Elizabeth
July 1559, 6-10

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Joseph Stevenson (editor)

Year published

1863

Pages

362-369

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Elizabeth: July 1559, 6-10', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 1: 1558-1559 (1863), pp. 362-369. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=71749 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

July 1559, 6-10

July 8.
B. M. Reg. 13 B. 1. 14.
940. The Queen to Philip, King of Spain.
Having committed certain business to Sir Thos. Chaloner, requests credence for him.
Copy. Letterbook. Lat. P. 1.
[July 8.]
B.M. Sloane, 4144. 19.
941. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
July 8.
B. M. 13 B. 1. 14.
942. The Queen to Philip, King of Spain.
There has been a long intercourse of mutual friendship between their ancestors and he has not only continued but augmented the connexion by his good offices. She anxiously desires to reciprocate the same, and for this purpose sends Sir Thomas Challoner to be her resident orator with him, whom she recommends, and for whom she requests credit.— Greenwich, 8 July 1559.
Copy. Letterbook. Lat. Pp. 2.
July 8.
B. M. Sloane, 4144. 19.
943. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
July 8.
B. M. Galba, C. i. 47.
944. The Queen to Philip, King of Spain.
Although the Conte de Feria has doubtless informed him of her desire to remain upon terms of friendship with him, of which good wish upon his part she has already had so many proofs, (which she will never forget,) yet she thinks it expedient to despatch a special messenger for this purpose, as a token of her anxiety to continue the amicable relations which have so long existed between the houses of Burgundy and England. The Bishop of Aquila, his Ambassador in England, shall receive the regard due to the representation of such an exalted Prince as his master is. Desires recommendations to the Queen, his sister.
Draft, injured by fire. Ital. Pp. 5.
July 8.
R. O.
945. The Duke of Holstein to the Queen.
Acknowledges the receipt of her letters sent by Armigilius Waden. Perceives that she approves of his proposals for a treaty of commerce between their subjects, about which he formerly wrote to her sister. Will send an envoy to treat on the subject according to her request.—Rendsburg, 8 July 1559. Signed: Adolphus hæres Noruagiæ.
Orig. Add. Endd. Broadside.
July 8.
R.O. 171 B.
946. Another copy of the above.
Modern transcript.
July 8.
R.O.
947. Throckmorton to the Queen.
Has used the best means he could devise to bring M. de Rochfoucault to some conformity for Lord Gray's ransom, but he continues obstinate and greedy in his former demands. He has also been earnestly communed withal by the greatest personages of this Court; but as they could bring him to no other terms, they have somewhat declared their discontentation with him for it. The Count will be brought to none other end than to this which is written in a bill herein enclosed; and will either have this his way or (as he said) the said Lord's life, who is now weakened through his sickness. Reminds her how necessary a subject he is to her in many respects, and such a one for some intents as England enjoys not many his matches. If she will help him the same may be handled so that it shall be thought the money is raised upon such goods and lands as he has.
Has written upon other occurrences to the Lords of the Council and to Mr. Secretary.—Paris, 8 July 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
July 8.
R.O.
948. Lord Grey's Ransom.
The demands made by M. de Rochefoucault of my Lord Gray, his prisoner:—
1. That he shall pay 25,000 crowns for his ransom.
2. That this sum shall be paid at three terms: 12,000 crowns between the present time and 10 August next.
3. For the second payment, 6,000 crowns on 1 January next, and the remainder on the Easter following.
4. The said Lord Gray shall remain a prisoner where he is until he shall have provided at Paris a satisfactory hostage, not only that he will be a true prisoner, but also for the payments at the terms specified, whether he should happen to die or continue in life.
Endd. Fr. Pp. 2.
July 8.949. Another copy of the above, in the same handwriting.
Endd. Pp. 2.
July 8.
R.O.
950. Throckmorton to the Council.
1. Notwithstanding all the means he could devise to use and the help of divers great personages of this Court touching the Lord Gray's ransom, the Conte Rochefoucauld will be brought to no nearer point than is mentioned in a bill herein enclosed; or else (such is his great cruelty) to have his life. Reminds them what a necessary man the said Lord is, of his inability to satisfy these unreasonable demands, that his nature cannot endure this handling, especially as he grows weak through sickness, and without the Queen's helping hand he cannot rid himself out of captivity.
