America and West Indies
May 1695, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. W. Fortescue (editor)

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1903

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466-482

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'America and West Indies: May 1695, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 14: 1693-1696 (1903), pp. 466-482. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70815 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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Contents

May 1695

May 1.Bills to appoint Rangers and to ascertain the tare of hogsheads read a first time and ordered a second reading. Bills to empower justices to sign commissions of probate, and for enlarging the bounds of Princess Anne County read a third time and sent to Council. Six propositions as to revision of the laws approved and a message ordered to be drafted to send them to the Council. The Committee of Public Claims presented its report.
May 2.Bill to ascertain the size of tobacco hogsheads read a second time and ordered for third reading. Report of Committee of Grievances further considered, and two bills ordered to be prepared. Message to the Council as to the revision of the laws read and approved. Bill to appoint rangers read a second time. Message from the Council requesting a conference as to the question of giving assistance to New York. Mr. Catlet obtained leave to go home, since his family was exposed to danger from a party of skulking Indians.
May 3.Two letters from officers on the rivers, reporting mischief by Indians, were received from the Governor. Agreed to join in a conference with the Council as to the question of assistance for New York. The question of land-patents referred to the Committee of Grievances for report. Bill to ascertain the size of tobacco hogsheads read a third time and sent to the Council. Bill empowering James City County Court to make bye-laws to prevent hogs running at large in the city, was read a first time. Eight members appointed to meet four of the Council in conference over the question of assistance to New York. On the report of the Committee of Grievances as to land-patents, it was resolved that the present form of their patents was good and valid in law. Bill appointing rangers read a third time and passed.
May 4.Two new bills brought up and appointed for first reading on the 6th. A new member appointed for the conference with the Council in place of one absent. Order for the conference to meet again on the 7th. Bill as to hogs in James City read a second time. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1237–1252.]
April 30.1,791. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Address of the Burgesses in reply to the Governor's speech was received and recommended by His Excellency to the consideration of the Council.
May 1.A verbal message as to the revision of the laws was received from the Burgesses, and a request sent down that a matter of so much importance might be put in writing. Acts for enlarging the bounds of Princess Anne County, and to empower justices to sign commissions of probate, received from the Burgesses.
May 2.on the address of the Burgesses, the Council agreed that their reasons for sending no assistance to New York were unsatisfactory and that a conference should be desired. Message to the Burgesses accordingly. Message from the Burgesses as to revision of the laws received.
May 3.Message from the Burgesses as to the number of Conferrers received, and the numbers fixed. The Council agreed on the following resolutions respecting the address of the Burgesses. The objection urged by the Burgesses, that Virginia is rendered incapable of assisting New York by the tax on tobacco, is improper, since the tax is imposed by Act of Parliament. The objection on the score of expense of maintaining rangers is unsound, for that expense is inconsiderable compared to that disbursed by New York and New England, which have spent £700,000 and £30,000 respectively, whereas Virginia only keeps an officer and eleven men at the head of each of the four great rivers, with occasionally a few men additional. The objection that Virginia has always borne its own charge and that troops at New York would be of no protection to Virginia since the Indians that infest Virginia are nearer to it than to New York, is answered thus. It is forgotten that the King spent over £60,000 to assist Virginia in 1676; and that he will give orders for the other Colonies to assist it and be liberal from his own Treasury, there can be no doubt. Whether forces at New York would help Virginia or not, sure it is that New York, being under distress and a burden of insupportable expense, the King fixed a quota himself, a conference of the different provinces to fix the same having done nothing. How then can we evade the Royal command? If our poverty be pleaded, our only way is to obey to the utmost of our ability, thereby to show the King our true state and be excused from performing the rest. With such testimony of our loyalty and obedience the King will be the more graciously inclined to us. If Virginia be thought to have no interest joined with New York, this is a mistake, for this assistance is not wanted to forward the particular designs of New York, but for the defence of one of the provinces from the French and Indians, declared enemies to the Crown of England. The war being national, all the provinces stand mutually obliged to the defence and protection of each other, as one county of England to another. This country would think it hard to be destroyed by denial of a little help from the next Government. As to the Northern Indians being nearer to Virginia than to New York, the Council desires to be informed of a late "disionerey" thereof, which would be of great service, since upon any mischief done, they could be directly pursued. From all of which considerations the Council is of opinion that since the Royal commands and information as to New York are positive, ready compliance will be most serviceable both in obtaining for us help on a like occasion, and for gaining us remission from further assistance. It therefore suggests either that a levy be raised by poll or a duty laid upon liquors, with the necessary limitations for securing the sum to this purpose, if required, but if not, to use it for such purposes as the General Assembly shall from time to time direct. On the other matters of the Address it is ordered the Collectors to report as to a vessel for suppression of illegal traders. As to the maintenance of the clergy, the matter is referred to a conference with the Burgesses when the New York business is over. The business of the College is referred for further consideration. As to the fifth paragraph concerning rangers, and the sixth as to an impost on liquors, consideration is deferred till the promised Bills are before the Council. Resolutions end. Bills as to probates and as to Princess Anne County read a first time.
