Elizabeth
May 1559, 26-31

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Joseph Stevenson (editor)

Year published

1863

Pages

280-298

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Elizabeth: May 1559, 26-31', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 1: 1558-1559 (1863), pp. 280-298. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=71743 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

May 1559, 26-31

May 26.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 108.
757. The Queen to Lord W. Howard, Wotton, and Throckmorton.
This day, being Corpus Christi Day, the French King's Ambassadors, Le Sieur de Montmorency and Le Sieur de Veilleville, required oath of her for the performance of the treaty of peace concluded at Cambresis, and heard and saw her with very good will take an oath upon the Evangelists. This being done, they required a like oath for the peace of Scotland; whereunto she answered there was no article nor covenant in the treaty of Scotland requiring the same, and for that cause she had given no authority to her Commissioners in France to require any, and for proof thereof she caused the French Ambassadors to see the treaty. They, however, seeming not so satisfied to overpass it, by advice of the Council and the commission of the French having been seen, she took the oath required, wherewith they were much satisfied; adding this for their part, that though it was not comprehended by any special article in the treaty, yet was it the meaning thereof, and they knew that the King and Queen Dauphin would do the like. She therefore addresses her commission to them under the Great Seal to demand the like oath from the King and Queen Dauphin, which she sends herewith.
As the Chamberlain and Wotton may have taken their leave, her Ambassador there resident may execute this matter. Wishes them, if they meet her courier upon the way, to address him with her commission and her letters to the Ambassador resident, with their further advice as they shall see cause.
Draft, endd. by Cecil: 26 May 1559. Copy of the Queen's letter to the L. Chamberlain, Mr. Wotton, Mr. Throkmorton.
Pp. 2.
May 26.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 258.
758. Another copy of the above. Forbes' transcript.
May [26.]
R.O. Forbes, 1. 109.
759. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Commission by the Queen to William Lord Howard of Effingham, K.G., Nicolas Wotton, and Sir Nicolas Throckmorton, to receive the oaths of Francis and Mary, King and Queen of Scotland, that they will observe and fulfil the treaty of Cateau Cambresis.—Westm. [blank] May 1559, 1 Eliz.]
Copy. Lat. Pp. 2.
May 26.
B.M. Sloane, 4134, 260.
760. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 26.
R.O.
761. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript. (fn. 1)
May 26.
B.M. Cal. B. ix. 42.
762. Another copy of the above.
Draft, corrected, dated, and endorsed by Cecil. Pp. 4.
May 26.
B.M. Cal. B. ix. 106 b.
763. Another copy of the above.
f Copy.
May 26.
R.O.
764. Lord William Cobham to Cecil.
Has received by his brother, Henry Cobham, the Queen's letters and Cecil's, and will observe their commandments. His doings (if he might say upright) have by sinister means been turned to their worst. God and the Queen, he hopes, will be her rightful judges. His brother Henry is gone this morning to Dover, with whom he has appointed seven gentlemen to attend the Conte's coming, who can either speak the Latin, French, or [defaced] languages.—Cobham Hall, 26 May. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 26.
R.O.
765. Cecil to Throkmorton.
Thanks him for his frequent writing. His last came by Florence d'Aceto. By the Queen's letters and commission he will perceive the occasion of this despatch. Sends a copy of an oath to be required, wherein he thinks they will alter nothing, only varying by omission in the Queen's title this word, France, wherein it is in vain to contend with them, since the word is there. Sends also a form of a testimony to be signed by one or two of the Secretaries that shall be present. In the passing of the oath for France he [Throckmorton] is well enough informed.
These French seem much enamoured with the Queen's behaviour and entertainment; wishes they were also as far in fear.
"There hath been a great innovation in Scotland this last week. At Dundee, where Knox and other be preaching, there was an assemblage of 6,000 people, wherewith the Queen was so offended that she hath put the preachers to the horn. The Earls of Argyll, Marshall, Arrell, and Glencarne maintain them and offer to bring them to the Queen to dispute with the clergy of Scotland. The houses of religion in S. John's Town be dissolved. The Abbot of Cowper, brother to Argyll, hath left his habit and is a secular. Some great consequences must needs follow. Thus I end."
Prays him to get him some Frenchman that has knowledge in planting of a vineyard and keeping of an orchard. "I would begin a mastery beside Stamford, that if I cannot have wine yet I might have good sauce." Encloses a letter. —Westminster, 26 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 26.
R.O.
766. The Earl of Northumberland to Cecil.
The business and controversy betwixt the Dowager of Scotland and certain noblemen about the religion, as Sir J. Croftes has advertised up, has been partly an occasion that the Earl has stayed in writing of the same till he knew the more certainty thereof. Now it appears that it is like enough to be qualified and taken up, because the Duke and the Earl Huntley have promised their assistance unto the Queen Dowager, and are presently with her about the same. As he has further knowledge of their proceedings, Cecil shall be advertised from time to time.
Whereas he moved the Queen for licence that the Lord Keith, now prisoner here, might repair unto his country for the recovery of his health, she had agreed to the same upon a bond for the payment of a ransom in the event of his nonreturn because of his death or other impediment;—his friends refuse to be bound, if he should die before the day of entry, to pay any sum; but in other respects are agreeable to the bond. The clause is without precedent. What is the Queen's pleasure herein?