2. By his last of the 4th inst., he signified unto them the state of the French King at that time, who remains at this present somewhat "feverous; and those who have him in cure, though they say there is no danger in him, yet can they not give any certain judgment what shall become of him, till such time as the days which they call indicatory be past."
3. Delabrosse uses as much expedition as he can for his setting forth, and looks to be landed in Scotland about the 18th of the next month. The Marquis d'Albœuf, upon knowledge of the proceedings of Lebrosse, shall follow after with a greater company, according to the necessity there, who minds to take his wife with him. It is also reported that the great Prior shall likewise go into Scotland with such galleys as are sent for out of the Levant Seas, accompanied also with men of war. And albeit the report be of the employing by him of the said galleys into Scotland, yet the writer is credibly informed that these galleys are sent for to annoy us. Requests them to consider this and to have an eye to the sea coasts.
4. Ruy Gomes arrived here on 5 inst., and immediately was brought (booted and spurred as he was) to the King, with whom he tarried two hours. He was afterward conducted to the lodging of the Duke of Alva hard by the Louvre. Vesalius, Philip's physician and surgeon, who was long with the Emperor Charles, is come hither to look to the King, and has the special charge over him. Such as come from King Philip and all others of this Court seem much to lament the King here; and in very deed, there is great show of friendship on all sides.
5. On the 6th inst. M. de Boissy, le grand escuyer, was married to a gentlewoman of the Scottish Queen's. It is said that on the 9th the Duke of Savoy shall be married without any great ceremony. Already all things are defaced and pulled down, both at the palace, Notre Dame, and the Tournelles.
6. The Constable and others of the Court have affirmed that the Earl of Arran is safely arrived at Geneva, where he was well received. They of Geneva (being afraid that the Duke of Savoy will endeavour to recover their town, and that the French King will assist) fortify their town and furnish it with men at arms and all things necessary for the war.
7. The Bishops and Sorbonists have condemned Bourg for an heretic. He is already degraded and will be shortly executed. Great lamentation is made for him, for he is both a godly, virtuous, and great learned man. The Duke of Savoy (by the solicitation of Margaret his wife, who favours religion) has been an earnest suitor for his life, but by no means can procure his pardon. He has been greatly persuaded to recant, but has utterly refused to do so, and his case is a great deal the more to be noted, as he is a man of the Church. The rest who were committed with him at the first, (being men that mind to live in the world,) have liberty to go abroad under sureties, and will do well enough. Such as fled are condemned, their goods confiscated, and the proceeds given to Mme. Valentinoys.—Paris, 8 July 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Portions in cipher, deciphered. Pp. 4.
July 8.
R. O.
951. Transcript of such portion of the previous letter as relates to Lord Grey.
Endd. Pp. 2.
July 8.
R. O.
952. Throckmorton to Cecil.
A Yorkshire gentleman named Markamfield, who took shipping at Newcastle and landed at S. Valery's, having arrived on the 5th inst. at Paris, to which he came by post, the writer not knowing at the first whether he had a passport, requests that for the future notice may be sent to him of all passports granted by the Queen.—Paris, 8 July 1559.
Williamson's transcript. P. 1.
July 8.
R. O.
953. Cecil to Croft.
Has received, this 6th of July, his letter of the 1st inst., with a schedule therein contained of intelligence of the Scottish Queen's coming to Dunbar. As to that part of his letters touching the discharge of the pay of 2d. per diem to every soldier wearing corslets, the same is answered already by letters sent before the coming of Mr. Vaughan; as for the ceasing of the benevolence given to the old garrison, he shall [be answered] as soon as Cecil receives answer from my Lords. In both matters much is to be referred to Crofte's wisdom. Wishes his neighbours were advertised that the Earl of Arran is departed out of France, and that the French King means to send an army thither, viz., 200 men at arms and 30 ensigns of footmen. The Protestants there shall be essayed with all fair promises first, next with money, and last with arms. Wisdom is to provide for the worst. He may keep them in comfort that this realm neither may nor will see them ruined. Desires him to endeavour to kindle the fire, for if it should be quenched the opportunity thereof would not arrive in their lives. What the Protestants mean to do should be done with all speed, for it will be too late when the French power comes. Desires to be commended to Sir Henry Percy, with whom he may well communicate any part of this letter.