May 4.Four members appointed to confer with the Burgesses. Bill as to the rangers and as to the size of tobacco hogsheads received from the Burgesses. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1173–1189.]
April 30.1,792. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. Orders for the Assembly to be prorogued till 4 June, and for a full Council on 2 May. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 304.]
April.1,793. Address of condolence from the Governor and Council of Barbados to the King on the death of Queen Mary. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 128–129.]
May 1.1,794. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Mr. John Monro complained that he was shut out from the chapel of St. John's parish, where he had been minister two years. A copy of his petition was ordered to be sent to the vestry with directions to answer it on the 8th inst. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., p. 897.]
May 1.1,795. List of the standing officers of Colonel Holt's Regiment of foot from the 1st of May; and of the reformed [retired] officers who are to receive half pay during their actual service with the regiment and to be replaced on the first vacancies in their respective regiments. This list shows a complete establishment of officers for ten companies, with seven subalterns over. Copy. 1 p. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 58; and (list of reformed officers only) 44, p. 229.]
[May.]1,796. Another list of the same, but with some slight alterations. The list shows a complete establishment of officers for twelve companies; and it is added that all but eight of them are with the Regiment in the West Indies. 1 p. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 4. No. 59.]
May 1.
Kensington.
1,797. The King to Governor Sir Edmund Andros. Authorising him to charge the sum of £765, expended upon assistance to New York and on the fortifications of Virginia, against the revenue from the quit-rents in the Colony. Countersigned, Ste. Fox, Charl. Montague, J. Smith. [Board of Trade. Virginia, 36. pp. 281–282.]
May 2.1,798. The King to Governor Russell. Ordering him to send shipping to bring part of his regiment, now ordered to the Leeward Islands, from thence to Barbados, unless they be still required there. He is to despatch further assistance, according to his power, to the Leeward Islands, if required. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 44. pp. 95–96.]
May 2.
Kensington.
1,799. The King to Governor Codrington. Since two hundred recruits cannot be raised in time to sail with the frigate which we have ordered to the Leeward Islands, we have directed a part of Russell's regiment to go thither, and remain there for two months, after which they will be transported to Barbados, for which Colonel Russell has the requisite orders, unless the Leeward Islands are in imminent danger of invasion, in which case Governor Russell has orders to assist you with ships and troops. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 44. pp. 213–215.]
May 2.1,800. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. The Council recommend Richard Lloyd as Chief Justice to succeed Samuel Bernard, deceased. Edward Broughton approved as the new Receiver-General. Order for Henry Napier to attend and answer for scandalous words spoken against the Government. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. p. 305.]
May 2.1,801. Minutes of Council of New York. Patent for land above Anthony's Nose on Hudson River granted to Theunis De Kay. Orders for payments for entertainment of the Indian messengers and for work done at the fort. The Governor recommended the Council to consider of honest men for the next Assembly and to use their endeavours that way. [Board of Trade. New York, 72. p. 29.]
May 3.
Barbados.
1,802. Petition of Ralph Lane to Lords of Trade and Plantations. That his petitions, enclosed, to Governor Russell and to the King may be laid before the King for redress of his grievances. ¾ p. Endorsed, Recd. 26 June, Read 7 Aug. '95. Annexed,
1,802. I. Petition of Ralph Lane to the King. Notwithstanding your orders, all access to records for my justification is denied me, and I am kept in confinement, on the plea that I am imprisoned for debt. Governor Russell allowed me to be heard, and ordered Mr. George Hannay to render me an account of all that he had taken of my estate, which account was very erroneous. Governor Russell also instructed Mr. Bond and Mr. Bromley to report on my case, which they have not yet done to effect. I beg that my appeal to you in Council may not be dismissed.
Postscript.—The report by Mr. Bond and Mr. Bromley has been sent to me, which puts a wrongful colour on my imprisonment. I have sent a petition to Governor Russell in my own justification, and by that the enclosed copy may be read, and relief granted to me. 2 pp.
1,802. II. Francis Bond and John Bromley to Governor Russell. In the matter of Ralph Lane we find as follows. (1) He was taken into custody on three writs for £321, of which we find that all but £32 has been paid. (2) He was further taken into custody on two writs for £146 besides costs, to which he appears to have made no satisfaction. (3) He was also taken into custody on an execution issued by the Court of Exchequer for £50. These writs and execution we find to be the causes of his imprisonment. 1½ pp.
1,802. III. Petition of Ralph Lane to Governor Russell. You heard my case and ordered the Provost Marshal to produce his account against me, which he did, and I then wrote to you my exceptions against that account. You then ordered Mr. Bond and Mr. Bromley to report on the case. The second paragraph of the report is erroneous and incomplete, and the third is new to me. I have already given security to prosecute an appeal to the King in Council, and I will give further security if need be. I now appeal against the report abovesaid, and beg that you will appoint the security to be given by me and will set me at liberty. 18 April, 1695.