May 26.Troubles him once more with his suit about the Holme and Tynemouth, as necessity much provokes him thereto.— Alnwick, 26 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 27.
R.O.
767. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Notarial instrument to the effect that in "the great chamber of presence" in the palace of Westminster, in the presence of the Queen and of Francis de Montmorency, Francis Despeaulx, Sieur de Villeville, and of others hereafter named, Frederic de Foix, Count de Candalle and Captal de Buch, Louis de S. Maur, Marquis de Nesle and Count de Lavalle, and Gaston de Foix, Marquis de Trani, made oath, as the hostages of France, to observe the treaty concluded at Cateau Cambresis. This was done in the presence of Wm., Marquis of Winchester, Treasurer of England, Wm., Marquis of Northampton, and other witnesses, and of Tho. Argalle and Wm. Say, notaries public.—27 May 1559, 1 Eliz.
Orig., on vellum. Endd. by Cecil: 28 May 1560. Lat.
May 27.
R.O.
768. The Oath of the Hostages of France.
Frederic de Foix, Count de Candalle and Chaptal de Buch, Louis de S. Maur, Marquis de Nesle and Count de Laval, Gaston de Foix, Marquis de Trani, hostages sent by Henry II., King of France, to Queen Elizabeth, as provided by the treaty of peace of 2 April last past, have made oath before Francis de Montmorency, Knight of the Order of S. Michael, Lieutenant-General of the King of France, and Francis Despaulx, Sieur de Villeville, Lieutenant-General of Metz, that they will not leave the realm of England without the express permission of the Queen. Signed.
Orig., upon vellum. Endd. by Cecil: 27 May 1559. Lat. Pp. 2.
May 27.
R.O.
769. Draft of the above.
In Cecil's handwriting. Endd. by him: 27 May 1559. Pp. 2.
May 27.
R.O.
770. Another copy of the above. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 27.
R.O. 171 B.
771. Another copy of the same. Modern transcript.
May 27.
R.O.
772. The Earl of Northumberland to the Council.
Desires to be advertised whether the castle of Wark-uponTweed, the inheritance of Sir Ralph Grey, taken during the late wars into the Prince's possession, (being at that time very like to have been in the enemy's hands, to the destruction of the whole frontier,) and kept ever since at the Queen's charges with such garrison as was convenient, should be restored to the owner, Mr. Grey, as peace is now concluded.
May 26.The piece is situate for annoyance and defence in the best place of all the frontiers, being there the best entry into Tevydale and the west part of the Merse, and for defence of invasion out of the Merse, it keeps much between that and Norham; and, on the other hand, for the invasion of Teviotdale it is the whole stay between itself and Cheviot. If, therefore, it be not furnished as it ought, it gives the enemy such entry as they might in few days, at any time, devastate the country of Glendale. After the field called Flodden, it was in the King's possession, and was then repaired and built at his charges by Lord Dacre, that last died, then Warden of the said Marches, to keep Glendale plenished and to be annoyance to our enemies. When besieged with a great army by the Duke of Albany, then Governor of Scotland, it was so well defended, and a power levied to raise the siege, that he departed frustrate of his purpose. It so continued with a captain, and being of no great force, till the latter end of the reign of Henry VIII., who seeing the necessity of its situation, bestowed thereon great charges, as well in fortifying as in making houses for brewing and baking as a place of mass and stowage for victuals; which, as well in his time as in the time of King Edward served to much good purpose. Afterwards (upon what occasion he knows not) these houses were delivered to Mr. Grey, with certain pieces of ordnance and munition, and he was bound by covenant in writing to keep the same, which had not remained in his possession past five years, in the besieging of the last wars. The ordnance and munition were spent and decayed, and the house so repaired, as it served neither for defence nor annoyance, which was soon perceived by the destruction of the country.
After the writer's coming down he called on Mr. Grey for the reformation of the building, but this was not done till the town was burnt. If the house had continued a few days in that state it had been in the enemy's hands; so of force the writer gave it to his brother Slingsby there, and caused the town with much hard labour to be re-edified, a brew-house to be there prepared for victuals, and many other necessities to be done, and by that means it was defended and so has hitherto continued.
Begs that Sir John Brende or Mr. Lee, or some other as have knowledge of the piece, may give them his opinion thereon.—Alnwick, 27 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 27.
R.O.
773. Sir Richard Lee to the Council.
Gave Sir John Brend at his departure "a platte" of the town [of Berwick] and full instructions for the works here, which he will declare to them. Wished my Lord of Bedford had arrived to direct his doings, the works being great and chargeable, and to see to what purpose the treasure is spent, and whether the charges past are well employed. Had he come he would have seen the necessity for money more plainly than the writer can advertise them. Beseeches them to send a "mass" of money speedily, the want of which causes the Queen to be put to great charges without any service done.— Berwick, 27 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 27.
R.O.
774. Sir J. Croft to the Council.
The Treasurer repairs to them to certify what money is due. Both he and Mr. Brende can testify the necessity of it to pay the works and the soldiers. Beseeches them to have consideration.—Berwick, 27 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add, with armorial seal. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 28.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 110.
