will be sent for to the Emperor either to-day or to-morrow; he seems to have a great desire to demean himself in all things to the Queen's contentation. Shall not fail to give him advice occasionally, in terms of the letter from the Council which his Lordship brought with him. [One page and a half.]
May 21.
Brussels.
360. Same to same. Last Sunday the Earl of Devon was conducted to the Emperor by the Duke of Alva. Masone was not present, but by report of the Duke and Chamberlain, whom the Earl has requested to be his interpreter if necessary, he demeaned himself very well; declaring among other things how much he was indebted to King Philip for helping him through the Queen's favour out of custody, and also for procuring him leave to see the world, whereby he might attain to such knowledge as displeasant fortune had caused him hitherto to lack: for which reason he had come to offer his services to the Emperor, the renown of whose Court was so great. His Majesty embraced his offer most willingly, minding from time to time to show him such signs of his favour as the Earl should have no cause to for think his journey hither. To this he said he was moved not merely by the King's and Queen's recom mendation, but for the sake of the Earl's father, whose noble virtues were not unknown to him, and of whose ill fortune a great piece be thought was for the good will he bare to his welldoings. The Earl should be informed of the service devised for him, and in the mean time his Majesty desired that he should take all pleasure which the Court could show him. His Lordship has now gone to Antwerp to deliver his letters to the Queen of Hungary; he has 15 or 16 men very well in order. Yesterday the Duke of Alva departed in post for Italy. The Queen has removed some Governors in Antwerp, of whom the people complained for their corrupt administration of justice, and has in effect changed the whole Scabins [Echevins] "which be in the like state of our Aldermen of London" to the great content of the city. In their places she has chosen both learned, upright, and substantial men, of whom one is Melchior Schetz. The Emperor has ready about Namur, 12,000 foot and 3,000 horse; he has also ordered to repair thither 5,000 pioneers, " not tag and rag, but of the stoutest and likeliest men," to labour there and in the countries of Luxemburg and Namur. He has also caused a number of boats to be conveyed thither, both for bridges and other service. The meaning of this preparation is a secret, but it is thought for an attempt on Marienburg, Mezieres, or some other French fort; wherein if they fail, then to encamp in the vicinity of the former city and there construct a fort like that at Hesdin, whereby Brabant and this town, which lie open to the French, may sleep afterward with better quiet. The widow of the late Vaivode begins to stir on the confines of Hungary on behalf of her son, being spurred on by the Turkish, French, and Moldavian Ambassadors there. Many soldiers are levied about Bremen, bruited to hang upon Marquis Albert; and it is suspected that the Elector Joachim will make some stir for restoring him to his estates. No news of late from Italy, but rumours continue of the likelihood of Ferrara's attaining to the governing of the Church by professed bribery. Peter Gonner having in his hands 8,000 Collen cleves, which he says he provided by order from England at very reasonable prices, laments much that for lack of money they have lain so long on his hands, much, as he alleges, to his hindrance. [Three pages.]
May 23.
Copenhagen.
361. Christian III., King of Denmark, to King Philip. Acknowledges his letter of the 18th of April in reference to the restitution of some cloths belonging to Thomas Bannister, which were seized two years ago for evasion of the custom duties. However agreeable it would be to him to gratify his Majesty, it is impossible, for the various reasons set forth, to do so in the present instance. The matter has been judicially settled by the proper official, and although there might be no intention on the part of his Majesty's subject to defraud the revenue, it is absolutely necessary to act rigorously in consequence of the numerous frauds which are constantly being perpetrated. [Latin. Broadside.]
May 23.
Brussels.
362. Sir John Masone to Sir William Petre and Sir John Bourne. Last night the Earl of Devon sent him the inclosed letters to be forwarded, in which he thinks his Lordship gives the King and Queen an account of the gentle entertainment which he has received from the Emperor. The Marquis of Marignano has gone with his army to the enterprise of Porto Ercole, and Andrea Doria has gone by sea to the same exploit with 48 gallies; to these will be joined the gallies of Naples and Sicily now on their way, which will make the number of the fleet at least 60; with these the French will be unable to match. The Cardinals entered into conclave on the 15th inst.; the names mentioned as having a chance of being elected Pope are the Cardinal of England, Cardinal di Fano, Cardinal Morone, and the Cardinal of Naples, named Chietino [Chieti]. The talk of Ferrara is not so hot as it is of the others. [One page.]
May 24.
Rome.
363. The Count of Montorio to Queen Mary. Takes advantage of the opportunity afforded to him by the elevation to the pontificate of his uncle the Cardinal of Naples, now Pope Paul IV., to offer his services to her Majesty. [Italian. One page.]
May 25.
Brussels.