Here follow copies of Lane's petition to Governor Russell for enquiry into his case, and of the Governor's order thereupon. The whole, 3 pp. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. Nos. 91, 91 I.–III.; and (without enclosures II., III.) 44. pp. 183–189.]
[May 3.]1,803. A Collection of Documents relating to the Act of Parliament for reversing the attainder of Jacob Leisler and others.
1,803. I. Copy of the Resolutions of the House of Representatives of New York, condemning categorically the actions of Leisler during the Revolution; with the assent of the Governor and Council thereto. 17 and 18 April, 1691. Printed sheet.
1,803. II., III. Reasons against passing the Act. A brief summary of Leisler's usurpation of the Government, his violence, his interception of the Royal letters and his defiance of Major Ingoldsby and Governor Sloughter. It is added that of the three persons named in the bill, Leisler was a German musketeer, not naturalised and without property, Milbourne the son of a poor tailor in England with no visible estate, and Gouverneur a Frenchman, not naturalised and of no visible estate. Printed sheet. 1½ pp. Two copies.
1,803. IV. A briefer summary to the same effect as No. II., in manuscript. 1 p.
1,803. V. A further memorandum of the misdeeds of Leisler and of his associates. 3 pp.
1,803. VI. An answer to the reasons against the Bill (No. II.). A specious attempt to defend Leisler's usurpation by the suppression and distortion of facts. Printed. 2 pp.
1,803. VII. Copies of the printed Votes of the House of Commons, 11 and 12 April, 1695, recording the first and second reading of the Bill. 5 pp.
1,803. VIII. Further copies of the same for 16th and 18th April as to the passing of the Bill through Committee. 12 pp.
1,803. IX. Order of the Chairman of the Committee on the Bill, Sir Henry Ashurst, for production of certain papers, 22 April, 1695. ½ p.
1,803. X. Further copies of the Votes of the House of Commons, 30 April, 1695, recording the passing of the Bill through Committee.
1,803. XI. Further copy of the same for 2 May, 1695, recording the third reading of the Bill. 4 pp.
1,803. XII. Copy of the Bill. 6 pp.
1,803. XIII. Copy of the London Gazette of May 2—May 6, recording the Royal Assent given to the Bill on the 3rd of May. 2 pp. [Board of Trade. New York, 6. Nos. 4, I.–XIII.]
May 3.1,804. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Letters from Governor Andrew Hamilton as to the Post Office read, when the Council said that they had done all they could with the Assembly for encouragement of the same and were still willing to do what they might to promote so good a work, but that at present they could propose nothing further, nor think it proper to move the Assembly therein. A supersedeas granted to Colonel John West from an order of the Accomack County Court. Colonel Byrd directed to select a vessel or vessels with fit commanders for suppression of illegal trade. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 897–898.]
May 6.1,805. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. Bill for dividing King and Queen's County read a first time, also a bill for an impost on liquors. Address to the Council, praying that no one person may take up more than 400 acres of the land South of the Blackwater, read and approved. Bill as to hogs in James City read a third time and sent up to Council. Bill for alteration of inconvenient roads read a first time. Bill for pounds brought in and rejected. Leave given to the burgesses from Accomack and Northampton to bring in a bill for pounds in those counties. Report of Committee of Claims read and, with certain alterations, agreed to. Order for inspection of the Treasurer's accounts exhibited at last Assembly, to see how much of the fourpence per gallon duty remains unaccounted for. Allowances for the officers of Assembly agreed to and sent to Council for concurrence.
May 7.Bill for dividing King and Queen's County read a second time, also the bill for an impost on liquors. Bill for alteration of inconvenient roads rejected. Bill for better restraint of horses in Northampton and Accomack Counties read a first time. Report of the Committee of Grievances on the complaints of the inhabitants of Northern Neck against the Proprietors read and agreed to. Resolved to address the King for their redress. The two charters of Virginia of March and October, 1676, considered. Resolved to address the King for a new charter containing as full and ample privileges as that of March, 1677.
May 8.Bill for impost on liquors passed and sent up to Council, also the bill for restraint of horses in Northampton and Accomack.
May 9.Address to the King as to the grievances of the people of Northern Neck read and debated, also the address as to a new charter. Bill to enlarge the bounds of Princess Anne County returned from the Council, being assented to without amendments. Bill for an impost on liquors returned with amendments. Order for the Collectors to make up their accounts of the fourpence per gallon duty. Report of the Conference as to the question of assistance to New York read, and after long debate resolved that £500 out of the impost on liquors be advanced for supply of New York, and that a bill be prepared to that effect. The amendments of the Council to the Bill for the impost on liquors considered, two of them accepted and one of them rejected. Message to that effect sent to the Council.