775. Oath of the King of France.
On the 28th of May 1559, in the presence of Claude de L'Aubespine, Lord of Haulterive, and Jaques Bourdin, Lord of Villaines, Councillors of the King of France, Secretaries of State and of his finances, the said King took the oath, according to the treaty of peace concluded between the Queen of England's Deputies and those of the King, on the 2 April last, in the presence of William Howard, Baron of Effingham, K.G. and Chamberlain to the Queen, Nicholas Wotton, Dean of Canterbury and [York], and Nicolas Throckmorton, Knight, all Councillors of the Queen.
The Cardinal of Lorraine, first Peer of France, Archbishop and Duke of Rheims; the Duke of Guise, Chamberlain; the Duke of Montmorency, Constable; the Lord of S. André, Marquis of Froissac, Marshal of France, with other princes, counts, lords, and barons, were also present. Signed by the King's hand, at the request of the Deputies of the Queen of England. Signed: D'Laubespine,—Bourdin.
Orig., on vellum. Fr. Endd. by Cecil.
May 28.
R.O.
776. Another copy of the above.
Orig. on vellum. Endd. by Cecil: 28 May 1560.
May 28.
Sloane, 4134. 262.
777. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 28.
R.O. Fœd., xv. 520.
778. Oath of Francis and Mary.
Similar attestation on the part of Francis and Mary. Signed: De l'Aubespine,—Bourdin.
Orig., on vellum. Endd. by Cecil. Fr.
[May 28.]
R.O. Foed., xv. 519.
779. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
Oath of Francis and Mary, King and Queen of Scotland, that they will observe the treaty of peace concluded at Cateau Cambresis. Signed: Francoys, Marie.
Orig., on vellum. Endd. by Cecil: 28 Maii 1559.
May 28.780. Cecil to Throckmorton.
By the Lord Chamberlain's servant, has received the packet with two letters to himself, one from Amiens, the other from Paris, the contents of which he read to the Queen, who means to have in consideration for his return. Of the matter of the hostages here, and the lack of the fourth, Throckmorton has wisely considered. The Queen has referred the election of a meet fourth to the French King, but he will do well to understand what is to be misliked therein; and before appointment is made, to hearken, either by the Constable or otherwise, what manner of person he shall be, that the occasion of misliking may be avoided.
This morning "our Monsieurs" depart, accompanied to Gravesend by the Earl of Worcester, thence to Canterbury with Lord Cobham, and thence to the sea by Mr. Wotton and the gentlemen of the county.
This day, in the afternoon, came an Ambassador from the Emperor to the Queen, Baron Pryennye, an Almayne of great credit there. He came by Brussels, and meeting at Dover the Count de Feria, was directed by him to lodge in Durham Place.
Yesterday the three hostages were presented to the Queen, and made their oath in open presence. She has given to Montmorency a cupboard of stately plate, about the weight of 100 oz. in gold and 1,563 oz. in gilt, in value 884l. 14s., and to the second another cupboard of 1,000 oz. about the value 500l. They were both prepared bigger. What she will give this morning to M. Thorye he is not certain, but has been therein somewhat busied to make the gift meet for the giver; but what will come of it yet he knows not.
Has written to Mr. Wotton presently, that if he has not come thence with Cecil's boy before receipt of his letters, he shall on Cecil's part trouble Throckmorton with leaving him there in his service. Thinks the boy's service will deserve finally, but if he be put to any kind of service, either of reading or writing, or such other as may keep him occupied, it will do him more good and the writer great pleasure. Has but one, and his care is more for him, but principally to have him honest; for his outward manners, covets to have him courteous and cleanly; gayness he cares not for. Has given him certain precepts, and beseeches Throckmorton will command him to write them, that thereby he may put them in execution.
P. S.—There is now sent to M. Thorye a chain of gold garnished with pearl, and a fair gelding. Given to M. Montmorency, in gold 100 oz., in gilt 1,563 oz.; to Vielleville 1,000 oz.—28 May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 28.
Churton's life of Nowel, p. 392.
781. [Alexander Nowel?] to Mr. Abel. (fn. 2)
Last Sunday could not write to him in time for the post. On Whitsunday Mr. Grindal preached at the Cross, which was the first sermon that was there since Christmas, saving two at Easter. The Lord Keeper and the whole Council being present, the preacher proclaimed the restoring of the book of King Edward, whereat the Lords and the people made (or at least pretended) a wonderful rejoicing. Never a Bishop or Canon of Paul's was present thereat. On the Friday after, a priest, a popish merchant, was carried to the Tower for uttering words against the Queen, that she should not long continue. By him we may conjecture the good wills of the rest.
The penalty for not receiving the book not taking place till Midsummer, Paul's and certain other churches keep their popish service still; but the most part of the city is reformed. There shall shortly be a visitation throughout the whole realm.