364. Sir John Masone to the Council. In consequence of the reports of the great naval preparations of the King of Denmark, the Emperor sent recently to Antwerp for some of the Easterlings, who have their house there resembling the Steelyard at London. After communication had it was concluded that their Secretary, whom they call here their Consul, should with all speed resort to the East cities to ascertain the facts and to know whether, in case of any ill-meaning, they had any intelligence with the King. He has accordingly gone; in the meanwhile it causes many divers talks, some tending to these countries others to England. The Emperor for all events has stayed here the Spanish fleet, and minds to take steps for the staying of all ships that may arrive in any of these ports to be employed as need shall require. " I would wish that our navy were looked upon in such sort, as the world might at the least see we mind not to suffer it to decay; for, if any mischief be intended, let us be sure our ports shall either first or last be therein." The King of Denmark has so divided his realm as that every tenth man fit for the wars is appointed to serve, at the cost of the remaining nine. The French soldiers in Corsica have mutinied for lack of payment, whereby Calvi, before which they lay, stands on better terms; if that place were obtained, as now it is trusted they shall not, the whole island were gone. The Duke of Alva has left for Italy, having commission to spend on the way a couple of days with the King of Romans to confer with him, among other matters of importance, about his wife's dowry and his partage, which hangs in some question. He is also instructed to end the matters between the Colonnas, father and son. Notwithstanding the quiet demeanour of the Emperor's soldiers in occupying Sienna, above four or five hundred of the inhabitants have availed themselves of the liberty granted by the capitulations, and have removed with their houses to Montalcino, in spite of the persuasion of Count de Santa Fiore to the contrary. "Such matter breedeth a sect and a faction when it once resteth in a man." During the week before the town surrendered above 1,000 of all classes died from hunger. Strozzi brags that he will ordain a form of new Sienna at Montalcino, with magistrates and all as before when Sienna was at liberty; but if the Marquis of Marignano succeeds at Porto Ercole, that device will quickly quail. The Emperor's army is encamped seven leagues beyond Namur; the spot where he is building the new fort had been viewed and measured by the French for the same purpose, three days before the arrival of the army. The Cardinals entered into conclave on the 15th. Ferrara makes shift by all means, lawful and unlawful, to carry the bell away; but others, doubting the inconvenience of such election, and detesting the open bribery of his agents, do their best to let him; and, what is best, Farnese, who was thought on his side, makes a party against him. It is thought when he sees no chance of success he will give his influence to Fano. " The wagers in the banks run upon England, Morone, Fano, and Naples, otherwise called Chietino [Chieti], and least is laid on Ferrara his side though he thrust never so fast at it." The Duke of Urbino has the charge of the city, and Ascanio della Cornia of Bologna, during this interregnum. If advices from Constantinople are correct, the Turk's navy comes towards those seas in greater force, though not so soon as was feared; besides the Captain-General there come with it four Sangiacchi, of Santa Maura (Dragut Rey), Metelin, Negropont, and Isnich. The Turk himself is still in Amasia, waiting for the Sophy's Ambassador, who was appointed to be with him in March. [Three pages.]
May 29.
Brussels.
365. Sir John Masone to the Council. The Queen having settled all matters at Antwerp, has returned here, and the soldiers have been sent to the camp. On the 25th inst. Martin Van Ross [en] set the first shovel into the ground for the beginni g of the new fort which is devised between Givet and Verey on the Meuse. It is promised to be tenable in three weeks, there being employed upon it 6,000 pioneers, besides such as for two patarts extra pay choose to put their hands to it. In the banks at Rome are laid on the head of the Cardinal of Naples twenty for the hundred, upon Ferrara sixteen, on Pole, Fano, and Morone twelve. " If our Cardinal were present at Rome he were by the common opinion like to be made Pope." The Algerine gallies, in number 20, have arrived in the Tuscan sea to aid the French, and it is reported, though not thoroughly believed, that the Turk's fleet to the amount of 80 are afloat to make thitherward. Strozzi, leaving Cornelio Bentivoglio in Montalcino, has gone to Porto Ercole, in hope of the arriving of the Turk's fleet. Matters in Piedmont stand at a stay. The French still lie at the siege of Vulpiano. The Duke of Savoy arrived in Milan on the 13th, contrary to a rumour that he had been taken in Germany by the way. The Bishop of Ely and the other Commissioners are still in Bologna, their expenses being defrayed by the Consistory of Rome, like as when in Milan they were by order of the Senate. Sir John Cutts died suddenly at Venice about the 8th or 9th inst. "One Woodman is at this present in this town, with three or four servants in blue coats at his tail, whom (for that being an Englishman he strangeth himself from my house) I had for a time in suspect, but upon inquiry made of him, I have learned that he is received to serve the Emperor upon the sea, which I knew not before. How he useth himself in that charge, well or ill, your Lordships cannot be but well advertised."
P.S.—A post just come from Italy mentions the arrival of the Duke of Alva at Augsburg on the 25th, and that of the Duke of Savoy at Vercelli on the 15th. [Three pages.]