May 10.Bill for supplying £500 to New York read a first and second time. Addresses to Their Majesties on the grievances of the inhabitants of Northern Neck, setting forth the whole story of the grants to the Proprietors, the extortions and uncertain administration of their Agents in the matter of land-grants, and the mischief of divergent practices and customs in that part of the province as compared with the rest. The Address (which is of great length) was approved and sent up to the Council. Address to Their Majesties for a new charter, comprehending all the privileges conferred by the charter of March 1677, read and approved.
May 11.The Address for a new charter sent up to Council. Bill for rangers returned from the Council assented to, and the Bill for the impost on liquors also returned with the Burgesses' amendments agreed to. Bills for dividing King and Queen's County, for restraint of horses in Northampton and Accomack, and as to hogs in James City, returned from the Council not agreed to. Bill as to tare of tobacco hogsheads returned from Council, with amendment proposed. Resolved that the Burgesses adhere to their bill; and a message sent to the Council accordingly. Bill for giving £500 to New York read a third time and passed. Messages from the Council desiring a conference as to the maintenance of ministers, and agreeing to a conference as to revision of the laws. Conferrers appointed accordingly. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1252–1269.]
May 6.1,806. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. The Book of Claims and a bill as to hogs in James City received from the Burgesses.
May 7.Address from the Burgesses as to the land to be thrown open to settlement south of Blackwater received from the Burgesses. The bills for rangers, for ascertaining the tare of hogsheads and concerning hogs in James City read a first time.
May 8.Bills for an impost on liquors, for dividing King and Queen's County, and for restraint of horses in Accomack and Northampton Counties, received from the Burgesses. The first named bill was read a first time, and the bill for enlarging the bounds of Princess Anne County read a second time.
May 9.The last named bill was read a third time and passed. The bill for an impost on liquor was read a second time, amended, and sent to the Burgesses, who agreed to increase the duty from twopence to fourpence and also to a verbal amendment, but refused to extend the time for the impost to remain in force.
May 10.Bill for rangers agreed to. Bill as to tare of hogsheads returned to the Burgesses with amendments. Bill for impost on liquors agreed to as desired by the Burgesses. Bills as to hogs in James City, for restraint of horses in Northampton and Accomack, and for dividing King and Queen's County rejected.
May 11.Messages from the Burgesses as to their Addresses to the King respecting a new charter and the Northern Neck, and as to their adherence to their bill for tare of tobacco hogsheads. Messages to the Burgesses as to conferences over the revisal of the laws and the question of maintenance of the clergy. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1189–1197.]
May 7.
Barbados.
1807. Governor Russell to Lords of Trade and Plantations. The sloop that brings this started with the fleet, but returned leaking, and is now going by way of the Leeward Islands. Had she not sailed I should have been forced to send a vessel on purpose to England to inform the Admiralty of the condition of the men-of-war here. The King has no stores in this Island, and the King's ships want them of all sorts, as also ammunition and provisions. We have daily for some time expected a fleet, but we hear that there is an embargo without any limitation laid on ships in England, so that we are uncertain when we may expect recruits of all sorts for the King's service. Last Tuesday the men-of-war had not one day's provision left, and the people here, some of them, cannot be so long out of their money as to give credit, and I find that others will not take the purser's bill for provisions, nor the gunner's, carpenter's and boatswain's for stores. I have recommended to the Assembly to trust the King, and with much ado got them to do so for fitting out the Tiger, but when I told them of the wants of the Bristol and the Play they positively refused it and desired me to write for leave to employ the money in the hands of the Commissioner of the four and a half per cent. duty for the King's service, the Commissioner having told them that he durst not do it without an order. So that all the provisions being expended I was forced to speak to the merchants who had provisions to furnish the Bristol and the Play for a monthly victualling, promising that if their bills were not paid in England I would pay them myself. Without this I could not have got a victualling for the men-of-war, and I do not doubt that it will be paid; but when such accidents happen I beg that you will lay them before the King, so that if the like happen again the Treasury may give an order to the Commissioners of the four and a half per cent. duty to furnish such sums to the King's ships as they require. I send an account which I have had from a prisoner from Martinique. I hear that there are many prisoners there, and therefore send a flag of truce to see if I can get them hither. There are several ships from North America and some from England which sail for these parts without any guns, which in this time of war is very injurious, for every little vessel takes them, and these captured ships laden with provisions are the chief support of Martinique, which otherwise would be in a very miserable condition. The Play is returned from Salt Tortudas. She reports that on her arrival she found two French privateers waiting there, one a sloop, the other the old Snow. She chased them, but finding that they had the advantage they waited thereabouts for some days, when, finding that the man-of-war still remained with the fleet, they left the Island. Had not the man-of-war been there, the Snow and sloop would easily have picked up some of them and prevented the rest from loading their salt to New England; and then