Sir Anthony Coke, Mr. Gudryck, Doctor May, Doctor Cox, Doctor Haddon, Mr. Wrath, with my Lord of Bedford, Lord Munge [Mountjoy], and one Doctor Weston, (formerly Mr. Coverdale's chancellor, and now Dean of the Arches,) shall be visitors, and also the Queen's Commissioners for all ecclesiastical matters, with others added to them, so that they shall be in all fourteen. On Trinity Sunday Mr. Horn preached an excellent sermon at the Cross against Antichrist's Vicar.
On Tuesday after came in the French Ambassadors, and were received very honourably at the Court at Westminster on Wednesday, and there feasted. On Thursday, instead of receiving the Sacrament in the chapel at the Court, the Queen came down from her closet and received a corporal oath to the French King's Ambassadors for the confirmation of the peace; but she received not the Sacrament. All the Ambassadors were present at the English service in the chapel, and after the service were feasted by the Queen very honourably, and with such solemnity almost as never had been seen the like. The same day departed hence home again Count Ferys [Feria], King Philip's Ambassador, with his company. On Wednesday last came home Mr. Spryngham and his wife, with his company.
This day did preach at the Cross Mr. Barloo, who is named to be Bishop of Chichester, Mr. Scory of Hereford, Mr. Parker of Canterbury, Mr. Cox of Norwich, and Mr. Byll or Mr. Whytheade of Salisbury. None are as yet certainly appointed, but thinks that as soon as the Ambassadors are gone, things will be speedily set forth. Mr. Elmar has set forth a book called "The Harbrough," against Mr. Knock's "First Blast;" he is with my Lord John Graye. "Of any marriage towards there is no talking at all." (fn. 3)
May 28.Was at his new benefice in Kent, (whereof he wrote in his last letter), this last week, by the same token that he was robbed at Gaddy's Hill of his gown and cap. "Take heed you come not there."
Desires commendations to his [Abell's] wife, to Mr. D. Mownt and his wife, to D. Andernake and his wife "Fraw Katryn," and other their friends. "Your own always, as you know."
P. S.—Longs to hear from him and what tidings from Balborn. Has not received his [Abell's] first letter. Certain Bishops, (as the Bishops of York, London, Lichfield, and of Carlisle,) do put away their men, because (as men think) they will give over their bishoprics. Prays God there come no worse tidings to England. The most part of the monks of Westminster have changed their coats already.—London, 28 May 1559.
Orig. Add.: To his loving friend, Mr. Abell, now being at Strasburgh, deliver this at Strasburgh. Received the 19th June 1559. (fn. 4)
May 29.
R.O.
782. King Henry II. to the Queen.
Reciprocates the friendship which Lord Howard and Dr. Wotton, her deputies, have signified on her part, and expresses his satisfaction at the treaty of peace.—Paris, 29 May 1559. Signed: Henry Laubespine.
Orig. Add., with armorial seal. Endd. by Cecil: By the L. Chamberlain, and Mr. Wotton. Fr. Broadside.
May 29.
R.O.
783. The Queen to Throckmorton.
The Lord Grey of Wilton remaining yet in ward as prisoner to Rochefaucault and an unreasonable ransom set upon him, Throkmorton shall ascertain in what terms he stands presently, what price is made of him, what his charges have been, and what they are daily. He shall then receive knowledge what his yearly "lyvelvode" is in a certainty by Mr. Dyve, the bearer hereof. This done, he shall tell the French King that the ransom (fn. 5) is four times more than all the lands he has are worth if sold, and pray him that M. Rochefaulcault would consider what is possible to be done and what is impossible. He must take care that the French do not know that this motion proceeds from her, lest it might occasion them to look that she should of herself redeem him, whatsoever ransom they shall set; "which to do indeed we would were either seemly, considering the loss of the hold with him, or meet for us, having otherwise released to him his debts to us, and being, as ye know, otherwise diversely burdened." (fn. 6)
Draft, with corrections. Endd.: 29 May. Copy of a letter from the Queen to Sir Nicholas Throkmorton, Ligier in France. Pp. 3.
May 29.
Keith, 1. 200.
784. Reformation in Scotland.
Agreement at Perth, Monday, 29 May, between the Queen Regent and the Congregation.
1. Both the armies shall be disbanded and the town left open to the Queen.
2. None of the inhabitants shall be molested on account of the late alteration in religion.
3. No Frenchman shall enter the town, nor come within three miles of it; and when the Queen retires, no French garrison shall be left in the town.
4. All other controversies shall be referred to the next Parliament.
May 30.
R.O.
785. The Queen to the Queen Dowager of Scotland.
Having concluded a peace not only with the French King but with the King and Queen Dauphins of Scotland, confirmations of which they have sent to her, the writer, she informs the Queen Dowager thereof.
As to the ratification of the treaty between her and Scotland, delivered to Elizabeth by the bearer hereof, "Sor. de Ledington," he will declare the same to the Queen Dowager. Has delivered the confirmation of the same treaty to the said Sor. de Ledington, who has charge for the same purpose by letters of the King and Queen Dauphins, to whose use the said ratification shall be delivered.
As certain articles mentioned in the said treaty are as yet undetermined, two or three commissioners should be appointed. Herein the bearer will communicate her mind to the Queen Dowager.
Corrected draft. Endd.: M. of a letter sent from the Queen to the Queen Dowager of Scotland, 1559, 30 May. Broadside.
May 30.