May 30.366. "Instructions given by the King and Queen's Majesties to Sir Edward Carne, their Ambassador to the Pope's Holiness." On receipt of her Majesty's letters he is to notify the same to Cardinals Morone and Sequenza, and follow their advice in delivering them to his Holiness. Should his Holiness seem to mislike that the letter is written in the King and Queen's name jointly, he is to be informed, that by a common order taken in England, whatever passes under the Queen's name, during the King's absence from the realm, his still goes jointly therein; and if he be within the realm his hand and subscription is also to every such writing. He is to inform Cardinal Caraffa of the receipt of the letters, of their Majesties' desire for the maintenance of the true religion, and of their trust that he will be a furtherer and helper therein. He is to thank in their names Cardinals Morone and Sequenza, for their good will and communications by the Ambassador Resident. To enable him to converse on the subject of their contents, copies of these letters and of another writing by the Bishops are sent to him, and which he shall use, according as to the Cardinal Morone and his own wisdom shall seem convenient. Should his Holiness or Cardinal Caraffa mislike that no special messenger was sent with these letters, they are to be informed that their Majesties, thinking the matter to be of weight and importance, considered all diligent speed should be used therein, which in these great heats could not have been done by any man of reputation meet for such message without danger and peril of his life. In conference with his Holiness he is to use their Majesties' names either jointly or separately as he shall deem most expedient for promoting the matter; and should the Pope seem inclined to condescend to the contents of the letters, he is to be suitor for a reply; otherwise not to ask or appear to desire such. The letters from his Majesty to Cardinals Morone, Sequenza, Carpi, and Compostellano, he is to deliver personally, and inform them that they may make such use of these letters in discoursing with his Holiness as they shall see fit. As Cardinal Pole has apprized Cardinal Caraffa of the full commission given to the English Ambassador to treat with the Pope for peace and quiet, the Ambassador is to be guided by the Cardinals before named as to his answers to Cardinal Caraffa. To declare the cause why he opens no such matter to his Holiness, if it shall be agreed that the same may be better done by the Cardinals aforesaid. [Draft. Autograph of Petre. Five pages.]
Copy of the preceding. [Four pages.]
[End of May.]
Hampton Court.
367. Queen Mary to Pope Paul IV. Informing his Holiness of her safe confinement of a Prince and requesting his prayers and thanksgivings. [Latin. Broadside. Signed by her Majesty; autograph of, and countersigned by, Roger Ascham.]
Copy, in modern hand, of the form of style of the preceding. [Quarter of a page.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
368. Same to Henry II., King of France. Informing him of the birth of a child. (One of the forms prepared in anticipation of her Majesty's being confined.) Blanks left for the name of the bearer [intended to be the Viscount Fitzwalter as appears by the subsequent form] and the sex of the infant. [French. Broadside. Signed by her Majesty.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
369. Same to same. Having dispatched the bearer Richard Shelley, one of the gentlemen of her household and esquire carvers to notify her accouchement to the King and Queen of Portugal, and the Princess of Portugal, Regent of Spain, she has commanded him to pay his respects to his Majesty by the way, and requests a safe conduct for him. [French. Broadside. Form as preceding.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
370. Same to the Emperor Charles V. Announcing her safe confinement. The sex of the child and date left blank. [French. Broadside. Signed by her Majesty.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
371. Same to the King of Hungary and the Romans. Similar announcement, with the like blanks. [French. Broadside. Signed by her Majesty.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
372. Same to the King of Bohemia. Similar announcement, with the like blanks. [French. Broadside. Signed by her Majesty.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
373. Same to the Queen of Bohemia. Similar announcement, with the like blanks. [Spanish. One page. Signed by her Majesty.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
374. Same to the Queen Regent of Flanders. Announcing her Majesty's safe confinement. [French. Broadside. Signed by her Majesty.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
375. Same to Catharine, Queen of Portugal. Announcing her confinement. [Spanish. Half a page. Signed by her Majesty.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
376. Same to the Queen Dowager of France. Informing her of the birth of a child. [French. Broadside. Form as preceding.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
377. Same to Francisco Venieri, Doge of Venice. Announcing the birth of a Prince. [Latin. Broadside. Signed by her Majesty, and countersigned by Roger Ascham.]
[Eo. temp.]
Hampton Court.
378. Passport for Richard Shelley, Esquire, sent by King Philip and Queen Mary to the King of Portugal and the Princess of Portugal, Regent in Spain, to announce to them her Majesty's confinement. [Broadside on vellum. Signed by their Majesties.]
[End of May.]
Hampton Court.
379. The Council to Dr. Wotton. Desire him to procure from the French King a safe conduct for Richard Shelley, Esquire, sent to carry the news of her Majesty's happy delivery to the Princess of Portugal, Regent of Spain, and to the King and Queen of Portugal. [Signed by Stephen [Gardiner] Bishop of Winchester and Chancellor, the Marquis of Winchester, the Earl of Arundel, Lord Howard of Effingham, Sir John Gage, Sir Robert Rochester, Sir William Petre, and Sir Edward Waldegrave. One page.]
[End of May.]
Hampton Court.
380. Passport for Lord Howard of Effingham, High Admiral of England, sent as Ambassador to the Emperor Charles V. to announce Queen Mary's safe delivery. Sex of the infant and date left blank. [Broadside on vellum. Signed by King Philip and Queen Mary.]
May?
[Frankfort.]
381. "Responsum Commissariorum Cesariorum ad literas Regis Galliæ." [Latin. Six pages.]


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