Elizabeth
May 1559, 1-10

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Joseph Stevenson (editor)

Year published

1863

Pages

232-247

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Elizabeth: May 1559, 1-10', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 1: 1558-1559 (1863), pp. 232-247. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=71740 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

May 1559, 1-10

May 2.
R. O.
582. Croft to Cecil.
Has received the Queen's letters the last of April, by which he understands the words of M. Dosel's letters are mistaken; for whereas the Queen's pleasure is signified unto him how he should use the subjects of Scotland desiring to come into this realm, the request of M. Dosel was to know whether the French King's subjects might not pass through the realm. Is doubtful how to proceed till he hears again from him; but if in the meantime M. Dosel shall require any passage he will, as it is peace, send one to accompany them to the Court.
Will inquire about the man mentioned in Cecil's letter, and begs to know if he have any conjecture where he is. The Treasurer arrived here the last of April, and this day all those cassed are being paid. The numbers left here are less than he looked for. Would have written before, but that he has continued a long time sick of an extreme cold, and is lying now on his bed; as he feels himself very ill, and has been two years past sick here (the air being unagreeable to his body) he has petitioned the Queen to be allowed to withdraw for a time. The words of his patent are very large, giving him leave to appoint a deputy or deputies in his place, but he will not use this liberty without great extremity. Hopes he will be somewhat mended by the time of the arrival of Lord Bedford; or by his Lordship's advice to depute Sir John Brende, if he abide here, or Mr. Marshall. Asks Cecil's advice how to use himself, foreseeing the strength of our neighbours and the state of his charge, but trusts that some greater man will be appointed in his place, one able to support himself on his revenues, whereof he is utterly destitute.
P. S.—Begs him to remember his small tithes to help to find his children bread.—Berwick, 2 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 2.
B. M. Harl. 353. 175 b.
583. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 2 May 1559.—Present: the Earl of Derby, the Lords Admiral and Chamberlain; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Sackevill.
A letter to the customer, comptrollers, and searchers of Southampton and Plymouth, that whereas they were heretofore written unto (upon information here) that they should stay Strangwishe and Wilford, and such ships as they should prepare in warlike sort to the seas; forasmuch as Strangwishe having been here, has made declaration that they only mean to go to the seas as merchants, they are willed to suffer them to pass, notwithstanding the former restraint, having licence of the Lord Admiral so to do. And if they shall perceive they shall be prepared in warlike sort, then they are willed to stay them according to the former letters.
A letter to Sir James Crofts and the Treasurer of Berwick to give order that Ralph Evere, brother to Lord Evere, may have his pay for himself and his late band of light horsemen, according to the minute remaining in the Council chest.
May 2.
R. O. 27 V. 138.
584. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 2.
R. O. 27 VI. 100.
585. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 2.
R. O.
586. Expenses for the Scottish Borders.
"The debts owing by the Queen, due 2 May, of all the extraordinary garrisons receiving wages upon the frontiers against Scotland, as well to such as be discharged as to such as remain in wages; the prests which they have received being deducted," amounting to 10,266l. 9s. 4d.—Signed: John Brende, John Yngleby.
Endd. by Cecil: 2 May 1559. Debts at Berwick. Pp. 2.
May 3.
R. O.
587. Mundt to the Queen.
The French Ambassadors had their answer given to them 26 April in palatio, in presence of the Emperor, Electors, Princes, and Commissaries of the absents. The same day the Princes "Maguntinus, Treverensis, Bavarus, Wurtembergensis, Megapolensis, Gemini-ponticus, and Badenses Marchiones," dined with the Emperor. The day before the Ambassadors dined with all the Princes at their lodgings. The second day after the answer, Burdilion went to Metz, and two days after Episcopus Viennensis came to France, "per Helvetios." The answer did not much please them. They were asked by certain Commissaries, in name of the rest, if they had a commission to treat upon the surrender of Metz; they had small comfort. Sends a copy of their answer. The Estates are consulting to send Ambassadors to the King of France to "repete" Metz and other places detained from the Empire by him. The result is doubtful; the States would fain have these places, but whether words will obtain them or not, what will be done he doubts.