R.O. 171 B.
786. Another copy of the above. Modern transcript.
May 30.
R. O. Forbes, 1. 112.
787. The English Ambassadors in France to the Queen.
On the 28th inst. they accompanied the French King from the Louvre to the church of Nôtre Dame, and there after Mass were present at his taking the oath for ratification of the treaty between the Queen and him; whereat were also the Bishop of Fermo, a Florentine born, the Pope's Ambassador here, and the Ambassadors of Venice, Ferrara, and Mantua; with diverse Cardinals and Bishops and the most part of the nobility of this Court. This done, the Lord Chamberlain delivered to the King his ratification sent to the Queen by La Marque, which he redelivered to them as her Ambassadors. The Lord Chamberlain then presented Sir N. Throckmorton to the King, as her resident Ambassador, who delivered his letters of credence to the King and said his instructions; to which the King replied, that he bare the Queen as great or greater affection than was between their two fathers. This done they dined in his company at the Court, sitting on his right hand at one end of the table, and the King Dauphin, the Cardinal of Lorraine, and the Prince of Ferrara at the other end. The King to and from the church caused the Lord Chamberlain to ride by his side, the other Ambassadors riding before; and further, when leaving the church, the Pope's Ambassador pressed to go before him, but the King put him back and took the Chamberlain by the hand and bade him go by him.
After dinner they followed the King into an inner chamber, where he used courteous communication to the Lord Chamberlain, and declared that he had received letters from M. de Montmorency, whereby he understood what great courtesy he and De Vielleville had received at the Queen's hands. Afterwards they repaired to the lodging of the Lord Chamberlain.
About 4 o'clock in the same afternoon Francis, the Queen's courier, arrived at Paris, by whom they received her letters of commission for taking the King and Queen Dauphins' oath. Desired De l'Aubespine to be means that they might have that ceremony despatched, which was forthwith granted. The French King sent for them to a chapel near the Court, where they found him and the King and Queen Dauphins at evensong; and according to the commission saw the oath perfected by the King and Queen Dauphins. Whereupon Sir N. Throckmorton presented his letters to them and said as Mr. Secretary ordered him; and the Queen (who took upon her to speak more than her husband) replied, that they were glad of the peace brought about, and for their parts would endeavour to see it preserved and maintained; adding that when Throckmorton had any thing to do with them touching the realms of England and Scotland, he should have access and favourable audience; and so with the King they returned to Court, and from thence to their lodgings. In the evening (being so required) they repaired again to the Court, where, after they had seen the King and others dance, the Lord Chamberlain and Dr. Wotton took leave of the French King and Queen, the King and Queen Dauphins, and divers others present; and depart from Paris homeward this day, minding till they come to Abbeville, to take the way of Beaumont and Beauvais. The Constable said to them divers times that he always bore goodwill towards England, and now more than ever he did, understanding the Queen to be en dowed with so many goodly virtues. Visiting them at their lodging, he said that as there was a new impost upon wines and other commodities coming thither from these parts, the same must also be done on this side, which would breed unkindness between the subjects of both realms.—Paris, 30 May 1559. Signed: W. Howard,—N. Wotton,—N. Throkmorton.
Orig. Add., with seal. Endd. by Cecil. Pp. 5.
May 30.
B.M. Sloane, 4134. 264.
788. Another copy of the above. Forbes' transcript.
May 30.
R.O. Forbes, 1. 114.
789. Throckmorton to Cecil.
1. Has received by his servant Middelmore, Cecil's letter of the 15th inst., and also another of the 26th, received on the 28th about 2 o'clock, but did not receive in either of them the copy of an oath, or the form of a testimony to be signed by one or two of the Secretaries, which he was informed had been sent. Has received the French King's oath at Nôtre Dame, the circumstances whereof he may perceive more at large by the Lord Chamberlain's and Wotton's letters. The same afternoon according to their instructions they took the oaths of the King and Queen Dauphins, in a chapel near the Court, the French King and Queen being present. The King told him that M. de Montmorency had advertised him, that he had received such entertainment in England and been used so courteously there as he was never in any place.
2. The Admiral is arrived at the Court, who has used them very courteously, and has taken order that such ships as come out of England to transport the French train thence, shall stay and remain at Boulogne till the Lord Chamberlain's and Mr. Wotton's arrival there for their passing over. The Admiral in conducting Mr. Wotton and him to Nôtre Dame, questioned him regarding the state of religion in England. Mass being begun, looked for him, but by no means could understand him to be there, he having slipped away from Mass. In bringing them home again he praised King Edward as the most virtuous and godliest Prince, and of the greatest hope to do good in Christendom that was of many years.
3. Will make inquisition for a man for his vineyard; and when he has learned of one meet for his purpose, will do all he can to get him for him and send him over.
4. The Constable told the Lord Chamberlain, Mr. Wotton, and himself that an impost of new was set upon wines and other commodities coming thither from these parts; and that the like must be done on this side, which would breed unkindness amongst those of both realms.
5. The Emperor and States of Germany have assembled 20,000 men for the reuniting of Metz again to the Empire. Whether it be true or not does not know, but such are the news here. On the 29th inst. the Council assembled and seemed to be somewhat perplexed. King Philip says that he has nothing to do with it, nor is it any matter of his.