Draft, in Cecil's hol. Endd.: 8 July 1559. Pp. 3.
July 8.
R. O.
954. Croft to Cecil.
The Protestants still remain at Edinburgh and the Queen of Scots at Dunbar. Knows not yet what will follow, but the Duke of Chatellerault departed from the Queen the last of June to go to his house. The Protestants upon the 6th day sent to require that she would maintain religion and to continue what she has begun, and also to put out all Frenchmen except such as should remain in her house, and no more to be brought into Scotland. On the messengers saying that they had no commission to put the terms into writing, she refused to make them answer.—Berwick, 8 July 1559. Signed.
Orig. In cipher, deciphered. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
July 8.
R.O.
955. Sir Richard Lee (fn. 1) [to Cecil ?]
Since he received a letter from him to stay here, has also received letters from the Queen to the same effect. This he would have done if no such letters had come, for notwithstanding he had licence to come home when he thought meet, he had not so little consideration as to go home but at such time as conveniently he might be spared, which he sees by the order of the work will be about the end of this month, as he has written to the Lords of the Council. Asks him to procure money to be had for sparing further charges, and to let him know when he shall repair to the Court. (fn. 1)
Draft in Cecil's hol. P. 1.
July 8.956. Sir Richard Lee [to the Earl of Bedford ?]
Has written to the Queen desiring that some nobleman might be sent hither to see these works, which he heartily desires may be his Lordship. To encourage him thereto, trusts he shall see that which shall make him think his journey well bestowed, besides that by his coming he shall do the Queen good service, being in place where he shall be both able to report the truth of the thing as it is set forth and to what purpose it is made, and also when anything hereafter shall come in question concerning the fortification, he shall be always able, upon view of the plat, to let Her Majesty understand from time to time how her works go forwards. For witness of his doings thinks not his own report sufficient in so weighty a matter.
Draft in Cecil's hol. Endd.: The 8 of July 1559. The M. of two several letters of Sir Richard Lee, Knight. Pp. 2.
July 9.
B. M. Reg. 13 B. 1. 32.
957. The Queen to Cosmo, Duke of Florence.
Understanding from her Council that a sum of money is due by him to her, the payment of which has been delayed at his request in consequence of the recent wars in Italy, peace being now restored she doubts not he will take an early opportunity of settling this debt, which will be very acceptable to her. This may conveniently be done by Barth Campagni, unless he should prefer some other agent.—Greenwich, 9 July 1559.
Letterbook. Lat.
July 9.
B. M. Lansd. 98. 101.
958. Draft of the preceding, dated 4 July 1559.
P. 1.
July 9.
R. O.
959. The King of Spain to the Queen.
Credence for Don John de Ayala, (about to accompany his relation the Countess of Feria,) whom Philip sends to the Queen.—Ghent, 9 July 1559. Signed: Philippus,—G. Perezius.
Orig. Add. Endd. by Cecil. Lat. Broadside.
July 9.
R. O.
960. John Frederic II., Duke of Saxony, to the Queen.
Credence for Volrad, Count Mansfeld, and Franciscus Burcartus, sent by him to communicate certain matters to her.—Isenach, 9 July 1559. Signed: Johannes Fredericus Secundus, manu propria scripsit,—Tho. Rudolf.
Orig. Add. Endd. Lat. Broadside.
July 9.
R. O.
961. Sir Richard Lee to the Queen.
Seeing a great mass of money has been bestowed upon the fortifications of this town, beseeches her to send some persons of credit to see how the same has been employed. Also that she would direct such a man hither as that he [the writer] may open to him such secresy appertaining to the fortification of the town, to be considered by the Queen, as according to such lessons as he [Lee] learned of the King, her father, he thinks it not meet to be opened but to such a one as she shall put in special trust for that purpose.—Berwick, 9 July 1559. Signed.
Orig. Add. Endd. Pp. 2.
July 9.
R. O. Forbes, 1. 155.
962. Cecil to Throckmorton.