There have been divers communications amongst the Catholics and Protestants in religion, but nothing is concluded; the peace has made the Bishops stubborner than before, for they think to have these two Kings on their side.
On the 1st May the Princes present, as Wirtemburg, Mecklenburg, Zayenbruck, the Marquis of Baden, and other adherents to the Augustan Confession, have been with the Emperor, about whom were all his councillors, viz., the Duke of Bavaria, Duke Charles his son, and certain Counts, and have "exponed" at large that "Collocutores Papistici," be only the occasion that Colloquium Wormaciense appointed by his Majesty is broken up. They pretend that this controversy ought not to be decided by the Holy Scripture, which is materia litium, but by the see of Rome and dicta patrum. This open blasphemy they have required the Emperor to command them to leave. They say that many who pretend Confessionem Augustanam uphold many sects and errors under this colour, to which the others answer that they will stand in all points exhibited anno tricesimo imp. Carolo V.
Sends now the Landgrave's answer to his message done to his Commissaries in her name, also his own translation of the same. Three days after this answer the Landgrave sent "by one post" to tell him that a great number of footmen and horsemen are gathered beside Hamburg. It is supposed that the two Kings intend to bring into Denmark the young Duke of Lorraine, Christierni Regis nepotem, and so Regis Gallice generum.—Augusta, 3 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 3.
R.O.
588. Mundt to Cecil.
Writes to the Queen. Sends the Landgrave's answer given him upon the message done to his Commissaries, written by them in Deutsche. Cecil may cause it to be translated besides his [Mundt's] translation. It seems friendly and assuredly written. They signify to him, by their master's command, that a great number of footmen and horsemen are gathered about Hamburg, and required him to write the same to England; no man can tell by whom or for what intent. Has required of all the Princes to whom he has done the Queen's message, that they would signify such occurrences to her as might be profitable for her to know. Suspected at first the Hanse cities would attempt somewhat against England. Has written in the Queen's letter his conjecture of these sudden gatherings. It is reported that the King of Denmark prepares to defend his country, and likewise Elector Augustus, who has married the King's sister. The King of Denmark is comprehended by both Kings in the peace made, "sed si jusjurandum violandum est, propter regnum violandum est."—Augusta, 3 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Hol., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 3.
R. O.
589. Philip, Landgrave of Hesse, to the Queen.
Reciprocates her expressions of friendship conveyed to him by her Ambassador Mundt. Had heard with great pleasure that she was favourable to the Christian religion; that she had received the Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Christ under both kinds at the late festival of Easter; and that she is busy in reforming the churches.—Cassel, 3 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. German. Pp. 5.
May 3.
R. O.
590. Translation by Mundt of the above letter into Latin.
Mundt's hol. Endd.: Versio epistolæ Langravii. Pp. 3.
May 3.
R. O. 171 B.
591. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 3.
R.O.
592. The Queen to the King of France.
"Minute of the Queen's letter by the Seigneur de la Marque," reciprocating good intentions and wishes, and accrediting Sir George Howard, Knight, with her letters and message.—Dat. Westm. [blank] May 1559.
Draft, corrected by Cecil, and endd. by him: 3 May 1559. Fr. Pp. 3.
May 3.
R. O.
593. Another copy of the above, omitting the date.
Draft, corrected by Cecil, and endd. by him: Copy of a letter to the French King from the Queen; by La Marque.
May 3.
R. O. Forbes, 1. 85.
594. Draft of the English original of the Queen's letter to the French King.
Draft, in Cecil's hol. Portions of the edges torn off. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 3.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 224.
595. Another copy of the preceding.
Forbes' transcript.
May 3.
R. O.
596. Embassy to France.
"Instructions to Sir George Haward, Knt., sent by the Queen to the French King."
1. Thanks him for sending by La Marque the ratification of the peace, and now transmits by Sir George her ratification of the same.
2. Thanks the King and Queen Dauphins, the former for the ratification of his father's treaty of peace, and both of them for the ratification of the peace between her and the realm of Scotland. She has delivered the same to the Scottish Secretary, the "Seigneur de Ledyngton."