Barbados would have had no provisions. For during this time of war we are not enough supplied with provisions from Old England, the chief of our supply coming from the North. Since the Play sailed she has not lost one man nor has anyone been sick, and thanks be to God both the ships and the country are in pretty good health again, as I hope they will continue. I am now sending her with about sixteen sail bound for North America, which she is to convoy to the north of the eighteenth degree of latitude, my information being that the Snow is cruising in latitude 17° and 18° to intercept this fleet. I am told too that Count de Blenac has sent all the men-of-war and privateers that he had at Martinique to prevent the designs of our Jamaica fleet upon Petit Guavos, for he had intelligence of it some time before the fleet got into these seas. Had I the rest of my regiment here I make no doubt that with three or four hundred men I might destroy all the French plantations on the Grenadines. When the Play returns from her convoy she must go to the Leeward Islands to careen. The storms of last September very much diminished the mole here, and since that so much sand and so many stones are thrown in that a merchant-ship now in the mole, of smaller draught than the Play, is in danger of not getting out again. If ships in these seas are not careened every five of six months they are in danger of having their bottoms eaten out by worms. On the 18th of April a Guinea ship arrived here, whose captain reported that he was from the Cape de Verde Islands, having hid his negroes, three hundred and seven in number, under hatches. He landed all or nearly all of them that night, and next day reported to me his arrival and his cargo, but said nothing as to having landed them. He told me that he had a very healthy ship, not a sick man on board, white or black, designing to deceive me. But learning that he had landed his negroes before reporting his arrival or entering his ship, for which the penalty is forfeiture, I sent a lieutenant and others from one of the frigates on board her. At midnight the master accompanied by others went on board and forced this party on shore and I believe would have run away with the ship had I not sent to the fort to stop her. She belongs not to the Company but to private merchants, and is now libelled in the Admiralty. Signed, F. Russell. 3 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 25 June, Read 4 July, 1695. [Board of Trade. Barbados, 5. No. 92; and 44. pp. 141–147.]
May 7.1,808. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Order for the Churchwardens of Wilmington parish to attend on Friday next to answer for turning out their minister, John Gourdon, without any known reason, and the Churchwardens of Abington to answer for the like treatment of their minister, Stephen Gregg.
May 8.Petition of the Trustees of the College read, asking to be admitted to execute the office of Surveyor General and to be informed how many surveyors are necessary, that they may appoint them according to their charter. Advised that they be admitted to the office accordingly, and that the numbers of surveyors in the counties are sufficient as they now are till further directions. Mr. Monro's complaint of being shut out of his chapel was heard, when it appeared that the vestry closed the doors to keep out the cattle and kept them closed under the impression that the parish was vacant of a minister. The vestry declared their willingness to continue Mr. Monro as minister, with which he was satisfied. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 899–901.]
May 8.1809. Journal of House of Burgesses of Maryland. The House was called over and several members were found to be absent. The Speaker informed the House that the Governor had removed their clerk for misconduct. The House was willing to continue him till the Governor should signify his crime.
May 9.William Bladen appointed clerk, approved by the Governor and sworn in. Message to the Council asking that, in consequence of renewed reports of the Queen's death, her name be omitted from the prayers and a day of humiliation appointed. Committee of Grievances appointed. Bill to encourage manufacture of hemp and flax received and read. Voted that 100lbs. of tobacco be allowed to every person converting 100lbs. of hemp or flax into cordage. Act for protection of Administrators and Executors read a first time. Resolved that the private Acts for Naturalisation passed in Governor Notley's time be confirmed, and that the Act to regulate Ordinaries be drawn up anew, with additions.
May 10.Committees of Accounts and of Laws appointed. Message from the Council appointing Saturday next to be kept as a day of humiliation, and recommending members of the House, all officers and persons of justice to go into mourning for the Queen. Intelligence as to strange Indians referred to the Governor, for the necessary measures to be taken. A committee appointed to inspect the journals of last Session reported the matters which had been deferred for consideration at the present session.
May 10.Message to the Council asking as to the Bill for protection of executors, already sent up to them. [Board of Trade. Mary-and, 12. pp. 425–431.]
May 8.1,810. Minutes of Council of Maryland in Assembly. The Governor produced the Queen's letter of 22 August, 1694, fixing the quota to be furnished for defence of New York at 160 men, and asked whether a supply should not be asked for now, to save calling another assembly. Letter from New York as to the protested bills sent by Governor Copley also read; and both letters sent down to the Burgesses.
May 9.In accordance with a message from the Burgesses William Bladen was approved as their clerk. Message from the Burgesses as to Queen Mary's death. Message prepared to the Burgesses. (See preceding abstract.)
May 10.Proclamation for a day of humiliation for the death of Queen Mary. On intelligence of strange Indians Colonel Nicholas Greenberry was ordered to send a party of rangers to the falls of Patuxent. Message from the Burgesses as to the Act for protection of Executors. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 461–466.]