6. The 30th the King goes to Equan, the Constable's house; and from thence to certain other places of Madame de Valentinois; and will tarry abroad eight or nine days. He has not appointed any Ambassador to follow, as there is no lodging near the places he repairs to; notwithstanding Throkmorton minds to have one to follow the Court and to understand how things go there.
7. The Duke of Lorraine arrived this afternoon at the Court in company with Marquis de Bœuf.
8. Cecil will receive herewithall a proclamation for jousts and tournays to be made at the French Court at the solemnization of the Duke of Savoy's marriage. The Lord Chamberlain has received a very large and honourable present of very fair and stately plate, gilt, amounting to 4,140 ozs., and worth 2,066l. 13s. 4d.; and Dr. Wotton has also received as much gilt plate as amounts to 1,500 ozs. and more, which is worth 2,000 crowns of the sun. He himself has received no present, being Ligier, but he is told that he shall be considered at his departure, which he trusts shall not be long. The Ambassador of Venice did reverence to the Lord Chamberlain yesterday, and after many good words spoken about the Queen on the part of the Seignory, wished her marriage might be to her satisfaction and to the honour of the realm. As he accompanied the Ambassador somewhat on his way, he asked the writer what he heard of the Queen's Ambassador at Rome, Mr. Kerne. Replied he understood he was on his way homeward; whereat he smiled, and said that the Pope had staid him there with his will and given him the hospital which the Cardinal Pole had in Rome, and which Mr. Kerne hath thankfully received. Here is the beginning of acquaintance between the Ambassador and himself.
9. The Earl of Arran being sent for by the French King and the King and Queen Dauphins, has made his excuse that he cannot come; nevertheless there is an express messenger sent him this day with great offers, both of the French King's order and other profits and commodities to be bestowed upon him in case he come to honour these triumphs. Some one has declared to the writer that Arran will not come; therefore some great consequence is to be looked for.—Paris, 30 May 1559.
10. P.S. (fn. 7) —Has touched upon these two matters in his letter to the Queen. Great secresy is to be used in this last matter for diverse imports.—Paris, 30 May 1559. Signed.
Orig., partly hol. Add. A few passages in cipher, deciphered. Endd. by Cecil. Pp. 6.
May 30.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 268.
790. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
May 30.
R.O.
791. Treaty of Cateau Cambresis.
1. Oath by Henry II. King of France, that he will observe the conditions of the peace concluded on April 2 last between his Ambassadors and those of Queen Elizabeth.
2. Attestation (dated A.D. 1559 [blank] May) of the Secretaries Claude de l'Aubespine and Jacques Bourdin, that King Henry II. in their presence took the oath above mentioned.
Copy. Endd.: 30 May 1559. Lat. Pp. 2.
May.
R.O.
792. Another copy of the above. (fn. 8)
May 30.
R.O.
793. Ralph Laurens to Sir Henry Percy.
Has spoken with Robert K., who has delivered him these letters here enclosed, which he willed him to send to Sir Henry with all speed, and, as he says, William K. shall be here on Friday, and would be very desirous to talk with him [Percy] for many good causes. If Sir Henry may not come himself will he write to my Lord for a "gowyde" [guide ?] for Robert, and one with hence (?) that he might pass and repass to Sir Henry, where he is from time to time, for he dare not venture to send more letters as yet. Thinks these Commissioners will not "brecke" these ten days. Robert and the writer have conferred to meet and to take order on Friday next, if Sir Henry comes not, for the passage of the former to the latter, if William come not in the meantime. He willed the writer in anywise to come on Friday or Saturday, but if it be Sir Henry's pleasure the writer will come away. Will make the haste he can. "Ye send me word that ye would send for your bedding at Norham, and I have none to deliver it but myself, for I have sent my wife to Newcastle." Will not fail to accomplish his commandments. —Berwick, 30 May 1559.
Orig. Hol. Add.: To Sir Henry Percy, Knt., Captain of Norham, give these at Alnwick or elsewhere. Endd.
May 31.
R.O.
794. Mundt to the Queen.
1. Has written to her on the 24th concerning the resolution made by both parties concerning religion. The Emperor has answered the writing made by both the parties to the effect that the previous conferences have been ineffectual in terminating disputes; he is persuaded that by no more convenient way this debate and contrariety in religion may be judged than by a General Council; for which he will now travail with all diligence, whereby disputes may be decided and an earnest reformation may ensue for both Estates, spiritual and temporal. As no mention in the Emperor's answer is made of such conditions as the Protestants have for many years required, they are now in deliberation to make an exception to this answer; for they will in no wise consent in one manner of Council except it be after such sort and conditions as they have ever required.
2. The consultation upon persons to be sent into France is not ended as yet; the Protestants have elected the Duke of Wirtemburg, and the Bishops and Papists the Cardinal of Augusta, but the Duke will not go with the Cardinal. Herewith the Cardinal is much offended; whereat the Duke openly told him, and also the Emperor, that he will have nothing to do with him, the Cardinal having said at Rome that if the Duke of Wirtemburg, and one or two other Dukes in Saxony, were made away, the Protestant religion would be easily overthrown; which the Cardinal cannot deny; nevertheless will not desist, as he has written to the Pope that he has been chosen to this "Legatie." This consultation has lasted a whole month, and the Emperor, if he chose, could end it with one word.