Draft, in Cecil's hol. Endd. by him: 3 Maii 1559.
May 3.
R.O.
597. Throckmorton's Embassy to France.
Warrant to the Treasurer and Chamberlains of the Exchequer to pay to Sir Nicolas Throckmorton, her Ambassador resident with the French King, the diet of 3l. 6s. 8d. by the day from this day to his return, and to advance to him in prest of his said diets 280l., that is, for three months. They shall also pay him all such sums as he shall signify unto them to have been defrayed for transportation and post horses, and for sending of letters, and for all other charges which he shall think good to defray for the better furtherance of her service from his departure until his return.—Westm., 3 May, 1 Eliz.
Pp. 4.
May 3.
R.O.
598. Throckmorton's Embassy to France.
Sir N. Throkmorton, having been appointed her Ambassador resident with the French King, has petitioned her that she would lend him 1,000l. over and above his diets in his journey. She warrants the delivery of the said sum.
Copy. Endd.: A mem. of a warrant for a thousand marks (fn. 1) lent to Sir Nicolas Throkmorton, 3 May 1559. Pp. 2.
May 3.
R. O.
599. Throckmorton's Embassy to France.
"Money paid out of the Exchequer to Sir Nicolas Throkmorton during his ambassade in France, as well for his diet after the rate of 66s. 8d. per diem, as also for his extraordinary charges during his ambassade," amounting to 4,783l. 6s. 8d., by virtue of the Queen's warrant, dated 3 May, 1 Eliz.
Copy. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 3.
R. O.
600. Sir J. Brende to Cecil.
By a letter and schedule sent to the Lords he may see what is due for the cassing of the garrisons. All super- fluous charge being taken away, he is travailing to bring the debt and charge into a certainty. Has not neglected what Cecil willed him to do concerning the rate of the new establishment for this town and the orders concerning the same, which are much to be altered, forasmuch as they shall not pass by Parliament, as was first appointed. He and Sir James Croft cannot diminish the yearly charge of the new establishment, yet cannot devise to abate it above 500l. per annum. The town, yet weakened by this new fortification, cannot be well kept with that number; and victuals are yet at that price that soldiers cannot live on 6d. a day, their wage. The first thing to be done is the naming of officers, who ought to be men of estimation and wisdom. Requires that he may not be one of them. The entertainment should not be less than is now limited, which is rated with the straitest. Would not wish that countrymen be appointed; but yet men born in the inland counties must have some allurement to draw them there. At the "cassment" of soldiers, very few who were discharged made suit to tarry, and those appointed to remain tarried against their wills, notwithstanding their liberal pay, as every one is so desirous to return towards the sun from the sourness of this northern air. This has been the cause more than anything else why we so often have lost the footing and possession we have had in Scotland, for after men had continued there any time it was thought sufficient reward of service if they got leave to return home. "And so the captains left their charge to their deputies, the deputies to men of less sufficiency, and they to others, till it came into the Scot's hand again." Not long ago this town was certain years together, through the "unableness" of the officers, feebleness of the garrison, and weakness of the inhabitants, in case to have been had for the coming and attempting; but that now it is in no like danger, as it is carefully provided for by the fortification, but ought to be furnished with sufficient officers, choice soldiers, and good orders.—Berwick, 3 May. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 3.
R. O.
601. Expenses for the Scottish Borders.
"The monthly charge of all the extraordinary garrisons and officers serving upon the frontiers against Scotland, 3d May 1559," amounting to 2,160l. 8s. 8d. Signed: John Brende.
Orig. Endd. by Cecil: 1559, Berwick, May, monthly charges there. Pp. 5.
May 3.
B.M. Harl. 353. 176.
602. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 3 May 1559.—Present: the Lord Great Seal, the Marquis of Northampton, the Earl of Shrewsbury; the Lord Admiral; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Sackevill.
A letter to Sir Robert Riche, son and heir to the Lord Rich, Sir Henry Lee, Knt., and John Smythe, Esq., to be here at the Court upon Sunday next, so as they may be ready the next day following to attend the Lord Chamberlain and others, whom the Queen presently sends to the French King.
May 3.
R. O. 27 V. 140.
603. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 3.