May 9.1,811. Minutes of Council of New York. On report that the forces coming from Long Island had been obstructed by the ferry belonging to the city, it was ordered that the Mayor of New York take care that they have free and ready passage. On the petition of Thomas Coker the Council decided that he should apply to Colonel Ingoldsby, who had employed him to distribute money to the Companies, for satisfaction, the Governor declaring that he had no money of Colonel Ingoldsby's due to him on account of the Companies. The Governor desired the advice and consent of the Council for calling an Assembly to ease the province of the burden caused by the neglect of the last Assembly. He pointed out that some had given as much as eight pounds to a substitute to take their place for three months in the detachments for the frontier, and that this burden was likely to continue unless the families and troops were withdrawn and the frontier left to the enemy. Order for a proclamation to summon an Assembly for the 20th June. Petition of Dirck Schepmoes (?) read, and petitioner referred to his legal remedy. On the complaint of the justices of King's County Gerard Beeckman was summoned to answer for detaining £12 of the county's money under colour of his being attainted, although he is at liberty and in possession of his estate. Order for payment for repair to the fort. [Board of Trade. New York, 72. pp. 29–30.]
May 9.1,812. Minutes of Council of Jamaica. The King's order for the continuation of the present Great Seal read. Evidence against Henry Napier heard, and order given to take him into custody. Edward Broughton produced his securities and was sworn Receiver-General. Order for payment for materials for fortifications. [Board of Trade. Jamaica, 77. pp. 305–306.]
May 10.1,813. Minutes of Council of Virginia. Mr. John Gourdon's complaint heard, when the vestry said that they had tried to agree with him to continue their minister, but that he would not; but that they would call a vestry meeting and agree with him. With this Mr. Gourdon was satisfied. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 901–902.]
May 13.1,814. Minutes of Council of New York. The Governor reported the sorrowful news of Queen Mary's death. Resolved that her name be left out of the prayers, but that the present seal be still employed, and that the Council express its sorrow at her death. [Board of Trade. New York, 72. p. 31.]
May 13.1,815. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Attorney General attending, the Lords proceeded with the consideration of the laws of Massachusetts, when it was agreed to recommend disallowance of the Act to make lands liable for the payment of debts, and to consider further of the Act for establishing Courts of Justice. [Board of Trade. Journal, 8. pp. 23–25.]
May 13.1,816. Journal of House of Burgesses of Maryland. Resolved to make an additional law to the Act for Religion. An explanatory Act for the same negatived. Bill for ascertaining boundaries of land rejected. Conditional law against runaway servants and debtors from Virginia deferred to next Sessions. Motions for appointing itinerant justices, for appointing muster-masters and as to Colonel Hamilton's affair of the Post Office rejected. On the Act concerning towns it was resolved that two ports be made, one on Patuxent river and one on Potomac river, and that a port be constituted in Somerset County. Bougues Bay accordingly appointed for the Patuxent and Newton's Point for the Potomac. The law about money referred to next Sessions. Message to the Governor in Council asking for appointment of a Court to try a murderer, and calling his attention to Mason and Burley, still in custody for murder at great expense to the country. Message to the Governor as to the quota for New York, to the following effect. (1) We shall at all times be ready to help New York with such men as we can afford, consideration being had of the cost of armed men for defence of our own frontiers. (2) We cannot afford the money asked for at present by reason of the vast charge which already lies on us. (3) We know nothing of the protested bills alluded to by the Council of New York. The matter appears to have been in the hands of the late Governor Copley. Message ends. Message from the Council, announcing that a commission shall be issued for trial of a murderer, and that the sheriff has been summoned to give an account to Burley and Mason.
May 14.The votes carried yesterday as to ports on the Potomac and Patuxent were rescinded. The following proposals were brought down from the Council. (1) That an additional clause be added to the Act for securing orphans' estates. This was rejected. (2) That a clause be added to the Act of Religion, to provide for the registration of births, marriages and deaths by the vestry-clerk. This was agreed to. (3) That a brass standard of weights and measures be sent for to England and kept in the Secretary's office. Resolved instead that one brass hundred weight be sent for and kept by the Clerks of the several counties. (4) That measures be taken to redress undervaluing of the public faith. Resolved hereon that the sheriffs are within the purview of the Act for relief of debtors. (5) That a division be made of St. Mary's, Charles and Calvert Counties. This was rejected.
May 15.A sixth proposal from the Council, that the County Courts of Anne Arundel County be kept at Anne Arundel town, was accepted, and a bill for the purpose ordered. Resolved to address the Lords of Trades and Plantations as to Naval stores. On the question of giving assistance to New York, resolved that the assistance of men shall be given when need shall require, and that Mr. Thos. Tasker's offer to advance £200 to pay the soldiers now in arms be accepted, he receiving 8 per cent. for the same. Additional Act to the Act for Administration of Justice read a first time. On proposal of the Council a bill was ordered for an impost on negroes and imported servants. Resolved to present addresses to the King in condolence for the death of the Queen, and to point out the inability of Maryland to assist New York, as also to pray for exemption from the command to do so.