Has thought meet to send a recapitulation of sundry things. Has conferred with Sandy Whytloo, by whom he has sent divers advices into Scotland. Trust they will consider that nihil est tertium; aut erunt victores aut victi. The Dowager Queen and French are come to Dunbar. The Protestants are at Edinburgh, where Lord Arskyn, one of them, has the charge of the castle. They, without violence, dissolve religious houses, directing their lands to the crown and to ministry in the Church. The parish churches they deliver of altars and images, and receive the service of the Church of England according to King Edward's book. They are now coming to Kelso Abbey. Their number is ordinarily 5,000, and upon need 10,000. Sends the names of the principal parties. Knox desires to come thither; would allow it if he might come secretly, otherwise not. Prays God the Earl of Arran may well escape, "if he were in Scotland it were best for all purposes." Would know when the French ships will set forth; thinks John Rybawt would tell, if well used. The French Ambassador complained much here that the Earl of Northumberland stayed M. de Frommet, who yesterday departed for France, but in these cases they [the French] seek haste for their own desires, and not according to commodity of horses and passports. They come sometimes early in the morning for passports, and think long to tarry until the Queen is ready. Yet they are as gently used as may be.
Mr. Howard will ascertain him of common occurrences. There has been hitherto great slackness in appointing Bishops, and the same still continues. All parts are quiet, but the cathedral Churches are void of church service; hopes on visitation it will amend.
The Emperor's Ambassador is still here [in England] in his suit, "but for ought I see, the tide runneth no way certainly;" another will come shortly to reside. Mr. Challoner departs to morrow to the Kings Catholic. The Bishop of Aquila is here sick of the gout. There is now required and returned the collar and the robes of the Toison, which King Henry VIII. had; the demand seems strange. The Swedish Ambassadors looked for daily from Antwerp. Sees Throckmorton cannot return before Michaelmas. Thanks him for his son, whom he knows has been troublesome; if he can he shall repay him service hereafter. Has directed Mr. Sommar to pay his charges and send him home.
Draft, in Cecil's hol. Endd. Pp. 3.
July 9.
B. M. Sloane, 4134. 353.
963. Another copy of the above.
Forbes' transcript.
July 10.
R. O.
964. The Queen to the French King.
True friendship makes all occurrences common among friends, as she feels at the present time. Since the amity lately concluded, she has taken much interest in the matter of his "triumphs," so now she experiences great sorrow on hearing of his wound. She praises God that the danger is so trifling. Anxious to have fuller intelligence she sends the present bearer, Charles Haward, with her most affectionate recommendations, for whom she asks credence.—Greenwich, 10 July 1559.
Corrected draft. Endd. Fr. Pp. 2.
July 10.
R. O.
965. The Queen to the Constable of France.
She would have conceived much comfort from his letter (which gave her good assurance of her former opinion conceived of him) were it not that the advertisement of the chance to her good brother had much amazed her and struck her with sudden grief. Mingles both her affections together, grief for the King's hurt, and gladness to be advertised of the truth by him, her good cousin. Great monarchs are subject to great misfortunes; we should thank Almighty God that preserves us daily from greater. Cannot satisfy herself without sending this bearer, Charles Howard, to bring her word, as she trusts, of the King's towardness in amendment.
Draft in Cecil's hol., and endd. by him. Pp. 2.
July 10.
R.O.
966. French translation of the last letter.
Corrected draft. Endd. Pp. 2.
July 10.
R. O.
967. Howard's Mission to Henry II.
"A memorial of the message of Charles Haward, being sent by the Queen to her good brother, the French King."
1. He shall make his repair to Sir N. Throckmorton, and, imparting this his message, shall proceed with his advice.
2. He shall do to the French King her most hearty commendations and deliver her letters, which read, he shall say that she was suddenly stricken with great sorrow to understand the "inconvenience" happened to him, upon intelligence of which (which came not before Sunday night, the 9th,) she sent the said Charles to wish him speedy recovery of his hurt.
3. He shall then visit the French Queen, and after the Queen's commendations, shall say that she will help her in bearing part of the burden. And the like he shall say, if they be there at the Court, to the King and Queen Dauphin.
4. He shall visit the Constable, deliver the Queen's letters, and thank him heartily that, in the middle of his own grief, he made her participant of the chance of fortune in this case. He shall say that she prays him to continue his good amity.
5. He shall follow the advice of the Ambassador there resident, in any other thing that shall be thought requisite touching the visitation of any other personages.
Draft, in Cecil's hol. Endd. Pp. 3.

Footnotes

1 See endorsement of the next letter.