R. O. 27 VI. 102.
604. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 5.
B. M. Add. 5756. 246.
605. Throckmorton's Embassy to France.
Warrant by the Queen to John Astley, Esq., Master and Treasurer of her jewels and plate, to deliver 1,685½ oz. of plate to Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, appointed Ambassador resident at the Court of France, for his better furniture in that charge, the same to be redelivered by him, or the whole value thereof, on his return. The particulars of the plate are specified in the warrant.—Westminster, 5 May, 1 Elizabeth. Signed: Elizabeth,—Yetsweirt.
Orig.
May 5.
R. O.
606. Another copy of the above. Pp. 2.
May 5.
R.O.
607. Croft to Cecil.
Since his letters of the 2nd inst., (wherein he signified with what diligence the soldiers were in paying,) understands that after the cassed men of this town are paid, little money will remain to supply the works, and to serve the surveyor of the victuals to pay for grain daily coming hither upon such bargains as he has made upon the coasts of Norfolk and Suffolk. When money shall want for the works, the Queen will sustain a great loss, since for want of pay unserviceable people shall be long detained in wages, and the taskers, (wherein stands a great furtherance of the works) shall not only cease their doings but will not credit the promises made to them hereafter. Those persons also who bring the grain, sustaining a breach of covenant, will break off, and this town will be short of the provision which is looked for.
Finds, upon examination of the matter, that all Mr. Abbington's deputies can demand at this pay is not above 1,500l. They do not confess to him that there is above 5,000l. or 6,000l. of provision anywhere in store; but the writer remembers 13,000l. or 14,000l. being delivered into the hands of the surveyor of victuals. An inquiry should be made how the money was employed. Marvels why M. Abbington, or some other, is not sent to oversee it. The unseasonable victuals has been undoubtedly the casting away of many poor men. For the fish (that came very late in the end of the Lent,) he did what he might for saving the Queen's charges by increasing one day more in the week for fish than was accustomed, and observed the like order for his own house. Nevertheless upon the complaint of the poor, and beholding into what misery they were brought by the naughtiness of the fish, he called Mr. Abbington's deputies, and appointed with them a servant of his own and one of Mr. Treasurer's to view the victuals and separate the bad from the good. At one time they laid apart of naughty fish 33 last of herrings, white and red, besides butter and cheese.—Berwick, 5 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 4.
May 6.
R. O.
608. The Queen's Marriage.
"M[inute] to the Ambassador of Sweden from the Council." Cecil had informed the Queen that the Ambassador of Sweden wished to have an interview with the Council. The Queen's will was to this effect, that she trusts the friendship with Sweden will never be interrupted; but hearing that the Prince contemplates a marriage with her, she regrets that she is unable to enter into any such arrangement. Short of this, there is no form of friendship which she will easily refuse. She hopes that, if possible, an embassy about to be despatched into England with this object may be kept back, but if this cannot be done, she trusts that the refusal which they will receive may not interrupt the friendship which she is desirous of preserving. The Lords of the Council think this to be so important that they hope that the Ambassador will take care that the matter be not proceeded with unadvisedly.
Draft. Cecil's hol. Endd.: 1559, 6 Maii. Lat. Pp. 2.
May 6.
R. O. 171 B.
609. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 6.
R.O.
610. The Queen to Thomas Wotton, Esq.
Being desirous to have the French Ambassadors well used and entertained, she has written to the Lord Cobham, Warden of the Five Ports, with whom she wills him to consult. As soon as they come to any certain intelligence of what persons of honour come with the Ambassadors they shall thereof advertise the Privy Council.
Draft, corrected by Cecil. Pp. 3.
May 6.
R.O.
611. The Queen to William, Lord Cobham.
Certain personages of honour being thought to be coming towards her in ambassade from the French King, who will arrive at Dover or some other port in Kent, of which he is her Warden, she appoints him her lieutenant in that county and commits the chief charge of the matter to him, requesting him to confer hereupon with Thomas Wotton, Esq., her sheriff of that shire, who, accompanied by six, eight, or ten gentlemen, shall meet the Ambassadors at their landing, and shall thence accompany them to Canterbury, where they shall be met by Lord Cobham, who shall keep company with them continually until they come into her presence.