3. The Emperor, in consideration that his own countries and realms be much impoverished by continual wars against the Turk, has made a solemn petition to all the States of the Empire requiring immediate aid and money to fortify the frontiers and passages upon the Danube in Hungary and Transylvania, as, though peace is made with the Turk, he dare not trust them; and even if they made peace with him for the term of his life, his advanced age would render that peace uncertain. Therefore it is necessary to make certain strong places in Hungary to resist such an enemy; for which, the help of his own subjects not being sufficient, he prays the Estates for their own defence to lend him honest sums of money, promising that it shall be spent in no other way than is above rehearsed. So it is like the end of the Diet will be money.
4. One of the King of Spain's Commissaries this week showed him a letter written by a nobleman from Brussels, containing that the French King kept the peace more for lack of money than for love; and that as hitherto all their practices have been in Italy, upon Milan, Naples, &c., so all their imaginations were now directed towards England. If they were let otherwise they would attempt to obtain the realm by force, pretending that the Queen of Scotland is the right heir of England. But this dreaming is not new, and the French King has gone about to set forth this vanity through an Ambassador by Otto Henry, late Palatine.
5. Sends an answer of the Duke of Saxony to the Queen, upon his message done in her behalf to the Duke's Commissaries, who beg that she will excuse their delay owing to much business and occurrences now in Saxony. Of the proceedings of the men of war gathered in Saxony has heard nothing assuredly, but that the young King of Denmark has joined his men with the Duke of Holstein's host, and they do invade Ditmarsos. Last Sunday the Emperor put out of his service a young Lord of Ligniths, who was his cup bearer, because he did not attend upon him at Mass.—Augusta, 31 May 1559.
Orig. Hol. Add., with armorial seal. Endd. Lat. Pp. 3.
May 31.
R.O.
795. Mundt to Cecil.
This Diet is purposely protracted by the Emperor, who is minded to tarry here all the winter. The article of religion is suspended upon a general consent, and it is not unlikely that the Bishop of Rome will induce the two Kings now agreed, to a Council in Italy; for "this doctrine goeth so much up in their own countries, that they can by no otherwise compesce or inhibit this doctrine than by the usurped authority and prejudice of a General Council," which, if it be kept after the old usurpation, our doctrine is not only condemned but cursed. To such a Council as the Protestants require, the Pope will never consent; therefore it shall be convenient that all who agree in religion shall join themselves "in doctrina et veritatis confessione."
The article of religion is almost finished, and there is nothing more to be done here than the grant for money and the taxes. Intends "to go home at Argentin," about St. John's day [24 June]; except he should be commanded to tarry longer. Begs him to know if he is to do so; which may be done by Richard Hillis, a merchant of London, "or by the Schorers' (merchants of Augusta), factor, dwelling in London, in Minsonnelane, over against the Belle." Prays to be commended to Sir John Mason and to Sir Anthony Cooke.— Augusta, 31 May 1559.
Orig. Hol., with armorial seal. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
May 31.
R.O.
796. Sir H. Percy to Cecil.
Since his departure from London has remained upon the borders only for days of truce. Cecil is not ignorant of the occurrences that have passed in Scotland. Has presently received a letter out of Scotland from Wm. Kirkaldy, and by the means of the Laird of Lethington, (although he will not be thereof "acknowen,") which is enclosed, and on which he asks advice how to act. Upon the receipt of this letter he has addressed himself unto the borders, although by a fall he has hurt his hand and arm. Will speedily send a servant who shall declare at large in what sort he feels the meanings of the Scots. Sends a letter received by him from his servant Ralph Loraunce, one of his practisers in Scotland. "Ye shall perceive that Robert K., bringing my servant's letter, is cousin to William Kirkaldy, and the same William will meet me, if it be possible, who is he himself."
Date torn. Written by "John Hudson, clerk."
"Delivered at Alnwick, the last of May at 8 of the clock, forenoon. Received at Stanforth, the 4th day of June, at 9 of the clock at night. Received at Tuxforthe, the 4th day at 12 of the clock."
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 3.
May 31.
R.O.
797. Thomas Gower to Cecil.
Sends herewith the return of the commission directed to the Mayor of Newcastle, Mr. Bartholomew Anderson, and himself, for the inquiring out of certain concealed ordnance within this town. Sends also certain notes here enclosed, which cannot here be examined into.
Was appointed by the Lords of the Council in Queen Mary's time, to take charge of the ordnance at Newcastle and Berwick, and the north generally; but a warrant having been issued appointing John Bennett to the same office, requests redress.—Newcastle, the last of May 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add., with seal. Pp. 2.
May 31.
R.O.
798. Peculation of Stores.
"An information given unto me [T. Gower] by one John Christiane, dwelling in one of the lanes that goeth down to the Crane, within the City of London, against John Bennet, late master of the ordnance in the north," for having appropriated to his use certain military stores here specified.
Pp. 1.
May 31.