May 16.Message from the Council received as to the sailing of the shipping, and answered by the request that, owing to the lateness of the crop through unfavourable weather, the Commodore may stay until the 30th of June. The Committee of Grievances brought up its report with proposals for bills. Resolved thereupon to bring in a bill to fix the fees for naturalisation of aliens. Colonel Darnall's representation as to Lord Baltimore's claims in respect of wild horses and cattle was answered by a resolution that the animals are not ferœnaturœ, having been imported into the country, but in the nature of waifs and strays.
May 17.Bills to fix fees for naturalisation and to settle Anne Arundel County Court at Anne Arundel town, as also a bill to restrain frequent assembly of negroes and an additional bill to the Act of Religion, read a first time and returned to the Council. The settlement of ferries and the question as to shoemakers and tanners deferred to next Sessions. On a petition from the Quakers it was resolved that they be not dispensed from the taking of oaths nor exempted from the poll-tax for maintenance of ministers, but that they be continued on the same footing with all other of the King's subjects. Bill for raising a tax on all offices, an additional bill to the Militia Act, and a bill to regulate ordinaries read a first time.
May 18.Bills to regulate ordinaries and for an impost on negroes and imported servants read a second time and sent to Council. Message to the Governor thanking him for his offer to defray the cost of passing the Acts of Religion at his own charge. Bill for an additional supply sent up to Council. Message to the Council reporting its resolutions of the 15th in the matter of assistance to New York. The following bills, with amendments from the Council, were agreed to and read a third time, viz., bill to settle Anne Arundel County Court, additional bill to the Act for administration of justice, bill to regulate ordinaries. Resolved to address the King that the greater part of his revenue given by him to provide arms and ammunition may be appropriated to the necessary charge of the Government. Resolved to rescind a former vote, and that St. Mary's, Charles and Calvert Counties be divided. Resolved that a post be employed between Potomac and Philadelphia, and that Mr. Perry attend the House on the subject. The following bills were read a first time, viz., bills for a public levy and for reviving temporary laws. The following were read a second time, viz., a private naturalisation bill, and the additional militia bill. The following were read a third time, viz., bill to settle Anne Arundel County Court, additional bill to the Act of religion, bill for a public supply, bill for protection of executors, bill to fix naturalisation fees and the private bill already mentioned. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 431–442.]
May 13.1,817. Minutes of Council of Maryland in Assembly. Messages from the Assembly as to giving assistance to New York, (pp.461–462), and as to trial of a murderer and the detention of Burley and Mason received; and the latter message answered (see preceding abstract). Bill for protection of executors read a first time. Bill to encourage manufacture of hemp and flax reserved for a conference.
May 14.The Governor sent down a number of proposals to the Burgesses (see preceding abstract) including a recommendation to ascertain the price of Naval stores before drawing a bill, and sundry other matters.
May 15.The question of the sailing of the fleet was considered, and the proposals of the ships' masters and of the merchants were heard; after which the Governor directed the clerk to acquaint the Burgesses of all that had passed.
May 16.Message of the Burgesses as to the sailing of the fleet received.
May 17.Petition from the Quakers received, and themselves heard, when the petition was referred to the Burgesses, who returned their answer thereto. Messages interchanged with the Burgesses as to the appointment of a naval officer at the port of Oxford.
May 18.Message of the Burgesses as to the question of assistance to New York (p. 462). Seven bills received from the Burgesses were read a first time, amended, and returned to the Burgesses. Message of thanks from the Burgesses to the Governor for an offer made by him. Four more bills read a first time, amended, and after conference agreed to. Orders for the public accounts to be stated and for a return of shipping to be prepared. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 468–479.]
May 13.1,818. Journal of House of Burgesses of Virginia. On the call of the House, many members were missing both in the morning and afternoon, and seven were ordered to give the reasons for their absence before taking their places.
May 14.Conferrers appointed as to revisal of the laws, and six revisers appointed with remuneration of 130lbs. of tobacco for each day's attendance. Report of the Conference as to maintenance of ministers read, and a Bill ordered, fixing the sum of 13,333⅓ lbs. of tobacco as the sum for the minister in each parish.
May 15.Message to the Council reporting the measures taken for revision of the laws, six members of the Burgesses being associated with three of the Council for the work. Bill for fixing the maintenance of ministers read a first and second time. Several bills and the book of claims received from the Council, and their additions to the claims agreed to. Bills as to assistance for New York and as to tare of tobacco hogsheads received from the Council agreed to. Bill to empower justices to sign commissions of probate returned by the Council not agreed to, but a message sent from the Council that the Governor had authorised proper persons to perform that duty. Message from the Council promising due attention to the address respecting land south of the Blackwater. Certain additions to the book of claims agreed to and sent to the Council for concurrence.