The town of Dover shall be prepared in the best manner for the receiving of the Ambassadors, of whose arrival within the port she shall be advertised by post.
Draft. Endd. by Cecil: 1559, 6 Maii. Pp. 4.
May 6.
R. O.
612. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Oath by Queen Elizabeth that she will observe the articles of the treaty of peace at Cateau Cambresis on 2 April 1559. Signed.
Orig., on vellum. Broadside.
May 6.
R. O. Forbes, 1. 86.
613. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Commission to Wm., Lord Howard of Effingham, K.G., Lord Chamberlain, N. Wotton, and Nicholas Throckmorton, to receive from the King of France the ratification of the treaty of Cateau Cambresis, and to swear to her ratification of the same.
Endd.: Commission for the Ambassadors sent into France, 1559, May. Draft, with additions by Wotton and a few corrections by Cecil. Lat. Pp. 7.
May 6.
R. O.
614. Another copy of the preceding, with the signatures of the Council;—N. Bacon, Cust. Sigill., Winchester, F. Bedford, Thos. Parry, Ab. Cave, W. Cecill, John Masone, Ry. Sackevyle.
Copy. Endd. by Cecil: 6 May 1559. Pp. 8.
May 6.
R. O. 171 B.
615. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 6.
R. O.
616. Another copy of the preceding.
Copy, with corrections. Imperfect. Pp. 2.
May 6.
B. M. Sloane, 4143. 46.
617. Another copy of the preceding.
Forbes' transcript.
May 6.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 226.
618. Another copy of the preceding.
Forbes' transcript.
May 6.
R. O.
619. Instructions for Ambassadors for France.
"Instructions given by the Queen to Lord William Howard of Effingham, Doctor Wotton, Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, Knt., sent to the French King for the purposes following:—
1. To urge the French King to confirm the treaty of Chateau Cambresis by his oath before the 28th inst.
2. To thank the King and Queen Dauphins, the former for the ratification of his father's treaty, and both conjointly for having sent the ratification of the treaty for Scotland by their Secretary, Monseigneur de Ledington, which Elizabeth has subscribed and sealed.
3. To procure the apprehension and punishment, by means of the Constable of France, of certain Frenchmen mentioned in the confession of one Christopher Rowson, now in the Tower of London.
4. Lord Howard and Dr. Wotton shall then return, leaving Sir N. Throckmorton there as Ambassador resident. Signed by the Council;—N. Bacon, Cust. Sigill., Winchester, F. Bedford, Thomas Parry, W. Cecil, Ab. Cave, John Masone, Ry. Sackevyle.
Copy. Endd. by Cecil: Copia, 6 May 1559. Pp. 7.
May 6.
R. O. 171 B.
620. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 6.
R.O.
621. Instructions for Throckmorton.
"Instructions given by the Queen for Sir Nicolas Throckmorton, Knt., whom she has appointed to reside as her Ambassador with the French King."
1. After having accomplished the purposes for which he is associated with the Lord Howard of Effingham and Dr. Wotton, he shall continue as Ambassador resident with the French King, and in this capacity is to promote the increase of amity between the two realms.
2. In the transmission of intelligence he shall send duplicates of all letters of importance, either by the merchants of Rouen, or Dieppe, or by way of Germany, from Geneva or Strasburg.
3. He shall continue to act in the matter respecting "the detention of certain Frenchmen, counterfeiters of monies, both English, French, and Spanish." Signed by the Council;—N. Bacon, Cust. Sigill., Winchester, F. Bedford, Thomas Parry, W. Cecil, Ab. Cave, John Masone, Ry. Sackevyle.
Copy. Endd. by Cecil: Copia, 6 May 1559. Pp. 7.
May 6.
R.O. 171 B.
622. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 6.
B.M. Addit. 5756. 247.
623. Throckmorton's Embassy into France.
Indenture, May 6, 1 Elizabeth, between John Asteley, Esq., Master and Treasurer of the Queen's jewels and plate, and Sir Nicholas Throgmorton, Ambassador to the French King, respecting the delivery to the latter by the former of certain articles of plate, (the particulars of which are here specified), amounting to 1,683 oz.