B. M. Sloane, 4734. 167 b. Knox, 1. 344. Calder. 1. 458. Keith, 1. 201.
799. Reformation in Scotland.
Confederation of the Congregations of the West Country, with those of Fife, Perth, Dundee, Angus, Mearnes, and Munross, convened in the town of Perth, to assist together at their whole powers to destroy and put away all things that do dishonour to God's Name, so that He may be truly and purely worshiped. If any member of the Congregation is troubled for cause of religion, or for any other cause dependent thereupon, the whole shall assist to his defence. Subscribed by appointment of the whole Congregation by "Arch. Ergyle, James Stewart, Matthew Campbell of Teringhame, Glencarne R. Lord Boyd, and Uchiltree."—Perth, 31 May 1559.
May 31.
B. M. Sloane, 4737. 95.
800. Another copy of the above.
May 31.
R.O. Fœd. xv. 520.
801. Treaty of Upsetlington.
Treaty concluded at Upsetlington between the Commissioners of the Queen on the one part, and those of Francis and Mary, King and Queen of Scotland, on the other, upon certain articles left undecided by the treaty of Cateau Cambresis. Dated in the church of S. Mary the Virgin, at Upsetlington, 31 May 1559, and afterwards interchanged on both sides in the parish church of Norham. Appended are the Queen's commissions.—Westminster, 10 May, 1 Eliz.
Commissions of Francis and Mary, Stirling, 21 May; Seeunder that date.
Orig. on vellum, with four seals. Endd. by Cecil.
May 31.
R.O.
802. Another copy of the above in two hands. Art. 18, has several corrections and is re-written on a separate slip.
Pp. 12, and slip.
May 31.
R.O.
803. Another copy, in a French hand, of the preceding treaty and commissions.
Endd. Pp. 13.
May 31.
B. M. Calig. B. ix. 59.
804. Another copy of the preceding.
Copy. Endd.: Tho. Gargr[ave]. Pp. 14.
[May 31.]
R.O.
805. Preamble of the treaty of Upsetlington, as drawn up by the Commissioners on the side of Scotland.
Lat. P. 1.
[May 31.]
R.O.
806. Another copy of the above
Pp. 2.
May.
R.O.
807. Orders for Berwick.
"Things specially considered in the orders of this establishment."
That the officers be men of sufficiency, and inland men; that the footmen of the garrison be southern men; that the town be peopled with a force of inhabitants; that some restraint of the soldiers' marriages be made, otherwise they would so pester the town that none other should have space there to inhabit or resort; that the soldiers be not suffered to use retailing, and that the soldiers' "rowmes" be in perpetuity during life.
Endd. by Cecil: Berwick, May 1559. Orders for Berwick. Pp. 2.
May.
R.O.
808. Orders for Berwick.
"Instructions and orders given by the Queen to A.B., captain of our town of Berwick, and to C.D. and F.G. commissioners for the new establishment for the garrison within the said town. Not executed."
Endd by Cecil: Berwick, May 1559. Establishment of a crew there.
Endd. Pp. 13.
May.
R.O.
809. The New Establishment at Berwick.
"The new establishment the town of Berwick, with the officers, soldiers, the numbers of them and their entertainment." Summa totalis, men, 1,000, arg. 11,554l. 17s. 11d.
Endd.: A device which was not executed. Pp. 5.
May.
R.O.
810. Expenses of the Bishop of Ely.
Payments "for shipping my Lord of Ely's men and horses at Dover, 7 Oct. 1558," and for the return homeward of the same from Dunkirk, with certain other expenses connected therewith. Signed: Thomas Ely.
Pp. 3.
May.
R.O.
811. The Queen's Debts in Flanders.
Letters patent (fn. 9) by which the Queen promises to pay to Jacobus van Garlicke the sum of [blank] borrowed for the use of the Crown by Thomas Gresham, Esq. in 1548.—Westminster [blank] May 1559.
Endd.: 1558, Gresham and Bands. Pp. 8.
May.
R.O.
812. The Queen's Debts in Flanders.
A list of "The Queen's debts put over until May next," with the names of the creditors and the amount due to each.
With marginal calculations by Cecil, and endd. by him. Pp. 2.

Footnotes

1 Transcript from the original, under the Great Seal of England in the Tresor des Chartes at Paris, J. 652. 36. in the collections for the Fœd., vol. 137.
Lat. P. 1.
2 From the original in the possession of John Loveday, D.C.L., of Williamscot, in 1809.
3 It was first, "Of Phylyp's maryage there is." Then the writer dashed his pen through "Phylyps," and interlined "any" and "towards."—Churton.
4 Sealed with a wafer, the device or impression now effaced, except that the letters E. A. are discoverable on one part, and (I think) N. on the opposite margin.—Churton.
5 Originally,—being, if it be 30,000 crowns, more than thrice all the land he hath is worth.
6 This passage between inverted commas is cancelled.
7 This P.S. is holograph.
8 Along with the Treaty of Cambrai, 2 April 1559; see that date.
9 Draft, originally drawn in the time of Philip and Mary and adapted to the present date. The first lenders were Andreas Lixalles and Thomas Flechammer, and the sum borrowed was 50,922 florins.