May 16.Bill to fix a maintenance for the clergy read a third time, passed and sent to Council. Orders for repair of the Secretary's office. Committee appointed to draw up an address to Their Majesties on the state of the country. Book of claims returned by the Council assented to, and a message added, that the minister attending the Assembly and reading prayers had not been gratified, as usually. Bill to fix the maintenance of ministers returned from the Council with amendments. Message to the Council accepting some of the amendments but rejecting that which changed the maintenance from 13,333⅓ lbs. to 16,000 lbs. of tobacco. Address to Their Majesties concerning the state of the country read, setting forth the poverty of the country, the weight of taxation, the cost of defending their own frontiers, the distance which prevents the defence of New York being any security to Virginia, and the readiness of the province notwithstanding to obey the Royal orders if it were possible, but praying that such commands may not be laid upon Virginia in future. The address was approved and sent to the Council for concurrence. Order for payment of £5 sterling to each of the two ministers who have attended the Assembly and read prayers. Message to the Council as to payment of the rangers, with a view to proportioning the levy by poll.
May 17.Message from the Council concurring as to payment of the rangers, but suggesting that they be paid for twelve months out of the impost on liquors. Message in reply, recommending that such payment be made out of the levy by poll. The House then attended the Governor by command, when the bills for rangers, to enlarge Princess Anne county, to raise an impost on liquors, for giving assistance to New York, and for fixing the tare of tobacco hogsheads were passed. The Governor then recommended to the Burgesses to consider what further business remained to be despatched. Bill for maintenance of Ministers returned from the Council, who insisted upon their amendments. The Burgesses after debate declined to accept these amendments. Order for preparation of a bill for a public levy.
May 18.Messages between the Council and Burgesses as to payment of rangers, wherein the Burgesses carried their point. Bill for a public levy read thrice and passed, the proportion being fixed at 22¾ lbs. of tobacco for every titheable man. Message from the Council proposing that the Committee for revision of the laws be reduced to three Councillors and four Burgesses, that they receive fifteen shillings a day for every day that they shall necessarily be from home and their clerk twenty shillings. The Burgesses dissented. Message from the Council, suggesting that the material heads in the three addresses to Their Majesties be embodied in one address with a memorial of each particular grievance, and returning the address accordingly. The Burgesses dissented. Bill for a public levy passed, sent up to Council and returned with concurrence. Message to the Council, insisting on the Burgesses' dissent from the Council's proposals as to revision to the laws. The House then attended the Governor by command. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1269–1284.]
May 14.1,819. Minutes of General Assembly of Virginia. Report of the Conferrers as to revision of the laws and as to the maintenance of the clergy, to the effect that the Conferrers from the Burgesses were not empowered to agree to the proposals of the Council but would report them to the House.
May 15.Message from the Burgesses with their proposals as to revision of the laws. (See preceding abstract, May 14.) Two bills returned to the Burgesses with concurrence, and one bill rejected. Message to the Burgesses on the rejection of the bill as to commissions of probate, and on the address respecting the land south of the Blackwater. The Burgesses' additions to the book of claims agreed to.
May 16.Bill for maintenance of the clergy considered and messages exchanged as to the Council's amendments thereto. The book of claims agreed to, and sent down with a message as to payment of the Ministers attending the Assembly. Order for payment to be made to them of the sums authorised by the Burgesses. Several messages exchanged between the Council and Burgesses as to payment of the Rangers.
May 17.Further messages as to payment of the Rangers. The Burgesses attended the Governor, when five bills were assented to.
May 18.Further messages as to payment of the Rangers. Messages interchanged on the subject of the revision of the laws, and of the addresses to Their Majesties, whereon the Council and Burgesses continued to disagree. Bill for a public levy passed. The Governor prorogued the Assembly. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXV., pp. 1197–1212.]
May 14.1,820. Minutes of Council of Maryland. The Attorney-General produced a Chancery Commission, and forms of oaths to be taken by the officers thereof, which were approved. The Commission was then signed, and Henry Jowles, Kenelm Cheseldyn and Edward Dorsey sworn of the Chancery Commission. Here follow the forms of oaths. [Board of Trade. Maryland, 12. pp. 143–145.]
May 14.1,821. Minutes of Council of Virginia. The Churchwardens of Abington attended and charged their minister, Mr. Greg, with several misdemeanours, for which they had dismissed him. Mr. Greg declared that he was as ready to leave them as they to part with him, and that he was ready to justify himself against any particular crime objected against him. The vestry then charged him with sodomy, and the Attorney-General was directed to prosecute him.
May 15.The Council, in answer to the Governor, declared that nothing further could be done at present concerning the College. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXIV., pp. 902–903.]
May 15.1,822. Minutes of Council and Assembly of Antigua. Adjourned till to-morrow.
May 16.Order for Captain Powell to have his accounts ready for audit within fourteen days, on pain of being committed. Messages from the Council asking the Assembly to pay two of its members to assist Colonel Rowland Williams, and asking if they were satisfied with the Secretary's proposals. The Assembly declared themselves not satisfied, insisting that the Secretary should give security, and the Deputy-Governor then decided to defer the matter until the arrival of the Governor-in-chief. The Council agreed to a proposal from the Assembly increasing the powers of the Committee appointed to audit the accounts of the public powder. Order for a payment. [Board of Trade. Leeward Islands, 64. pp. 136–137.]