Orig. on vellum.
May 6.
R.O.
624. Another copy of the same.
Copy. Endd.: 5 May 1559. Plate delivered to my father by the Master of the jewel house. Pp. 2.
May 6.
B. M. Add. MS. 5756. 245.
625. Warrant for Throckmorton.
Warrant to George Bredeman, Keeper of the Palace of Westminster, to lend 1,000 marks to Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, Knt., appointed her Ambassador resident in France, over and above such sums as are allowed him for his diets in this journey.—Westm. May 6, 1 Eliz.
Orig. on vellum. Signed by the Queen, with seal. Endd.
May 7.
R.O.
626. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Commission by the Queen to William, Lord Howard of Effingham, K.G., Nicholas Wotton, and Sir Nicholas Throgmorton, to receive from the King of France the confirmation of the treaty concluded at Cateau Cambresis on 2 April last. —Westminster, 7 May 1559. (fn. 2)
Modern transcript. Lat. Pp. 2.
May 7.
B. M. Harl. 353. 177.
627. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 7 May 1559.—Present: the Lord Great Seal, the Lord Treasurer, the Marquis of Northampton, the Lord Steward; the Earls of Shrewsbury and Bedford; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Mason, Mr. Sackevill.
A letter to Thomas Kayes and William Crispe, Esqs., of thanks for their diligence used in the apprehending and committing to ward of Basden, the priest of Canterbury, who was passing the seas at Dover. They are further willed, if the same priest can find good securities to be bound for him, that he shall be henceforth of good behaviour and not depart the realm without licence, then to put him at liberty; otherwise to detain him in prison until they shall have contrary order from hence.
May 7.
R.O. 27 V. 142.
628. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 7.
R.O. 27 VI. 105.
629. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 8.
R.O.
630. The Emperor Ferdinand to the Queen.
Sends Casper Preyner, Baron in Stibing, Fladnitz, and Rabenstein, one of his Council, and that of the Archduke of Austria, to inform her of certain grave and important matters. —Augusta Vindelicorum, 8 May 1559. Signed: M. Singkhmoser.
Orig. Add. Endd. by Cecil. Lat. Broadside.
May 8.
B.M. Galba, B. xi. 199.
631. Another copy of the above.
From the original.
May 8.
B. M. Sloane, 4142. 7.
632. Another copy of the preceding.
Forbes' transcript.
May 8.
R. O. 171 B.
633. Another copy of the preceding.
Modern transcript.
May 8.
R. O.
634. Treaty with Scotland.
The Queen to the Earl of Northumberland, the Bishop of Durham, the Lord Dacre, and Sir James Croftes, informing them that she has appointed them, (or any two of them, whereof the Bishop of Durham shall be one,) to treat with the Commissioners of Scotland upon certain articles which yet remain in suspense, not having been determined in the late peace concluded between her and the French King.— Westminster, 8 May, 1 Eliz.
Copy. (fn. 3) Pp. 2.
May 8.
Throkmorton Papers, A. S. No. 1. Forbes, 1. 85.
635. Lord William Cobham to Mr. Wotton.
Herewith sends the Queen's letter for the receiving of certain personages of honour thought to be coming over; to which effect he has also received like letters to meet the noble personages at Canterbury. It is her pleasure that the Ambassadors be well entertained at their arrival by Wotton and such other gentlemen as shall accompany him; therefore requires him to repair immediately to Dover, to take order for lodging, horses, and carriages for the said noble personages and their trains. Has written to the lieutenant of Dover Castle, to assist him herein; requiring Wotton that all intelligence he shall have of the coming of the said strangers he will not omit to signify to him, the writer, and as soon as they arrive at Dover to despatch an express messenger to him.—London, 8th May 1559. Signed.
Add.
May 8.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 225.
636. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
[May 9.]
R. O.
637. The Duke of Saxony [to his Council].
Dr. Mundt, the Envoy of the present Queen of England, having opened to them the commission with which he has been entrusted by the Queen, and they having communicated the same to the Duke, he returns the present answer to be by them delivered to Mundt.
Mundt having presented his credentials (which are found to be general and not specific), the writer concludes that he will in like manner deliver a similar message to the other members of the Confession of Augsburg.
Having heard of her accession the Duke was exceedingly rejoiced, he having understood that she is praised as a Christian God-fearing Queen, and one who loves the Gospel and God's purifying Word. He exhorts her to proceed with her Christian and God-pleasing design, and in short plant, establish, and propagate within the realm of England, God's Word pure and unadulterated, in accordance with the Confession of Augsburg, the Apologia, and the articles of Smalcald. He has not forgotten how her father, King Henry of blessed memory, stood in Christian and friendly communication with the writer's late father John Frederic of Saxony and the Electors deceased, as also with other Electors and Princes of the Confession of Augsburg. She having also stated by Mundt that she was anxious to renew with the writer, and with the other Electors and Princes, the same friendly union, it was their wish that she should be assured that a similar feeling existing upon their part, and that they will do their uttermost to further and assist in the establishment and maintenance of the Divine Word in England, and they pray that He would bless and strengthen her to continue the unfinished work.
This is the substance of the message which he wishes to be communicated to Dr. Mundt, and by him conveyed to the Queen.
Copy. Germ. Pp. 4.
May 9.
R. O.
638. A translation into English of the above letter.
Endd. by Cecil: The answer made by the Duke of Saxe to Christofer Mont. Pp. 4.
May 9.
R. O.
639. The Council of the Duke of Saxony to Mundt.
Apologize for their long silence, occasioned by the absence of their master. Ask him to inform the Queen of the Duke's cordial response to her message, especially as regards matters of religion.—Augusta Vindelicorum, 9 May 1559. Signed: Eberhardus a Luan (?) Johannes Vitus ab Obernitz.
Orig. Add. Endd. Lat. Pp. 2.
May 9.
B.M. Galba, B. xi. 207.
640. Count Helffenstein to the Queen.
Had lately sent to her the letters of his master, which she had graciously received and answered, and this her answer he had forwarded on the same day to the Emperor along with letters from himself. Now sends her the Emperor's reply.
Long before her accession to the throne the Emperor had contemplated a closer alliance, and but for the unexpected death of Queen Mary would have sent the writer into England with this object. When in England he had conversed with her upon this subject as she was walking in the royal garden, but with some obscurity, not venturing to express himself more openly, as he had heard another suitor spoken of. The Emperor having summoned him from the Court of King Philip, consulted him and others of his nobility upon the letters which he had received from her, and decided that a second messenger should be despatched. Knowing her prudence and judgment he reminds her how great will be the authority, dignity, happiness, tranquillity, security, advantage, and unspeakable utility which will result to her from a union with the Emperor's son, who is adorned with such advantages of mind and body. Offers her his assistance in her wars.—Brussels, 9 May 1559. Signed: Georgius ab Helffenstein.
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. by Cecil. Lat. Pp. 5.
May 9.
Sloane, 4142. 4 b.
641. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 9.
R. O.
642. Count Helffenstein to Challoner.
Recommends one whom his Secretary had already mentioned, and whom Challoner had kindly received.—Brussels, 9 May 1559. Signed: Georgius Comes ab Helffenstein, baro a Gundelfing.
Orig. Hol., Add., with armorial seal. Lat. Pp. 2.
May 10.
R.O.
643. Mundt to the Queen.
The Estates now consult upon a Legate to be sent into France for the "repetition" of Metz, Toul, and Verdun, and as to what answer they shall make if the French King reply that other Princes have also taken lands appertaining to the Empire, and that he will restore them when they do the like. Some of the Princes are earnest enough in this cause, but they lack a head.
In religion nothing is concluded, nor is it supposed anything in that matter will be in this Diet. The Protestants persevere in their answer given to the Emperor on 1st May, of which he has written to her the 3rd inst. They join themselves together earnestly and consult daily to stick ad Confessionem Augustanam, seeing the Papists are now encouraged by the two Kings, who mention in their articles that they will advance and procure the conservation of the Church and will travail that a General Council be held. They have intelligence that of late the Pope has written to the Emperor that the see of Rome be defended, and that the Lutherans be punished for their blasphemies spread abroad against the holy Church of Rome. They perceive the Emperor will do what he may to please the Bishop of Rome, and that the Kings of France and Spain are likewise minded, so necessity shall cause all who love the true religion to stand together. After this Diet the Protestants shall assemble their learned men to confer and make a perfect agreement in religion.
The Emperor on Ascension Day commanded all his gentlemen and servants not to attend the Protestants' sermons on pain of losing their service; and one of his guards was put away because he was married in a Protestant church. The Emperor is minded to tarry here all the winter, and hath given the administration of Bohemia and Austria to his sons. —Augusta, 10 May 1559.
Orig. Hol. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 10.
R. O.
644. Mundt to Cecil.
All things go "shlafully" forward. The Emperor has taken a promise, stipulata manu, of all the Princes and chief Commissaries here that they shall "not drink to others, neither whole neither half." Great rumour that one of the Emperor's sons shall marry the Queen of England, and that for the same purpose Count George of Helfestein has been in England, and of late, his secretary. Yesterday the Emperor sent from hence a gentleman to England for the same cause, and divers pictures have been sent also. Duke Ferdinand is at Prague; Duke Carolus is here, as is also an Ambassador of Maximilian, a very well learned gentleman, in religion earnest, of whom he has heard "mirabilia" of His Majesty; others have told him of their natures and conditions.
Soon after this Diet the Protestants shall have an assembly. The Queen should have some intelligence with the Princes, whose Commissaries are desirous thereof; if not in all, yet in primis religionis articulis an agreement and intelligence might be made. They suspect the Papists will be busier and stouter than before, and the Pope stir the coals diligently. The new Elector Palatine will come here shortly to take investituram et regalia of his lands, because he is the chief Prince in these parts of Germany. In what way it seemed to him, the writer, convenient for the Queen to enter with the Elector in amity he has showed to Cecil by his letter of the 21st Feb.
The convocations and consulations of the Protestants are done here by his Commissaries in the Palatine's lodging. Sends him the answer of the Duke of Saxony, Johannis Frederici, which he received late in the evening and had no time to translate. Begs to be commended to Sir Anthony Cooke. —Augusta, 10 May 1559.
Orig. Hol. Add. Pp. 2.
May 10.
R. O. Forbes, 1. 88.
645. Throkmorton to Cecil.
Requests to be furnished with instructions how to behave himself towards the King and Queen Dauphins of Scotland, the Cardinal of Lorraine, and others of the house of Guise.— Sittingbourne, 10 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 10.
B.M. Sloane, 4134. 228.
646. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 10.
B.M. Harl. 535. 178.
647. Proceedings of Privy Council.
Westminster, 10 May 1559.—Present: the Lords Great Seal, Treasurer, and Steward; the Earl of Bedford; Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Secretary; Mr. Cave, Mr. Mason, Mr. Sackevill.
A letter to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the city of London, with seven bonds for the taking up of money beyond the seas, which they are required to cause to be sealed with the common seal of the City of London, and to return the same hither, together with such assurances as they have accustomably used to have in like cases, to the end the same may be preferred to the Queen's signature accordingly.
May 10.
R. O. 27 V. 145.
648. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 10.
R.O. 27 VI. 108.
649. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
May 10.
R. O. Fœd., xv. 526.
650. Treaty of Upsetlington.
Commission by the Queen to Thomas, Earl of Northumberland and Warden of the Marches, Cuthbert, Bishop of Durham, William, Lord Dacre and Graystoke, and Sir James Crofts, to conclude with the Commissioners of Scotland upon certain matters left undecided by the 7th article of the treaty of Chateau Cambresis.
Endd. Copy. Lat. Pp. 2.
[May 10.]
R.O.
651. Another copy. (See May 31.)
Pp. 3.

Footnotes

1 Originally "pounds," but altered by the first hand.
2 Transcript for the Fœdera, vol. 137, from the original, with seal, in the Tresor des Chartes at Paris, J. 652. 35.
3 Forwarded by the Earl of Northumberland to Sir James Croftes, see May 13.